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Nonprofit Radio for December 9, 2016: Leveraging Expert Or Tech Volunteers & 7 IT Security Pitfalls

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My Guests:

Steve Heye, Erin Dieterich, & Princessa Bourelly: Leveraging Expert Or Tech Volunteers

(L to R) Steve Heye, Erin Dieterich & Princessa Bourelly

We’ve got what you need to know about managing volunteers with special expertise. Where do you find them? What about screening and scoping? Our panel is Steve Heye and Erin Dieterich from NetSuite and Princessa Bourelly from Juma Ventures. (Recorded at the 2016 Nonprofit Technology Conference)

 

 

 

Leon Wilson & Dan Rivas: 7 IT Security Pitfalls

(L to R) Leon Wilson & Dan Rivas at 16NTC

Not sexy but very important. Leon Wilson from The Cleveland Foundation and Dan Rivas from Idealware walk you through bad habits that you need to change so you don’t put your precious data at risk. (Also from the 2016 NTC)

 

 


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Okay. Hello and welcome to tony martignetti non-profit radio big non-profit ideas for the other ninety five percent on the aptly named host we have a listener of the week, young non-profit professionals network of milwaukee hello, milwaukee! They tweeted learning about non-profit excellence listening to tony martignetti non-profit radio end quote excellence love that thank you so much for that. Plus they’re very loyal re tweeters. Thanks for that also, i’m glad you found us. Thanks so much for listening for loving non-profit radio. I’m glad we’re helping your important work. Young non-profit professionals network of milwaukee they’re at and why p n m e congratulations on being our listener of the week. Oh, i’m glad you’re with me. I’d suffer with bracket nathalia if i had to speak the words you missed today’s show leveraging expert or tech volunteers we’ve got what you need to know about managing volunteers with special expertise. Where do you find them? What about screening and scoping their work? Our panel is steve hi and aaron dietrich from net sweet and princessa bourelly from juma ventures that was recorded at the twenty sixteen non-profit technology conference. Are you signed up for twenty seventeen? You? Need to and seven security pitfalls not sexy but very important leon wilson from the cleveland foundation and dan revis from idealware walk you through bad habits that you need to change so you don’t put your precious data at risk. That’s also from the twenty sixteen and tc. Sign it for twenty seventeen on today’s. Tony, take two your trump challenge reduction director’s cut. We’re sponsored by pursuing full service fund-raising data driven and technology enabled, you’ll raise more money pursuant dot com, and by we be spelling supercool spelling bee fundraisers we be spelling dot com here is leveraging expert or tech volunteers from the twenty sixteen and tc. Welcome to tony martignetti non-profit radio coverage of sixteen auntie si non-profit technology conference in san jose, california. This is also part of ntcdinosaur stations my guests now are steve, hi, aaron dietrich and princessa bourelly let’s meet them. They’re seminar topic is leveraging expert or technical volunteers. Steve is solution consultant for net suite, and next to him is erin aaron dietrich, director of corporate citizenship, and princessa bourelly director of finance at juma ventures. Steve aaron princessa welcome, thank you. You’re very welcome welcome to non-profit radio. Just indulge me for a moment while i highlight our swag item for this interview, which is from black mesh. Everything is in black there’s. A very high gloss notebook with a calendar at the end. And we have a usb drive. Flash driver should tell you flash drive and, uh, upend your basic basic pen. And this goes into our are you our swag pile for the day, which is right here. Awesome. Third for the for the people, for our listeners. Just have audio. Okay. There’s a difference. Hyre let’s. Steve, you explain it off off. Mike let’s, have you explain now, there’s a difference between using experts who are technical and non-technical help us with an overview of this? Sure. So the way we first started, you know, talking about this was, you know, we all have volunteers. We all understand how to work with them when we all have ideas. Part of matthew’s. Um but there is a very fundamental difference between using somebody that just wants to come in for a single day and do a single task versus somebody that has ah, very skill. A very big skillsets and indoors and expert. So you know, with probono the key is they’re coming in and they do legal work for their living, or they do finance work for their living, and they come or technology for their living, and then they want to do that for you, but do it for free. So that kind of volunteer requires a very different relationship with them because you’re allowing them to do work that will have dramatic impact on your organization and is much more critical that you understand what they’re going to be doing, how you’re going to use them and build a relationship with them. All right, erin, is it essential that these technical volunteers be supervised by other people who are technically inclined or who are technicians? So i would say it’s very important that they’re supervised the level of technology knowledge that the person who supervises has will differ at different organizations. And i think the most important thing is just that whoever’s managing thie non-profit ah project and whoever’s, the lead volunteered that they’re on the same page about what the project’s going to be, so as long as they can speak the same language and that’s probably the right skill level. But if you have a volunteer who’s very, very skilled and is speaking a language that you just don’t understand, as they described a project that projects probably not going to go well until you find somebody on your side who can speak the same language and understand what you’re getting involved in, ok, so at least that level of understanding. Okay, now princessa you’re using technical volunteers at juma ventures, we are currently using the probono through net sweet this’s a multi year and the project is going really well, and it is i have been a great experience and opportunity for juma as well as the net sweet probono to come in and offer their experience in what capacity are using technical volunteers, so they are helping us now set up our dash schwartz within the net sweet system, tio take an excel spreadsheet and be able to pull that same information out of net sweet without having to pull all of these different areas together. So it’s going to be sort of easier for us to manage to maintain. So we use their technology expertise to actually do the set up, and i managed the dashboards as well, okay. And do you have some lessons learned to share? Not necessarily. Right now, way. Have another twenty minutes together. But there’s some lessons learned about using technical volunteers. The biggest lesson that i shared today would be for us to be prepared on the non-profit side. Okay, little better preparation. So all right, well, we’ll get there. We’ll get a chance. Talk about that. Andi okay, you have some advice on finding technical volunteers. Erin, you want to start with there, start start stuff. They’re sure one of the things that we shared today in our session was that it’s important to look at who as a non-profit you’re already connected, teo. So you look at who is already, you know, from the corporate side making donations who perhaps is already a partner and look at what their core competencies are as an organization, and see if there is an alignment between their core competencies and what you need help with. If there is, it might be very easy. Next step to go back to them and say, hey, we love working with you, here’s something that were really struggling with do you think that this is something? Your team would wantto look at probono and start the relationship that way. In addition to looking at your corporate kind of connections, there are a lot of really awesome sites out there that can help you find an individual technical volunteer. So we shared a list of resource is today, but among them is the taproot foundation. Catch afire community core volunteermatch linked in latto from empower there’s a bunch community corps for man, power and power and power. Okay, where you could get you could go on there and essentially say, you know, we’ve scoped out this it’s a challenge that organizations having. Perhaps we need a new website and you can go and find volunteers who are taking their personal time after their job to to do that project for you. Okay, i’ve had the catch a fire ceo on rachel chong. Yeah, it was great a couple years, but yes, very true. Okay, is a screening is going to be important eyes? Okay, wait. So we talked a little about finding now we’ve got a prospect pool of whether it’s from real time relationships and partnerships or somewhere we found online screening. We re interview them. Right? I mean, i would think same way you’re interviewing. Ah hyre yeah, so there’s a couple, it varies a little bit. First, the amount of screening, the amount of effort that you’re going to put into the screening process depends on what the type of project that they’re going to be working on. So based on the level of impact of the project was going tohave and the risk that’s involved in this project, you’re going to want a little varying level of screening. So if it’s if it’s a project where they are like princessa talked about, they’re going to be in your financial system. They’re going to be looking at, you know, helping you, you know, adjust you although or if it’s a legal probono where your they’re reviewing contracts or they’re doing that, you’re gonna want to ah, ah, lot more screening a hell of a lot. A proprietary information, proprietary and potentially damaging. Yeah. So you want to make sure it fits in the wrong hands, right? So what do some of those, you know, nondisclosure agreement might be in place or, you know, on actual application, ask him who they worked with before. Do some background checks if it’s needed, but if it’s a vendor that you already have a long term relationship, you’re a customer with them and, you know, maybe then the barriers drop a little bit because you’ve already had a long letter longer relationship with that company and because you’re paying them and they have, you know, are already a setup established program is a little bit different on the type of screening you would do, or if you’re just having somebody build a little widget on your website, that isn’t like mission critical, then you’re screening might be a little lower because it’s it’s not like mission critical it’s not going to blow up the whole world, your world, your mission world and there isn’t a finance proprietary data right involved, but still there still going into your yeah, you still have to ensure that they have a certain level of technical expertise because they are going into the back end of your system, your coding and yeah, so i mean, asking could mess things up, right? Asking for examples of work they’ve done before who they worked with or even asking for their resume or having a full out a sample application there’s a number of things you could do just to get some simple information about them. Okay? Yeah, right to screen him. Princessa any any advice lessons learned on screening volunteers? So going through net sweet, we didn’t have to do the screening. We just we applied we the hardest part is narrowing down from this, you know, these grand scheme of ideas that we need internally narrowing that down for the next week team to then matches teo prose that could come in and have the availability to sort of target our project. Okay, so you potentially could have used more volunteers? Is that what you mean? T to other work for you? The beauty of net suite is that they offer it multiple times per year. So even though we didn’t get to address all of the projects there is, there is a possibility that we could get to it. Okay, okay, you’re tuned to non-profit radio tony martignetti also hosts a podcast for the chronicle of philanthropy fund-raising fundamentals is a quick ten minute burst of fund-raising insights published once a month. Tony’s guests are expert in crowdfunding mobile giving event fund-raising direct mail and donor cultivation. Really, all the fund-raising issues that make you wonder, am i doing this right? Is there a better way there is? Find the fund-raising fundamentals archive it. Tony martignetti dot com that’s marketmesuite n e t t i remember there’s, a g before the end, thousands of listeners have subscribed on itunes. You can also learn maura, the chronicle website, philanthropy dot com fund-raising fundamentals, the better way. Dahna the errand and steve are both nodding. So i guess you have a shot at this. All right? So instead of talking around, this remains will say, well, let’s, just have aaron, why did you describe the net sweet volunteer technical volunteer program? How this works? Sure so and nets sweet. We donate our software platform to non-profits and social enterprises, and once they start using that platform, they are eligible to apply for probono support from our global employee workforce every quarter, so at the beginning of each quarter and application goes out to non-profits they say, here are the things i need help with. And then internally at the company, we send out an email to all of our employees and say, hey, hear the things that non-profits need help with on the platform. We need your technical skills if you want to get involved, let us know, and then our team actually does the matchmaking. So were the screeners in that instance, we look at all the employees, backgrounds, we look at where they work, what time zone they’re on, what their expertise is and we put together typically teams of two to four employees who we think have the right skills to get that project done. That’s been requested. Okay. How many? How many people on your team princessa there? Ford for max. You got the mac. Okay, now, doesn’t that sweet? Havea probono requirement part of employment is you’ll spend weeks or ten percent of your time or something. Is there anything like that? So, it’s not a requirement, but all of our employees are allowed to spend twenty hours a quarter on a project probono when they get matched up so they could, you know, work it out with their manager that they apply and take on a project every single quarter of the year. But it’s not a requirement. Okay. Okay. All right. Thank you. Uh, all right. So after screening let’s, see where should we wish we go on starting to manage? We’ve nothing scope. Hoping is that we are right now on twenty martignetti non-profit radio. I have george in jail now think if this was a discussion on on hiking in the in the adirondacks, scoping, you know, would probably be pretty simple thing, understand? But in this conversation, i don’t know what scoping is. So get yourself out of jail, what is scoping? So i think the key teo a big differentiator between using an expert or technical volunteer is they will need something that tells them exactly the challenge you’re having, what you’re hoping to solve and how you want, ok, scope of the project so it’s a scope of the project, meaning that you’re going to just both sit down with a document and agree on what are the what is the challenge? We’re trying to solve one of the goals of the project and then talk through that together to figure out what the actual outcome will be. So you know it usually it starts way too big, and then you scale down into something that’s actually accomplish because that’s, one of the channels we have with expert could also employees only have up to twenty hours per quarter, right? And that zoho almost all probono helped that you get will have some sort of ah, limitation to how much help you’ll get and how long the project can last. So the real key to using a technical volunteer is having a chunk of work. That’s, containable, it’s, describable attainable and it’s something that you can easily pass to someone and have them understand. Princessa was this hard? Teo, define the scope. It was hard to narrow down internal given. I mean, you said there were other things get done, and maybe this project was even bigger than it. It could reasonably be i think i shot for the moon, ok? And they had to bring me back down. All right, so i basically put out our, you know, our primary concerns. They chose a a project that they could actually accomplish within the twenty hours. And so the difficult part is on my end, making sure that i’m providing them with the proper information to make the project six successful. Okay. Yeah. You clearly have responsibilities. Yes, a swell as they do. Okay. Okay. All right. So scoping. Yes, of course. We what do we want to see if the out at the end of this whether you know again, this supplies beyond that’s that’s sweet program, but, uh, you gotta have a scope document. Yeah. Okay. All right. Yeah. It’s hopeful about both sides. Not just for the non-profit, but also for the, you know, the probono person because the probono in person and it knows what’s expected of them. And then is mohr able to know if their skills is the right skills and if they’re able to actually achieve it, or to start to understand if it’s even impossible within the amount of time that they’re given to do it? Okay, and that they have to do to donate. Okay, all right, what comes at right now? Snack it’s, savoury snacks are being served and the announcement is being made. That is not theirs, not god. Not on. I’m diffident, it’s. Just somebody who knows that the savoury snacks are being served. That’s awesome that’s extension of a sense of his omnipotence. Chocolate snacks, including big urns of chocolate milk. Here. Then i see which i don’t know about the rest, but i kind of like talking, but it was weird to see a milk in an urn and you don’t see that very clear that they were armed with a silver top. It looks like a three gallons, three or four gallon earned. It looks like to me. Yeah, and with a little with, you know spigot on it. Okay. Okay. After scoping working with our technical volunteers. Aaron, what comes? Next what i’m really getting into the meat and potatoes of getting the project done and, you know, something that’s important to think about there is project management because sometimes you’ll get a really excited set of volunteers. And if there’s not somebody who’s responsible for keeping the project on track, as with any project you’d work on probono or not, you know, khun, go kind of off the rails or can get delayed, or people can kind of wander away, and it doesn’t get accomplished on the time that you really had set aside for it. So focusing, having that timeline, having a project manager who’s going to lead everybody through the process is really critical. But now we are working with volunteers. So where do you draw the line between? You know, team, this is you’re too slow and okay, team i understand. We understand who will will extend the timeline. You are volunteers and we don’t want to lose you because we’re twenty five percent of the way into this now, right? How did we manage that? Well, it’s a collaboration. So i think that’s one of the most important things about using technical volunteers is that it’s not like you’re saying i want this project done, go do it and let me know when it’s done it’s that you are saying, i’m going to work with you and we’re going to get this project done together, so if it starts getting delayed because of your timeline or their timeline, you’re kind of in that together and you can re adjust expectations vs if you just kind of set it and forget it, then you have no idea what’s going on on the scenes, but if it’s a true collaboration, then you’re both coming to the table. You’re both taking on work in order to get this delivered and the project’s going to be something that really resonates with your organization and that you can continue using for a long time if you were part of the process versus if non-profit volunteered just came in. Did something said, here you go and then left. You might not know how to use that thing in the future, okay? I don’t know, princess is i don’t want to put you on the spot and say that sweet volunteers volunteermatch please there, there, there, there, over budget there, behind time. E, you want to you want to get more out of this so you don’t know anything you want to add to this part of the project management internally, we had to make sure that we were prepared for our meetings, okay? You know, you have periodic meetings face-to-face orwell, skype or whatever virtual virtual once a week, and prior to that meeting on the non-profit side, we had to be prepared in order to get the best benefit from the professionals on get their insight in their feedback. Ok, what do you want to say about preparation? You got to get the right people collaborating internally. So internally we have a great team, you know, working with the accounting team and then also communicating that information to the leadership team for their feedback, and they’re circling back to net sweet just to make sure that they know that things are working that were, you know, also to make sure that we’re on track and to make sure that we’re on pretty much on track to complete the project. Okay, okay, i should have asked you earlier. What is juma ventures work? So junior ventures works too. They’re they’re fighting. The poverty, the poverty cycle by providing education and financial literacy to youth. And they employ the use at the ballpark. Ballpark venues around the area and what’s your area. Where are you? We are end. We’re here in san jose. We’re in san francisco. Where in nor new orleans. We have new york. Venue way are growing. Yes. Yeah. Your central. You’re west. Your east? Yes. Nothing north. The chicago. Detroit? Not yet. Okay, but probably definitely on the on the horizon. Okay. Okay. What’s, the budget there, annual budget. The annual budget is eight million. Yeah. Okay. Now, some people might think, why a million dollar budget? Why do they need probono? How come they couldn’t pay for the help that they need? So with non-profits we use most of that that money to sort of support the mission. And it is it is difficult to be able to provide income for this level of professional, you know, services? Yeah. You’re getting roughly eighty hours of technical help. Which several hundred dollars an hour. I imagine if you had to go out and purchase it. Yes. Okay. Okay. Fair enough. Uh, all right. Project management. That seems like a pretty broad topic is there more we could say about strategies for project manager? Upleaf i think the key there is just that collaboration and just trying to have regular scheduled meetings and you even having a regular format to that regular scheduled meeting like, we’re going to start the meeting and we’re going to look at the goal we meet the goal help along. Are we on the timeline? I know there’s not much else to say about the project management, except that it shouldn’t be a, um, attack or, you know, like we didn’t meet the deadline or, you know, managing it that way as much as trying to ensure the both sides are happy with the progress, but i’d say the other big key with that project management that isn’t talked about enough is making sure that the non-profit is in er the probono person is seeing their impact and seeing the progress that is being made and understanding how it is really helpful to the non-profit so the non-profit has sort of has a responsibility to keep sharing back to the volunteer of how appreciative they are from the help and the outcome that it’s going to do and what it’s going to allow that non-profit to do, they couldn’t do without that help. And just because the energy of a probono khun feed over time especially the project, is like three months or, you know that it’s time, you know, when they’re when they first start, they’re not they’re excited, they’re energetic, but then when they get into the weeds and then the problems start or they hit a hiccup part of that project management is keeping that person engaged and excited and reassured. Yeah, there’s value there’s a number of ways to do that of, you know, either to recognition or doing many celebrations of metoo hitting a milestone or doing, you know, small thank you says you go, i think that’s a big part of that project management. Okay, princessa you wantto share what what you’re doing around, sharing the value and encouraging the the probono volunteers? I don’t think i’ve done anything specific, but i think what goes a long way is the fact that they can see that their work is being utilized ized and actually brings value to the organization. How do they see that they don’t see that? During them during the project management phase, so they don’t see it until abila project is finished, right? But during the process, you know the fact that we’re not coming back with a lot of changes, a lot of iterations, you know, a lot of going over the time schedule in the time frame, i think it’s it’s sort of positive reinforcement tio let them know that things are going smoothly and according to plan and will be seen to her through fruition, your work is appreciated, yes, and i think the other thing that she’s maybe down playing a little bit is that she is able princessa did talk about how she was able to share that back-up with our leadership team, and i know that the probono volunteers are seeing the fact that there’s, an investment from the leadership team there’s an engagement through the team and their energy is staying up and excited about it so that just, you know, it plays into it, it doesn’t have to be in actually like a gift or anything like that. It’s just that continued conversation, okay? And i think as the volunteers get the exposure of understanding more and more of what you’re non-profit does they take away a real pride of what they’ve helped you achieve, even if what they were building is, you know, a small widget for your website, they are now kind of feeling a part of the team, and i love when i, you know, ask employees who have done probono projects hey, what kind of a project did you d’oh? What was the organization? And they automatically become the spokesperson for the organization they tell you about they light up there like, oh, and you’re now i donate to them or oh, i just went into the five k run for them and there’s so much more engaged now than they were before, and they kind of feel like they have a real responsibility for that organization because they took on actual technical work for them. That’s wonderful. All right, all right. Are we at project completion? Now? We have. We have a couple minutes left together. We’re okay. Are you anxious to get out of here? I don’t know. I mean, the project. I got to go somewhere way. Chocolate milk. You’re looking really good there in the middle. You can’t leave. Until steve, steve are princessa does okay, what? We’re project completion. Yeah, so i think the big project completion to me then is where we ended our presentation was talking about connecting it back to the mission, so then, you know, the outcome was a great great we created this financial dashboard, but i think taking a minute there and just saying, yeah, you just created a finding dashboard, but now what you’ve done is you’ve eliminated hours of work that i was doing every week in a manual spreadsheet that now i can really spend time analyzing that data and actually changed the way my organization works based on this data and just taking time to celebrate that, connecting it back to the overall goal and of inviting leadership, maybe to come in and talk to thank the volunteers. That could be a real way to wrap up and close the projects that leadership leadership touch again. Yeah, valuable aaron, anything. You know, i think revisiting the project maybe five, six months out is also really important for the volunteers just to hear from you about hey, you know, for six months now, we’ve been using these new dashboards. And here’s, what we’ve seen that’s happened at the organization, i had a probono project that some colleagues were working on a few years ago, where they helped build a social media strategy for a non-profit and a year later, the non-profit came back to them and said, hey, you know, because of that strategy that you helped us build, we want to grant to get a full time social media person on the other hand, it’s like gravel or the amazing, amazing stories, but had that non-profit not come back to the volunteers a year out and told them that they would have never known that we’ve just been happy about the project, but now they felt real prime glee that’s, magnificent. Princessa is your project finished? It is one week away from ove r being done there. Go deliver balls have been sent to us, the dashboards are set up, the reports are active, and it is now on me to actually play around with them and make sure that they’re functioning properly and any changes or anything like that, we would have to communicate back to the team, but we’re pretty close to signing off on that. Okay. This’s is exciting. Time was cool and, uh, what’s planned for the for the for the mark. The occasion of the completion dahna we hadn’t thought that far. That’s only you only got a week left. I got to get to ceo onboard is gonna be some something dramatic. Okay. Okay. Uh, all right. This is wonderful. Lots of great ideas are durney project management tools. Online tools that you you recommend that you like. If not, you could say no, but i think the project management for me, for this kind of a project, it depends on the severity or the scope of the project. But i think keeping it simple, askey, let’s say scope, not severity also. Very. Yeah. Yeah. E i think keeping the tool is simple. A za project. So you know, if it is something something as simple as a google doc just having a quick outline, they’re keeping your mini me meeting minutes. They’re keeping, you know, the record of what happened and what got done. You could do something more complicated now, but i don’t think it really needs to be anything more. Okay. All right. Should we wrap it up there? Hands alright, excellent, great ideas, lovett and that was leveraging expert or technical volunteers with steve hi solution consultant at net sweet also aaron dietrich, director of corporate citizenship at that sweet and princess bourelly director of finance for juma ventures steve princessa thank you so much. Thank you, thank you, tony martignetti non-profit radio coverage of sixteen ntcdinosaur non-profit technology conference thank you for being with us. Seven security pitfalls coming up first pursuant, they have a new content paper for you, it’s free and easy to get overcoming the major donor dilemma. How to identify and engage new major donors and also optimized your cultivation process. You’ll find this paper at pursuing dot com, and we’ll be spelling spelling bees for fund-raising are you kicking off millennial engagement in twenty seventeen? You can do it with stand up comedy, live music, dancing and raising money. Check out the video at we b e spelling dot com now, tony steak too you’re trump challenge re ducks director’s cut it’s still up it’s the reduction of the reduction check out to lula, the jack russell terrier. I’m telling you she has great insights into donald trump’s. Potential impact on non-profits and i have minor contributions. Check out the video. The director’s cut. The video is at tony martignetti dot com. And that is tony’s take two. We got to live listener love. I would do it quickly. And then, of course, the affiliate affections of podcast pleasantries. If you’re listening live love out to you you know who you are you know where you are. Thank you so much for being with me. Podcast pleasantries i still got to check you know i keep saying way we’ve been spiking twelve thousand on some shows. However many there are is way over ten thousand could be his money is twelve or thirteen thousand pleasantries to you, our podcast listeners and the affiliate affections to our am and fm station listeners nationwide, you thought of anything to say throughout the country, but i nationwide affections to you. Let your station know thatyou listen, i’d be grateful for that. Thanks so much for being with us. Here are leon wilson and dan revis from the twenty sixteen non-profit technology conference seven security pitfalls welcome to tony martignetti non-profit radio coverage of sixteen ntcdinosaur non-profit technology conference. We’re in san jose, california, at the conference convention center in san jose. My guest now are leon wilson and dan revis. Leon is chief technology and information officer at the cleveland foundation. And he’s sitting right next to me. And dan revis is managing writer for idealware. Gentlemen, welcome. Thank you. Welcome to non-profit radio. Pleasure to have you. Yeah, a pleasure being here. Your session is seven. Highly risky habits of small to midsize non-profits security pitfalls. That’s great. Leon let’s. Start with you. Why? Why are non-profits just not paying enough attention, teo. Security? Well, a lot of in the whole emphasis behind presentation was just my travels over the last four years of working with small and midsized non-profits and constantly seeing the same challenges that we’re dealing with. Some of it is just naive nous ignorance, complacency, poor slumming that it really doesn’t impact them until it does impact them. So we felt that this session was critically important to just remind them of some of the simple, basic and black lean tackling things. Okay, we’re trying to avoid crises here. Is that right there? That’s? Right? Dahna i mean, how bad can it be? Security, dan, don’t you have an actual example of or just making hypothetical, but how bad could it be? Well, yeah, i don’t have examples. We worked on a report recently where we talked teo security experts and sort of learned from them what are the things that non-profits they’re dealing with? And we found that, you know, non-profits are in an interesting space, as we all know, low budgets, very little time security often gets overlooked, gets neglected, it’s not particularly sexy, no it’s, sort of the vegetables, you know, the non-profit world. We were surprised by how many people came to our session because the reality is it’s the last thing you really want to do, but i think people have seen enough of the data breaches they’ve seen enough of the issues come out like weekly there’s, there’s, data breaches and that’s on the commercial side where they presumably have so much more money toe to throw with us. Absolutely on dh that’s where we see so much of trouble. Yeah, all right arika okay, i mean, it’s pretty simple stuff, i mean, the way you do, i don’t mean the topic metoo details of it, the way you’ve organized seven highly risky habits. Right. So all right, you know, you shouldn’t be sleeping with a bad partner. What? All right, why don’t you start us off? Well, leon, but you bring up anything point, they were all very common sense things that are happening. What we want to do is share with them if you’re going to do these things, but we wanted to educate you on how you can mitigate the risk. For example, one of the first things we talked about wass bring allowing people to use personal computers in the workplace. We know it’s going to happen because for a lot of non-profits it’s the way that they can save money because you don’t have to worry about purchasing a computer for someone. But keep in mind that you have toe put some provisions around that, like making sure that they have the most up to date somewhere running on that computer, making sure they have anti virus running on that computer, otherwise and who’s had who who else has access to the computer when they’re at their homes, their family members, friends, other type of disaster. Exactly. So we know it’s gonna happen. And that’s why we said that? We’re not telling you something that you don’t already know, but what we do want to do is provide you with some wisdoms and some thoughts as far as how can you mitigate, prevent or least contains some of the challenges that you’re going to be dealing with that so that’s a good example right there. Okay, so way need to have policies, i presume they’re absolutely around the use of the personal technology in the workplace. What are some of these policies? Well, i mean, just having a policy thinking ahead of time, what should we allow and what should we not? You know, that’s probably the first most important thing just to think it through. So you’re not doing that at hawk way or that people aren’t sort of making it up as they go along. But then from there, you know, some of the things we talked about our session things that you already know you need anti virus software, you need to make sure it was on your phone that your aps are not downloading something malicious. That’s pulling data from your phone, you know, there they’re things that you have probably all heard somewhere in. Your life. But, you know, in the work context, we sort of forget that, you know, we assume that there’s someone on the and who’s taking care of everything and we forget once we bring it home, you know, it’s up to us now, and so if you as leader of your organization, aren’t making sure your employees, they’re doing those things, they’re helping them do those things, there’s a lot of risk in that we did it, we did it really a straw man pole where we asked a lot of people had about forty or fifty people in our session, and we ask him how many of you have any virus software on your cell phone? I was expecting to see about release half only about maybe six people raise your hands, and i don’t even think most people know that that exists. There you go. So now wear allowing folks to share to sync up their email, sync up their email that context also get access to certain files off their mobile devices, because, again, it’s how we operated these at these days, and it works for a lot of us, but what happens when that smart? Phone gets stolen, lost or if you’re constantly upgrading, you’re a smart phone and you don’t properly clean out here clean out your smartphone well, if you don’t have password protection and also, if you’re not using anti virus software on their, imagine how others can get out that information. Where are we even gonna find auntie? But where do we start to look for anti virus software for our phone? It’s right out there? I mean, if you go out to the iphone store and just search for any virus software, if you go to the google play store and search for anti virus software, it is out there it’s just again. It’s not sexy, it’s, not something you’re downloading, usually downloading games and absent things that nature, you’re not down lee office productivity, our office, productivity, aps as well as in the especially for android phones because they’re not as police. The acts that are not a police there’s a lot of malicious acts that are out there, so you’re downloading what you might think. It’s a free game, the software but it is designed to then go after your contacts, your emails and other type of other types of information that could end work its way into your organization. Leon let’s, stay with you. How did we enforce these policies that both are saying are important on the in this? This this one on the personal technology side? How do we make sure that people are doing with their equipment what we’re asking them to do if they want to use it in the workplace? Great question. And that question came up a couple of times in our talk. Part of it is human police enemy some of it you can, you can you can afford through technology through right, so certain kind of tools, but sometimes it’s just about writing that policy in place, right creating a b y o d policy and and require all your staff members to comply with that were to sign off and understand a lot of his education, and then try to do sometimes basic auditing and checking with people’s equipment. Verify that they have this, that they have, that they’re compliant with those policies. So if you have the luxury of adapting technologies to enforce those rules and some of them are very commonplace with microsoft exchange and often sixty five you could do some of those things, but you you can’t it cost you nothing to write a policy, to put it in place forces, but enforcement. So there is actual verification. We actually going to look at their device and see that they’ve got on it what we are asking them to put. Well, imagine if you’re working for social services organization and you have health and human services information on there that information get lost, would you would you rather not go after and once a year check and verify that they are in compliance with that as opposed to falling prey to a hip, a compliance issue? Okay, okay, then let’s move on to number two are you know what a second? Why don’t mean necessarily in sequence, but what’s another one out of the seven? You know, another one that i think falls in line with it’s a bad habit that people just aren’t really necessarily very aware of is they’re. They’re not always very discerning about which cloud platforms they’re using so often people wanting his drop box. It’s easy. They probably have a personal account already and so, you know, you jump. On dropbox and you’re putting your data files from your organization on there, the reality is that consumer based called services just aren’t as secure as ones that air oriented, more towards business and enterprise type. I’m called service, so you know, people think they’re doing fine, they think they’re doing good, they trust drop box, but they don’t really understand there is a difference between using that and a more business orian commercial. What were some of the more? What are some of the commercial ones? Leon leon for-profit says that well, i mean what again, what we’re talking about rather than using the dropbox to personal version used to run blocks for business or dog bites for team rather than using dahna g dr usedto get a partial use g driver’s part of blue collapse whether than using microsoft one dr that you get for free if you haven’t outlook dot com account, use it as a part of one dr for business on the part of your opposite sixty five you have greater securities, the i t department or whoever is your tech support provider has greater control over containing who has access to that information. Plus you can retrieve that information more efficiently. Imagine it wanted you using your own personal dropbox account and it’s sink to, like five or six other different devices when you leave that organization. How do we get that information back from your personal rot box account? We don’t basic. There you go. So information’s out door now you’re basically are storing your data and everybody’s home when everybody’s personal device you’re probably not a magic. I don’t know how many people have tried to return. Retrieve a lot of information off a dropbox personal account’s been successful at it. Okay. Okay. So you thank you because you let your name three resource is there on top. Your head. Excellent. Ok. Alright. So safe for use of the cloud of cloud services. Okay, what else we got of our seven? Well, the one thing that we always harp on and people get a chuckle out of it. But we have deal with it is proper password management strong password using stronger passwords and insurance, and requiring that your staff members whether they’re using their personal devices or if they’re using company own devices to use strong passwords and not just using one, two, three, four, five, six or password as your password, but also changing that passed were periodically will do with that that’s still out there, we showed a church, we showed her chart and still one, two, three, four, five, six password no past are still the top passwords being used by most folks. So we again we think that we’re past that, but we’re really not and what we’re what we’re doing in our talk is really just reminding folks and educating them of things that they know, but they just need to be reminded of people. Please have a secure password do not use one, two, three, four, five or password, no path, no pan out used you’ll be, you’ll be, you’ll be better than probably two thirds of users if you just eliminate those three things that i don’t use them. What oppcoll yeah again, you’re right. These things were here, but we’re not doing it exactly when i do it, there should be numbers that should be symbols. It should be a word out of a definition of what a lot of people are talking about. It now is maybe using phrases so you can’t you can’t assume you can’t you can’t expect your staff member to come up with a cryptic pass where like a b capital, jay lorts see one, two, three oh, the ampersand sign and all that sort of stuff, but they could come up with a phrase always use the example of it. He used big mac fries but capitalized, obey in the a m and neck and then using empress stand for the a m a that is going to be far harder to increase, to break to crack, then some some more simple password, but you’ll remember it. Or maybe a phrase that’s just known to you or your family or your yeah, yeah it’s in your from your grandparent’s something, and then you choose the first couple of letters of each exactly, exactly, and using symbols and numbers and still those things, too, make it somewhat creek critics still, because really, what? What happens? You know you’re you’re lengthening the time it takes to crack your password, you know, if they if they know there’s a with just twenty six characters a through z, they can do that a lot more quickly than if there’s twenty six. Characters plus, you know, ten digits plus cerini of upper case and symbols. You just magnify the difficulty. Yeah, absolutely exponentially. Okay, okay, give us another one again. Would you throw something else out from our from our seven? Yeah. You know, one that is another pretty basic thing. People aren’t necessarily always backing up their data. They they don’t have a plan for back-up. Yeah. Disaster recovery, you know, not just a disaster. Where, say, a server breaks down or, you know, something gets erased, but like real disasters, what happens if you have a flood and you know, your servers get destroyed? That way, you know, a fire, those sorts of situation, actually, at last, year’s auntie si i interviewed. I remember you could you could search listeners if you want to find this one. Her name was dar geever ca. It was all about you, you know that. You know, you know that, you know, dark. It was all about your disaster disaster recovery plan. So that was just one year ago. But first of all, you gotta have a plan. You’re not the airtight may not be hurricane proof, but i have a plan, right, let’s. Get started well, that’s the key thing, and we were saying that a lot of non-profits have become more mature, smart backing up their data. But david, backing up your data is just one part of it. When you talk about disaster recovery, you’re talking about protecting the entire environment. So if your server crash it’s going to take a lot longer to bring that server back-up depending on how you been, how you been poor, proactive, into that recovery, then just restoring the working files, how long is it going to take for you to get the operating system back-up apply altum security patches and all that sort of stuff and depending on the type of non-profit you are, is that ok or not for you to be dahna day a week, two weeks, so when we talk about disaster recovery we’re talking about you got to go beyond just backing up the data, you’ve got to be concerned with the environment as a whole and what is your strength? What is your what if analysis for if this were to occur, when are we going to do? Like what you’re hearing a non-profit radio tony’s got more on youtube, you’ll find clips from stand up comedy tv spots and exclusive interviews catch guests like seth gordon. Craig newmark, the founder of craigslist marquis of eco enterprises, charles best from donors choose dot org’s aria finger do something that worked. And naomi levine from new york universities heimans center on philanthropy tony tweets to he finds the best content from the most knowledgeable, interesting people in and around non-profits to share on his stream. If you have valuable info, he wants to re tweet you during the show. You can join the conversation on twitter using hashtag non-profit radio twitter is an easy way to reach tony he’s at tony martignetti narasimhan t i g e n e t t i remember there’s a g before the end he hosts a podcast for the chronicle of philanthropy fund-raising fundamentals is a short monthly show devoted to getting over your fund-raising hartals just like non-profit radio, toni talks to leading thinkers, experts and cool people with great ideas. As one fan said, tony picks their brains and i don’t have to leave my office fund-raising fundamentals was recently dubbed the most helpful non-profit podcast you have ever heard. You can also join the conversation on facebook, where you can ask questions before or after the show. The guests were there, too. Get insider show alerts by email, tony tells you who’s on each week and always includes link so that you can contact guests directly. To sign up, visit the facebook page for tony martignetti dot com. Lively conversation, pop trends and sound advice. That’s. Tony martignetti non-profit radio. And i’m lawrence paige nani, author off the non-profit fund-raising solution. Dar even went into the possibility that some organizations may need off site places to go. Well, you gotta have some place rented or or have a share agreement for when you needed an emergency for physical location. It is it is conceivable me, obviously, going to the cloud has helped out tremendously as far as people who still itjust dorner information in a cloud using google laps ofthis office. Three, sixty five things that nature there, they have access to their working files, and they could still use things like microsoft office or google docks and things that nature. But if you’re trying to get to your donor zsystems and hopefully that’s in a cloud of swell, but there might be still some things that are on that physical server and what happens if that server was to crash or the building that you’re operating out of two is inaccessible or loses power? Yeah, okay, all right. They’re excellent. What else you guys got? Well, the one of things that we also talked about that we want to touch on was about software management. And this is about basically ensuring that when you’re doing software updates, patch updates and things that nature, that you do it in an intelligent matter-ness not every not every update is a good update. A lot of the hackers thes days are going through the adobes, the job of e ems and things of that nature. So you want to be mindful of that? And you want to make sure that if you’re allowing people to download software and do updates on their own, um what? What are your provisions around that they’re actually downloading malicious software. So we talked about again, more policies the potential the locking down the workstations and required an it person or tech support person, too. Basically white list that particular software patch up days before comes down. Because once you do that, then it help out with on the productivity. Okay. Okay. Anything else, dan, you want to add about the suffering management side? No, i think that covers it that way. Okay. Okay. Don’t want to go through these two fast. No that’s. Quite all right. Okay. So feel free to elaborate. Well, well, i will share that one thing that in the office, when we’re talking, we’re going to talk. That thing that came up a lot of security and especially we start talking about cyber security, and they say, well, leon and dan, if you’re telling us we have to be have stronger passwords if we have to be responsible about where we’re storing our data in mohr business, great cloud storage solutions as opposed to consumer grace clouds store solutions, what does that say for cybersecurity were what are your thoughts on cybersecurity? And what we were sharing with them is that we feel that a lot of the cloud stores a lot, a lot of the cloud vendors are doing a decent job as far as doing that. What we need to start looking at when we start talking about password management is looking to some of the clouds cloud password management solutions out there, because now we’re requiring our staff members to remember five or six or seven different passwords because they log into their computer one way they logged into google app susan another password because we were now no longer have single sign on any more, so they were asking questions regarding that and make it, and we were given recommendations on tools like last past and so forth, okay. Let’s not gloss over this. Yeah, yeah. Last last past a cz one of those clouds on password management solutions and there’s two or three others that are out there if you go out there and google them. But what they allow you to do is is almost like a software it’s. Almost like a password vault. You can upload a key and all your primary passwords. And then you have one master password with some kind of token key that allows you to then log in one time. And then those solutions was analog into your sixty five. Those solutions argument with in laws because they have they have they hold on to your credentials. So as we’re now moving into maur, this hybrid mode where we still have to log into a local network. But we have a lot of our systems out in a cloud. We have to now deal with howie managing our passwords across both in the cloud and on premise. Okay, about dash lane. Either of you familiar with it. Actually. Password management is that you think is in the same camp it’s in that same camp with last pass and so forth. I mean there’s two or three, they’re out there. Octus another one that’s out there that a lot of people are trying to use for a single sign on between their microsoft active directory network as well as in the cloud. So and some of them tie in with things like salesforce. Dot com embraces these kind of things. So the more major players out in the field, the major software vendors are making sure that their cloud management solutions are our being able to be accessible through these cloud password management system. Okay, dash lane, last pass octa okay, and he wasn’t any another one. You want to shout out as worthy? There was another and there’s another incarnation of non-profit radio. So you won passed hyre special one passes another one as well. Ok, very good. What else? But this is in our list of seven. Well, the other thing that we talked about it kind of going to school in size. We are talked about personal computers to introduce it, but i’m going to talk about that. But then, if you want to talk about, we’re talking about the mobile devices and so forth and the issues that come with that mobile, right? So we we talked about bring your own device when your pc or your laptop, you know similar concerns with mobile devices. You know, you need policies in place. I need to make sure that, you know, there’s a reality that people were using their phones or tablets for work. We’re taking our work everywhere now. And so how do you manage that? That’s a there’s a reality there that everyone’s probably living with on some degree. How do you minimize the risk and manage it so that your comfortable with how people using their mobile devices for work? Okay, how do you how do you know? Well, you know, i think some of the things that we’ve already talked about you making sure you have antivirus software on your phone is a really important thing, okay, you’ll be able to manage on some level the device that if someone say, leaves your organization that you can either you know, it’s complicated, potentially, but you potentially could delete some of the information in particular aps you’re not likely probably to be able to delete their whole phone and that’s probably good for everybody, but just having a little bit more control. On how people are using their mobile devices when it comes to work. And, you know, leon mentioned he’s sort of old school, and i think maybe very prudent in the sense that he has his personal device and he has a work device and he keeps those separate, i think, for for an organization, if you could do that, it really is the most prudent approach, because the reality is you can’t control. So what else is device they’re passing around with their family, you know, someone borrows it to look something up or use the phone, you know, that data contract veliz the reality. And so, you know, you have to think about that risk, and if your organization is sort of willing to take that risk, or if it needs to take some steps to kind of minimize the okay, we have time for one more dan you want introduce the last one? Yeah, the last one is the lack of network security, right? So you’re we often using wifi. You have a router. But did you make sure to set a unique password for that round? Or are you just using the factory setting and itjust admin, which is public. Anyone could look that up and get on your router at any time. You know things like that, making sure firewalls are in place. You’re making sure your network is secure altum throughout and i think leon comprise going more. Did you want to have anymore about network security? Yeah, that’s the one thing is it’s a multi layer it’s, a multi layered approach. So you have to have the external penetration protection with your firewall but that’s also where you need to also maybe have a firewall running at the pc level is well along with the a v and malware software. Additionally, what we were talking about, hiss. If you’re providing wifi access within your organization, you definitely want to have a separate wifi space for a guest, contractors, visitors and thea nature versus you definitely want to do that. And you definitely want because again, if you have people just coming in off the street in public and bringing in their laptops, you don’t know what’s running on their laptop you again. It goes back to a lot of the other issues we were talking about it’s, like, bring another personal workstation in there we’ll have to wifi. And exactly you want to have a separate it one where? Even if you give him a password to log again. That password maybe times out after two hours of three hours with boy, they have to re authenticate, separate from your stamp, where they’re always going to be able to go on and have constant access to what? You want to keep it separated. Okay, we’re gonna leave it there. Ok. Cool. So it’s cool, right? They are. Leon wilson, chief technology and information officer at the cleveland foundation, and dan rivas, managing writer for idealware. Gentlemen. Thank you very much. Thank you very much. I have to a highlighter intense wag item. We’re doing that each each interview and i neglected due in the beginning. We have this usb flash from texas, and we had that to the pile of here. You might have thought we just have a message said that’s. Not true. Thean ten swag pile. Very well organized. Cool. See? Very nice. Tony martignetti non-profit radio coverage of ntc sixteen twenty sixteen non-profit technology conference. Thank you so much for being with us. Thank you. Thanks. Next week, zombie loyalists. If you missed any part of today’s show, i beseech you, find it on tony martignetti dot com. We’re sponsored by pursuing online tools for small and midsize non-profits data driven and technology enabled, and by we be spelling supercool spelling bee fundraisers. We b e spelling dot com. Our creative producer is claire meyerhoff. Sam liebowitz is the line producer. Kevin dollars are am and fm outreach director shows social media is by susan chavez, and his great music is by scott stein of brooklyn. 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So you got to make it fun and applicable to these young people look so otherwise a fifteen and sixteen year old they have better things to do if they have xbox, they have tv, they have their cell phones. Me dar is the founder of idealist took two or three years for foundation staff, sort of dane toe add an email address card, it was like it was phone. This email thing is right and that’s why should i give it away? Charles best founded donors choose dot or ge somehow they’ve gotten in touch kind of off line as it were and and no two exchanges of brownies and visits and physical gift. Mark echo is the founder and ceo of eco enterprises. You may be wearing his hoodies and shirts. Tony, talk to him. Yeah, you know, i just i’m a big believer that’s not what you make in life. It sze, you know, tell you make people feel this is public radio host majora carter. Innovation is in the power of understanding that you don’t just do it. You put money on a situation expected to hell. 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Hello and welcome to tony martignetti non-profit radio big non-profit ideas for the other ninety five percent on your aptly named host oh, i’m glad you’re with me. I’d be hit with santa chromium if you joined us me with the mere notion that you missed today’s show boost revenue with donorsearch vase john hayden and rachel muir reveal how to smartly and effectively survey your donors to increase revenue and grow your major gift pipeline. John is the ceo of inbound zombie, and rachel is vice president of training at pursuant that was recorded at the twenty sixteen non-profit technology conference and discovery visits thes one on one meetings are critical to your prospect research maria simple, our prospect research contributor and the prospect finder make sure you’re getting the most out of them that originally aired on july tenth twenty fifteen tony take two twitter responsive by pursuing full service fund-raising data driven and technology enabled, you’ll raise more money pursuant dot com, and by we be spelling supercool spelling bee fundraisers for non-profits we be spelling dot com? Here are john hayden and rachel muir on boosting revenue with donorsearch vase welcome to tony martignetti non-profit radio. Coverage of sixteen ntc it’s the non-profit technology conference with the convention center in san jose, california with me now are john hayden on rachel bure. John hayden is yeah dahna ceo founder. Easy everything of inbound zombie. And rachel bure is vice president of training at pursuing before we begin with john and rachel, you have to do our a swag item of the of the interview, which you may have noticed a big, big green glass from wind streams. And inside is a charging charging box so you can charge your charge your usb device using and then at the same time, have your drink from win streak. Preacher, would you have that swag pile? Please take the charger out before you drink. It worked in the foreground, foreground of our swag pile, if you please. Thank you very much. Thank you. Okay. All right. Rachel. John, your topic is how did boost revenue with donorsearch vase. I don’t think people think of boosting revenue with older surveys, but so that’s spell that misconception. John, how is it that donorsearch vase can be used to boost revenue? Well, thie idea is that the more you understand your donors the more they’re going to feel heard, right? And then the more that they’re understood and they feel heard and they’re connected to the organization them or they’re going to support the organization, so don’t donorsearch is a really about understanding people that support your organization. So it’s part of ah multi-channel engagement strategy. Yes, you could say that it’s fair to say, rachel, this is one of our channels in our multi-channel strategy absolutely and it’s a really great tool for understanding what your donor’s interests are. So then you could target your appeals based on this interest, and you can talk to your donors about the one program that they care about and not the nine programs they don’t care about you okay? I don’t think i don’t think many people are thinking about surveys as a channel. I think they’re thinking about twitter and facebook and instagram as their channels, not a servant, all right? Yeah, i wouldn’t i wouldn’t say this survey zahra channel, i would say that surveys are almost like an approach, you know, too sir, because you could survey people on twitter you could survey people on facebook you could survey people with a surveymonkey app you khun survey people in a number of ways so it’s more like, you know, get feedback from donors, you know, approach to a channel. Yeah, exactly approach to a channel to a strategy for an engagement purpose. Exactly. Yes, i couldn’t have said it better. I couldn’t have said it worse. Okay, so let’s dive into this, you have some i can t example, i don’t feel like starting with the examples because then you have some do’s and don’ts, which we’ll get to. But you have some examples to share of good donorsearch practices. Rachel sure, yeah, we shared a example in oven online donorsearch ve in our session and it was a short six question survey that really focused on identifying number one. What donors communication preferences are how we doing on communicating with they are communicating to little just write too much. What? What air? The beneficiary preferences the donor has who does it don’t care about of all the target populations that the non-profit serves which one interest the donor the most some questions about you know what? What programs do they care about the most? Is that just some great basic? Questions that you can use to ask your donors and these were important because that was six question, yeah, six question, okay, you only important because these are all really important questions because donors give for their reasons, not ours, and the more and one of the points that john and i made in our session is, the more you find out you’re you’ve gotto ask when you ask these questions, you’ve got to be prepared to use them to use what you learned and then honor your donor’s preferences that they tell you i want to hear from you more, or i want to hear from you less or i want hear about this book, i’ve got to be prepared to be able to deliver on that so that you’re honoring their preferences. You’ve taken the time to find out, and you’re going toe near next up, it’s going to deliver on it. Okay, so we’ve got a preserve these responses not just use the to analyse survey, and then we get it not before. Yeah, we’ve got to make good on it and that’s what we want to because we want to be talking about what they care. About the more we talk to them about what i care about, where they’re going to give, the longer they’re going to stay with us, jon, otherwise, people are gonna feel unheard, yeah, totems of serving me, if you’re not going toe honor what i asked you to do. Exactly, yeah, okay, you got another, i can’t example for us, john, i can’t example, i’m only quoting from your text here, so is this text fortified? I persisted, it’s, somebody else wrote it. I don’t know what i doubt that, you know, you have no, it turns to blame too exuberant. Okay, you got some other examples. I can’t hear otherwise. Good serve, good serve a example. No. You know, we should see we shared another video example of using video. Yeah. Video. Yes. Sorry. I thought we were in this session. I was definitely the sessions that work you did? I did provoc way. So we shared a great example of using video using video to really take the donor right into the action. Take them right there in the field, allow them to release, give them an immersive experience where they can experience the donor’s work and then use that to open up a conversation with, um, wade love to talk to you. We want to learn more about what inspired you to give. We’d love to talk about what we’re doing. We want to do so respectfully if you’d like to hear from us, just click this button and we’ll set up a visit. So it’s a great way to have your donor raise their hand on their own and find out who wants to have a deeper relationship with you. Yes. Okay. It’s a little more about what was the content of that video? The video example that we shared was a great video for operation smile and it really took the viewer. First hand into the operating room, seeing these surgeries and seeing how marchenese cleft palate surgery’s how, how they impacted these families and these communities, and they heard stories from the program officers they heard stories from donors, doctors from doctors from the founder of the organization and the founder of the organization has a very respectful called action at the end where he says we’d love to hear from you. We want to do so respectfully, we’d love to hear your hopes would love to hear your wishes. Wait, if you’d like for us to call you and set up a visit, just click this button so it’s a really nice way using the emails since the donorsearch to a landing page with personalized you were all so they could track how the if the donor watches the video, how long they watch it for, and then invite the donor to respond and raise their hand if they’d like to have a visit. So it’s another tool to learn more about a donor’s interest and hopefully set up a visit. Okay, okay, you’re tuned to non-profit radio tony martignetti also hosts a podcast for the chronicle of philanthropy fund-raising fundamentals is a quick ten minute burst of fund-raising insights, published once a month. Tony’s guests are expert in crowdfunding, mobile giving event fund-raising direct mail and donor cultivation. Really, all the fund-raising issues that make you wonder, am i doing this right? Is there a better way there is? Find the fund-raising fundamentals archive it. Tony martignetti dot com that’s marketmesuite n e t t i remember there’s, a g before the end, thousands of listeners have subscribed on itunes. You can also learn maura, the chronicle website, philanthropy dot com fund-raising fundamentals, the better way. Dahna john, i’ll give you a chance to rehabilitate. Duitz. I was just there for my looks and that’s it. You could say what not to ask, no, no, yeah, yeah, yeah, yeah, thank you, rachel. Yeah, i was gonna get do’s don’ts. Thank you, teo. Grayce you think? Well, i’m talking, john, you want to scrap something? Yeah, there you go, that would help them if they want to sign. You know, i don’t know, i okay, let’s, move. Yes, duitz a note. Don’t you ask them how much they recently gave? Don’t ask them what they gave and these air no nose, because you should know this information, right? So if you ask them that right away out of the gate, they say, wow, what? What if it’s an anonymous server or we’re not, we’re not we don’t like anonymous service. No, we can’t, because we’re supposed to be a hundred preferences. They were not so from the kate we’re not talking about no, no, no, no. Yeah, and s so were were, you know, again the purpose of the surveys to understand the donor. So we’re collecting this information putting into the donor database so that we can follow up with appropriate communication. So if someone says, hey, i like cats versus dogs for an animal shelter. They’re going to get communication that’s about dogs, here’s, harold, the dogs that were saving and here’s what you can do to help change the life in a dog. So that’s, really, the purpose is to try and taylor the communication and connect the have basically have the donor have a voice in the in the cause. Okay, i understand. Rachel’s getting the pen out of swag out chili that’s. Okay. I mean, john is squeezing the clients, just ball. I’m a little nervous. Yeah. That’s. Okay, rachel got tomato, but i know you’re nervous because you’re doing so badly. I know he’s doing our angel holding its made of which is not squeezing she’s selling. Yeah, i would say. Okay, here’s, some morning lol i was going to give you some dues. Don’t don’t use complicated phd level language don’t use complicated language keep it short keep it simple sixth grade reading level literally experience meeting you wanted to be don’t use have it be all text used highly visualized examples that fit in with the organization’s mission think. Think of a buzzfeed stall quiz that you might take on facebook. Like what? Eighties band and my duran duran psychedelic furs, thie cures you know you you just see the images and you know how you’re going to vote. You barely even have to read the text. You wanna make it as easy for them to read is easy for them to do is possible. Okay. Okay. Really? Sixth grade level. All right. Any other don’t you don’t don’t use don’t send people to a website that looks horrible on a mobile device where they have to zoom in and look at the survey in order to fill it out. Don’t ask people twenty questions be very careful what you’re asking and the number of questions you know, twenty years too long twenties way too long is there arrange five or six? If you’re doing a survey to your whole group, just keep it short and simple. Five or six? Yeah, and i would say, don’t skimp on this subject line put as much thought into this subject line as you do your survey questions so that you get people to open it. We’ll talk about the subject line of the invitation email. Exactly. Put a lot of thought into maybe a test. Your subject line. Okay, so easy to do now we all should be tested. That’s. True. Yeah, i say be testing is like it’s. Like letting your donor’s vote on subject line that they like the best and then using that to send out to all the other people. It’s, basically, you know, having them help you write the email. Yeah. Okay. Okay. That was a good one. Good response. Join arms. I don’t mean the beginning of this catching ourselves ability, working bilich. Like getting out of prison. You were. Seriously, you’re not serious, man. Like a parole officer. You’re like the worst parole officer. You’re much better one. I’m much better on twitter, facebook way we’ve never met trump. I invite you you all this time, i’ve been holding you at bay. Yeah, exactly welcoming, but probably yeah. Okay hyre be horse that’s. Great, man. You’re a good sport. Yeah, i’m a good sport. Absolutely. You beat the crap out of you later on before you go. I am in a police state. Okay. Kruckel with affiliate. I will not oppcoll hyre all right. All right. We’ve exhausted. Don’t let’s. Look let’s. Focus on the positive. Yes. Do. Alright. Well, rachel, you hit some of that. You make it simple. Very visual, right? Visual, other deuce, other good practices. I would say. Try to integrate, serving your donors in multiple avenues. You know, you can send them a donorsearch juche. Khun, ask them questions after they you know, we talked about having just a comment box. What inspired you to make this gift on your donation form after they get your newsletter after an event after the gala, you know? There, there. Are multiple touchpoint where you can solicit feedback from your donor’s there’s a reason why you can’t go to old navy that buy something for my twins without me getting a survey about the experience and satisfactions and number one driver dahna loyalty. So think of other ways that you console is thatyou’re dahna speed back way also talked about donorsearch coll’s, which is kind of interesting. So when you think surveys right, you think, oh, the internet, we gotta use the website and all that stuff, but donorsearch coll’s kind of old school. You get five or six donors in a room, you know, very kind of, i guess, you know, committed long term donors. Maybe, you know, from different, maybe maybe a volunteer. Maybe a donor could just be a virtual room. It could be, you know, a real impersonal world. Yes. You meet them in person and you ask them questions. You know what made you decide it? Initially support the organization. You know what? You know what? What kind of stories really get you amped up? You know why? Why do you continue to support the organization and just have that open dialogue in the small? Group and i think often that khun b, that dialogue can be the kind of source to create the online survey, because then we know well what you know, when you start with an online survey, you might be asking, well, what do we even start with? But maybe the donorsearch kel is a good place to start, find out what are the key kind of issues or what the key preferences and then sussed that out throughout the throughout the database. Yeah, yeah, exactly, yeah, yep, okay, are there certain groups of donors that air better to try to engage in a survey than others like sustainers vs strictly annual donors or hyre plant e-giving donors vs others durney any distinctions across types of donors that we’re talking with or dealing with? That’s a great question, i would say surveys air really great for all your donors and it’s an opportunity for you to be able to identify who you’re sustainers prospects are and who playing, giving prospects are and really move those people from the annual fund up because you cared enough tto learn about what they care about, and you’re going to deliver on it so you’ve got you’ve increased your chances of deepening that relationship and deepening their involvement with the organization by asking them the survey because donors give for their reasons, not ours and it’s up to us to figure out what they are. I see a lot of fundraisers really trying to read their donors minds and wasting a lot of time and, you know, i like to say ask more questions, read les minds there’s someone it’s, it’s totally appropriate to say how do you like to be invited to make a gift? That’s a very respectful way to find out more about how someone does like to be invited to make a gift, and these are all you don’t have to try to read their minds. You can ask them these questions and learn a lot build a relationship in the process i can think of to gary with one music suggested. How do you like to be asked? How often? How often should we be approaching? Use is two or three times per year appropriate five times one time that’s a great example. We actually talked about that, you know you’re giving donors choice when you do that and that. That’s giving them control and that’s a really big part of them deepening their engagement with you. They want to have that control. We’ve got one study where an organization raised fifty percent more fifty percent more at their year and appeal because they gave those donors those choices win, do you? When do you want to hear from us? When do you want us to ask? How often do you want us to ask? They first proved the value of their communications and that’s something i would caution anyone to first do you know if if the first time you make a gift? If i ask you how much how often you won’t hear from me, you might say, not very much because you don’t know me yet, but once i proven the value of the communications and you do know and the donor doesn’t know the organization it’s really great to ask those questions. That’s a really great point. Thank you. Like i scored warning sixteen minutes and forty seconds. All right, john, you want a chance? A chance of what? Score a point? Okay asked me a question we’re talking about. Good, good. Good news. No, mistress. Yeah, eso so keep the language simple, very simple and use their words right don’t use any jargon that you might throw around in the, you know, internal meetings, use their words on dh focus a lot on visuals, actually, visuals drop people in the video is a great example. And actually, that video is very powerful because and the organization was alt-right smile training, you know, is it was operation smile operation, smile. Yeah, it was great. I mean, when the video was playing during our first session, i was kind of had tears in my eyes, you know? So that emotion drives the person take action, right? So at the end, you know, hey, tell us what we can do or contact us. We want to take the next step with you, that person probably more likely to take that action because that emotion, right? So i think that’s that’s really key is to try two focus on drawing people in emotionally and and appeal to that because that’s going to drive the action and there’s something like logic will logic drives a conclusion. So a logical solicitation koegler appeal, logical appeal drives a conclusion. An emotional appeal. Drives a response. Action? Exactly. Exactly. That’s crazy. You weren’t ten points to that. I love it. That was brilliant. No one gave you the authority to assess points. There’s a hostess that just here. You see the signs? Yes. Okay. Tony martignetti okay, he’s putting you in this company. I’m being put in my space and i think i’m being hard. I think john hayden may never come back co-branded before so yeah, people will google me at least. Who is this guy? John hayden he’s having a total failure on this video? Shit. You don’t even mention it. A credential here that you’re exactly facebook marketing for dummies proof that i am a dummy proof facebook marketing for demolition take himself too seriously and not at all. Okay. Secrets your favorite for-profit brands used to build loyalty let’s, start revealing some of some of these for-profit secrets. Well, they ask, i mean you you can hardly buy anything or do anything without being asked about your experience, right? I mentioned like the survey over the dressing rooms. I was the lighting and and they, you know, the best time to build on a great experience or fix a negative one is in the moment that it happened. And that’s why? Surveys are so great if you ask people honestly, you get a chance to interact in that experience before that donor becomes a lapsed owner and that’s. Why it’s great to be soliciting feedback often, often often and immediate. Yeah, depending on the engagement, right, depending on what that engagement was. Okay, okay. That’s a good one. Yeah, and actually, someone has a bad experience, you know, they might wait. One the question we asked to us. Have you ever had a bad haircut? You know? So you’re not going to tell your hair and i don’t. I don’t know if i’d have been here cut or not. Probably not right now, but, you know, if you have a bad haircut apparently, according to people i know if you have a bad haircut, you’re going to tell your friends, you know, whatever you do, don’t go to the hairdresser, but you’re not gonna tell the hairdresser, right? So it’s important to listen on follow-up and but but just being heard can often turn things around, and i think that way refer to the recovery paradox. Yeah, this is known in the for-profit sector. Is this service recovery paradox? Yep, service recovery so it says it says that if you do something really awful and it’s, someone has an awful customer experience if they feel heard, they are more likely. Teo, you know, support, you are loyal, but they’re going to be more loyal then if they never had a complaint in the first place and you don’t even have to fix the problem. That’s the good thing you don’t have to listen to it. Yeah, really? That’s the that’s? Why it’s a paradox like you would think if someone has negatives, something negative to say about your you know, organization or your business, you know, you you have to fix it. We gotta change this, but not necessarily you have to listen, something’s, you obviously can’t change, right? But just giving that person the opportunity to say how they feel and be heard. Then they say, wow, of all the brands of all the retailers of all the non-profits i sport, i feel hurt by these guys. Now they’re not doing everything i like, but i really liked them so that loyalty increases universes. The defensive, you know. Blaming the victim response? Yeah. Service. Yeah, exactly. And again, the bad haircut. Right? So if you don’t listen to them that person’s out there on the street telling their friends, hey, you know, whatever you do, don’t support these guys because they’re kind of, you know, not only did they do it wrong, but they don’t want to hear what i have to say. Also, you don’t want that on the street. Your customer donorsearch taking the time to share their opening up to you. If they didn’t care about you, they wouldn’t. They wouldn’t bother wait. They’re in their mind. They would waste a time sharing this bad if you are. Yeah, this person cares enough to tell. And eventually we all heard that that will increase their loyalty. That’s the parent? Okay? Yeah, yeah, yeah. We got a couple more minutes together. What else? What else can we do? You have to depart. Rachel it’s. Okay, just you don’t have to do it silently. I’m going to turn off your mike so you don’t make a lot of noise. You’ll wake latto by rachel buy-in right now you’re gonna leave me with the, uh, heimans lackluster way. Go. Alright, let’s, finish this up. Tony that’s. So that’s. Rachel, you’re vice president of training at pursuing thank you, rachel. Thanks, rachel. Okay, john. All right. Great. So i hope that i just said we have a couple of minutes left, so don’t disappoint. Good. Okay. What? What else? What else is gonna be covered in this topic, or or what else was covered in? Well, i think, you know, i think i talked about the thing that we’ve tried to impress people with. The donor survey is not just a survey that you do once a year, once a quarter, but it’s almost like a mindset of creating upper every opportunity to follow up with the donor and listen to them. So, for example, we talked about when someone makes a first time donation, right? That’s a big deal. That’s. A pretty big deal. Hey! Wow, you you gave us money. Don’t! Why did you know what was what made you decide to do that? Someone gives a second time, right? If they give once that’s that’s great. But if they give a second time, it’s almost a miracle. So wow! What did we what are we doing? That drove you back to us twice reinforced the catch of a miracle. That is because we have a seventy percent donor attrition problem across non-profits in the u s absolute we’re losing seventy percent of our donors each year yet so it’s quite a big deal when somebody gives you that second? Absolutely. And then and then, of course, monthly, right? If someone says, hey, i gave once or twice here and there, but now i want to commit to a monthly program, right? I want to commit to that. Wow, you did that other yeah. So obviously these follow-up these donor-centric questions going different for each of the situations right on then also, you know, even on a donation form, having, like rachel said an open box that said, if you wanted, you know, if you have anything to tell us anything you want to share with us about why you’re supporting us, just type it in right here, just having this attitude of kind of b, you know, having an ear and being open there, listening to people and giving people opportunities to share how they feel, you know, even on, you know, i wrote facebook marketing for dummies and i’m always telling people yes, there’s facebook insights, you can look at all the data but read the comments on the posts, right? That’s, where you get all this really incredible personal stories, people sharing personal stories, what they think about certain issues, how they and you and also you learn their language, right? How are they talking about the cause we think we talked about has a, you know, communications person at a non-profit, you know, sometimes they get into jargon or talking about a cause in a certain way of thinking, they have to educate donors, but, you know, by reading comments really listen to donorsearch kind of understand their language, how they’re talking about it using their words, you know, okay, yeah, cool john all right, was that i think that’s a great rap, all right? Because i was so harsh to you. Yeah, i’ll give you a shout out. You should be following john hayden on twitter he’s at john hey, because he is very good who does have a lot of good content and it’s not only about facebook, email anything put candy, you know, five tips five think you sort of known for five of these seven of these quick tips very tactical there’s that value yet. But you also go deeper to oh, yeah, yeah, definitely. Yeah, and i’ve weekly webinars i do free webinars called the hump day coffee break and it’s just, you know, people show up, look at wednesday’s eleven and, you know, have a cup coffee, learned something and leave and that’s it, you know? So yeah. So i feel like i told you that. Great. We’ll let you have it. Thank you. Well, thank you for the opportunity. Really do appreciate it. And it was fun. I have very thick skin, so i had a great time. Honestly, tell your friends about not probably. I do. Do i tweet about it? I know you tweet about it. Yeah. Thank you. Yeah. John hayden, he’s he’s. Everything around inbound zombie. They do. Marketing consultant. Exactly. Thank you. Took it. And you are listening and viewing tony martignetti non-profit radio coverage of sixteen ntcdinosaur non-profit technology conference wrapping day one with john hayden and rachel muir. Or we’ll be back on day two. Of course, on the day three stay with us. Discovery visits. We have maria. Simple coming up first pursuant you know them, they have fund-raising management tools that are ideal for small and midsize shops perfect for our listeners. They fill your potential donor pipeline that keep your fund-raising on task, time against goal and all the individual fund-raising task day after day, week after week that you need to track, they’ll keep you managing those making sure that your time is is probably focused. So you’re meeting goal pursuant dot com we’d be spelling spelling bees for non-profit fund-raising this is not your mother’s spelling bee, not even the ones from seventh grade there’s too much fun, they’re enormously interactive, including dancing and there’s also stand up comedy and the comics i’ve seen are quite funny live music too. Facilitate that dancing note there’s no deejay thing here is live music so you got a concert you get stand up comedy there’s dancing fund-raising, of course, and they squeeze the spelling bee in there too. I love what they’re all about it’s really very cool, it’s. Very different. They have a video that shows it all at we b e spelling dot com now tony steak too. Meet me on twitter i love i have a lot of fun on twitter. Even people cite that hundred forty character limitation, but that’s nonsense because if if the conversation is getting detailed, you go into direct messages. And if you if you want to keep it public, then you just do multiple one hundred forty character messages. So, uh, seems kinda old to be hope you not put off by one hundred forty characters. It’s fun, you know, it’s it’s immediate. Um, i get a lot of guests that way. I get a lot of listeners of the weak that way. Twitter’s very cool. So if you’re not following, you could check me out at tony martignetti be grateful as i always am. If you re tweet about the show talking about the show, let your followers let your network know that you’re into non-profit radio and, uh, yeah, check me out. Sabelo please say hello on twitter that’s tony’s take two it’s just that simple live listener love it’s got to go out you know, it’s coming gratitude, gratitude and love to all our live listeners whatever city, state country you are in your listening now and i appreciate it live love to you i will spare you the diatribe about then versus now, when we’re pre recorded this week podcast pleasantries, they go out right after the live love they go pleasantries to our many, many podcast listeners are lots of different platforms for podcast listeners. There’s still that one in germany hanging in there we get like thirty or forty hits ah month from his podcast dot d i think, but itunes the vast, vast majority stitcher number two platform and then there’s like player dot fm and pod bay and podcast and smaller ones. But whatever platform you’re getting, the the the show from pleasantries to you and our affiliate affections right on the heels of the podcast pleasantries i know where platforms you’re getting it from our am and fm affiliate stations throughout the country and i am grateful to you affections to the many affiliate listeners on stations all around the country. Here’s maria simple originally from the july tenth show last year on discovery visits you also know maria simple she’s, the prospect finder, a trainer and speaker on prospect research. Her website is the prospect finder dot com. Her book is panning for gold. Find your best. Donor prospects now she’s on a diet of dirt cheap and free. You can follow her on twitter at maria simple welcome back, maria maria so i gave the screen here. How are you? Where you been? What’s going on there? What do you think? That’s? Too much that’s too much. I had myself on mute while you were doing on minute announcements there. Sorry about that. Um, i’m glad you’re with me. Welcome back. Absolutely. Thank you. Pleasure. We’re talking about discovery visits today. These, uh, he’s let’s define a discovery visit. And then once you explain why you think they’re so critical to prospect research, well, you know, as prospect researchers, unfortunately, we don’t have access to every little piece of information that would be useful for you. As you’re thinking about cultivating or soliciting someone so actually sitting down face to face with a donor is going to yield so much insight about what motivates them, why they love your organization and potentially yield larger gifts for you down the road. I blogged this a while ago, and it may be one of the first times that you and i met online because you commented on it. But i don’t think you were on this show at this point, but i blogged the value of face-to-face meetings, and i was not diminishing prospect research online and all through all the resource is that you and i have talked about from chambers of commerce and libraries toe online resource is wasn’t diminishing those, but yeah, the value that you get from having lunch with someone i happen to like doing it over meals, but whether it’s over meals or a meeting in their office or a site visit to your place there’s going be great. Um, you just pick up so much just by talking to somebody for for an hour? Yeah, yeah, and and definitely even in the body language alone. So if you start steering that conversation in a certain direction and you see people getting uncomfortable or fidgety or ah, in the opposite way, if maybe they start leaning in and leaning forward and looking like they’re really engaged with with what you’re talking about, perhaps a new program that you’re looking toe launch and get funded, all of that can yield so much great information for you. Sometimes it could be a little awkward. You hear things that you, you’re not sure how to document, and we’ll talk about the importance of doing that, like, you know, they don’t really like the ceo or your boss, you know, are there glad that you’re at the lunch with them and not this other gift officer? Yeah, and you do have to be careful about that. How you document that? Because, you know, a donor does have the ability to walk into your organisation at any time and say, let me see what donorsearch crowds you have on me. So you think you would want to document it in as a subject in an objective manner i should say objectively think of yourself as a a nen vested gate of reporter, right? When you’re trying to write down what the comments are so you might, you know, just right. You know, they did not seem particularly interested in the new x y z program and period end of story. Now we’re talking about the documentation it’s critical to save this in your hopefully you have a c r m database, right? A donor database cr m someplace. This has tio this information, you know, it’s what? We call, i guess, institutional memory, right? And you’re not going to put me in jargon jail for that? Are, you know, that’s a pretty straightforward one, okay, i’m enjoying for well, if if you as a development officer or is an executive director, sit down and have a conversation with someone and then you decide to leave the organization a year later. Ah, and then the new person takes over and goes in and has a visit with this long time donor sort of starts asking that same set of questions that donor’s going to kind of look at him like, don’t you already know this? Because i’ve already talked to your predecessor about what my interests were, etcetera. So you really do need to make sure that you are taking, you know, the time and it’s time well worth, you know, spent just documenting what happened during the conversation. What were the critical point? What were the things that need to be followed up on? You know, maybe it’s a timing issue. Maybe they say, well, you know what? This is a really bad time for my family right now, but in two years we feel that our finances will be in a different situation, you’ve got to get that documented and that’s an ideal example of one of the many, many things that you’ll find out from talking to somebody that you’ll never find online or any other resource is i don’t lose its talking, you gotta you gotta drop people out and and they love your work, otherwise they wouldn’t be meeting with you, so they’re happy to talk about what it is they love how, how their situation can impact your organization. I mean, positively or negatively, you know, like you’re saying, this is not a good time for us, you know, we just had a downturn in my business or from death in the family or, you know, whatever i mean stuff you’re not going to find out anywhere else than talking to people, you’re absolutely right. And, you know, one of the interesting things too, is you sometimes when i’m having conversations with with a non-profit maybe it a networking event or at a conference or something, and i’ll last generally how is your fund-raising going and then steer the conversation towards you know well, you know, when was the last time you had a chance to meet with who you would consider to be your top ten donors, and they kind of look at you like, uh, am i supposed to be regularly meeting with on donors? Oh, boy, yeah. That’s ah that’s yeah, that’s where the person in charge of development needs to be stewarding and managing up the, you know, the sea level people and that maybe that’s only one person may be the ceo is executive director is all there is but that, you know, yeah, yeah, you’ve got to be managing up and making sure that these relationships are nurtured with your your most important donors. You’re most important volunteers as well. Yeah, and if you don’t have the time to do it as a staff member, get your board involved. This is a perfect role for a board to get involved in. Even your board members who say, i hate to ask for money. I’ll do anything for this organization just don’t make me ask for money and it’s so simple for them to just go in and have it really a conversation you know you can provide them with, you know, prompt them with a list. Of questions that they might consider asking this individual, but it really is a conversation all about discovering what is this donor-centric about why are they giving any money to you at all when you know, when did they start? And, you know, where do they see themselves going with your organization? As a consultant, i do hardly and, you know, i don’t i don’t meet with donors and potential donors alone ever and very few of the visits that i am on our discovery visits, you know, where we don’t know the person all that well, but when i was a director of planned giving at a couple of colleges, i should do these all the time, and i remember my head’s spinning with oh, i don’t remember that, but i’m trying to stay in the conversation, too, but you can’t take notes while you’re having lunch, but i remember my head swimming over my gosh, i can’t remember that and that. Oh, and this news about his sister and that relationship, you know? Oh, you know, but there’s so much too, and you get back to the office and you just have to spill it all out and i agree with you, i usedto have ah, client, who said never write anything about someone potential donor or donor at anybody boardmember that you wouldn’t want them to read basically the same standard you had when you said someone could come in the office any time and ask what you have on them. That’s fine, you know, today with with technology having advanced right, i’m hoping that people who were in those positions that you were holding at that time in the plan giving departments and and so forth are using their smartphones and the recording feature not to record the conversation, but afterward, once the meeting has ended and you’re getting back into your car or getting to a quiet place, you know, in, you know, a different space or something like that, just data dump it right in by voice because you can speak a lot faster. Most people can speak much faster than they can write or type, so why not just get it in that way? And then if if you needed to, you know, use a transcription service of some sort to then get it into a print format and then edited from there. I think you know, that could be a particularly great way to use technology. Yeah, great. Cool tip. I like that. You’re right. You can dump into a voice memo. Excellent. I also like your idea of using board members for this purpose idea. We’ve we’ve talked about it, but good many times, but good to mention that also, this is ideal for board members for organizations that have a prospect research person. Do you think that these contact well, i’m going to call them contact report? Because as we used to call them at the colleges, should they flow through the prospect researcher? Or should they go right into the c r, m database and then it’s a prospect researchers job follow-up and read them how does? Because the prospect researcher is the the focal point of a lot of this, the prospect activity? How should this info get to the to that person? Well, you know, it really again depends on the size of the department and the type of cr m that you’re using and who has access to it because some will allow you no board members to have access and others won’t. So then clearly if it’s your boardmember that needs to be providing the information in many cases, they’re not going to have access two, uh, to that database, so don’t need to get it to that prospect. Researcher some other way. If it is ah development officer who does have access to the database. And i do recommend that they inserted directly themselves. If it’s a small organization, if it’s a larger organization with multi level, then you know you would want to make sure that there are certain procedures in place for me. No, but certainly the prospect researcher in some way, shape or form should be alerted that there’s been an update to that record in case there’s, you know any additional updated information that they need to provide? Yeah, right. It could be a simple is ah, niu ah, new email address or you are. Whatever new relationship. Ah, i know. In the in the colleges where i worked which bigger organizations, they the prospect researcher was the like. I said the focal point, and they would pull out something from a prospect research report that would say, oh, you know i should. This is consistent with this other contact report that i read for this other person done by a different gift officer. And these two need to be talking to each other for whatever reason, that was always that was always the done through. The prospect researcher i don’t know is that it makes sense to you. Yeah, yeah, it does. Absolutely. And i can tell you that, you know, having attended various conferences in the past that are, you know, attended by prospect researchers. They would love to be on every one of these donordigital covering visits, making sure that the right questions get asked and so forth. Okay, so this should be from training there, maybe maybe training the gift officers by the prospect researcher. When again, when it’s an organization that has prospect research. I understand a lot of listeners organizations problem may not. But if you do, should there be some training that the prospect researcher was doing for the gift officers? Yeah, absolutely. There should be some sort of training and in terms of not only what they confined online, if they needed to find some information quickly. What are some of the go to resource is when they’re out on the road? Etcetera. But also, you know what air the typical questions you should be sitting down and asking of every single donor and prospect and, you know, ah, good development officer, this should really be intuitive and second nature for them. Um, but if there’s somebody fairly new in the role, or if it’s an executive director who is, you know, that that’s it that’s the only person there is no development officer on, perhaps they’ve been so very used to running an organization and and the day to day management of the organization that they really haven’t gone down the road of of getting trained on, you know how to ask the right questions to elicit the responses we need to move this prospect forward. We’re gonna go out for a break. Marie and i will keep talking about this a little bit. And then she also has, um, unconference dates coming up this summer. That would be valuable for your prospects, research or stay with us. Like what you’re hearing a non-profit radio tony’s got more on youtube, you’ll find clips from stand up comedy tv spots and exclusive interviews catch guests like seth gordon, craig newmark, the founder of craigslist marquis of eco enterprises, charles best from donors choose dot org’s aria finger do something that worked and they only levine from new york universities heimans center on philanthropy, tony tweets to he finds the best content from the most knowledgeable, interesting people in and around non-profits to share on his stream. If you have valuable info, he wants to re tweet you during the show. You can join the conversation on twitter using hashtag non-profit radio twitter is an easy way to reach tony he’s at tony martignetti narasimhan t i g e n e t t i remember there’s a g before the end he hosts a podcast for the chronicle of philanthropy fund-raising fundamentals is a short monthly show devoted to getting over your fund-raising hartals just like non-profit radio, toni talks to leading thinkers, experts and cool people with great ideas. As one fan said, tony picks their brains and i don’t have to leave my office fund-raising fundamentals was recently dubbed the most helpful non-profit podcast you have ever heard, you can also join the conversation on facebook, where you can ask questions before or after the show. The guests were there, too. Get insider show alerts by email, tony tells you who’s on each week and always includes link so that you can contact guess directly. To sign up, visit the facebook page for tony martignetti dot com. I’m dana ostomel, ceo of deposit, a gift. And you’re listening to tony martignetti non-profit radio. Big non-profit ideas for the other ninety five percent. Got more live listeners in san francisco, california live love going out to there now podcast listeners and affiliate listeners. Did you think i forgot? How how could you live? Listener love always is accompanied by podcast pleasantries and affiliate affections very grateful to all the podcast listeners wherever, whatever device, whatever you’re doing, i love having you with us and all those affiliate listeners in the many stations across the country affections out too. Our am and fm affiliate listeners perish the thought that i would forget podcast pleasantries and affiliate affections. Maria, any last thoughts you want to leave us with on discovery visits and before we move teo unconference ideas? Well, you know, really, just to figure out what what is a donor’s? Why, right? That that’s, what you’re looking to get to understanding there, why to the heart of why they’re investing in your organization and, you know, try and use that language when you’re speaking with them, you know, why are you investing in us? What? What motivates you to continue supporting us? What do you like best about our non-profit? And you know what? Can we actually improve? So try and really elicit some good conversation from them and, you know, you’ve probably heard that old adage tony asked them for money and they’ll they’ll offer you advice and asked him for advice, and they’ll offer you some money. So, you know, it’s a great way to get people engaged in your organization, so don’t be afraid to start those conversations, even if somebody proposes something or says something a little bit on the negative side, take it as constructive criticism and look for areas of improvement. Yeah, you’ve got to hear the negative and a lot of what you’re what you’re suggesting comes out organically, you know? I mean, the person knows that you’re there to talk about the organization, you know, they’re talking about politics or hopefully you keep politics off the table. I always think that’s a bad idea for these kinds of visits, but yeah, they’re talking about the organization that’s, what the two of you have in common, so, you know, a lot of that stuff just gets elicited. I love this program, or i didn’t understand this or i didn’t know you’re doing this thing, but i just read about it in the newsletter, and you know that. Stuff. I mean, you’re right. Ask if it’s not coming out, but a lot of times, it just happens organically because right that’s what you have in common. That’s what? You share, right? Right. All right. So ah, you gots unconference ideas for us. Prospect. Researchers like to meet during the summer. Yeah, absolutely. So the biggie for prospect researchers is the international conference that happens every summer for apra, which is the association of professional researchers for advancement. And this year the conference takes place in new orleans, metoo and it’s going to be july twenty second to the twenty fifth, and they actually also have ah, a new researchers symposium as part of that, uh, they have a full day symposium just for new researchers. So this is a great way to get i think, you know, a full day in, um ah, dedicated to a newbie. And, you know, if you’re just getting your feet wet in this whole thing about prospect research, that might be something well worth while attending. Are you going to the international conference? I will not be going this year. I’m actually attending other conferences, but, you know, this one is definitely if you’re thinking about prospect researchers, this really is the one to consider. Um, you know, there are fall conferences that, you know, we just missed a few conferences that are more regional. So, like in new england, there’s, an organization called nedra, the new england development research association, they they had a conference in april, it was not researchers let’s not look okay, let’s not look backwards, let’s go forwards, but but the good thing about it is that some of those organizations will still put the presentation’s in powerpoint on the website so still perhaps worth just checking into even if you book market for next year. If you’re in those regions, certainly something to think about seeing what what have they shared from the past conference? Cause you might be able to just do a little, you know, your own online learning are these all apra chapters that we’re talking about? Yeah, yeah, they really are there. They’re more regionalized chapters of research association years ago, i spoke a couple of apra chapters, i think in new york and new jersey years ago, back when i know i’m not even sure i was consulting at the time. Maybe more than twelve years ago, but glad they’re still around. Okay, what else? What else you got besides the international? Also coming up in arizona? There’s going to be a false symposium on the topic of campaigns and that’s going to be held november fifth through the sixth in tempe, arizona. So that might be one to consider. And also in california, they have several events going on. The california advancement researchers association have several things on their website, so i’d be glad to share some of these links on your facebook page, if you like and then people can check them out, and if they’re in those regions and see if they want to attend. I love it. Why did you do that? As a comment to the takeaways that’ll be posted around four o’clock eastern today? Sure. Okay. That’s outstanding. We still have another minute or so left. What’s uh, what’s going on in. Oh, i’m sorry. There are the conferences or that you got it. That’s covers it. You know, i think because several have already passed. Those were the ones that i really found that i thought you know, were sprinkled throughout in different places. That you might consider going tio okay, sounds good. Tell me, uh, yeah, now we just have about a minute or so, right, sam? So what what’s going on in your world, what you’re seeing among your clients in our last minute, you know, well, i’m definitely seeing a tick up in activity, capital campaigns and so forth. So, you know, it’s great to see that good news came out with e-giving yusa numbers, and i think that that generally just kind of buoys people a little bit and their spirits. So i am seeing more activity and more research requests because of these larger campaigns and the need to research some of these high net worth individuals before visiting them. So in general, i think it’s it’s all good news. Okay, glad you’re optimistic looks so a beat. Andi, you’re going to be back with me in two shows on july twenty fourth for the two hundred fifty of show. Yes, you’re going to here in the studio? Cool, i will. All right, looking forward to it will be nice to have you institute a sze yu wei would say in latin i’m fluent in latin is a worthless skill, but thank you very much. Good to see you. Good to talk to you. Thank you. You’ll find her at the prospect finder dot com and on twitter at maria simple next week. Have i ever let you down? Well, maybe there was that one show on fermenting, possibly. If you missed any part of today’s show, i beseech you, find it on tony martignetti dot com. Responsive by pursuing online tools for small and midsize non-profits data driven and technology enabled pursuing dot com, and by we be spelling supercool spelling bee fundraisers, we be spelling dot com our creative producers claire meyerhoff sam lied. Wits is the line producer gavin dollars are am and fm outreach director. The show’s social media is by susan chavez on our music is by scott stein. Thank you for that, scotty. Be with me next week for non-profit radio. Big non-profit ideas for the other ninety five percent go out and be green. Yeah. What’s not to love about non-profit radio tony gets the best guests check this out from seth godin this’s the first revolution since tv nineteen fifty and henry ford nineteen twenty it’s the revolution of our lifetime here’s a smart, simple idea from craigslist founder craig newmark insights orn presentation or anything? People don’t really need the fancy stuff they need something which is simple and fast. When’s the best time to post on facebook facebook’s andrew noise nose at traffic is at an all time hyre on nine a m or eight pm so that’s when you should be posting your most meaningful posts here’s aria finger, ceo of do something dot or ge young people are not going to be involved in social change if it’s boring and they don’t see the impact of what they’re doing. So you got to make it fun and applicable to these young people look so otherwise a fifteen and sixteen year old they have better things to do if they have xbox, they have tv, they have their cell phones me dar is the founder of idealist took two or three years for foundation staff to sort of dane toe add an email address their card, it was like it was phone. This email thing is fired-up that’s, why should i give it away? Charles best founded donors choose dot or ge somehow they’ve gotten in touch kind of off line as it were and and no two exchanges of brownies and visits and physical gift mark echo is the founder and ceo of eco enterprises. You may be wearing his hoodies and shirts. Tony talked to him. Yeah, you know, i just i i’m a big believer that’s, not what you make in life. It zoho, you know, tell you make people feel this is public radio host majora carter. Innovation is in the power of understanding that you don’t just put money on a situation expected to hell. You put money in a situation and invested and expect it to grow and savvy advice for success from eric sacristan. What separates those who achieve from those who do not is in direct proportion to one’s ability to ask others for help. The smartest experts and leading thinkers air on tony martignetti non-profit radio big non-profit ideas for the other ninety five percent.

Nonprofit Radio for September 23, 2016: Data Disruption & Small Data Rocks

Big Nonprofit Ideas for the Other 95%

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Tom Hudson, Tak Fujii, Porsha James & Trevor Kale: Data Disruption

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Our panelists share their wisdom on how to connect large data to untrained users. They reveal the tools they’ve used to prototype, wireframe, etc.; how to measure success; and lessons learned. They are Tom Hudson from thirteen23; Tak Fujii and Porsha James with Pancreatic Cancer Action Network; and Trevor Kale with Springbox. (Recorded at the 2016 Nonprofit Technology Conference)

 

 

Steph McAllister & Andi Argast: Small Data Rocks

Steph McAllister & Andi Argast at 16NTC

Small data is the human-counted data you already have. Steph McAllister and Andi Argast explain what you can do with it and how to capture more. Then they leave you with the tools they use. They’re both with Framework Foundation and this is also from the Nonprofit Technology Conference.

 

 


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Hello and welcome to tony martignetti non-profit radio big non-profit ideas for the other ninety five percent. I’m your aptly named host. Oh, i’m glad you’re with me. I’d suffer the embarrassment of somnolent chea if i came to learn that you slept through today’s show data disruption, our panelists share their wisdom on how to connect large data to untrained users. They reveal the tools they’ve used to prototype wireframe, etcetera, how to measure success and lessons learned they are tom hudson from thirteen twenty three tak fuji and portia james with pancreatic cancer action network and trevor kale with springbox that was recorded at the twenty sixteen non-profit technology conference and small data rocks small data is the human counted data you already have. Steph mcallister and andy are gassed, explained what you could do with it and how to capture mohr then they leave you with the tools that they use. They’re both from framework foundation, and this is also from the non-profit technology conference tony’s take two. Don’t be in the woods, responsive by pursuant full service fund-raising data driven and technology enabled, you’ll raise more money pursuant dot com and by we be spelling super cool spelling bee fundraisers. We be spelling dot com hear from auntie si sixteen. We have our panel on data disruption. Welcome to tony martignetti non-profit radio coverage of sixteen ntc twenty sixteen non-profit technology conference. We are at the convention center in san jose, california, kicking off our coverage with a team of four tom hudson, tak fuji, portia james and trevor cale. They’re session topic is using digital disruption to elevate your cause. A case study, tom. Correct. Tax. Yes, portia. Yes. Trevor. Welcome morning. Thank you. Pleasure. We’re kicking off with you, it’s. All right, thank you. And portia is taking one for the team by standing, but, well, i’ve already reassured her it works. We’ve done it before. Not a problem. Okay, we’re talking about digital disruption. Now you have a you have a case that we were talking about? The pancreatic cancer clinical trial finder. Trevor let’s. Start down in with you. What was this case all about? I think we should start attack. Actually, pre-tax the owner of the whole shebang. Here’s. Okay, he’s got the best starts the first time. I forgot to do the proper introductions. Tak fuji is vice president of information technology. Pancreatic cancer action network. Portia james is senior manager of clinical initiatives at the pancreatic cancer action network. Tom hudson is technical director at thirteen. Twenty three. And trevor news not listed in here. Trevor is your what is your work? I’m the chief engaging officer at a company called springbox in austin, texas. Springbox dahna chief engagement officer austin, texas ntcdinosaur last year. Yeah, yeah. Now were, of course, the sanders. They were you there with that last year? I wasn’t few of us fear these guys work, but i was yeah. Okay. Porsche and tack. Alright, this is my third one here. Hat on. Okay. So best place to start with the case is with tom. Is that right? Now we attack with may attack? Yes. Okay. Acquaintance with the pancreatic cancer clinical trial finder case. Thank you. So about two thousand ten, the organization came up with the concept of gathering all pancreatic cancer clinical trials information across the nation to bring it into one comprehensive database. This allowed our internal patient services folks to then spread the word that there are alternative therapies for people afflicted with pancreatic cancer. There was such a great tremendous demand and need for this information that folks started pushing us. And so at from two thousand ten, we came up with the concept. We engaged tom trevor there, close to the mic and all of us. Or that came up with a concept of opening this thing upto the public. Okay, what kind of data set size are we talking about all clinical trials? You know that that’s portia at any one time, it varies a little closer at any one time. It varies for the number of trials, but we’re looking about one hundred sixty five trials at any one time that are available for pancreatic cancer patients. Okay. And what was our objective with this? A large data set of all these trials, what we we hoping to achieve? Sure. Well, for pancreatic cancer, the five year survival rate is eight percent. And one of the best ways for patients is to get involved in clinical trials that will help them just push the research forward and find better treatment options for this disease. So we opened up our clinical trial finder to the public in order, provide patients with real time access to clinical trials. That are available to them in their community. So many people have have preconceived notions about what clinical trials are, and we knew that this is the best way to push the science forward for this disease. Okay? And what is the first thing we need to do as we’re tryingto directly connect? Right? We’re trying to collect directly. Connect all this data. Two people who have the disease got cancer. What’s our first step in organizing this this endeavor? Well, yeah, sure. Every point to you. So you’re on with you. I got it. I got a confident about it. People point to you, you’re on. So so they approached springbox it’s, a agency in austin, texas, to help them bring this to the public. It was at its existing faze. It was only an internal tool, and the patients had to call in, and then they would access the internal tool via the employees that worked at the pancreatic cancer action at work. So in order to bring this public, we had to build a public facing interface for it. But we wanted to build the right thing, and so we really had to take the proper steps. Which meant, you know, doing some interviews with some of the stakeholders and actual patients and health care professionals that would be using the tool in order to make sure we build it, to be easy, we build it to be secure and to quickly connect them with trials in their area. Okay, so actually getting people who are going to be and users in focus groups, yeah, focus groups, interviews way wanna walk listeners through this process? We have about twenty five minutes to do it, so yeah, so focus groups, important focus groups, focus groups, and then and then from there we go ahead and start building what we call wireframes that turn into a prototype that we can actually test with people and make sure we’re doing the proper things in order, tio in order to get the information that they need and find any roadblocks that might be occurring. Twenty martignetti non-profit radio has george in jail. Everybody may not know what a wireframe is sure let’s wireframe is sort of a sort of a shell of what the actual final design and look and feel of the website would be with all the major functionality. There in place, but very flexible of that point to be able to make adjustments according to how the user would use the tools. Okay. Thank you. Quick, quick probation from drug in jail. Now, our surveys helpful. It’ll like at the pre pre-tax group stages. Is there any value in surveying? Did we dio any email surveys or anything like that? We had a general idea. So organization, we know our constituency very, very well. We knew through the years what patients were asking for what family members were asking for we also through our collaboration with medical professionals and pharmaceutical industry. We knew through the years what they were looking for. So they’ve been asking for years for access to our tools. Okay, so this has been a frustration point for your constituents for a long time? Yes isn’t asking pleading yes. Okay. Trevor kale, let’s bring you in here. What was your role in s o? Actually, the time of the initiation of the trial finer and that’s more or less current form technology, i was working with portion tack, a pancreatic cancer action network to sort of help to find the scope figure out we’re going to go and hand in hand with tom and the technology team it springbox i think piece of part of this is we’re talking about the process and where we go is the pancreatic cancer action network has been right, and what they do is being on the leading edge of technology and health care and what that means to providing resources to patients. Obviously they’re dealing with a segment of cancer that is much more aggressive than a lot of others out there, and so we have to move fast have to be smart about what we do and how we get there. And so one piece of this, you know, wireframes and prototyping and a lot of the visual designer research is a big piece of this, but i think part of the vision was taking the data that exists in spicing that in ways and making it more accessible that’s ever been done before you’re tuned to non-profit radio tony martignetti also hosts a podcast for the chronicle of philanthropy fund-raising fundamentals is a quick ten minute burst of fund-raising insights published once a month. Tony’s guests are expert in crowdfunding mobile giving event fund-raising direct mail and donor cultivation, really, all the fund-raising issues that make you wonder, am i doing this right? Is there a better way there is? Find the fund-raising fundamentals archive it. Tony martignetti dot com that’s marketmesuite n e t t i remember there’s, a g before the end, thousands of listeners have subscribed on itunes. You can also learn maura, the chronicle website, philanthropy dot com fund-raising fundamentals, the better way. Dahna on what we have today is as we start, you know, we’re iterating and it’s alive tool, and we’re optimizing and taking real time learnings, but what we’ve done, i think probably the leapfrog on anything else sort of in the same space is we have gone along yards the hard yards on slicing that data in a new way because i’m thinking this is very technical data research, trial data. We’re trying to siphon it down and make it user yes, simplified user friendly how do we how do we take on that kind of is this for you? Back-up how do we how do we do that? We actually from our sort of user acceptances and engagements and all the different inputs that we got, we pretty much knew that we just had to get the data to the individual that was goal. So we had to put a geographic sort of indicator or what we call a zip co finder alright, so ah, a new patient would come on to our website type in looking for a pancreatic cancer clinical trial type in the zip code it’s a simple is that in hit enter, i mean and then a list of pancreatic cancer trials within their zip code would pop up means that simple. And we took us federations to get to that simplicity. But that’s sort of the journey we went through that, yes. That’s the objective. Now, this jack make it that simple that’s, right? But that that data did take a long journey because i think in the beginning it existed purely at the pancreatic cancer trial finder office on a computer. And then from there, we went to the cloud. We use the rack space to be able to host that information, and they were a great partner and being able to get that information up and running and fast access. Okay, major, major background noise. That that’s fine. This’s real times live. Yeah, we’re in the exhibit hall and exhibits are still being set up. So whatever noise you may hear like that yeah. You know, it’s spartan parcel of setting up the exhibit floor before you all enter. So this is what happens you’re we’re covering it live. We got plates crashing, we got forklift so that there’s teaspoons we got a full tea set. Yeah, so? So then the data went into the cloud, and then we had to be able to take that data that was still being used internally by the pancreatic cancer action at work team to talk to people and individuals on the phone. We had to use that same data and publicly interface that for people to do searches on, and so we had to build what’s called an ap i interface and what that is is just a conduit to be able to take that data that’s internal and bring it live. Teo, a public facing website to be able to see on a website real time subsume to this conversation is you need technical help to do this to take a large data set, make it manageable for end users who are not technical technical people, right? We’re talking about trial data that was is written by professional by researchers, right by phds and researcher, not just correct. We’re trying to bring it down usability for people who have thank you out of cancer than more there or family member non-technical people so this can be done, but well, you need help even more challenging than that was that we had to bring it not only for non-technical people, but also for health care professionals, doctors, researchers and so they understand the technical parts of it. So we had to be able to interface to two audiences, technical and non-technical okay, let’s, see a little more about that, about having accessibility to multiple levels of sophistication around data. Who who can we could speak to how you how you organize that? Sure. So, yeah, so we already have the expertise in house that we take, you know, very dense clinical information, and we pare it down to lay lay language, essentially for anybody to understand with a high school education or even less and that’s really geared toward our patients and family members, we still keep it very technical and clinical for the health care professionals. So the challenge was to have this tool accommodate two very distinct groups of people, but tohave one tool to fit their distinct needs. And so we actually created to kind of entry points into our clinical trial finder to a comedy thes two distinct groups based on their level of expertise. We need some technical tools to help us to do all this who’s best to speak, to start, talk to the what some tools work, i can start it out well, from a from a programmatic standpoint, well, let’s even go back further to when we were starting to conceptualize thie piece, we use the tool called actor to be able to prototyping, and not only those those static wireframes be ableto bring those wireframes toe life toe where you could even put those on a website and be able to click around and then from there we quickly move teo html five, which is, you know, sort of the new protocol for front and web development, and that allowed us like to build those prototypes in html five and then take that same code and build out the actual tool using dot net at the back end structure and then host on rack space for all the cloud infrastructure way had to do a lot of scrubbing of the data, to be able to make that consumable to the patient and make them feel comfortable, you know? As portia said in the beginning of this session, pancreatic cancer, the survival rate is extremely low and not only that there’s very little time for these people, and so we want them to feel as comfortable as possible. And so we had to sort of taylor that content to be comfortable to them, to be able to quickly get to acceptance of, you know, the fact that they might be able to do a trial on be ableto end up maybe saving a life. Okay, we now i made us digress a little bit from our chronology. We were at the it’s. Fine. We’ll get back. We always come back as we rittereiser wireframe and and testing well, not testing a product, but early testing stage. What comes after we have feedback from the users. And of course, the users now, i realise, include technical medical staff as well as families and patients. What comes next is we started as they start to get feedback. We go, you know, into the next round of generation of revision implying obviously, the learnings we have starting to apply visual design based on, you know, brandeis lines and some of the cues that we take directly from the pancreatic cancer action network’s branding working with the, you know, marketing team as well, making sure that we’re expressing what that looks like in the right voice and tone. And then we start to layer content, strategy and actual, you know, calls to action and how this thing’s gonna look and work and feel to tom’s point we want this to be accessible. I think if you put yourself or try to put yourself in the shoes of somebody that may be, has just left the doctor’s office with this diagnosis, you know, you need a tool and you need to be able to get through it, and he needs to be not something that you don’t understand or too complicated to kind of use, so starting to apply content, strategy and visual designed to push the prototype further. This, tom said, studying to apply some of the front end’s, starting to build things in html five and starting to actually mold this thing into, you know, sort of a real version of the, you know, the first real version of what it’s going to really be using some, you know, dummy data and things like that to make sure it’s powered but that we still have some flexibility and ability be nimble along the way in that structure, and during this time i think i think one of the big important issues that tack sort of helped us understand mohr as an agency and we realize now is so important is security of that data and being sure that that layer of security is on their so that, you know, we’re not we’re not losing any kind of patient information, you know, these these people are putting up their information about themselves in a public facing way, and so we just want to make sure that that data is locked down and secure. So as part of that sort of security, we cognizant lee knew that we had to provide privacy. I mean, people are coming, they’re in a serious situation, and we went in to ensure them that their information that they provide was secure. So from the get go we designed, we actually went out to the market place, and we knew as a non-profit we could not bring on staff, we couldn’t tilt up servers, we couldn’t do this security, so we went out to the market place, and we selected rackspace. As that partner, that would build out the infrastructure and provide the security. The other thing is, as we built out the security infrastructure, one thing we also wanted to insure was performance. We wanted to make sure if the person’s on a pc laptop mobile device that this information was going to be quick and easy, so part of tom and trevor and porsche when their private providing the ease of use perspective, i was worried about performance because i needed this information be quick and easy and accessible and guaranteed to be up at all times across devices that surround responsive. Okay, attack. How long does this process take? From the time that you decided? Okay, we’re going to listen to these constituents who have been clamouring for this to the time you got something that you were comfortable putting out to the public and probably still continues to evolve. Probably never done. But you know from okay, we’re going to take this on two. We’ve got version one point. Oh, and it’s available to the public. How long was that? You know, my involvement came about three years ago. I was tasked to bring the clinical trial. Data based to the cloud. So that was the first thing i had to do. So that was the internal perspective. Our long term goal was to make it public facing. So keeping behind our firewall internally wasn’t goingto do that. So we had them move it to the cloud. So that was the first thing. Once we push the product to the cloud existing product, we built the security structure. We ensured that i was working properly. Then that’s when we sort of said, okay, springbox and team, how do we take the next step? How do we start? Prototyping duvette helping. And how long how long should people expect? Well, how long you know, just kottler project from that. It was from two and a half to three years at least. Yeah. And, um, yeah, i was gonna say portia probably dreams and gan charts. So she’s probably actually the best person teo tends to the question, but yeah. I mean, i think it was a couple of years and in depending sort of on the phases as we i went through in to find, you know, there was a lot of research. Obviously we had to be. Done. And once the research phase is out of the way, we were able to move quicker and other pieces. And yes, to your point, it still it still goes on. Okay, gant charts get yourself out of georgia. Everybody’s. Not a project. Project manager what’s a gamma man can’t explain it. It’s it’s, a line by line series of events that help you map out tasks across timelines. Okay, help. Shoretz shows dependencies to just dependencies and parallel deliver. But it has happened before. You know where you can happen. Okay, okay. Wait. We still have ah, good number of, you know, minutes left together. Let’s start too let’s say we start to move to success. I mean, our measurement, you know, you’ve got these two very different constituencies. Although very inter related. How do we know whether this has served their needs at version one point? Oh, not not today. When it was first launched, how do we start to get feedback? Sure, i’m so when we launched it to the public. I mean, feedback was instantaneous because the clinical trial finder is connected to our internal database. So as people are using the tool and requested information that would come into our cue on the back inside for us to interface with the patients. Our google analytics shows the traffic to the site. How many people are our visiting? How many people are completing searches? We have so far. It’s it’s, it’s coming on it’s one year birthday, thie end of next month so we’ve had so far sixteen thousand unique users, which is amazing. We have a lot of qualitative feedback from patients and families, they’re telling us that being able to use this tool has made him feel empowered, you know, for a disease that takes so much a way for them to be able to use something and feel like, wow, there’s actually options for me so many times, these patients are not being told of these options by their doctors, so to be able to go to their doctor with information and say, i found these trials that i could be eligible for help me connect to them. How are you getting this feedback from from patients and families? Surveys are calling your you interviewing a subset it’s actually a combination of all i mean, we’re on the phone with them daily, so we hear verbal feedback, we get written feedback, we have surveys, we have postcards. We just got a lot of, you know, just feedback that they practically sent to us to say thank you that we’re providing them hope we’re making them feel empowered. They’re grateful that we’re here for them. They’re grateful that they have access to this information and it’s, not something that we would have necessarily heard if we hadn’t provided this tool to the public. Yeah, of course you would not have. They wouldn’t have had access to it. Anyone else want talk about measurement? Course we can talk about. The national statistics are sort of success. Oh, yes. So for adult cancer patients for a clinical trial participation glow art nationally, it’s three to four percent. And what we’re finding with our program is that we’re seeing about fifteen percent of patients are reporting that there actually enrolling in a trial based on the information we’re giving them. So when you compare three to four percent nationally across all cancer types and for this disease fifteen percent, i mean it’s a significant significant improvement, and we’re really impressing the medical community for this disease to see, oh my gosh, like you guys were doing something that you were told could not be achievable, and we’re achieving it. How about some lessons? Learned? What? What didn’t go the way you expected to have to pivot? Maybe somewhere we haven’t heard from tom for a while? Yeah, i think a big lesson that we learned as an agency working with a company like the pink ah non-profit like the pancreatic cancer action at work is that, you know, this is like, like you said earlier, this is really, really complicated data and in order to do, you know, a top notch job, you’ve got to jump in headfirst and understand that data inside and out, and so there was so much work up front really getting to know all about, you know, all the different aspects, you know, i would say there was maybe two hundred data points across the data when you talk about patient information and when you talk about trial information and health care professionals, and we had to manage all of that data and make sure that everything is working smoothly. And so what was it, maura? Front time learning the data set. That lots of upfront times, but it’s, you know, understanding their process with the patients when they’re on the phone and the different data points that they’re collecting and what’s important to them and what’s not important to them, you know, the different parts of the tool that or the data that maybe they’re not using as much versus some of the data that’s crucial that we must track things like that. Another part of the experience that i thought was was pretty eye opening. And what sort of new for the day was doing mobile first design and so knowing that you know what way? Have vacuum cleaners now. Thank you. Exhibit floor car it’s so clean need to be clean. They need to be clean. So clean. That’s a vacuum. Wait. We could hear each other. Yeah. Yeah. It’s fine. So yeah. So this is one of the first protects. Well, first where? You know, we knew that within about a year and a half to two years the mobile traffic was going to surpass the death top traffic. And so we went ahead and designed ah, on a mobile first platform. So starting with the mobile phone. Doing that design and the working up to tablet and desktop from there ever anything lessons learned? Andi, i think it goes back to we learn new things every day. I think some of the parts that poor shows speaking to around success have been surprising and have really challenged us in what we do with the tool now that it’s live. And now that we’re iterating and optimizing, we have been known to bend and potentially break our own tool via demand. Oh, and that was something i think that, you know is it’s horrible problem, but sort of a great problem to have in some sense, right? We’re driving more people to this great resource. Oh, and that has been something that we’ve been working through. I mean, i think we’ve got some good solutions in place and have done so, but that was, i think, a surprise along the way as we went again, i think going back to that rackspace conversation, working with those guys to figure out like, how did we really just get ahead of this and solve it? But and there’s been a lot of things, you know? We’re talking about one system. That integrates were only one system, but it integrates with all of these other systems that are also all unique and very complex on. And so it sort of is, you know, we get into these positions where you want to add a thing or change a thing. Oh, and it’s not just a simple as adding or changing a thing, right? We’ve got to go into the source data, we’ve got to go into the the place where the data is output her story, we’ve got altum also alter those data sets and tables and structures and things like that. So a lot of sort of pandora’s box type problems along the way, but all all great learning’s to solve, and i think we’re getting more scaleable everyday, you know, a cz we continue to optimize oppcoll alright, attack. I’m gonna leave you with the last word. We just have about fifteen, twenty seconds. Vice president information technology of the organization that took this on. What would you like to leave listeners with if they’re anticipating a project like similar it’s? Really coming down to just teamwork amongst all the different agencies? All different parties involved keeping an open mind and really, really just communicating continuously because with this type of design and the need to get it out to the public, it had to be very rapid. And so there were times where tom and i are kind of at what’s going, wait, just go back and forth, but we’ve worked through it will come to a good conclusion. So it’s, just the open communication, teamwork, outstanding great way to leave it closest to me is tom hudson, and tom is the give me a clue, of course. Technical director of thirteen twenty three, then is tak fuji he’s, vice president information technology at the pancreatic cancer action network. Porsche james is senior manager, clinical initiatives, pancreatic cancer action network and please remind us. Trevor kale, you are chief engagement officer it’s springbox thank you very much. Thank you, thank you. Ready non-profit radio coverage of sixteen ntcdinosaur twenty sixteen non-profit technology conference thanks so much to you for being with us. Small data rocks coming up first pursuant, check out their fund-raising management tools. They fill your potential donor pipeline and keep your tasks prioritized and aiming toward your fund-raising goal. Their tools are smart, intuitive, easy. 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And you shouldn’t be intimidated by the jargon. I give you lots of ideas for getting started on planned giving in my video don’t be in the woods and that’s at tony martignetti dot com that’s tony’s take two the live listen love, you know it’s got to go out it’s coming every week, you know that live love to the many listeners who are out there right now fromthe cities and countries you know who you are right now, you’re listening and i thank you so much. I mean, now when we play now, then you’re playing. Then now you’re listening now, then latto to the show that then on, but we’re doing it now. But then that’s you the podcast pleasantries, they go out, they go out every week, right in the back of the live listen, love all those over ten thousand listeners pushing eleven thousand and sometimes actually, we peak it. Ah, little over twelve thousand, but on the average over ten thousand very grateful pleasantries to the podcast audience as vast as it is, and those affiliate affections to our am and fm listeners throughout the country, affections to you and your am and fm stations for carrying the show on their weekly schedule. Here we have. Steph mcallister and andy are gassed, also from ntcdinosaur welcome to tony martignetti non-profit radio coverage of sixteen ntc, of course, that’s, the non-profit technology conference, and also this is part of ntc conversations. We’re in san jose, of course, at the convention center, and my guests are steph mcallister and andy are gassed. We’re going to get to them very shortly. First, after highlight my swag item for this interview. It’s from firefly. It is a key chain with an led light and also a very powerful whistle standby. It’s actually still echoing i think the echo is done now. Ok, wei had this to the swag pile for the day and it’s in all right. Steph mcallister is the city is seated next to me. She’s, the manager of systems and impact reporting at framework foundation. And andy argast is national program manager and digital strategist for the tech razor program at the framework foundation. Ladies welcome. Thank you. Thank you for having us. My pleasure. Your seminar topic is forget big it’s all about small data. Andy let’s, start with you. What? This is not what we hear about. We don’t hear about small data now. Why are you causing trouble? Because, well, we like to be like to challenge things a little bit. Okay, so small data as opposed to a big data, really is all about the idea that organizations can use the data they’re generating everyday in the work that they do and small data is data that human countable it’s, actionable and it’s understandable by the organizations that are using it. We already have it way already. Haven’t we already have it? Yes, it’s all around us. And what we what we really wanted to talk about in the session today, and i think that we did is not only do we already have it, but we can put the infrastructure in place to actually do amazing things with it if we’re a little bit strategic voted okay, we’re going to learn about that of the next twenty five minutes. So anything you want to add step to the overview report? Sure. So one of the things you wanted to accomplish with this session was also doing people some hands on actual things that they khun dio to start collecting, collecting their small data, so getting them using tools that do a lot of this for them automatically, and so taking a lot of the burden off rather than saying small data zoho further burden on your on your organization. Okay, well, let’s, jump in. What? What, what, what? What types of data are we talking about? That we already have that we should be using. So it could be something as simple is how many volunteers you have on staff and it’s it’s? Odd. Especially if you have a medium sized organization. You might not know these kinds of numbers off top. Of your head, or what percentage of them do a particular type of work for the organization or knowing what your top ten donors are at any given time in real time? S o that kind of information is coming in to you through c s v s and excel files, which might be complex and are being analyzed. But you have it there, and you can do some pretty simple things to get that information. What amount of that you’re just gonna know off the top of your head. Something like like the donor. David, you know that information who’s your top ten donors? Depending on your job in the organization, you may very well be able to recall that in your sleep, you may. You may be able to, but you would be surprised, especially in real time. You know, you might have a lot of donors coming in and a different basis. And you might think, you know, that’s. Okay. Yeah. So and you know that you might think that you know those top ten and you make a good point that you, depending on your job, you might know that. But having something like an organizational dashboard, where myself in sort of a night position, might have access to that information as well. So there’s this kind of openness, even within the organization for everybody have access to this information numbers, not just the specialists like organization. Andi, what can we do with this? Well, there’s a lot that can be done, i think, though, that i just wanted to take, like, a little step back and sort of turned to my earlier point because there was something that i forgot to mention with chaillou that when we talk about small data, were sort of what we want to do is demystify that term because there’s so much buzz around the idea of big data, and i think that what set small data part is that, you know, unlike big data where you need a machine typically to process and you’re talking about petabytes exabytes of data, which is huge, and obviously, no one person could do that small data is the, you know, it’s stuff was saying it’s in those excel sheets, and it might be top of mind, but it really is that sort of tangible, you know, information and data that were that. Were working with, and i think that so to as to go back to your question, what we can do with it is sort of anything that you want to do with it to achieve the goals of your organization. It really depends on what kind of knot for-profit you’re working at and what sort of strategies and objectives you have in place. So we try to be a little bit technology chick about that in terms of saying you should or shouldn’t do this with it, rather just saying what? What is it that you want to ultimately achieve and then work back from there and set up the infrastructure and put the processes in place so that you’re collecting that data to to achieve those particular goals? Ok, so we should start with our goals then andy, what is it? What is it? We’d like tio have people be aware of what outcomes we would like to measure. So we start with our goals. Okay? Differently. Okay. Okay. Once we have our goals in place than well, then what? We identify the data that is going to help us get there. Absolutely. I think. It’s what am i? Doing the right track, you know, this is this is perfect. So so what it is is it’s ah, thank you with a data dummy perfect train him in the next twenty minutes. Eso what were and that you know, our target with small data’s people that may not have the level of data literacy that they think they need to have, and it really makes that accessible. So one thing we want to do is get him thinking about a systems overhaul. So as much as we’re saying this is small data it’s, actionable, it’s easy, it does involve a transformation of the organization, and one of the things is getting your team together to decide what those data points are. What do you actually need to collect rather than falling back on? We need to collect absolutely everything, or we’re overwhelmed, and we’re not going to collect anything s o bringing those together for us. The first up to the system overhaul is taking on cloud computing tools who, by and large, we’ll focus on collecting these small data points and making it really easy for you to report on them. So it made it may not be you know how we’re going to collect this data ourselves, but what tool allows us to do that? So instead of selling tickets by email, were going to use an online ticketing tool where we can export all of our ticket sales? So some of these air are smaller, easier changes to make, but that’s what we’re recommending as a starting point, okay, using tools to capture the data, absolutely being thoughtful, but at the start of a program or project rather than at the end, when you’re funders asking you, you know, how many tickets did you cellar, you know, maybe that’s something that basic, but any data point they’re asking you for? You planned to capture that before you even started the project. Okay, do you have some recommendations for different tools that way can be using for capture? Absolutely. So we do, depending on what you’re trying to capture something like, i guess i’m bringing up tickets so things like eventbrite, our universe, which was recently acquired by ticketmaster. A lot of those have freemium options. Eso freeman just means that you have a free option and especially if you’re a small organization to use them if you’re wanting, teo capture even basic data using surveys, survey tools for things other than simple, like feedback surveys is a way to get other people to do your data entry for you. So if you have volunteers coming into your center and you want to capture data, getting them to fill out a simple form like a google form or surveymonkey is a sign in that will structure your data for you in ways that are really simple and actually free in those andy anything, any data captured tools you want toe? What ad? I think steph covered off a lot of them we use in our own work. We do use the google suite a fair bit because it is available as a free free for not-for-profits or registered charities on we really said we try and sort of being a listing about the tools, whatever works for a particular organization, but we really do encourage people to pick tools that are cloud based, but also to think about where it will get them in a couple of of years because technology changes quickly and we want to ensure that in, you know, five years down the road. That they’re not going to be saddled with something that they can’t export their data from, for instance, that there is sort of like in is an escape plan, and staff has always found of saying that she has an escape plan for all of the tools that we work within our own organization, which i think is a good idea to talk about the escape plan in one second. I just want people know that that was not god speaking way have we have not embodied him or it where the were in the convention center at ntc? That was an announcement, i think about lunch people queueing up so important running it was nothing more, nothing more independent than that. It was just a lunch announcement, okay, what about the back door escape? Non-cash whatever you’d like, tio and every kind of okay escape hatch, so this escape so escape hatches. So one of the benefits, as is and he said, is we really like people to use cloud computing. They’re often affordable, theirs, they’re rapidly expanding and changing and, you know, great things there is coming out. They often talk to each other, so data transfer is great. But one of the downsides is, you know, a lot of these air small start up sometimes, you know, a company’s fail and succeeded different levels. So it’s. Good. You know, if you have any of these tools knowing how you will move to a new tool if if something better comes out okay. So, you know, before you purchase saying okay, what is my worst case scenario? This whole company goes under? I’m not using this cloud to anymore. What is my action plan to get us, you know, onto a new platform onto a new tool. Not to say that that kind of thing happens often, but it’s, good to prepare for that when you’re living in a really fast paced technology could say it’s a part of your your disaster recovery plan. Exactly. Risk-alternatives recovery. Okay, okay. All right. So that we were the capture. St wei had some tools for capture. What? What else should we be thinking about in a small daily s o thinking about how to communicate the data effectively share it had a share in the organization outside the organization. And both, yeah, funders, but also leadership thunders leaders. Whoever donors for us, it’s really important the general public understand the transparency of our organization, so we actually have our data from we have largely centralized database of all of our program stats, we share that in real time on our website that’s something we encourage other people to dio but making it whenever you’re communicating externally, making it accessible to people. So when we talk about data literacy, understanding your audiences, various levels of data literacy, so some of the recommendations we gave it our talk were things like, you know, is this tweet herbal, if you ask your mom about this chart of the stats, are this data she understand it? Or, you know, somebody that’s not steeped in your organization? Can they understand and get something from sharing any other about some of this sharing tools that framework foundation is using? So we use a lot, but i think i want to make a point about sort of about the quality of the data as well as it relates to communicating. So i think we’re talking about, you know, ways that you can communicate it but it’s really important for organizations to consider the share ability or the openness of that data sort of as a characteristic of the data itself, so if you’re thinking about different types of data, some data, you don’t want to share it all, so that would be like hr data or personal data, like anything that’s person identifiable, you’re not sharing that within the organization, but once you move into the realm of share data, so stuff you’re going to be sharing with stakeholders, like using some of the tools that staff mentioned, then you want to start thinking about how you can share that, and then sort of the furthest end from close data would be the idea of open data, so releasing, you know, sets of data for other people to reuse. So, like any of the tools, that could be that so using share data, for instance, could be any of the infographic tools we use picked a chart at our own organization chart, picked a chart like a with a k s o the nice thing about picture chart is that you can connect it to google sheets and so it’s seth is mentioning the idea of updating data in real time, so instead of just watching numbers change in a spreadsheet that you can watch her change. Excellent. Okay, so it sort of it pushes it sort of not it’s typically not immediate, but sort of it, you know, cycle through every few hours, and then you’ll see those turns. Actually. So for instance, if you had people, you know, sending you a customer satisfaction surveys you, khun see those charts, like how many people you know, actually gave your session. Ah fei, vote of ten are the ten out of ten. You can see those charts updated in real time, which is pretty exciting for small organizations that want to prove the sort of impact that they’re having in a particular community to say, like a thunder, for instance, you don’t have to, you know, wait till the end of the year to give them more report. They could be like, oh, you can just, you know, hop onto the website and take a look right now, okay, excellent. Other tools that you’re using it the framework. So what about anybody? Well, we use a lot of use somebody tio we’re sharing stage. Okay, so as far as that s o r centralized database is sales force, so we use a tool and there’s a lot of sales force people here or people that use sales force. We use a tool called cloud h q. And what that allows you to do is take what is essentially closed data at the time, it’s any of your internal database information and pull reports sales force and put that onto something like google sheet that that can be represented through something like picked a chart info. Graham is also a version of picked a chart that’s really useful, but i’m in a programme in program so it’s out of info gr dot a m info graham s o there also a really great one, but it’s finding those tools that help you bridge between where the data is being stored so on our cases salesforce database to whatever tool using to visualize it and those air examples of doing that in real time. You also can do that really inexpensively with excel like anyone’s who’s, a really great excel user and and understands formulas they can take those reports and make them into really beautiful visualizations that maybe aren’t real time but are really impactful on useful. So no matter what your skills that is there some really great visualization tools, okay, no, what else? What else would we be talking about? Capture sharing what else we got think talking more about a little bit about how to use these sorts of things that interns internally, not just externally, okay, so we tend to focus on you know, we have to prove to funders or stakeholders how well we’re doing in our successes, but we don’t talk about using these to make cases to each other so internally, so but between departments or two decisionmakers, you’re bored and how you can use visualizations to get them interested on dh for us. The example we gave in our session was actually using visualizations and, in our case, a dashboard to make the case for small day that your organization so actually using a small data example to to sell the idea that you need to make an infrastructure investment by organization to do this kind of small data capture. Like what you’re hearing a non-profit radio tony’s got more on youtube, you’ll find clips from stand up comedy tv spots and exclusive interviews catch guests like seth gordon, craig newmark, the founder of craigslist marquis of eco enterprises, charles best from donors choose dot org’s aria finger do something that worked and they are levine from new york universities heimans center on philanthropy tony tweets to he finds the best content from the most knowledgeable, interesting people in and around non-profits to share on his stream. If you have valuable info, he wants to re tweet you during the show. You can join the conversation on twitter using hashtag non-profit radio twitter is an easy way to reach tony he’s at tony martignetti narasimhan t i g e n e t t i remember there’s a g before the end he hosts a podcast for the chronicle of philanthropy fund-raising fundamentals is a short monthly show devoted to getting over your fund-raising hartals just like non-profit radio, toni talks to leading thinkers, experts and cool people with great ideas. As one fan said, tony picks their brains and i don’t have to leave my office fund-raising fundamentals was recently dubbed the most helpful non-profit podcast you have ever heard, you can also join the conversation on facebook, where you can ask questions before or after the show. The guests were there, too. Get insider show alerts by email, tony tells you who’s on each week and always includes link so that you can contact guest directly. To sign up, visit the facebook page for tony martignetti dot com. I’m jonah helper, author of date your donors. And you’re listening to tony martignetti non-profit radio. Big non-profit ideas for the other ninety five percent. So okay, so creating a dashboard to make the case for free dashboard there. Exactly. So what we did was we and we do this a lot of organization is, you know, when we want something, we’ll hack it together until someone else makes it. So what we said is you have fractured data set that your organization, i know you have excel files and you have, you know, things that you can export from tools you’re using and but you don’t have a dashboard and also dashboards i find, especially with aids and boardmember is a love that idea they’re coming out of oftentimes of business, intelligence, environment where those air really powerful so what you can do is it again, it may not be real time. It may not be the final product that you want, but you can turn those into what we did is actually used google sheets to create it that dashboard with some images, some numbers, some comparisons and put that together and said, you know, this is something you guys can put together show to your board showed your executive director and say, you know, this is the kind of, you know, in business intelligence we can have about organization and andy, what kind of reaction did you get when you did that? So it was really interesting, so we ask for a show of hands, esso. Before we presented the dashboard, we asked for a show of hands who thought that they had fractured data, so thinking about, like data, that silo door kept in separate buckets and sew it more than one day to source it’s actually not talking to each other. So you have isolated on a spreadsheet for exactly on a spreadsheet, or even having you noah database for donors and a database for your volunteers and not having any correlation, because sometimes your donors might be your volunteers on, and we had an overwhelming majority of people in the room raise their hands when we ask them if they had fractured data sets. So i really think that the idea of a dashboard resonates with people because, you know, i mean, who doesn’t love, you know, graphics, individuals and being able to sort of see everything right in front of you. But i think that there’s quite a lot of power and having sort of an overview of thie information that’s flowing in into and out of your organization rather than sort of having to go t chase it down. And so what we presented is a it’s a you know, open source template. Anybody can go in, we give them the link. They can go in and repurpose it. The formulas are all in there, so all they would need to do is paste in their own data. And they could actually just create one were away. So how could we share that with listeners? Is that possible? So we have a bit late for that? A bentley so that its bit lee forward slash small data dashboard and that’s all want lower case. So bentley forward slash small data dashboard. All data dashboard. Okay, excellent. So there’s a template? Yeah, right. What was the reaction at framework foundation to the dashboard that you cobbled together? Uh, so we weigh this wasn’t one. We actually used test data for this. So we didn’t use our own way. We do use dashboards at our organization for a multitude of i mean, when you were trying to make the case for small data at framework foundation, what was the reaction tell your to your pitch were pretty data informed, i guess i would say organization s o we’re pretty lucky in the fact that even though we are quite small that we do work entirely in the cloud that that we know don’t really need to sell it that hard. I think more it’s less an idea of selling the idea of small data and more the idea of just creating that, that culture in the organization where people know that, for instance, if it’s not in sales for us, which is which is our database, it doesn’t exist, so making sure that those work habits are in place because, even though did it doesn’t form our overall program objectives it’s hard to sort of injured that everybody is working in the same way we’re all individuals way inherited it from our founder thiss idea, like he was very much a pioneer in the nonprofit sector in canada, especially in this in this space, so we encourage that through the tag razor program to other organizations. So we we’ve been at the organization about three years or so, so we haven’t had to make the case, certainly for new employees, we often make the case when we’re introducing them to our philosophy as an organization, but no, we’re very fortunate in having not had to make thie case ourselves. Okay, okay, i understand back-up we’re talking about a good number of things, any other tools that we should be should be sharing the people i think you have tons of resource is right. I mean, i love the template for the way we get a few bentleys and in their presentation, what else? What else could we share with listeners? Other tools? Resource gosh, that there’s there’s so many wonderful tools out there on dh there’s, lots of great organizations that curate those tools for you. So tek soo who’s, a big sponsor here that people should be familiar with great place to go to first, they do a great job of organizing if you know the type of tool that you want to go out, but yeah, i really think the best advice i’d give is less an actual tool as an approach to tools don’t look for tools that air just for non-profits look for tools that and that are available to anybody and find out how. They can work at your non-profit. Okay. Okay, andy, anything about tools? Resource is you want to share. So i guess the only thing that always pops mine because it’s, a personal favorite of mine, is that there is an open source tool called raw raw. All right, w yeah. And i believe it’s raw dot i oh, i want to say, but that’s, right, i think, which is an open source data visualization tool and creates really, like, quite sophisticated and beautiful data visualizations with almost no riel data visualization skills required. And you can just take a data sheet and pasted into into the web site, and it doesn’t save any of your data. And then it gives you a bunch of different parameters to choose from and you can create, like, really good looking, like super cool data visualizations in, like, five to ten minutes. This is amazing, like, like, like infographics. So these are more like if you think about the like, you know, the scattered charts and, like, it’ll show, like the different sizes of the data balls and that sort of thing. Word trees, thes heir not the right terms because i’m not a data visualization expert, but definitely more on the actual viz lizzie’s inside, then an infographic so less a story that’s illustrated with pictures, but more like a genuine representation of your data in a visual form. Okay, wrong rock, and embed a bull on your website, which is really great if you want to share those insights. Oh externally definitely embedded it’s, an italian organisation, i think our coalition that’s put it together so oh, and tableau as well, which you didn’t mention. So missed to not mention tableau or tableaux public last shot. Go ahead, go ahead so tableau again, much more targeted towards statisticians, but really great. If you want to do mapping visualizations, google maps a cz well, you could make your my maps through google, so if you’re wanting, if you’re coveting anybody’s sort of map of their stakeholders or their engagement, you can do some really simple up loads of cs fees and have it sort of rendered onto a map. So if you want to pinpoint same member organizations of your non-profit, you can do that as well. So those two tools are great and tableau you could get a really great rebate through. Texas, which coming there’s a ton of stuff you could do with mapping the density of your donors? Absolutely. Of your volunteers, population centers of your donors around your different offices. Yeah. Okay, yeah. Blow tableaux and my maps. So that’s under google and yeah, and there’s really great. If you’re using wordpress, there’s, some great plug ins where you can style eyes those google maps, they don’t look like google maps so you can fool people into thinking it’s something that you magically coded yourself, which is that many of those plug it. The names are escaping me. But if you go teo wordpress huggins for my maps or google maps there’s, several really great ones and there’s examples to see what could work for you. Alright, excellent. Great. I love all the resource. We’re gonna leave it there. Great. Thank you very much. Thank you. Mcallister. Steph is manager of systems and impact reporting at the framework foundation. And also if the framework foundation is andy argast she’s national program manager and digital strategist for the tech razor program there. This is tony martignetti non-profit radio coverage of sixteen ntcdinosaur non-profit technology conference. Thank you so much for being with us next week, boost revenue with donorsearch vase and discovery visits. If you missed any part of today’s show, i beseech you, find it on tony martignetti dot com. Responsive by pursuing online tools for small and midsize non-profits data driven and technology enabled. Pursuant dot com, and by we be spelling supercool spelling bee fundraisers, we be spelling dot com. Our creative producers, claire meyerhoff. Sam liebowitz is on the board as the line producer. Gavin dollars are am and fm outreach director. The show’s social media is by susan chavez, and this music is by scott stein. Be with me next week for non-profit radio. Big non-profit ideas for the other ninety five percent. Go out and be great. What’s not to love about non-profit radio tony gets the best guests check this out from seth godin this’s the first revolution since tv nineteen fifty and henry ford nineteen twenty it’s the revolution of our lifetime here’s a smart, simple idea from craigslist founder craig newmark yeah insights, orn presentation or anything people don’t really need the fancy stuff they need something which is simple and fast. When’s the best time to post on facebook facebook’s andrew noise nose at traffic is at an all time hyre on nine a m or eight pm so that’s when you should be posting your most meaningful post here’s aria finger ceo of do something dot or ge young people are not going to be involved in social change if it’s boring and they don’t see the impact of what they’re doing so you gotta make it fun and applicable to these young people look so otherwise a fifteen and sixteen year old they have better things to dio they have xbox, they have tv, they have their cell phones me dar is the founder of idealist took two or three years for foundation staff sort of dane toe add an email. Address their card. It was like it was phone. This email thing is fired-up that’s, why should i give it away? Charles best founded donors choose dot or ge somehow they’ve gotten in touch kind of off line as it were on dh and no two exchanges of brownies and visits and physical gift. Mark echo is the founder and ceo of eco enterprises. You may be wearing his hoodies and shirts. Tony talked to him. Yeah, you know, i just i i’m a big believer that’s not what you make in life. It zoho, you know, tell you make people feel this is public radio host majora carter. Innovation is in the power of understanding that you don’t just put money on a situation expected to hell. You put money in a situation and invested and expect it to grow and savvy advice for success from eric sacristan. What separates those who achieve from those who do not is in direct proportion to one’s ability to ask others for help. The smartest experts and leading thinkers air on tony martignetti non-profit radio big non-profit ideas for the other ninety five percent.

Nonprofit Radio for August 22, 2014: Integrate Social And CRM & Technology And Organizing

Big Nonprofit Ideas for the Other 95%

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Bryan Giese & Jenn Smith: Integrate Social And CRM 

With Bryan Giese and Jenn Smith at NTC
With Bryan Giese and Jenn Smith at NTC

How do you integrate social media data into your CRM database? What social media data should you preserve? I talked to Bryan Giese, Heller Consulting’s director of marketing, and Jenn Smith, Heller’s vice president of digital agency, at the Nonprofit Technology Conference (NTC).

 

 

 

 Austen Levihn-Coon & Rachel Butler: Technology And Organizing

With Austen Levihn-Coon and Rachel Butler at NTC
With Austen Levihn-Coon and Rachel Butler at NTC

Technology has created opportunities for organizing, but also challenges. Austen Levihn-Coon and Rachel Butler identify the challenges and how to overcome them. They share strategies to deepen engagement beyond petition signing and identify leaders in your community. Austen is chief innovation officer at Fission Strategy and Rachel is campaign representative for the Beyond Oil campaign at Sierra Club. We talked at NTC.

 

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