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Nonprofit Radio for July 6, 2018: Peer-To-Peer Peek & Poverty Porn

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Noah Barnett & Kenny Kane: Peer-To-Peer Peek
Our panel from the Nonprofit Technology Conference shares an overview of community-driven fundraising. How do you plan for, inspire and activate your supporters? They’re Noah Barnett from CauseVox and Kenny Kane with Testicular Cancer Foundation.

 

 

Amy Sample Ward: Poverty Porn
Amy Sample Ward returns to discuss the issues around graphic images and descriptions of poverty. How can you avoid the porn trap and white savior stereotyping, while telling compelling stories and advocating effectively? She’s our social media contributor and CEO of Nonprofit Technology Network (NTEN).

 

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Duitz hello and welcome to tony martignetti non-profit radio big non-profit ideas for the other ninety five percent, i’m your aptly named host. Oh, i’m glad you’re with me. I’d be thrown into righteous, sardonic ous if you expected me to smile when you say you missed today’s show peer-to-peer peak, our panel from the non-profit technology conference shares an overview of community driven fund-raising how do you plan for inspire and activate your supporters? They’re noah barnett from causevox and kenny kane with testicular cancer foundation and poverty porn. Amy sample ward returns to discuss the issues around graphic images and descriptions of poverty. How can you avoid the porn trap and white savior stereotyping while telling compelling stories and advocating effectively she’s, our social media contributor and ceo of the non-profit technology network, and ten tony take two a big lump of thanks responsive by pursuant full service fund-raising data driven and technology enabled tony dahna slash pursuant radio by wagner, cps guiding you beyond the numbers wagner, cps dot com and by telling by telus turning credit card processing into your passive revenue stream, tony dahna em a slash tony tell us, here are noah barnett and kenny. Kane from the non-profit technology conference welcome to tony martignetti non-profit radio coverage of twenty eighteen non-profit technology conference hashtag is eighteen ntc where the convention center in new orleans, louisiana. This interview, like all our ntcdinosaur views, is sponsored by network for good, easy to use donorsearch and fund-raising software for non-profits i guess now are noah barnett and candy cane. Noah is head of marketing for causevox and candy cane is, you know, the testicular cancer foundation. Gentlemen, welcome. Thanks for having us, this’s. Great talent. Yeah. No it’s. Great. Not that in ten things. Not great. It’s. Exceptional. Yeah. It’s. Exceptional. Thank you. And ten. Thank you. All right. Your workshop topic is community driven. Fund-raising how do you use peer-to-peer to cultivate dahna relationships and reach new donors? That sound familiar? Yeah, absolutely. We just wrapped up our session. We’re already done. Yeah, we’re all done outside. Yes. Yeah, we’re on the downswing. So this’s the after party’s victory last put both put it well, community driven fund-raising let’s, start with you, let’s. Start close to know what’s what’s not being done quite right. That non-profits could do better. Yeah, so i think what’s interesting is we’ve gone through a few shifts in fund-raising we went through this idea of there was, like, localized fund-raising back in the day, and then we went to mass fund-raising where we basically didn’t differentiate any of our appeals, we sent all that out. And now today, like, i think there’s a fundamental shift where we’ve moved into what we call the connected economy, where the lines between digital and offline are starting to blur, and that requires a shift in how we approach fund-raising and we see kind of a playbook for the connected economy is community driven. Fund-raising okay, b i like the way you you sort of set this up for us the lines between online and the physical world and our real life are blurring indeed, yeah, okay, so we’re bringing these things together? Yes, okay. Peer-to-peer community driven. Okay, yeah, we’re calling it the connected economy because we’re just connected to anybody anywhere, at any time, through technology and our lives are more connect xero never. So why shouldn’t our causes b similarly should should we be similarly connected to our cause is exactly through our community. Exactly. Okay, kenny, anything you want to add? To the start up? Yeah, i would just say that you know what? The testicular cancer foundation were really big on storytelling and creating compelling stories that resonate with our audience? Not only, you know, as someone who’s been through it as a caregiver myself, but, you know, we try to put ourselves on the other end of the computer screen or the phone. What have you where these stories will compel people to act compel people to donate compel people that take action? Okay, let’s, stay with you. You’re right, your description says and in fact, in bold face, your description says that you will share with us exactly how to do this. How did so where where should we start? Where we’ve been, you know, everybody sees peer-to-peer well, let me take a step back, my ok to synonymous eyes peer-to-peer and community fund-raising or you guys drawing a distinction between those two? Yeah, we’re definitely drawing in this sham. Please set. Educate me. Yeah, so i think what’s interesting is community driven fund-raising is what we’re calling the umbrella that lays over all the various aspects of fund-raising where your community of supporters are actually the key. Driver of success in the campaigns here, it appears your war is a tactic inside of that larger exactly and so in community driven fund-raising there’s kind of a scale of the different types of things that qualify as that that moves from organization led meaning, like the organization is starting a campaign like e-giving tuesday campaign, a crowdfunding campaign, an annual campaign all the way down to supporter initiated, which could be i’m wanna raise money for cancer. And i’m choosing to do that for the testicular cancer foundation. But i decided, as a supporter to do that, he didn’t created environment for me to do that was organic. Okay, thank you so well. Refrain from making those two synonymous. I’m being too narrow. Choosing one method. One tactic. Okay. All right, exactly how kenny. Where where did wish we get started? We yeah, so appealing. But i don’t know where to get going. Sure. So in this rolling in my last role, which was a broader young adult cancer non-profit called stupid cancer. The same rules apply. So you have people who are affected by cancer? Cancer was huge. Yes. Did you have in north, like millions of kids and engaged around. Um, i know you’re probably right way did pretty well. Yeah, it still exists. They’re still there. Still hammered away at it. He’s going to take a little he’s, one of the co founders of super cancer. Yeah. Ok, so? So the long story short is that my father was diagnosed at age fifty with testicular cancer, which put me on a path towards can frat advocacy in my early twenties. And about two years ago, my friend matt first learn who’s, the founder of testicular cancer foundations and eighty want move from new york latto austin i said, sure. Oh, and i’ve taken over testicular cancer foundation. Okay, but getting back to you know that the same rules apply where we serve people who are in a a disadvantage spot going through cancer. You know, whether it’s a survivor, the patient, the caregiver who is helping the person caregivers often forgot. Yes, characters need to take care of them. So i was here to be coddled and cared for one hundred percent. That was made. Uh, so what we do is we see these people go along a path of being recipients of the mission. Being beneficiaries of the mission, and then they come back, you know, to three years out and, you know, they decide they want either run a marathon or they want to create a cancerversary party cancerversary is a really big milestone where on the, you know, annual date of their diagnosis or when they finish treatment which everyone they choose people will give back, and typically they get back to the non-profit that help them? You know, i think it’s probably similar in all chronic health. I know what i know. An oncologist office where they have a bell, you ring the bell, your final treatment? Yeah, i’ve seen a bell if tina got probable. Yeah. It’s a great milestone, you know, on and i had my own i’m sympathetic to caregivers. I mean, i had some sense of it before this, but during the summer this past last year, summer and in the fall so october, my mom was declining and i was my mom. My dad and i were were caregivers and just watched her, and then she actually died early october of twenty seventeen, so i it was became even more became even more aware of how. You need to take care of yourself. I know. It’s just one component of what testicular cancer is doing. Share the caregivers. You know, i often think that they have to be selfless. Andi, can’t you cannot give up your own life, teo, give another to get to another. You’ll burn out there’s a lot of self care that goes into your caregiver. So when we talk about the community aspect of community and fund-raising, you know, and i’m so let the host tigress i’m sorry. Sorry about that. Sorry about mom. Thank you. Host back-up kottler disgust like, welcome to the show cubine xero all week so community german fund-raising candy cane is goingto yeah, so the same rules apply so people go through this process, they come back and for every person who was perhaps turned away from the person going through this acute episode of, you know, not episode, but a stretch of cancer treatment. What? Not whether somebody wanted to give them food or take them to the doctor’s appointment person kind of turned away community driven fund-raising is a great way to really activate your community of people who wanted to help you and in the past, we have created opportunities for fundraisers to convert into things like travel scholarships to a patient conference. So if you’re this arrive, er, you could fund-raising within your community to raise money for travel reimbursement, so it’s not necessarily scholarship, is a little bit more democratic of a process scholarship can get a little tricky. So this skull, this reimbursement program that we did it stupid cancer actually allowed the people around the person affected to help fund their way to the conference while doing ah e-giving back to charity, getting the tax benefits all that. But it was just a really nice way of recognizing what that person had been through. It’s time for a break pursuant. Their newest paper is the digital donation revolution. You’re online donors have high expectations of you because of the swift transactions that they enjoy at amazon. Zappos, even some banks, the digital giving bar has been raised. How do you get over? Get the digital donation revolution it’s on the listener landing page, tony dot m a slash pursuant radio now back to peer-to-peer peak and then so what’s the broader lesson for our listeners in small and midsize shops. But know anybody? Yeah, i think what’s interesting is community driven fund-raising is just a reframing of how we approach raising money and building awareness for the causes that were advocating for okay, bye, basically recognizing the true value that every person in your non-profits community and as a community of supporters, whether they’re known or unknown supporters of your organization, typically we look at it from just a financial perspective. And so what community room fund-raising says, is that it’s not just about the money, that supporter khun give you its about their influence in the time they can give you a swell? And in the connected economy, the influence that a supporter has is actually more valuable than it’s ever been before, because brands are being kind of blocked out of feeds, whether it’s, facebook, it’s becoming really difficult for non-profits to reach any new people. And so by turning inward and saying, how can we actually empower our supporters by inspiring, activating and rallying them? Latto actually be the fundraisers for organization, ok, how do we get? How do we activate this within our own organization way we need to be thinking through sure, who should be. In the team discussing, i feel like we’ve spent enough time on motivation, what are some steps? How do we get started? I’m interested, but i don’t know how to organize myself. Yeah, absolutely, yeah, i think community german fund-raising is just like a lens on how you approach fund-raising and so i think it’s important to have non-profit leadership buy-in but also a fund-raising team in general and communications because communities and fund-raising is basically saying, we’re going to inspire people in our community becomes supporters rather than guilt them, then we’re going to activate those people that have true potential to become fundraisers and advocates for our cause instead of and we’re not trying to convince people to do that. We’re just activating the potential that’s already, and they’re already exists. Exactly, and they were rallying them together so fundraisers usually see raising money and reaching new donors as their responsibility. Community driven fund-raising says no it’s, actually your job to be a player coach and basically see your community is a valuable asset to helpyou fund-raising help you grow your impact, help you reach new donors, but i’m gonna ask you again. But how do we get? Started? I mean, maybe is that identifying certain people to maybe seed the program. I understand you’re not throughout the life of the pregnant thing, okay, you do something, you do something, but we need some seeds. Yeah, i think what we do is all we always advise people to understand the different stages of community fund-raising and so the first stage is inspiring. And so as you look at your current fund-raising whether it’s an event, whether it’s a male piece, how do you look at that piece and see it from a lens that you’re not trying to convince someone or guilt someone to gives your cause? We’re actually trying to inspire them and because inspiration leads to sharing and action. Okay, so so, yes, we wanted to share exactly. And then inside your current supporters, which is the second stage, which is activation, identifying key supporters that are ready to do something more. And so one of our customers world bicycle relief every time someone donates at that moment of inspiration that they’ve someone’s been inspired to support the cause, they want to provide a next step toe activate them to actually be an advocate or a fundraiser for the cause and so it’s something as simple as that by they implement this new program and they’re just asking new donors if they want to do more and presenting the opportunity. And if you apply the commuter and fund-raising methodology, you could find things across your current fund-raising program where you just shift your mindset to be how it can we make this more community focus rather than organization driven it’s sort of empowering them to indeed, i’m just adding another i mean, you’re talking about no inspiring them so that they share and then they take action. Yep, i guess i’m calling it empowering them and giving them well in power and giving them permission and maybe some tools. Two work with yeah, right, the backdrop is shaking video would be stable, it’s not going to fall, but it shook. I would have to say that, you know, historically, we’ve created fund-raising or maybe you donate twenty dollars, to yourself so that you don’t share this fundraiser with a zero balance the same rules apply to when you’re launching a campaign, you really need the buy-in have trusted ah, folks in your, you know, in your group people that, you know will create a buzz, and you certainly don’t want to launch it on deaf ears, right? Yeah, with xero balance, etcetera. You mentioned storytelling earlier, you seem to make a point of how important that is. How does that help us? I guess at the first stage that noah was describing inspiring the community, i think i think it contextualized is and provides insight into your motivation as a fundraiser. How do we start telling these stories? I want to get into the nitty gritty here, so, you know, obviously we’re up against the algorithm of any given social media platform and, you know, you could do it whether it’s, tio email or through, you know, social post, but really providing, you know, maybe a before and after photo in my case, where people are, you know, going through treatment and they come out with a smile on their face, that’s the best case scenario and just really humanizing it. You know, we talked a lot in our session today about being human throughout the fund-raising process, i think it’s really easy to get kind of technical and robotic about it and just create opportunities. For people that self serving, you know, creative latto fund-raising page and then never to be heard from again. I think. Causevox and, you know, i know. Using causevox. We aim. Tio certainly create opportunities for more than that. So you actually have a relationship with the non-profit as you’re going through the fund-raising fund-raising stages and and finishing the campaign about empowering people tell their own stories so that it doesn’t it’s not coming from the organization, but giving them the option to create a two minute self didio or log on their own power way actually saw this firsthand so and ten is a non-profit who hosts this conference, and what they did was they said, how can we raise money for scholarships so that people could come to this conference for free? Who can afford it? And one of the biggest things they did was they said, you know, we have ten board members that have influence and ability to do this and so let’s empower them to tell the community why ntcdinosaur others to them and fund-raising on our behalf, and so they were able to raise over eighteen thousand dollars, and i just saw the banner over there and there’s, you know, fifty, sixty, seventy different donors that came together to help support that campaign, and all they did was they said, hey, boardmember is ur supporters were goingto activate you to tell your story on our behalf, and they did it with did videos they wrote like testimony is different content, and so they didn’t say one thing to the other again. Theyjust activated those supporters and said, hey, can you share your story with the community and raise money on dh. They were able to do that and there’s people at this conference because of what those board members did in the stories that they told you. Excellent. So so starting capital so we’re activating people that they share a men that they take the act take the action of, of actually beginning fund-raising fund-raising on their own as we’re okay. It’s rise. Where going through this process of empowering, i would have described how you describe it. Do we need to circumscribe it a little bit boundaries around it? For listeners, that might be a little leery of maybe the the power they were transferring too much power. Yeah, we’re powering know it talked a lot about this during the session about giving, you know, the non-profit needs to give up a certain degree of control. You want to talk about that? Yeah. And i think that’s why? The third phase of commuters fund-raising is about rallying, not controlling. And so i think our default is well, how do we control this? How do we do this? How do we do that? I think in the connected economy, all the powers with the customer and it’s on the non-profit to realize that their supporters have more power than they think. And so they can try to control them. Or they can really say hey, let’s, rally this let’s, support this and help drive this forward, and so i think if you jump to taking a control position instead of how do we actually rally people in the right direction? Um, you’re going to miss huge opportunities really activate your community. You know, this reminds me of the fears that non-profits had around facebook. Oh yeah, allowing people to come it’s been going on for years? Yeah, come on their facebook page. I don’t know if we’re going to allow those car. Yeah, we should have opened commenting and posted. Yeah, well, circling back earlier we were talking about, you know, the storytelling aspect and in the cancer world and again in the probably the chronic illness world of non-profits it’s a beautiful thing when you have somebody sharing their story, whether we are sharing on the behalf, which is most of the time when you see in the comments let’s say they have a rare type of brain tumor or something like that they’ve never met or connected with another young adult with cancer, let alone somebody who has their exact same diagnosis toe watch that unfold in the comment section where now these people are going to be able to support one another, the fact that you facilitated that on the non-profit side, i’s, amazing and it’s only going to contribute to the overall strategy of activation and engagement getting people teo really buy into your non-profit buy-in to your mission. And you showed a great example that stupid cancer had a different name before it was stupid cancer, and it was, you know, this moment when they said everyone calls us stupid cancer because that’s the tagline so let’s actually switch. So he convinced the founder of the organization to switch the name to stupid cancer and make the name of the organ kapin line right and kind of say, you know, hey, like, we’re going to give power to this community that wants to be a part of this and that’s when they saw growth from two thousand two hundred fifty thousand like you saw hundreds of thousands dollars being raised because they just again said, hey, we’re not going to control this. We’re not going to, you know, they would correct people be like we’re not the stupid cancer guys where the i got every one of the other name it wasn’t i’m too young for this cancer and it’s very slavic, every word. But they gave up that control. And then they saw, like the mo mentum in the community like flourish. And i think what was interesting is that still progressed. What their mission, ford wass maybe in ways they never expected or never would have done themselves. But it’s still pushed the mission forward. And i think that’s the opportunity that non-profits small, large, medium all have today. And we see it time and time again with our customers at causevox and in parallel, you know, you don’t get to decide what school your audience is. The same sort of thing with fund-raising storytelling. All the concepts were presenting today, it’s all about the audience and did, uh, what about let’s? Talk a little more about building this into your annual fund-raising plan? Okay, okay, uh, what you’re the experts. I have a plan now, and i don’t feel like i’m sufficiently community driven or or at all community community supported what i need to rethink. Well, not just what we’ve already covered. But how do we get this in my plan? Yeah, i think what’s interesting is fundraisers have like the same playbook, and they just think if they do more of it that there’ll be more successful. Andi, i think that’s why the burnout rate for fundraisers is so significant in our industry is because they feel as though there’s one playbook to run, which is more events, more emails, more mail in wartime decides that they have exhausted that playbook organization. W ell, move onto organization, yeah, try again no more, yeah, and i think what’s also thing is it it creates this window shopping experience where you’re always looking at other non-profits and being like man, if i only had what they have, i would be able to solve and what we challenged our people that attend our session is that you really need to look at the challenges and reframed them. And so we said is instead of saying, okay, i need to do more of these things, it’s saying as part of my annual fundraising campaign, whether other things like we can do and what we provide, it was saying, how about we take a look at our community and see if there’s opportunities that we can inspire our community, activate them and rally. Them to actually help raise more money and reach new donors. Okay, that’s part of our annual can i would i would add that, you know, people listen, this interview who were saying, all right, how do i deploy this? You certainly don’t want to cannibalize anything that’s working for you, so if you raise a ton of money in queue for, you know, don’t don’t suddenly pivot and say, all right, i’m going to try to spread that out for the rest of the year, and then suddenly you’re exhausted by q for but there’s a lot of little things you can do through out the year like being more human, connecting with your audience, giving up the control is we’ve, you know, keep reiterating on just being more of a social entity, you know, that’s kind of what it comes down to is is it’s not a one way communication channel? It’s you know, the feedback goes both ways, yeah, yeah, and i think it’s, just even seeing the potential and being able to create the opportunities were actually saying we’re asking for more things than money, so a quick story i spent six years running growth at an international relief non-profit and i was overseeing growth, but that was communications and development, and so our major gift officers, obviously we’re hard core, like, go after money, cultivate new gifts year over year, and when i told them when i oversaw them was like there’s, other opportunities for these major donors to make a difference, their influence and their time are really valuable, you know, major donors know a lot of other major donors, and so we continually go back and say, the only thing we want from you is your money. We’re only going to get a portion of their value and so weak went to them and said, hey, you know, would you want to do something interesting by, like, leveraging your major gift to run a matching gift campaign? Or do you want to do a employee engagement campaign at your non-profit or do you wantto basically go into the business network that you’re a part of and share this opportunity, teo promote and inspire other people to support the cause? And what we saw is that the more that we got them to invest, their influence and their time, the more money they like. Well, how do you make those ass? You just picked off like three things? How do you make? So i think in the major gifts side, obviously, you know, it involves, like face-to-face conversations and having a conversation and providing examples of what other individuals but that’s, what people do you wantto do this campaign or, you know, activate matching gift? So what do you make those asks? You want to do your own work? Place campaign? Yeah, so i think obviously in major gifts, it’s different because you have a personalized contextual relationship with that individual. And so if you know that they’re a ceo of a company, you can have a dialogue about that and say, you know, how are you engaging your employees to give back as a community, you obviously care and see your legacy as giving gifts into our organization. How is your company doing? And so it’s having a conversation around that, i think in the broader sense where you’re asking a broader audience to do fund-raising is again making sure that you’re not asking everybody and just being like, hey, this is a new way that you can give to our information are give to our organization rather looking for segments of your audience that are ready to do something, whether that means they’re new donors, they’re volunteers, their board members, they’ve been giving monthly for ten years looking for signals that they have the potential to do something and that’s why we say that second phase is about activation because that means they already have the ability to do it. You’re just activating that, and so it can’t just be this broad sweeping thing where it’s like hey, now you can raise money on x y and z on behalf of our cause. That’s not gonna work. You just ticked off a bunch of very good identify irs indeed you are. Whom i who this might be appropriate for kenny, i want to go back to something that you said earlier. The feedback has to be both ways yet not organization too. Everybody correct this so that involved really listening on the organization’s it’s hard. Sometimes you don’t hear things. I mean, you might not. You’re not always gonna hear things you want to hear. Talk about. You know how how an organization khun sort of shift culture in terms of real listening, engagement that way i think i think you guys were just talking about some really important, which is the signals, you know, in a non-profits situation have a lot of people who will come to the table and, you know, people have ideas, people have always do this, you should do that. And, you know, one of the things that we always say is if you don’t pay attention to mission, eh, you know, mission b, c and d, whatever we’ll all fail. So listening is important, you know, for us, the example of changing the name of the organization was kind of a really big undertaking. When you look back at it, i think that you just have to have a qualifying process, you know, kind of ah, multiphase approach to letting feed back into the top and looking at the person who is suggesting it, and kind of like i said, creating a rubric to take me back in and, you know, you have a border directors for a reason. So if the board is providing you with information, obviously it’s probably a good thing that listen to but also people who were out of the core. Of the apple can sometimes ride the most meaningful feedback and again trying to figure you gotta be you gotta be ready to hear that, you know, not only not only listening to your board and also where they’re coming from, what is their motivation for providing this feedback? And if i can have two things that what we did at my non-profit is first and foremost we had to convince the organization that the donors in our supporters actually mattered so much of our head was like, we’re doing great work, and we just need people to give us money. And so what we did was every week we had an hour designated, so we got leadership buy-in where everybody in the organization wrote thank you notes to donors, and so that started to say, hey, we’re going to center on this, and then we started doing what? Like surveying or net promoter scorer type things where we asked, hey, you know, would you recommend our organisation to a friends, family or colleagues? If so, why? Why do you support our organization? And we actually started using their responses in our fund-raising copy because they were telling us why. They support our organization in a way that was specific that we could actually share with others, and they also told us ideas on how we could improve, and so i think the person foremost is you have to cultivate that idea that you’re actually gonna listen because you value that person’s opinion, and second is you just have to ask, i think we asked for money all the time, but we don’t ask for what people think or why they support our organization or how could we improve this organization? How could we reach new people? We asked that question to a small segment of donors. They gave us tons of ideas that we were able to filter throughout our organization. Good dahna we’re going to leave it there, gentlemen, thank you very much. Thank you for having us. You’re not on the you’re not watching the video. They’re both redheads on thei r noah barnett, head of marketing for causevox and can he came ceo of the testicular cancer foundation and cofounder of stupid cancer? And so i have that right way. Three a curveball and you just handled it. It’s amazing. Oh, yeah. Thank you. You get to use overviewing ingratiate something alright, way where he’s trying to get in by the back i’ve been listening sarrantonio twenty martignetti non-profit radio coverage of eighteen ninety see this interview sponsored by network for good, easy to use dahna management and fund-raising software for non-profits thank you so much for being with us. We need to take a break, wagner cps in the last two weeks, we had segments on storytelling. You don’t want your storytelling to be so compelling that it leads to restricted gif ts or even or just lots of restricted gif ts regular has you covered their block post is avoiding restrictions from donations inspired by storytelling it’s that wagner cps dot com click resource is then blawg in a moment. It’s poverty porn right now! Time for tony’s take two i have a big lump of listener thank you it’s not segregated it’s not discriminated against by whose name listed first or second or third. And, of course, any discrimination on non-profit radio is benign non video ce discrimination anyway, but we’re not doing that this this week. I am just grateful to everyone who listens to the show supports the show exultant and that i don’t care what platform you listen. What time of day, whether your digital or analog, however, you are listening to the show or supporting the show. Thank you. You make maybe ah, you’re just you’d listen occasionally and you get my insider alerts. So you know who the guests are each week you cherry pick that’s. Fabulous. Take it as you need it. Thank you. To everyone who listens and supports non-profit radio. My video gratitude is that tony martignetti dot com now, let’s, bring in any sample ward. She is our social media contributor and ceo of and ten, the non-profit technology network. Our most recent car, third book is social change. Anytime. Everywhere about online multi-channel engagement she’s at amy, sample ward, dot or ge and at a m e r s ward. Welcome back, amy. Sample word. Hi. Thank you for having me back. It’s. My pleasure to have you back. This is, uh uh. This is the have you been back on the show since and ten since auntie si thie ntc. I don’t think this might be the first time i think it is. I’m pretty sure because i was leaving you alone. Because i figured, you know, there’s clean up to do and thank you’s to sand and lots of stuff. So, um, and then you had a staff planning. Then you have your staff planning time. Yeah. So to two times a year. All of the staff. Because not everyone is here in the portland office. Let me have some remote dafs. Everybody comes to portland for a week together of planning and craft and happy hour and things like that. Wonderful. Yes. I think they call it staff planning, but planning is not all that we dio excellent. Nor should it be, because you’re all together only twice a year. So you have many vulture virtual employees, so congratulations on a wonderful and fun. And i hope from your perspective, successful certainly was for mine. Ntcdinosaur provoc technology conference. Congratulations. Yeah, thanks. Yeah, i think it was a really good year. You think so? Too good. Yeah. I’m good. I’m definitely fun. I know it was fun. I know that’s. Not a question, but we’re doing it for a little more off. Just the fun purpose fundez one is up, there fundez up there, but education and technology, you know. They rank, too, but congratulations, thank you for being part of it again. Thank you. It was my pleasure. We gotta lot. We got thirty interviews for non-profit. Yeah, great, no, thank you. Okay, so we’re talking today about poverty porn. You said this had come up for you in aa, some discussions or members have been raising it. You’ve you’ve been hearing ah, little more chatter about this. Yeah, i think that organizations are organizations have been criticized for participating in poverty porn for years, but i think those have often been organizations that are really, really big operating on an international scale global scale that are maybe more vulnerable to criticism, because so so many people are saying what they’re doing, and they’re raising so much money. And, you know, with all of that kind of spotlight and revenue, i think naturally organizations, regardless of what they dio, are open to criticism of lots of different forms, right? But now i think organizations, they’re starting to see yes, well, you know, maybe criticize those organizations for years, but also maybe we’re a part of that. And what does that mean for us? You know, you don’t just have to be really, really large organization are making lots and lots of revenue off of a single appeal to have some issues with the way your year doing your work, so i think it’s organizations are starting to see that there, maybe starting to ask more questions because they’re getting, you know, the the digital teams who are managing that content are starting to feel like if something does happen, you know, they’re the ones that posted that photo or sent that tweet or whatever and really wanting to figure out how how to navigate what what’s the best way to tell this story? Yeah, andan avoid a potential backlash. Yeah, um, how would you define this? Do you? Ah, i have a way, but i’m going to hear, you know, how would you define poverty porn? I got i don’t have probably an eloquent, succinct definition, but if i was explaining poverty porn, teo an organization i think you know, without knowing whoever we’re talking to what their mission is, you know, poverty point is when you’re who’s may be taking advantage of the difference between the audience you’re calling tau action most often it’s for donations and these people that you are serving in whatever way, instead of maintaining the humanity of everyone involved in that situation and honoring all that all of those people have and really owning the story. About what you do in the power of in this example, their donation, versace trying to exacerbate the difference and the things that are, quote unquote not had about this group that you’re serving and focusing on that discrepancy, i think to me and is really what it’s about you you’re not maintaining everyone’s humanity and then highlighting the service, you provide your instead, maybe kind of further opening divide and most of the backlashes that i’ve seen or, you know, examples of this on the on the web are our images, but could be written off as easy as you can see, right majority video, but a written description could also be oh, totally exploitative or, you know, you have the language that we use to describe communities we could also highlight that that gap that you’re describing, yeah, um, no it’s ah it’s it’s very sensitive, you know, because we are trying to do very good work and we are motivated and our mission statements are or are around help of this vulnerable population, whatever it might be, whatever country it might be. I mean, it’s not a lot of the lot of the images are from abroad. I mean, i see a lot of, like, south america, central america, africa, but it could, you know, it could be right here in the u s to i mean, you could certainly go astray with images and written descriptions of conditions right here, right here in the u s certainly right, but, you know, so where were motivated by the right? Um, in the right directions, but right, but we, uh, you know, it may just be is easy, if, you know, consciousness raising, which is what our conversation hopefully is doing, and certainly a lot of the conversation, you know, like i saw things back too, like twenty, thirteen or so talking about this subject. So i think a lot of it because our motivations are, you know, i always impute good motivations toe non-profits and most people no, there are good, you know, it’s just raising country business. I mean, i think that is there are lots of tactical things that we could talk. Yeah, you’re right, it’s not just, you know, you’re right your underlying the thing that’s really going to create change is that organizations and the individuals in those organizations actually do some, really hard work two to figure out an address and accepts and try and move forward from all the biases that they’re bringing to their work the again, even if their motivation, their intent internally, is field pure and good to them, it could still be coming from a really kind of dangerous place that they are the savior of that community, right? And that in itself isn’t is a bias that’s going to mean you? You cannot create content, whether that’s, you know, photos are writing these descriptions that not coming from that place, right? So i think doing that internal work to say, gosh, how are we, you know, without explicitly like deciding to do this, how are we already coming at this from not the best a place you know, and as an organization, whatever the practices or policies that we have that can help us change that? I mean, you know, if we want to start at the big picture level, don’t think about tactics, things like do every single one of your staff regularly have opportunities to interact with the community members you serve if they don’t, they’re not in a position to speak from a place where they understand the shared humanity, they understand that everyone both inside the organization and those being served all have strengths and weaknesses and hopes and dreams and challenges and are at a place to really, i think, talk about the work anymore, productive way, you know. So even just at that level are you creating opportunities for every single one of your staff to be a part of the community? I think i’m always surprised how many organizations where they say, oh, no, if you work in the office, you don’t ever talk to the community, only our program staff do that. Why would you do that? You know, why would you create this while the silo between the staff talking about the work stopped deciding how the work is going to be done and the people participating in that work? That doesn’t make any sense to me? And those opportunities need to be more than photo opportunities do no the right there’s, lots of examples, you know, it has to be meaningful, you know, there’s one of the iconic ones, i guess infamous one’s better better than iconic. What if this one’s is, you know, eyes ellen. Too generous in nairobi with lots of kids around her and, um, there’s one of each year in wearing the red nose with liberian children around him. I know so. And what i mean, i think it’s really smart to bring that up, eh? Because now people now everybody listening to our conversation, i can think of the same kind of image, but also that i think totally the kind of thing that organizations i would think to dio with staff, right is like, okay, here, the folks that we serve here’s some of quote unquote us let’s take a photo together and inevitably, these photos like the two you just suggested when you’re years ago, like ellen and nairobi or add in liberia it’s like here is this person in the center of all these other people, and you are both figuratively and literally centering yourselves instead of centering your community. This is now not a photo about those people. This is a photo about you on dh that is kind of the epitome of what we’re talking about here, right? Is that you have come in to save them your services, you’re donations, you or whatever it is. Are literally the center instead of this community truly getting too to be in that place. So i think that’s a really great, like daily kind of check, check and balance for yourself when you’re when you’re looking at two weeks or you’re looking at the way you describe something that you’re looking at, a photo you can just say is this photo centering the people that we’re serving? Or is this photo about us? Um and there are certainly times where photo should be about you, but that doesn’t mean that the photo should be you surrounded by people you served. Maybe then it’s a photo of just your staff at, you know, the conference table looking on something or if you know what i mean it it’s going to be about you make it on ly about you and not you, in contrast to your community. Very good point about figuratively and literally making the individual the center surrounded by the community in need. Yeah. Excellent. Yeah. See, that’s why that’s? Why we have you on? Because i looked at the same picture was an idea that did not occur to me. But that’s the brilliance of of aa expert. You know, lots of flecks of expert well, in this case, we have one expert and me, but other other people contributing exper, having experts contribute that’s what i mean, okay, you think about this, you know, it’s value of having multiple multiple opinions and and eyes on something very it was very well said, thank you for that. Altum i was thinking you by where i wasn’t thanking me for what i just said, that that was, obviously, you’re welcome. I always had a defective. I wouldn’t. I would probably not considered an expert perspective, but it is an opinionated one. You bring a lot of insight and used him to the show. Sabat yeah, you know, another part of the problem is that these images, their descriptions, you know, that it’s one dimensional, you know, right? If i’m here or if you swoop in with your donation from the united states that’s going to solve the problem, the child will no longer have empty hands reaching out, you know? And we just have a minute, but weaken, obviously we can keep talking beyond the break. Poverty is multidemensional mean, it includes govern the local community. The local community needs to be empowered, it includes well, and i think thinking about those layers, and we can talk more about this. Those layers of change that need to happen are are important. But also, as we continue to see, the kind of donor base of america change as boomer’s got older and millennials, you know, come into more of the majority in the world of social action that there is also your community. Your audience for this kind of message also knows there are multiple layers and maybe that immediate kind of got reaction of oh, my gosh, this crisis just happened, i want to respond, is there. But if you also, if that’s the hole that you do, you may not be really seen as a sustainable organization undressing all of those layers of change and i think that’s a huge opportunity. No, you’re seeing yourself. Yes, tio. One dimensionally. All right, let’s, take this break. Tell us i have a new tell. Oh, simoni yl for you, quote tell us has allowed my business to support my favorite charity without even feeling the pinch of writing a check. I am donating money every month that i would have spent on credit card processing anyway. Also, their customer service is far better than we’ve ever had. End quote, the businesses you refer are going to love tell us one hundred percent satisfaction among the businesses that you’re among among the business is working with them. Get started with the video at tony dahna em, eh slash tony tello’s. Now, let’s, go back to poverty porn with very insightful example. Ward um, yes, and we were just saying, yeah, it it narrows that the viewers focus to just donate and there’s a lot more that you can do. I mean, and, you know, if we’re talking about bonem poverty and hunger, i mean that that could reach to, you know, advocacy around global climate change policies, which you’re never going to get from these one dimensional ideas. No, and this i mean, i also don’t want to that folks listening now to our conversation up for this idea that every single tweet, every single picture, every single email appeal needs to talk people through. How do you know this action today is connected to this action in this all the way up that’s not what we’re trying to recommend that every single one of those has to include all of that context, but it should always include the context of what really you’re asking for if you are asking for donations for a really immediate need, the donation is still not the actual transaction of those medical supplies. Most likely right? So so at least framing it truly in what it is people are donating. Teo, was there an earthquake? And you’re well, these donations are in part to buy medical equipment and to support those medical teams administering it. Well, that’s also really great story. Who are these medical team? What kind of expertise are they bringing? You know, you don’t just have to focus on transactions because when you do, you make both the donor feel like they’re participating and transaction and the people receiving this support hyre the end of a transaction, i don’t think anyone really means for that i like, you know, back to that good intent, a key intent is not impact, but also even even in this case, i don’t think that’s really what you intend, you know it, so so raise that up and don’t focus on, oh, this is just like your example, before i really like that, you know, now these hands are full does not what happens in here, you know, and so really talkto what is happening and at a a tactical level, you know, there’s, this is opportunity for terrific content. No, you can direct people to interview, and i was talking about fresh content and depth of content there you can tell the story elsewhere, so the tweet is brief. The tweet is briefed, the facebook post, the ad, whatever is brief, but then there’s a link to you know, the back story back-up more to medical in this example who these medical teams are, you haven’t instagram account well, you could do you know instagram stories with either you know, actual quick video interviews update, facebook live there like there’s a ton of rich content you could have when you move to trying to really own what you do and what your story is. Instead of trying to focus on this idea of really, really immediate really, really fast transaction because that’s not the humanity that you want to be representing anyway. Yeah on and and wrapped wrapped up in all this eyes, you know, the idea of that, the important idea that the donations air not sufficient while while they’re necessary and we do need them, they’re not going to solve the problem alone exactly. The bigger context, you know that, and i love your idea, the hero you’re not talked about this a little oaky going well, just you, khun, you can actually then shift the spotlight to some of the work that you’re doing. Like you’re saying, you know, show videos of some of the programs and some of the care that you’re actually giving, you know you can you can shift the lens back to you as the provider, you know, when it’s all in the bigger context, it’s a part of the bigger falik well, i think there’s two things to think about here one is that we talked about before any campaign, whether it’s a fundraising campaign, our advocacy or whatever it’s never gonna have only one ass, of course, every you know, kind of sector best practices. You only have one ascot a time. But once someone takes that action, they have made the donations. They have called their senator. Whatever you need to be ready with another ask because they were just willing to do what you ask them to do. You might as well tell them that to do something else right. So instead of having, you know, here’s eight different things, please do what you want. You give people want and when they do it, you take them to the next step. Then you take them to the next step and you just keep going. And well, from a tactical perspective definitely think about it that way. And from a content perspective, justus you’re recommending i love that get people hooked in and then have them kind of watch the whole thing. Play out right. Continue to see how the work is happening on the other thing to think about, i think, is that there’s a lot to be sad out in the sector right now about how you know there are certain changes in fund-raising that people are more connected to topic than necessarily a single organization that that they’re going to donate to over a year over year, you know that they care more about the topic and whoever is maybe doing something good on that topic is who gets their money. This is a great way to keep people actually hooked to your organisation instead of floating between organizations in the same cause because you’re not just getting them to have a single transaction with you because it was immediate and compelling and kind of hyre fast way for them to feel connected, you have then continuing to connect them to you with these with content, of course, but also with those continued actions, ways where they’re getting deeper and deeper into this and feeling like, yeah, i donated but also high, you know, submitted short message for the medical l came to provide to those children and, you know, they’re starting to actually feel like they are a part of your work, which is the whole goal of this instead of feeling like, oh, i feel relieved that i sent my ten dollars, for that organization, and i don’t even know who they were because it was just the organization i saw on facebook, right? So really shifting how you frame all of this is, of course, as we’re talking about today, you know, getting you out of this trap of poverty porn, but it’s also serving you to build rial community with these supporters? Yeah, it’s the how many guests we’ve had on urging the relation a ll over the transactional that’s you you put a lot of depth into it, but you and i have talked about it and other guests as well. That’s the way to stand out, you know, as you said, that’s, the way to bring people to your cause and keep them there while the ah a lot of a lot of activists and donors are you’re saying maur, mission oriented versus organization oriented. But you know, if you can draw them into your work, they’re right they will stay with you. It’s the relation act it’s the relationship of course. All right, you know, another another facet of this is that all you know, these regions are not monolithic. You know, all of central america, south america and africa are not poor on dh and needy and destitute, you know, there are thriving cities, there’s, beautiful, rich history, culture toe all of these, you know, to all the african nations and all these other parts i’m talking parts of the world i’m talking about. So, you know, e i think you want some balance there too, tuley and i think there’s argument to be made that there are can definitions that we had organizations we as americans, we as white folks can put onto what is ah, community experiencing property or what is a geographic area, that it lacks access to resources that are not going to be a shared definition by the people living in those communities. And i think that really important thing to remember as organizations trying to highlight the service you’re providing or the way that you’re serving that community, is that your definition of of their needs and comparatively to you you know how how quote unquote in poverty they are is going to feel different in their own lived experience, so finding ways where they can authentically talk about again, back to what was said at the beginning, you know, their hopes and dreams, their challenges, their life and the way that they benefit or appreciate the services is going to feel far truer and position your organization into their community than it is for you to say from the outside, you know, look at this community, we’ve kind of defined as needing this and here’s how we’re going to fix, you know, back to that idea that are you centering you and and the organization are you really centering this community? How how are you doing that? Recognizing that part of deciding you know that a certain community is or is not in need is part of that? We’re gonna leave it there. Any simple word? Excellent. Thank you so much for talking about the tony. I know it’s a a scary topic for some, but i think it was a good conversation. I absolutely agree, and we’re not scared to be a little provocative. No, not at all. Thank you. She’s. Amy sample ward at amy, sample ward, dot or ge? And at amy, r s ward, next week, two more from the non-profit technology conference. See sweet cross talk and capacity call out if you missed any part of today’s show, i beseech you, find it on tony martignetti dot com were supported by pursuant online tools for small and midsize non-profit ofthis, data driven and technology enabled. Tony dahna slash pursuant radio by wagner, cps, guiding you beyond the numbers. Regular cps dot com and by telus, credit card and payment processing, your passive revenue stream. Tony dahna slash tony tell us. Ah, creative producers claire meyerhoff, sam liebowitz is the line producer, shows social media is by susan chavez. On our music is by scott stein with me next week for non-profit radio. Big non-profit ideas for the other ninety five percent go out and be great. You’re listening to the talking, alternate network, waiting to get you thinking. E-giving cubine you’re listening to the talking alternative now, are you stuck in a rut? Negative thoughts, feelings and conversations got you down? Hi, i’m nor in sometime, potentially, ater tune in every tuesday at nine to ten p m eastern time and listen for new ideas on my show. Yawned potential. Live life your way on talk radio dot n y c geever. Hey, all you crazy listeners looking to boost your business, why not advertise on talking alternative with very reasonable rates? Interested simply email at info at talking alternative dot com. Are you into comics, movies and pop culture at large? What about music and tv? Then you’re in for a treat. 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Nonprofit Radio for September 8, 2017: Video Storytelling & Deep Pockets

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Maria SempleHow do you find pockets of wealth in the communities you serve? Maria Semple reveals her secrets. She’s our prospect research contributor and The Prospect Finder. (Originally aired March 28, 2014.)

 

 

 


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Hello and welcome to tony martignetti non-profit radio big non-profit ideas for the other ninety five percent on your aptly named host oh, i’m glad you’re with me. I’d be forced to endure the pain of pancreas ola thigh assis if you hardened me with the idea that you missed today’s show video storytelling in a crowded video internet, how do you tell that compelling story? So your message moves others to take action. Sharing their smart strategies are yasmin win from vibranceglobal and sherry cheney jones with measurement resource is that originally aired september fourth, twenty fifteen and deep pockets. How do you find pockets of wealth in the communities you serve? Maria simple reveals her secrets. She’s, our prospect research contributor and the prospect finder that originally aired march twenty eighth, twenty fourteen on tony’s take two five minute planned giving marketing. We’re sponsored by wagner, cpas guiding you beyond the numbers wagner, cps dot com you’re not a business you’re non-profit apple owes accounting software designed for non-profits non-profit wizard dot com is them. We be spelling supercool spelling bee fundraisers. We be e spelling dot com here are yasmin win and sherry cheney jones with video storytelling welcome to tony martignetti non-profit radio coverage of ntc twenty fifteen the non-profit technology conference we’re at the austin convention center austin, texas we’re kicking off our coverage with this interview. Are my guests now? Are jasmine win and sherry cheney jones welcome. Thank you. Thank you, it’s. Good to be here. They’re seminar topic is stop shooting videos. Start unlocking stories. Jasmine win is founder and ceo of vibranceglobal and sherry cheney jones is president of measurement resource is let’s start sherry, what are non-profits not doing quite a cz? Well as they could with video interviews, storytelling? What? From my perspective, because we help non-profits measure and communicate their impact in value, they often are focusing on their impact. So how are they changing lives and changing circumstances there, too focused on the activities. So, really understanding what your true impact is and telling your stories from there. And you’re trying to elicit really heartfelt story telling stories. You know, emotional. We want emotional impact. Okay, what would you have you have? You know, i think that a lot of times we focus so much on the technology, the process of doing video and also the questions. That we ask people, and so we don’t focus enough on the connection and really, when you are able to provide a space for someone too open up to feel that they can speak about their passion, be grateful. They then create that connection that we can then capture and witness through videos and so it’s that focus on that connection rather than just the information or that exchange. Now, as we are today, you’re asking people to get in front of lights and cameras or and mike’s andi, open up. Yes, men. How are we gonna start this process first? Let’s, start with how do we find the right people? And then we’ll get into coaching them and and getting their best performance and storytelling out of them. But how do we find the right one? Yeah, absolute. Tony that the key thing is selecting the right people. And that starts with being mindful of who your audience is. You know, we found that the most impactful, ah, relevant person to interview talk with are a representation of our audience. So, for example, for appealing to a donor’s, then it be great to have a financial supporter donors to be able to speak in their language in the same mindset for them to connect and relate. So think about the group’s. We want this interview to be meaningful for and select people from that constituency. Right? Volunteers, donors, board members. Yeah. Ok. And someone who’s were well respected. Who’s. Our ticket who’s also a very passionate and a champion of of our particular cause to be able to speak for us but also, at the same time, carry the torch for our audience so that they can connect with them. Sure, anything you want to add to finding the right person is sure. I always say, think about your wise. Why do you do it? You do, but not just why does your organization do what it does? But why does your funders fund you and whitey? You’re participants participate. And when you’re finding people to tell your story, you want to make sure that you are covering those three perspectives. Okay, three wives. The three wise. Yep. Three wise men know e wise? Yes, different wise. Okay, sure. Let’s, say with you now. So we found the right people. How do we start the process of making them? Comfortable evoking the really heartfelt emotion that we’re tryingto chief? Sure. Well, i will actually default to us because he’s really good at that, you know, i’m i’m the one that helps you create the content think about what you should be eliciting and he’s when it does the great interviews, maybe you’re more on the on the production side. I’m more on the defining what what questions? You should be asking what impact you should be drawing down of them stuff like, okay, we’ll come to you very shortly. Okay, okay. We got plenty of time together. Twenty five. Just great. Yeah. You know, for someone to be at ease. You really it’s it’s? Really? About how you think about the interview or how you think about it being on video? A lot of times, people focus on the act of, you know, being on camera so they feel like they’re being evaluated. They’re being judged or in an interview, maybe you think of, like, a job interview or or some others where they have to perform, and they have to be perfect. And what that does is it raises this level of anxiety where you have tio feel. Like you have to know not necessarily be your best to be your most authentic. Authentic. Yeah, you’re you’re going to be your best if you’re most if you you’re most attentive, you just you write, which is hard to get and even on even in still right videos, pictures it really is okay, yeah, how are we gonna do so down? So so part of that is in the initial invitation is instead of hey, can you do a testimonial keen? And you come on camera and do a video it’s about framing it in a way that helps them give instead of being put in a position to perform. And so what i mean by giving is, you know, i’d like to invite you to come and share your story so that we can help inspire others like you. You know, we we want to put you in a place where you can be of service to others, and when you’re in that mindset of being of service, to be able to share your experience and insight so that it can help others, it takes that pressure off because now it’s about your own story, your own experience. And there’s no right or wrong. And so that that’s the first step is the mind set piece. Okay, so let’s try to avoid characterizing it as testimonial. Do you know, do something that way? Put a label on right or even an interview? It should be more of a conversation, and i find that mom i doing so far, you’re doing great. My failing is a failing grade know you’re at least a b plus or something. You’re doing great. You’ve done this a few times. I have a lot of securities right already. Absolutely cool. Yeah, s so tell me more. So so so that’s the first step is setting up the frame for for what? That experience is like giving them information so that they feel prepared, you know, even some questions not necessarily for them to prepare a script, but for them to at least be a tease to know what to expect, that there’s not going to be this sort of curveball, or they’re gonna be blindsided because people have a lot of anxiety around, you know the uncertainty. And so that that’s another element. And then once you actually get into the session, then then it’s really about creating that space? I go through a specific routine if i find that someone’s either really nervous or they’re very tense, where we do an exercise called a ci gong, slap on what that is is where you basically take your hand and one hand and you slap thea part of your front part of your arm all the way back to up to your chest, and then you do on the other side and then down to your legs and then back up through your back and then on your head as well. You do that a couple times having how hard you’re slapping, just just so just like just like this. So you’re going back like this and and and then down to your chest and then back-up and what you’re doing is you’re activating the various different meridian parties and your body, your head too as well, too. And then once you do that a couple times, you’ll notice this sort of tingle. It just activates the energy and yourself and so that’s physically gets you ready. Another gong xi gong slap? Yeah, yeah, you can google that nok will be on youtube. The other parties is also getting you into what we call the vortex or the zone or, you know, the peak performance state and so, you know, i listen to some music, so whatever music kind of gets you going here, the whole goal is to are we asking the person i interrupt all the time, you know, that’s bad that’s, bad technique, a weapon? You don’t have a conversation, really? So we’re asking the person in advance what’s your kind of music or bring bring some of your favorite music, you can bring some of that, but even before the actual interview, i will take time to have a phone conversation, just tow learn about that, okay, build that report so it’s not. We’re not meeting for the first time on camera and, uh, and that way, we feel like we’re friends and i can ask them about different things, so the whole goal is to get them out of their head and into their hearts, because when they start speaking from the heart when they start opening up that’s when the magic happens outstanding. All right, you’re tuned to non-profit radio tony martignetti also hosts a podcast for the chronicle of philanthropy fund-raising fundamentals is a quick ten minute burst of fund-raising insights, published once a month. Tony’s guests are expert in crowdfunding, mobile giving event fund-raising direct mail and donor cultivation. Really, all the fund-raising issues that make you wonder, am i doing this right? Is there a better way there is? Find the fund-raising fundamentals archive it. Tony martignetti dot com that’s marketmesuite n e t t i remember there’s, a g before the end, thousands of listeners have subscribed on itunes. You can also learn maura, the chronicle website, philanthropy dot com fund-raising fundamentals, the better way. Dahna surely now let’s, come to you with questions. Um, well, jasmine alluded to a little bit, but the types of questions where you’re aware your expertise comes in. It’s sure, in terms of thinking about what? Why are you doing this video? I’m sorry i called you jasmine jasmine? Pardon me? Sorry about that. Yes, you have been eluded. So what’s the purpose of the video you’re shooting. Who is your audience? What do they care about? And what we know about is although fund-raising is up from where it was pretty great recession levels, people want to know that there their money is actually making a difference. So no longer can we just say, oh, here’s a cute kid, i’m going to tell you my story about, you know, my family people really want to know that there’s a collective impact going on that there’s, you know, in the measurement world, the outcomes that you’re achieving. So you want to think about what are those outcomes that you know that people want you two to be showing and then making sure your interview questions air addressing those so people are telling their stories around how they experience the outcomes that you are saying that you’re achieving how they’re experiencing a perfect and we’re going to get really kind of personal, right? Like how i saved your life improved your life, help your child, etcetera. Yeah. So, you know, we have a list of twelve outcomes that typically non-profits air achieving like increased knowledge increased, gilles, you know, maintenance of new behavior, reduction of undesirable behavior. So no, those going in before you start asking your questions and let your interview we know that you’re going to want to know about, you know, how did this program increase your knowledge or help you get a job or, you know, decrease your, you know, risk for heart disease or whatever it is that you’re non-profits doing, make sure the questions are aligned with those important outcomes. Should we stay away from giving exact questions? You will be asked one, two, three, four, because i find in doing my show that that then leads to scripted questions, lead to scripted answers and and that’s not from the heart, that’s from appearing, like memorized so so sherry but we want to give them topics, right, but not exact questions. Is that? Is that the best practice or what? Either, either, yeah. I found that i could give them some questions and with a disclaimer that, you know, these are some of the similar types of questions that will be asking and then also explain to them how to prepare. So just think about some bullet points or just some stories that may be relevant but not necessarily prepare a script per se as well to so that that it alleviates the anxiety, but you’re also making sure that they don’t have a prepared answer. Percent yeah, yeah, like i said, then that’s not that’s, not the impact you’re gonna want, all right, anything else, before we get to the actual either of you need anything else before we get to the actual session with mike’s and lights and cameras that we should be thinking about? We didn’t talk about yet, you know, i think that’s that’s pretty much covers it for now we’re going to go and dive a little bit deeper into our session, then during that time. Yeah. Oh, well, i mean, there’s stuff you’re going to say in this session, you you won’t say here is that well, actually, you know, know what? We’ve got someone holding back. Of course not. Your size is okay. Okay. All right. I want shortchange non-profit ready. You know, of course, that all right. All right. So now we’re in the session, so presumably we’re in some kind of studio. These got a microphone because it might just we could just be doing audio, right? Possible? Absolutely. But might be lights and camera also who’s best toe ask, what do we do when we’re in the studio? Now? I could i could do that. Okay, yeah, you know, it’s again, it’s first getting them into that state it’s a two part process getting them into that place where they’re not thinking from their minus their speaking for the heart, then the next step, then it’s it’s like a dance. Then you’re the lead. And so through your mindful questions that you’ve designed, you’ve created both to communicate impact illicit to bring it out from them, per se. You’re also thinking about what is the overarching storyline that you’re trying to create. So one of the things that well, that we’re going to discuss in our session is the frame where for an appeals type of video, you know these air the videos that ah, non-profits play at their events to appeal to, you know, fundraisers and donors. And so there’s a seven start, seven step formula that i generally recommend to my clients as a guide for creating questions to elicit out those components. So the first part is, is that emotional hook or that connection? Something, whether it be a piece of data, something that’s compelling, or a story that just gets people that initially engaged. So they want to continue to watch the next step, then is ah gratitude appreciating the people that are there the people that have already supported you recognizing them so then they personally feel connected. Engaged. The third part then is impact showing the difference that that their support up until this point has made to show that you have traction, and that your stewards of their support this far. Then the next step is really diving into the importance of the purpose of the mission. Why are we all here? Why is it important to support us then? The next step is to is to paint a picture of what the future can be. So this is where we are. But this is how much we can this is how many more people we can serve. This is the greater impact that we can do. And then then goes the call to action, which is this is how you can help. This is how you can be a part of us achieving this bigger future. And the final part is that emotional clothes wrapping it up, tying it back to either the mission or or completing the circle of this story that leaves them with this emotional connection. But now they’ve see why why we’re doing this. They also know how they can be a part of it and that’s the framework in which we start to create questions that we start to elicit out in each of the different interviews. Sherry, this is a real art because that’s a lot to pack into what’s probably gonna be, you know, like a ford of five minute video or so bad. It’s doable, of course. Yeah, yeah. And i mean, in the session, we’re going toe share case study where one organization was ableto talk about their recreational programme with kids, but at the end of the day, they were able to demonstrate how they had a fifty seven thousand seven hundred seventy percent return on investment in those chilled children in terms of really transforming their earning potential over their lives. Just buy this, you know, recreational after school program and talk about and your fund-raising appeal if you’re able teo to share those stories, talk about those kids experience and at the end of the day, say, oh, by the way, give us five hundred dollars, and we’ll turn that into two hundred eighty nine thousand dollars for these children over the course of, you know, their lifetime that’s, very powerful and, you know, checkbooks are flying nah bins what if we’re in our studio session and it’s not going so well? Our interview is not really loosening up very tense you’re not getting the kind of emotion you’re hoping for. What what can we do to you? Break that besides achy gong slap anything else we can do? Like in them in that moment? Loosen him or her up? Yeah, yeah, you know, first of all, i always try with something with physiology. So some physical movement, whether it be breathing or others just to kind of, you know, shake out some of the stiffness there. If that doesn’t work, then i should start to shift into what are they passionate about? We totally go off or off camera off mike now, mike, or even even if the camera’s still on, but i shift their focus on hey, you know what? What do you know? What are you most passionate about? Tell me about your favorite, you know, and start getting really personal, and when they start to then connect with what really means, you know something to them, then it slowly they slowly start to kind of open up in that way. So i found that to be really effective, it might actually be a good idea to keep the camera rolling or the mike rolling because you might capture something really good whether they know it’s being captured or not. They’re there more of these because you’ve broken that i see you looking the tension about okay, let’s, create anything you want, but i was just saying, you know, a lot of it is the magic and editing, so if you know that framework that yasmin laid out and you know, that’s, what you’re going for, your looking for those nuggets that you’re going to put into that framework when you go to create your video and edit it together. And that that’s a really good point. Sherry, is that you know, when you’re looking at the post production editing process, you wanna have someone on your team that understands the story framework here? Not just someone that’s really a great good, you know, an editor or your your brother in law who knows howto video. But someone who understands the purpose understands the story’s understands elements of marketing as well so that they can put those pieces together in a meaningful way. Alright, we have plenty of time together. So you took some now about postproduction. We moved into that suddenly, that was well done. Thank you, baizman. What? What more about postproduction? Aside from let’s not have an amateur doing it. What else? What else can we say? You know, post production actually starts with preproduction. Always found that it’s very, very important to know the roadmap rather than shooting a bunch of content audio or visual and then just dumping it on to someone and saying here, figure it out so it’s it’s it’s essential to be involved throughout the process s so that’s, really, the key part here and then the other part is, is to understand buy-in to have someone who really understands the dynamics of human conversation per se, you know, there’s certain ways in which people speak that are more flattering than others. And so it’s it’s a very subtle nuance of how to cut the foot the pieces and then start assembled them together and then tie in either music or other elements that enhance that experience, whether it be visuals or other things as well to it sounds like you’re strongly suggesting that this be done by a professional. Yes, absolutely on dh they be involved from the beginning? Not just that you’ve given them a raw video file, and now they have to try, too. Kraft, what you’re describing? Great. Yeah, yeah, i think specially for your your fund-raising appeal videos and maybe the things on your website you’re going to ask people to donate to your cause. But i think for and you can correct me if you disagree, but for your maybe website testimonials or other things, you know, in our session, yasmin’s going to actually do one. On his iphone so just depends on what the purpose again understanding what is the purpose of the video? Your beauty that’s an excellent point. Yeah, i mean, we were we were talking last several minutes about the least, i think the the video that shone at the gala that ideally is evoking tears and and moving a room of seven hundred people or, you know, whatever, but on the other end of the spectrum share your point is really well taken. This could be very low production value with somebody with an iphone on dh can still be very, very moving. Yeah, absolutely doesn’t the production values don’t have to be high to be compelling? Yes. Depends what your purpose is. Yeah, and and and again, it’s, just starting with understanding, understanding your purpose, understanding your audience, understanding your call to action on and then finding the right medium for that. Um, i’m still going. Yeah, absolutely. It’s it’s really about having a storytelling mindset, it’s about having a mindset of thinking about what? What are we doing right now? And is who is this meaningful for? And then let’s just capture that moment, especially with technology these days. With, you know, our smartphones or iphones or android phones, you know, the cameras and the equipment is so advanced and it’s, i mean, you could capture a great experience bar trying to do it in the dark, but, i mean, if you think about wow, if i’m constantly thinking about how can i share this moment with someone else and who would benefit and why they would benefit, then then you’re you’re ready to go and as far as, like professional editing, you know, quite honestly, people can edit themselves, but really, i find that, like ninety plus percent of the clients and people i work with it’s a tedious process and that’s something that if they can learn how to improve the quality of capturing the experience that they can handed off to someone else, even if it’s simple edits it’s accessible and affordable for just even the average person who’s just doing a video for their they’re easing or something like that by phone has been picked up his phone as he was talking for those who are not watching the video as a visual. So i mean, it’s just it could be just that simple. Sure. You look like you want to add something. No, i’m just a green. Okay, oppcoll we still have another couple of minutes left together. What if i not ask you that? What have we not talked about? It doesn’t matter what stage of it is, what more would you like to say? It’s a great topic, i think. Just a kind of reiterate it’s about thinking about this experience, the interview or the video really as an opportunity for for you to help someone else give and and the way that they give is through their insights and experience. So we appreciate the opportunity to be here with you, tony, to be able to share and so it’s a it’s, a conversation and it’s an opportunity to give, and i think that really, when you start thinking of it this way, it alleviates a lot of stress and anxiety around the experience. Yeah, i’d love to leave loved leave it there, but we still have a couple minutes left, so i’m gonna press it’ll further on something i was thinking about when you’re recording. Do we do we need tohave an interviewer? Or should we just let the person kind? Of go free form and on dh hit on the topic questions hoping that they’ll do that or we need to have an interviewer. I i think yes, i think so. And unless the person is experience and very skilled with being able to create a connection themselves with either the camera, they’ve they’ve had either training or they could do it naturally. But i would say that the majority of the people are looking to have an interview because the goal is to experience a moment of connection. And how can you experience a connection without having some other person person? Lester trained to connect? Yeah, yes, directly to account. And so to answer your question, yes. Ah, it’s important to have at least someone there to connect with. Okay, yeah, sure, because i think it’s not it can be very scripted, and we’re trying to avoid that scripted feel so an interviewer helps reduce that that scripted feel better, more connection, okay? And, ah, there is one story i’d like to share and it’s about giving as well, too, and sherry’s heard this story a number of times because we actually start third i’m speaking together here, but last year, we were at the non-profit technology conference, and both of us were there to writing. So you guys last year, samaritan picked you up last year we missed each other in d c. Yeah, so sure. And i were both staying with our good friends neil and heather. Now new one. Heather had this amazing ten year old daughter named kendall. And every morning when we sit down for breakfast, kendall would just light up the room and she’d ask questions, and she will have about a minute left. Okay. Okay, so, so so anyway, you’re trained, so i know what you know. I’m gonna tell party there’s just to the store here, and i will re kapin the session here. Don’t worry about the way we wanna hear your story. Okay. All right. So so then ah, went the last morning that were there. She just barely looked up from her bowl and i said, hey, what’s going on, you seem different and she said, yeah, i’ve got to go sell girl scout cookies today i said, well, what’s wrong with that. People love cookies she said, yeah, but every time i get out there i get rejected and so i said, yeah, gosh, you know, i totally understand, so i asked her i said, hey, candle, how much of your cookies she said they’re four dollars a box? So i said here, here’s, twenty dollars, once you give me five boxes, she said really has like, yeah, it’s like, but here’s the thing i don’t eat cookies myself and so she but i want you to do what what i want to do is i want you to give these cookies to five people that you’ve never met before. All of a sudden her eyes lit up, she ran to her mom and said, mom, guess what? We get to give cookies away then? And i said, now here, kendall here’s, the reason why i want you to give those cookies away cause i want you to know what it’s like to make someone’s day. I want you to see, hear and feel their appreciation, and then when you’re out there and you’re asking someone to ask by a box of cookies, try this instead. Ask them hey, is there someone in your life that you really care about? I’d like to help you make their bay by giving them a box of cookies. So what we’re doing is we’re creating an opportunity for someone to give and so similar to this interview experience when you create an opportunity to give you shift that dynamic, so outstanding, we’re gonna leave it there. Thank you very, very much. You your favorite cookies with thin mints, by the way about us so good on this. Emotions are number two yasmin win he’s, founder and ceo of vibranceglobal and sherry cheney jones’s, president of measurement resource is non-profit radio coverage of ntc twenty fifteen the non-profit technology conference, thanks so much for being with us deep pockets with maria semple is coming up first, wagner cpas they do go way beyond the numbers for you. They have got dozens of policy statements for you to download a wireless device policy like no talking or texting while you’re driving for business purposes. Segregation of duties for financial oversight this chart will designate for you who should sign the checks? Who should write the checks? Who posts the accounts receivable? Who approves the payroll? It tells you who to assign each of these task too, and a bunch of other tasks. There’s a whistleblower policy, a conflict of interest policy, a travel policy, dozens of policies too many for me to name them all, go to wagner cps dot com creek resource is then guides stop wasting your time using business accounting software for your books you aren’t a business you’re non-profit appaloosa counting is designed for non-profits built from the ground up to make your financial management simple and affordable. It’s fun to counting, advanced reporting, donation tracking and more it’s all in one easy to use software they’re at non-profit wizard dot com check that out now. Time for tony take two i cut down my five minute plan giving marketing tips to a video that’s about three minutes long took it all down twenty five to three did the phone segment on the august eighteenth show? If you want a quick refresher video, you can have the takeaways in a three minute video. Plus, of course, there’s a link to the full facebook live video it’s at tony martignetti dot com for those five minutes plan giving marketing tips that is tony’s take two and here is marie a simple with deep pockets. Maria semple is with us. She is the prospect finder, the trainer and speaker on prospect research. Her website is the prospect finder dot com, and her book is panning for gold. Find your best dahna prospects now she’s our doi end of dirt cheap and free ideas. You can follow her on twitter at maria simple. Welcome back from vacation, maria. Thanks, tilly. Great to be back here with you. I’m glad you are. Where were you on vacation? We took the kids who are both in college. We took them on spring break and went down to riviera. Maya in mexico. Was this a selling vacation? I know you’re an avid sailor. No, it was land based. But it was wonderful. We did get out on a little catamaran to play that they had available at the resort, you know, to take out on your own. Just, you know, a smaller one. There was fun. There were times where your college kids thrilled about going on spring break with their mom and dad and sitting on the beach instead of being with their friends and drinking beers. Actually, they were. They were just fine with it. And, yeah, we won’t address the other. Part of that, i’m sure if they’re below twenty one that i’m certainly don’t drink beers or anything, are they? They’re they’re of age. They put it that way. Okay, okay, um, well, i’m glad you’re back. Uh, we’re talking about finding pockets of of affluence in communities. This this comes up in your practice, it does. It comes up a lot in, especially when i’m doing seminars or workshops in front of live groups, you’ve inevitably always have somebody raised their hand and say, g, we we really like to know a little bit more about our communities in terms of affluence. What what are the more affluent, zip zip codes on dh then, you know, what is philanthropy looking like in general amongst high net worth individuals? So i thought it might be kind of interesting for us to take some time and talk about what some of the resources are that are available online to kind of examine. You know, both of those areas. Okay, before we go online, is there any chance of starting with your immediate internal resources, like you’re bored? You could could you start there, perhaps? Oh, yeah, absolutely. You could definitely start. With your board what what i think is usually helpful, though, is if you very often, if if you goto your board and try and have a conversation at a board meeting or a development committee meeting and just kind of say, well, who do you know, give us the names of everyone, you know, you know, sometimes it’s better to kind of have maybe sort of almost vetted list first to se gi these air, some people we’ve identified or these air some affluent zip codes we’ve identified in our region? Does anybody know any of these people, or does anybody know anybody in the in the zip code? Because then now you’re getting them to really focus in on some specific people or some specific communities, and then, you know, versus them just trying to figure out who they know in their entire world or roll adex, okay, so we’re going to go online to try to generate these resource is start t these resources to try to generate lists and give people names and communities and things like that, too, jog their memories. Yeah, i think i think that works at a little bit better for a lot of boards, because a lot of people are a little bit more perhaps reserved, or they say, well, you know, who is it that you want me to bring to the table here, give me a little bit more parameter around that. Okay? Well, you’re our diet of dirt cheap and free, so where should we get started with this? So, you know, the census pulls together a lot of great data about communities, and that really is the basis for a lot of these statistics that you can get regarding not only where income levels are and wealth, but how what the makeup is of the population, right? So this could have implications not only for the fund-raising side of your non-profit but also thinking about programs and services that you offer. And, you know, maybe you have certain services that are more geared toward females are more geared towards certain types of populations, maybe immigrants, so you would want to know how you know, what is our population, makeup and how well, with this programme are service you’ve made have a sense that this might be something that you want to offer at your non-profit but not knowing the exact make of of the community you you would probably be, you know, better off. Just kind of doing a little bit of research to see. Well, just what are the numbers of the people in that community that make up that population? Ok, how do we access the census data? So one source is directly from the census itself. It’s it’s called american fact finder. And the website is a fact finder to roman that’s, the numeral two three arabic. We know that’s the arabic numerals, right. The arabic numerals, right back finder to dot census dot gov. So that is a pretty good place to start, because what you can actually dio is you can put in your specific zip code that you would like to do a little bit of research on. And you can get information, for example, like the average adjusted gross income for that community versus the entire state. What charitable contribution deductions are in that zip code. So that could because tito that’s very interesting. Yeah, it’ll. So i had gone in in prep preparation for this particular show today. I went in and put my own zip code in and saw that the average charitable contributions were three thousand sixty two dollars, right? So if you’re trying to think about where tio really start mining specific communities, it could be an interesting way to see if that how about community compares to other nearby communities, and you can also look at income income statistics there you can look at income, you can look at average adjusted gross income. You, khun look att estimated median household income. Andi khun, look att house values as well. So i thought that was kind of interesting because a lot of people will say, well, g, you know it it seems to be that the communities where there might be hyre hyre home values could potentially then translate to higher income bracket and potentially hyre giving as well, yes, interesting so you can you can play with these different variables of income and assets and charitable deductions average terrible reductions in the right zip code, for example, in my zip code. One thing that i found to be kind of interesting when i looked at the estimated median house value in in two thousand eleven as it was broken down by race, um, the asian community came out highest at just over five hundred seventy five thousand. The next highest level was the white population at four, sixty nine and change. So it was interesting to see how, how even they can break it down by race, based on the information found and census data. Okay, and that’s all that fact finder to dot census dot gov, right and another site as well. Which is it? City dash data dot com mom, where you can look at a lot of this broken down but focusing first on the census site that i mentioned the fact finder site, you can download their data into excel spreadsheet. So i thought that was interesting, because then you can you know, if you if you needed to do any type of reporting at your in you can take those spreadsheets and share them with other people within your organization, be that, you know, staff, or or bored, you can also sort you can also sort by different variables, right? Absolutely. And then they also had poverty, statistics and statistics around veterans. So if you were looking to try and figure out where the poverty stats, where, you know, maybe you’re trying to develop programming for lower income children in your community or something like that. You can try and take a look at where those stats are also some non-profits are addressing the needs of veterans, and so you could try and determine what the numbers of veterans in our communities and trying to come up with programming for that specific population. Okay, that’s a very good one. I love that one. Ah, yeah. All right, you mentioned city hyphen data. Dot com city data city data dot com there’s a hyphen in there? Absolutely. And i can put these on your facebook page, if you like after the show. Well, yeah, i’m going to do the takeaways and i’ll have a bunch of them. But you, khun, you can then add some or two you’ll be able to add beyond what i what i put in the takeaways. Okay, okay, terrific. So there again, you can search by zip code and again, you can look at the those adjusted gross income figures, charity contributions, home values again broken down by race and so forth. And, you know, you can a lot of the data you’ll you’ll note it’s laid out a little bit differently. So i think what i would say to your listeners is checked both of them out. See what type of information it is that you want to pull out of this. Andi, see if if if the data is going to be useful for you, it’s presented a little bit differently on the two websites. But i have a feeling that the actual core of where all the data is coming from. It’s really? All from the census. Oh, interesting. Ok, same data differently presented. So youse both lookit lookit? Both. Okay, absolutely. This is an example. You know, i love this example of ah, value that the government provides us through the through the census. Yeah. It’s all it’s all there, it’s free. And so why not take advantage of you know, all of this? All this work legwork somebody else has done for you. What else you got for us? So then i was beginning to think about, well, let’s, look, a philanthropy in general and the mindset, perhaps, of high net worth individuals and two interesting studies that are out there. One is by bank of america. They do a high net worth study on the last one was done at the end of two thousand twelve and another a source that i do want to give some time to talk about is the chronicle of philanthropy because they did something in two thousand twelve called hyre how america gives you remember that and the make of america’s study it is quite lengthy. They do have an executive summaries well, and that girl is a bit longer. So but of course, if you if you just google the bank of america hi network study, you’ll get right to it as well. But what i thought was kind of interesting is that, you know, that they profile how the high net worth individuals are giving now. So where the state of giving wass and at that point in time when they did this study and also how they might be projected to give so i would really encourage the non-profits to take a look at that, especially if they’re looking to, you know, really increase their individual giving program. Ah, most high net worth individuals just to kind of understand where the mind set is for these individuals. Okay, so this is sort of after you’ve identified people that this isn’t really to identify pockets of affluence in your community, but how to deal with those affluent populations, right? Why they why they give what motivates their giving? What motivates their giving? Right? So trying to trying to figure out where they’re giving, where, where might it be going? What is their mindset? So it’s one thing to be able to identify those pockets, but then how do you interact with them? How do you take that data and make it useful for you? Right? So one thing that i found interesting on on one of the pages of the report was that of that particular report was that the high net worth donors are increasing, they’re increasingly directing their gifts towards operating support. Ah, and this is something i get all the time. When i hear at my seminars, people will say, well, you know, the foundations and corporations they really want seem to really want ty, they’re giving to very specific program, nobody wants to fund operating support, but here in this report, they’re saying that they are open to the high net worth individuals are open to ah e-giving you contributions toward operating support. So i think that this is a huge opportunity for non-profits to focus up, because obviously these donors do understand about overhead. They understand that there has to be money for the lights and the heat, et cetera, and i think that you can easily direct some of your conversations to that. That sector. All right, we have to. We have to take a break for a couple minutes. Maria, when we come back, we’ll keep talking about these deep pockets, how to find them. We’ll talk about that chronicle of philanthropy survey, and i know that you have some others, so everybody stay with us. Like what you’re hearing a non-profit radio tony’s got more on youtube, you’ll find clips from a standup comedy, tv spots and exclusive interviews catch guests like seth gordon. Craig newmark, the founder of craigslist marquis of eco enterprises, charles best from donors choose dot org’s aria finger, do something that worked. And naomi levine from new york universities heimans center on philantech tony tweets to, he finds the best content from the most knowledgeable, interesting people in and around non-profits to share on his stream. If you have valuable info, he wants to re tweet you during the show. You can join the conversation on twitter using hashtag non-profit radio twitter is an easy way to reach tony he’s at tony martignetti narasimhan t i g e n e t t i remember there’s a g before the end he hosts a podcast for the chronicle of philanthropy fund-raising fundamentals is a short monthly show devoted to getting over your fund-raising hartals just like non-profit radio, toni talks to leading thinkers, experts and cool people with great ideas. As one fan said, tony picks their brains and i don’t have to leave my office fund-raising fundamentals was recently dubbed the most helpful non-profit podcast you have ever heard. You can also join the conversation on facebook, where you can ask questions before or after the show. The guests were there, too. Get insider show alerts by email, tony tells you who’s on each week and always includes link so that you can contact guests directly. To sign up, visit the facebook page for tony martignetti dot com. Lively clamber station top trends, sound advice, that’s tony martignetti, yeah, that’s. Tony martignetti non-profit radio. Oh, and i’m travis frazier from united way of new york city, and i’m michelle walls from the us fund for unicef. More live listener love going abroad, sweden, iran and carefully uk but it’s not spelled carefully like the word of course, i could be bringing mispronouncing it, but it looks like carefully to me. C e r p h i l l y welcome live listen, love also tampa, florida, atlanta, georgia, moorestown, new jersey and two unidentified in the u s so if i didn’t say your city, your state, you could be you could be masking, which which which i can’t say i blame you for, but we know you’re out there. We see you very vaguely somewhere in the fifty states. Maria simple. I want to thank you for including a picture of me on your the prospect finder, micro fiber cleaning cloth. Thank you like that. I don’t know how i feel about my face being smeared across people’s monitors and smartphones, but but i think there’s a little picture of you and me in the studio, on the arm, on your cleaning cloth. Thank you very much. You’re very welcome, very welcome. So i decided that sometimes that some of my speaking engagements i might be able to hand that out and be a nice little thing that people could keep and think about our faces for years to come. And i noticed, too. If i if i stretch it vertically, it makes me look hydrocephalus. Oh, my goodness, i haven’t tried them, and if you stretch it horizontally, then looks like i’ve gained about one hundred twenty five pounds. Can i send out some listener lovas? Well, three times? Well, because of your show, i was asked to go and speak to women in philanthropy of western massachusetts back in february, and they’re huge fans of your show. And so i just wanted to give a shout out to them and say hi, thank you very much. Women and women in philanthropy western mass and they’ve invited me to come, but they’re booked until, like, next mayor april or something like that. Twenty fifteen not talking about this year. They’re booked until spring of next year sometime. So tired. Organized group. Yeah. I have time to make my reservations. Um okay. Let’s. Go back to our deep pockets. Was there anything more you want to say about the bank of america study of high net worth philanthropy, or we finished with that? No, you know it’s very in depth, really good projections i found on pages sixty three to sixty five of the study of how they’re giving now and how they’re projected to give so people are feeling a little overwhelmed with study, and they want to at least try and figure out what wears what this all means for me. And where should i go with it? I would say they should focus on pages sixty three to sixty five study that’s incredibly valuable, because and so is the fact that you said earlier there’s an executive summary, because if i was listening and i heard sixty five pages in a survey, i think i’d move on to your next suggestion. But that’s, just me, but it is called the bank of america study of high net worth philanthropy, and as marie said, you can search for that and get it for free. What do we got over the chronicle of philanthropy? This how america gives thing. So what they did back in two thousand twelve, they, uh, they decided to make an entire map of the united states you can put in your zip code and get a lot of data. On where philanthropy is for those specific zip code. So i thought that was kind of interesting because, as you know, the chronicle is one of those resource is that a lot of people really rely on. Um so when i gone in, i put my zip code in, i took a look at they give a breakdown by total contributions what the median contribution is. And then they also give you the median discretionary income. Um, and then they give it as a percentage, they give you the percentage of income given. So i thought that was it was pretty good. They give a breakdown as well by demographic. So you just have an idea. You can look at a breakdown by age, race as well as education level of the population. Uh, just in case that was of interest to you. And they give a breakdown by income level of giving. So if you wanted to see, like they break it down between the people who make between fifty, the study basically starts at assuming on income level of at least fifty thousand. So fifty thousand to one hundred, and then one hundred, two hundred, two hundred. And up and then all income levels help me understand how you would use all these sites. And i know there’s another one one of two we’re going to get to but some claim gives you ah, project a task a need. How would you use all these different sites? You go to all of them? Or do you? You find some from some sites and other info from other sites. How do you approach this? Well, it really depends on what specific piece of information they want. Most of the time they’re giving me the name of an individual. Teo actually profile for them, and other times they might come to me and say, well, you know, we’re interested in it banding and doing some proactive prospecting, you know, where are some of the more affluent neighborhoods that we should be looking to perhaps hold cultivation events? Um, sent mailers out, too, so they’re just trying to identify what are those pockets near them that they should be potentially targeting if they want to get into some proactive prospect and get some new names of people associated with their organization? Right? And if that’s your that’s, your charge, the ladder to find those pockets. How would you how would you approach that? So i would probably go. Teo, both chronicle of philanthropy study, as well as the census data to try and identify where those hyre income levels are and those those locations where people are giving more. So they be more of, i guess, the more likelihood of success if they’re both approaching people with higher incomes and also are accustomed to giving hyre levels of money. Okay, okay, on. And then, of course, you have to devise. You know, what is going to be our plan if we want to go to that entire zip code? What? You know what? What are we going to do? Are we going to divide the mailer to go to all the households there’s in every door direct program, for example, that the post office runs where you can target specific zip codes? Um, every every door direct, no shoot. Right? We’re out of time. Let’s. Hold that every door. Direct, let’s, let’s. Talk about that next time. And ah, unfortunately have to leave it there. So there are some other resource is that you have? Which we will include? You can add to the to the takeaway is that i do on the facebook page, okay, sure, absolutely. Thank you very much, maria simple, the prospect finder at the prospect finder dot com, and on twitter at marie. A simple thank you, maria thank you next week, run like a business and program you’re bored. If you missed any part of today’s show, i beseech you, find it on tony martignetti dot com. These are our sponsors weinger sepa is guiding you beyond the numbers. Wagner, cps dot com you’re not a business you’re non-profit apolo see accounting. It is software designed for non-profits non-profit wizard dot com, and we be spelling supercool spelling bee fundraisers we b e spelling dot com creative producer is claire meyerhoff. Sam liebowitz is the line producer shows social media is by susan chavez, and this music is by scott stein be with me next week for non-profit radio big non-profit ideas for the other ninety five percent go out and be green what’s not to love about non-profit radio tony gets the best guests check this out from seth godin this’s the first revolution since tv nineteen fifty and henry ford nineteen twenty it’s the revolution of our lifetime here’s a smart, simple idea from craigslist founder craig newmark insights orn presentation or anything? People don’t really need the fancy stuff they need something which is simple and fast. When’s the best time to post on facebook facebook’s andrew noise nose at traffic is at an all time hyre on nine a m or eight pm so that’s when you should be posting your most meaningful post here’s aria finger ceo of do something dot or ge young people are not going to be involved in social change if it’s boring and they don’t see the impact of what they’re doing so you gotta make it fun and applicable to these young people look so otherwise a fifteen and sixteen year old they have better things to dio they have xbox, they have tv, they have their cell phones me dar is the founder of idealist took two or three years for foundation staff to sort of dane toe, add an email address card. It was like it was phone. This email thing is right and that’s, why should i give it away? Charles best founded donors choose dot or ge. Somehow they’ve gotten in touch kind of off line as it were on dh and no two exchanges of brownies and visits and physical gift. 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Nonprofit Radio for September 11, 2015: The 9/11 Giving Effect

Big Nonprofit Ideas for the Other 95%

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My Guests:

David Campbell & Cristine Cronin: The 9/11 Giving Effect

David Campbell is associate professor of public administration and department chair at Binghamton University. He has first-hand 9/11 experience from his work as vice president at Community Service Society (NYC) on September 11, 2001.

We talk about his opinion piece from 2011 in The Chronicle of Philanthropy, “The Lessons of 9/11 Philanthropy.”

Then Cristine Cronin, president of NYCharities.org is with me to discuss the first online giving responses to the attacks; what’s changed as a result; lessons learned about responsiveness and collaboration; and the future of the “Donate Now” button.

Both interviews are from Nonprofit Radio on September 9, 2011.

 


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Hello and welcome to tony martignetti non-profit radio big non-profit ideas for the other ninety five percent. I’m your aptly named host it’s september eleventh that’s always a touchy day for me, which makes it me especially glad that you’re with me, i’d bear the pain of otitis media if i had to hear that you missed today’s show the nine eleven giving effect. Christine cronin, president of n y charities dot org’s is with me to discuss the first online giving responses to the attacks what’s changed as a result, lessons learned about responsiveness and collaboration and the future of the donate now button. And david campbell, associate professor of public administration and department chair at binghamton university, he has first hand experience from his work as vice president at community service society and why, see, on september eleven, two thousand one, we talked about his opinion piece from two thousand eleven in the chronicle of philanthropy. The lessons of nine eleven philanthropy those two interviews air from non-profit radio on september ninth, two thousand eleven. Then christine cronin joins me live to share her reaction to what she said four years ago, and consider whether nine eleven still impacts giving on tony’s take two. Where were you on september eleventh? We’re sponsored by pursuant full service fund-raising data driven and technology enabled, you’ll raise more money pursuing dot com let’s get started with the nine eleven giving effect here’s christine cronin with me in the studio now is christine cronin. She led the creation and launch of charity wave dot com, which was one of the internet’s first e-giving sites started in nineteen ninety nine and as a result, she was on the front line of e-giving on september eleventh, two thousand one, she has worked in washington d c including as national president of women’s equity action league, which led the successful passage of title nine originating sports equity for women. Christine is now president of n y charities dot or ge. And i’m very glad that her work from september eleventh and today brings it to the studio. Christine conan, welcome. Hi, tony. How are you, it’s? A pleasure to have you. What was the state of e-giving in two thousand won? Well, right from the start, which i got involved in nineteen, ninety nine people were very cautious about using their credit cards online and so the ones who were who had even been there yet were what i would call the early adapters. So people who are always the first to do everything and and i also noticed that a lot of credit cards were being used because of awards and points. And so people love switching from check writing to credit card use for philanthropy because it allowed them to collect more points that charitable pursuits the thousand dollar gift gets me a thousand miles. So that was actually a help to getting app getting use of cards online. Absolutely. And i still see that today with our clients, people who want to do gif ts in the five and six figures by credit card for all those valuable points you were at charity wave tell us about charity wave. This was on september eleventh, two thousand one tells about charity wave. Well, justice charitable giving is often a small project within any company. Charity wave was built at the instigation of the chairman of a computer encryption firm called wave systems and the chairman who his name, peter sprague and he’s, the former chairman of national semiconductor. For thirty years, i wanted to use his fledgling e commerce infrastructure for charitable giving, but nobody in his company, which was scientists computer geeks, you know, really understood what he was talking about. And so he was helicopter skiing with a mutual friend one day, and he said, i want to use my e commerce infrastructure, charitable giving nobody understands what i want to do, and my mutual friends said, i think i know someone who would understand and of course, a lot of my background was non-profit so they called me from the mountain, and they said, would you meet? And i said yes and that’s how it all began, okay? And then, well, let me remind listeners that we’re live tweeting and the hashtag to follow is non-profit radio hashtag non-profit radio and just to sort of set the scene for moving us to september eleventh, i was monitoring a chat small non-profit chat, which is hashtag sm and pee chat, and i was not just monitoring, but i was on that this morning run by pamela grow and you can follow pamela on twitter, using that name at pamela grow and one of the quotes that i was really poignant to. Me was from someone who said he was in the tenth grade. And on september eleventh, casey deal away. He’s at k c, j, d and he said, you know, a tenth grade, just trying to figure out what it all meant september eleventh what? What was the charity wave response was immediate? You were up that afternoon, right? Tell us that. I know, and it actually wasn’t me who was the original instigator. We were a cz much in shock as everybody else in new york city, and we actually were at fifty seventh and sixth avenue, and i look down, you could see everybody walking because public transportation had stopped and everybody was silent and we were glued in front of a television, and suddenly a young staff person turned to me, and he said we should set up an emergency relief site, and i just stared at him for several seconds because never in my wildest imagination had i thought i would ever set up an emergency relief site for new york city, and we were already working very closely with united way international. So we were handling charitable giving two disasters all over the world for united way international. And yet this was still just such a stunning concept to me. But then i realized he was right, and i called our engineers, who were based in massachusetts and where our servers were, which were completely safe, and everybody just jumped on the idea, and we had a sight up that afternoon with united way international. So you pulled yourselves away from what everybody else was watching toe actually dig into work, right? It was up that afternoon, you know? And what was the what was the first response i know in the first few days or a week? Well, it was interesting that evening, i was still at the office, and i just wrote an email and i said at this time of, you know, profound tragedy, you know, i just want you to know that we’ve set up an emergency relief site for washington, new york and pennsylvania, and one hundred percent of your gifts will go two victims of these tragedies and what really surprised me because i think many of us did not know that the phones were down and we were so swept up in watching television and in the in the moment that we didn’t realize the phones were ringing and people all over the world because i wrote to everyone in my address book, people all over the world wrote back, and their first words were, thank god you’re alive because no one could reach any of us, and we didn’t even know that i mean, it had just went past us, but then immediately the gifts started coming in, people were desperate to do something, and the gifts came in from all over the world all over the world, and we are going to talk a little about the international response you got. But so even that afternoon and that evening, gifts were coming in. Yes, you have to take a break with christine cronin. We’re talking about the nine eleven effect she’s, the president of my charity’s dot or ge take a break and stay with us. You’re tuned to non-profit radio tony martignetti also hosts a podcast for the chronicle of philanthropy fund-raising fundamentals is a quick ten minute burst of fund-raising insights published once a month. Tony’s guests are expert in crowdfunding, mobile giving event fund-raising direct mail and donor cultivation. Really all the fund-raising issues that make you wonder am i doing this right? Is there a better way there is? Find the fund-raising fundamentals archive it. Tony martignetti dot com that’s marketmesuite n e t t i remember there’s a g before the end, thousands of listeners have subscribed on itunes. You can also learn maura, the chronicle website. Philanthropy. Dot com fund-raising fundamentals the better way. Welcome back to tony martignetti non-profit radio big non-profit ideas for the other ninety five percent, you can join us on twitter the the hashtag to follow is non-profit radio if you’d like tio call and talk to christine kronen were at eight seven seven for eight o for one two oh eight, seven, seven, four ito for one two oh, from the small non-profit chat that i joined earlier this afternoon earlier this morning, this came from amy cept. She said, my stomach still drops thinking of nine eleven. Amy cept is at nim beust. And i am b y christine cronan is with me and she’s, the president of n y charities dot organ had direct firsthand experience on september eleventh. Christine, um, we talked just briefly, but what? I want to get into this a little about the international response that you got from from charity wave what was happening? It was amazing because we were affiliated by the next day with the new york times nine eleven fund and united way international. I mean, we were seen as a very serious player in the e philanthropy space. And so people wrote to us from all over. The world and we were in the new york times every single day as part of their giving campaign, because i just want to clear united way as well as new york times media’s giving right was need e-giving cases was where the charities you had started with, right? Right? Well, i called jack rosenthal, the president of the new york times company foundation, who we were already working with on neediest cases, and he said, you know, give me a few hours, and so by the next day, the new york times nine eleven fund had been initiated, and so we we went with those two major charities, so as a result, we were getting emails from people all over the world and and very, very touching emails. I mean, even today when i read them and i re read them, i realized how important it is for people to be able to reach out and express their feelings during a disaster and people all over europe and japan and other parts of the world, we’re writing to say something about their feelings about new york and in the depth of how they felt strongly about new york city. Whether they had been there or there, they had grown up there and that they wanted to do something and so many people throughout ideas like we can create these t shirts and we’ll sell them here and then we’ll send the money and every email it seemed at the time ended with what do you think? And i and i felt absolutely compelled to stay every single night, you know, until eleven and midnight responding to all of those. What do you think? Even though i didn’t necessarily know the answers, people were looking for an outlet, a place to do something and you charity wave and other outlets that eventually a rose. I gave them that opportunity. A little boy wrote from switzerland, and he said, i want to do something, but don’t ask me to raise any money, tell me what i can do. I mean, it was just some of them were just heartbreaking, so it was so it was very time consuming, but i did it on. And how about financially? Just in terms of the response to the site that way? Yes. Now remember, people were still hesitant about credit cards online at the point in time, but there’s something about a disaster which helps people, you know, jump over the fence and start using them and to quit writing checks. And so there was quite a surge in online giving, i think you know, overall within about six months, thes site raised just under two million dollars, which at that time was a lot for online giving for those who will be listening to the show on the archive. Trending right now on twitter is the hashtag biggest lesson learned from nine eleven so if if you’re listening live, you can look at that hashtag but for those who are in the archive you khun listening to the archive you khun, listen, look back to the hashtag biggest lesson learned from nine eleven and so let’s christine let’s turn to some of the lessons first, how how do you see online giving compared to other other methods of giving? Well, i was very used as everybody was in the non-profit space to direct mail and the average gift through direct mail for years had been around thirty five dollars, when i began working at wave systems than charity wave in nineteen ninety nine. One of the first things i noticed was the size of the gifts, and i thought to myself, wired there’s so many hundred dollars gifts, you know, it didn’t make sense to me, and i finally began to realise, as did others who were involved in philanthropy around the world, that people will give more with their credit cards than they will win the writing checks, and i sort of explained it to myself if i’m in macy’s and i only have a check in some cash, i’m going to spend less then if i’m in macy’s and have a few credit cards on me and so that’s sort of how i explained it, okay, but then the challenge, of course, becomes acquiring the donors online versus doing more traditional direct mail. Any advice around around that? Well, often they find you. I mean, i’ve actually found it easier to be online and to be in search engines, and two people find us more than we’re not spending at all this much time looking for donors, as we did before and let’s explain what is and why charities dot or ge? Well, after the internet bust, the wave systems had to shut down various parts of the company, and we were we were never something they made money on, in fact, you know, they were funding their funding it and and they were absorbing credit card fees, so we were oh, so truly one hundred percent of the gifts in the credit card processing fees went directly to the charities that that wave charities was they never anticipated nine eleven when they set up that procedure, and so we were, you know, immediately targeted as something they had to shut down. And so the chairman, at that point peter’s break said to me, well, what do you want to do next? You know, i’d be happy to help you, and i said, we know so much i said we should do this as a non-profit and he looked at me, he wasn’t sure you were okay, he was going to be part of that, and i said, oh, you’re going to be chairman started recruiting your board instantly in the first conversation, brilliant, and i said, but i would like, i don’t want our efforts to be so dispersed. I mean, we were really national and any charity in the country could have started using us his charity way, but it was very difficult to do. Unlimited resource is and so i said, let’s, just target a space and do it really well. And after nine eleven, you know, it was so obvious to me that i wanted to target new york because of the emotionalism of that entire time period. Okay, so and why charities dot organism is a portal that leads people to e-giving and also information and even volunteering right for new york chadband tax returns on every charity in new york state. And i figured there were about twenty five thousand, but there were really closer to sixty. And now there’s closer to over one hundred hundred thousand, right? So a little less than ten percent of all the charities in the country with all the public five o one c three charities, which is, like one point three million. Roughly one point, four are in new york state are their sites like and white charities dot or ge in other states? Well, just about everything has been tried. And there was certainly one called touch dc, which has now been sort of absorbed into network. For good, and then there was one out of louisiana, which was started by the louisiana givers, but it didn’t last. It was sort of what the internet boom was all about, just hundreds and hundreds of efforts to try to make something go. But i would say probably eighty to ninety percent of these things died because there weren’t the resource is to keep it going. And later on, we’re going to be joined by professor david campbell from binghamton university, who has an op ed piece in this week’s chronicle of philanthropy about lessons from nine eleven and the three of us will be talking a little about some of the charities that were created right around nine eleven and how few of those have actually exactly of those have actually survived? So let’s let’s move a little to the future of of online giving. What? What do you see as important? Or maybe some things that charities generally are not doing online, that they should or trends? Well, everybody pretty much knows they’ve gotta have a vibrant website, and they’ve got tio got to make sure the meditate eggs air, working with the search engine, but the problem really is is that often the staff at small non-profits aren’t trained in these areas and as you know, like ninety percent of the non-profits air subsisting on five hundred thousand dollars or less that’s why we’re big non-profit just for the other ninety five percent exactly, and so, but but the internet really has made many, many things easier, and i intentionally hyre young people because they know so much more about technology. Well, and even that idea on september eleventh, you said, came from a young staff person person absolutely so hyre the young certainly we’ve had lots of shows devoted to social media presence for non-profits how important that is and how even just get started. So listeners, you can look back to the archive for how to get started in social media, even if you’re a small shop and why charities dot org’s, there are facebook presence. Oh, yes, but that is his vibrant as it should be. So we we do run unlimited resource is and and we’ve had over fifty million dollars go through when, you know, we started on a shoestring in late two thousand four and so that’s a lot of work it so it’s a lot of effort on the part of staff to make sure everything goes well. Yes, and every charity, nearly every charity starts on a shoestring. There may be the the well endowed family that supports a charity in the outset because a family member because of a family member’s passion but that’s the unusual case nearly everybody starts out with a very small budget, very small board and a lot of passion. And how do you turn that into move that toward, you know, more of a business model, and there are ways for small non-profits do that as you’re you’re describing, but it also, you know, sort of explains, as you said, so many of them then go out of business because they are all start with passion, and if they’re lucky, they start with money. But, you know, you can’t it’s this it’s a heavily regulated area, and so there is a lot to do to keep a non-profit going and there’s a lot of paperwork that needs to be filled out by people who didn’t realize that that’s what they were getting into that’s, right? We had a show, just a couple. Weeks ago with jean takagi and emily chan are regular legal legal contributors talking about alternatives to starting a non-profit and some of them one of the ones that they like to quote the first when they’re talking to someone who wants to start non-profit is collaborating with an existing organisation, and we’re gonna talk about that with professor campbell when he joins us, we have just about a minute before the break, what do you see is the future in online giving? Well, it’s very exciting because i mean, the young people coming up, i feel like they almost have ah, charitable jean, you know, that we didn’t necessarily have, you know, and they i really can’t even envision a life without charity being a portion of it. Plus they been handling and dealing with technology since they were, you know, two and three and four, and so they have a level of comfort with technology that many of us never had. And so i think we’re going to be seen so many exciting effort’s online and on the internet as a result of this generation coming and rushed on dh younger than generation y with christine cronin she’s the president of n y charities dot or ge? She has first hand experience from september eleventh in online giving. We’re going to take a break right now after the break, we’ll be tony’s take two and then i’ll be joined by professor david campbell. We’ll be talking about his op ed piece in this week’s chronicle of philanthropy, which is based on lessons learned from his firsthand experience in september eleventh giving so i hope you’ll stay with us all that coming up first, pursuing you need more money pursuant helps you raise more money. They’re perfect for small and midsize shops because they have online tools and that means you pick what you need. You don’t have to be all in for some big program package that’s more than what your organization really requires prospector platform. I’ve talked about this before finds your upgrade ready donors who are lurking in your database, you know they’re in there, but which ones are they find them and engage with them through prospector platform. Pursuant dot com, you’ll raise more money. Where were you on september eleventh? I was on the campus of st john’s university in queens, new york, that school is up on a hill, and i was able to see the world trade center in lower manhattan, and i remember switching between watching close ups on tv and looking out my own view out my window at my office window, the office next to me had a tv in it, and i remember going back and forth between the tv and the window like the tv didn’t seem riel because it was removing me from something so close just a few miles away, but obviously looking out the window made it ah made it quite riel and there’s, no mistaking or forgetting about what you see with your own two eyes and asked on facebook and twitter where people were patrice morgan, she was home in greenwich, connecticut, watching on tv and knowing that her husband, rick, was on a train to grand central terminal in new york city no smartphones than two thousand won, so she knew that he didn’t know what was going on our own. Claire meyerhoff was in her radio days. She was anchoring the news for yusa today channel on x m radio and from their washington dc from their washington, d c studio teo, she was doing breaking news for them on on that day, michael graciano he was walking into seven world trade center and remembers seeing the first crash and debris falling around like rain. He says september eleventh. Like i said, always a little touchy for may. Still, fourteen years later, that’s tony’s take two for friday, eleventh of september thirty sixth show of the year, affiliate affections affections out to all the listeners and our many affiliate stations throughout the country. Affections? I mean, i’d love to say affiliate love, but i don’t get the liberation there, so you know it’s love, but we call it affiliate affections. Likewise, i’d like to say podcast love to all the podcast listeners, but, uh, it’s, this doesn’t work for me, so sending pleasantries toe all our podcast listeners over ten thousand of you, you know, it’s really love but podcast pleasantries and live listener love where’s that going let’s, start let’s start here in the u, s st louis, missouri, new bern, north carolina and do cane, pennsylvania live listener love to those listeners in those cities and going abroad. Xiao yang, china, ni hao seoul, south korea always checking in seoul. So grateful to you, i know i saved all time, but that’s, because because i am so grateful. Anya haserot and tokyo, japan konnichiwa also joining us tashkent, uzbekistan welcome, uzbekistan, lovett live with their love to you let’s continue with the nine eleven e-giving effect. David campbell joins the conversation i’m joined. Now i’m going to bring in professor david campbell. He is a professor at binghamton university and chair of the public administration department there. On september eleventh, two thousand one, he was vice president for programs at the community service society in new york city, and they were affiliated with the new york times need his cases, which christine cronin was just talking about will bring all that together. We’re talking about david campbell’s op ed piece in the chronicle of philanthropy this week titled the lessons of nine eleven philanthropy a decade later, i’m very pleased to welcome to the show from binghamton, new york. David campbell. Thank you, tony david, i well, i know you’re actually not in becomes and right now you’re unethical, but has binghamton doing there’s? A lot of flooding there and evacuations. Twenty thousand people have been evacuated in in binghamton, still a state of emergency, the building where i work has been flooded, at least the basement and and the first floor things are pretty grim, so i guess i would ask your listeners, too. Check out the local charities in broome county, united way of broome county and others that are looking at ways to provide assistance to the many people in the southern tier who’ve been affected by the flood. David on september eleventh you were vice president at community service society. Why don’t you explain what that organization did? Community service society is on old line social welfare organization that has always focused on the needs of low income new yorkers, and after nine eleven, we were sort of faced with the challenge. How does the organization adapt to this very riel and new set of circumstances facing new yorkers? And and a lot of my offense piece dealt with how we responded and how other established organizations responded to nine eleven as well. If you wanna link teo david campbell’s op ed piece, go to my blog’s m p g a d v dot com and in the post for today’s show there’s a link teo read david’s op ed piece we’re live tweeting the hashtag is non-profit radio were also on the phone, so if you want to call eight, seven, seven four aito for one two oh, for those who may still use the phone and maybe you’re not on twitter, david, you point out. Well, actually, before we go there, community service society was related to the neediest cases in new york, the new york times charity, right? Yes, for the new york times neediest fund, a seven or eight established non-profit organizations, the community service society is one. And after nine eleven, the new york times created a special new york times nine eleven media’s fund and, uh, supported those same seven or eight organisations and one or two more that were so specifically focused on disaster relief. So christine cronin, were you aware of community service society? Very much so we had a we had a donation screen and dropped down with every one of the seven agencies listed. So we were very involved. And david. Then on september eleventh, you well, from september eleventh, you’ve just to point out some some lessons for existing charities. And one of them is that that they’d be willing to step outside their traditional role. Can you can you say a little about that? Yes, i mean, this was the thing that troubled me the most. The story i tell in the op ed is having come back to new york on september thirteenth and talking to david jones, the ceo at community service, a sizing. Well, what should we do? And i thought disaster relief that’s not what community service society does and david’s comment to me was any organization to be relevant has to be responsive to this new big need facing new york city, and we had to figure out and he was right. We really had to figure out how do we adapt the capacities and skills we have as an organization to be responsive to these new needs? Faith thing, new york city residents, and we did it. It wasn’t as big a stretches, i thought, and i think one of the lessons is that organizations can adapt to new circumstances and make a big difference that way. And how quickly would you say you? You adapted and we’re ready to go? Well, we had always provided emergency assistance to families facing housing challenges so we were able almost immediately, to say we’re going to move away from finding providing exclusively eviction assistance to providing emergency financial assistance. We could do that within days, subsequent to that, we had to really learn what is this? What are the new needs that other new yorkers air facing? And how can we change our services, for example, providing information toe local non-profits about new disaster relief benefit? We did that kind of education that took us two, two, three, four weeks, but it was really sort of based on how the, how the system of disaster relief was evolving. So we had to evolve with other new york city charities who were trying to figure out what to do at the same time. The learning and adapting and christine, that was your lesson you you learned and adapted immediately when you’re young staffers suggested that you need to do something that right. Assume it’s a disaster happens it’s no longer business as usual, and you’re sort of like playing it day by day, hour by hour, and suddenly you may be in a room with twelve other charities who you sort of have friendly rivalries with because you’re all pursuing the same pots of gold at various foundations. But all of those rivalries have to end during a disaster, and it becomes simply what can we do? What we do is a group. How can we work together? How can we supplement each other’s efforts? And, you know, it’s not always the easiest thing to do, but you have no choice during a disaster. And david campbell, your your op ed points out in a quote, i think from the your ceo that ah, charity risks irrelevance if it doesn’t react too two to the disaster, in fact, that’s what that was the reality for new yorkers on september twelfth was that we had been attacked and three thousand new yorkers had been killed and many were displaced and struggling. And it was the only way to be relevant was to be responsive. In some ways, that was sort of what the community needed. And and that lesson took me a couple of days to figure out. But as christine point that we had to adapt because that’s what new york needed at that point and i want to bring in something that comes from the small non-profit chat that i was privileged to be with this morning before the show quote is from from shannon do little her her, she said that you must connect services to the tragedy in the aftermath of fund-raising and i think that’s pointing out sort of the same thing. You otherwise you risk irrelevance not only that you have to act, but that your services have to be related to the tragedy at hand. That’s chan and do a little and her twitter ideas at sl do little so christine, you just we’re talking about collaboration and david, you have a terrific story about collaboration around the windows of hope organization in september eleventh. Can you can you tell that story? Yes. So the windows of hope family relief fund is a a new organization that was created by a chef who who wanted to provide some assistance to the families of hospitality industry workers who died on nine eleven. And in that case, it was the families of workers that windows on the world than anyone else who worked in the hospitality industry who was killed, and this group of chefs and other hospitality industry professionals got together. And the month after nine eleven, some of you may remember a special event called dine out on october eleventh, two thousand one, and from that event and others raised six million dollars and subsequent another eleven million dollars within the year. And in october two thousand won the leaders of windows of hope came to community service society and said, we’ve raised this money. We want to help out this group of of the families of hospitality industry professionals who were killed. But where, chef, not social workers, we really need to figure out how to get the expertise to provide assistance quickly and effectively to the families who are affected. Can you help us? And so we, uh we agreed to collaborate with them because we had the expertise and how to how to provide this assistant. And we had knowledge as a social service organisation about how to distribute it effectively. So we leverage they leverage their expertise and their connections with people in the hospitality industry to raise money and focus on the concerns of the specific population, and we were able to provide the technical expertise to distribute. That money, so it was possible to help those families of hospitality industry workers who were killed. I just think that’s a great story about collaboration we have just about a minute before break. Christine, you have a comment on the story? Yes, i saw very much through jack rosenthal’s work, who is president of the new york times company foundation. He really focused in on the immigrant populations and and the people who are really out of the loop of social services, and he gave a lot of thought and and brought his resource is together to get to the people who would never be part of the normal social service structure and that’s that’s difficult to do because they often these people don’t want to be found, but they were desperately in need, you know, they’ve lost their their breadwinner. We’re talking about the nine eleven effect on tony martignetti non-profit radio we’re going to take a break and when we return, of course, so staying with me will be christine cronin, president of charities dot or ge, and david campbell who’s op ed pieces in this week’s chronicle of philanthropy about lessons from nine eleven stay with us like what you’re hearing a non-profit radio tony’s got more on youtube, you’ll find clips from stand up comedy tv spots and exclusive interviews catch guests like seth gordon, craig newmark, the founder of craigslist marquis of eco enterprises, charles best from donors choose dot org’s aria finger do something that worked and they only levine from new york universities heimans center on philantech tony tweets to he finds the best content from the most knowledgeable, interesting people in and around non-profits to share on his stream. If you have valuable info, he wants to re tweet you during the show. You can join the conversation on twitter using hashtag non-profit radio twitter is an easy way to reach tony he’s at tony martignetti narasimhan t i g e n e t t i remember there’s a g before the end he hosts a podcast for the chronicle of philanthropy fund-raising fundamentals is a short monthly show devoted to getting over your fund-raising hartals just like non-profit radio, toni talks to leading thinkers, experts and cool people with great ideas. As one fan said, tony picks their brains and i don’t have to leave my office fund-raising fundamentals was recently dubbed the most helpful non-profit podcast you have ever heard, you can also join the conversation on facebook, where you can ask questions before or after the show. The guests are there, too. Get insider show alerts by email, tony tells you who’s on each week and always includes link so that you can contact guests directly. To sign up, visit the facebook page for tony martignetti dot com. I’m christine cronin, president of n y charities dot orc. You’re listening to tony martignetti non-profit radio big non-profit ideas for the other ninety five percent. Welcome back. We’re talking about the nine eleven effect with christine cronin and professor david campbell. There are some lessons, david in your piece about small non-profits and how nimble they could be, and i think that windows of hope story is an outstanding one. That was it was a startup organization before we go a little further with that, christine cronin has some ideas about how big existing non-profits khun struggle in the midst of a disaster. Yes, often you find yourself in a pr disaster, even though it was so unintentional and you were really trying to do the right thing. And, for example, one of the major charities of the red cross explained that they often kept part of the money for future disasters, and they always had but that became a point of severe contention and ah, lot of bad press, and it haunted them for quite a while and then the including in congress? Yes, because red crosses congressional charter very, but as well as outside congress and then the salvation army, because so much money was coming in offered to pay basic expenses of people across the country, i mean across the state and city, they were flooded with people sending their bills in, and they couldn’t handle it. And then they found they had a pr disaster on their hands. And so, you know, you try to do the right thing, but often you find yourself in trouble later and david, the lesson you point out eyes that those big existing charities shouldn’t fear the small startups that emerge for disaster relief. Well, there’s always the fear, and you hear so much talk these days about we have too many non-profit organizations in a time of recession, we need to merge. And the takeaway i i took from nine eleven is that the windows of hope family relief fund, as christine was describing earlier, was able to meet the needs of a population that would otherwise be ignored, that those small organizations, really or the startup organizations can can fill a niche or metoo need that others are not meeting. And those immigrant workers those huh? Those families of hospitality industry people who were killed on nine eleven may not have been able to or willing to go to salvation army. They may not have been been nervous because of their, uh, their immigration status or or lack of familiarity with those traditional organizations, they go to a place they trusted, and that in that situation they went to the windows of hope family relief fund because they knew the chefs they knew the restaurant owners who started the fund and they trusted and felt confident with them. Community service society, founded in eighteen forty three, couldn’t offer that same assurance hard lesson for me to learn, but a really important one for leaders and nonprofit organizations to take away. You did some research on the two hundred fifty eight charities that sprung up as a result of september eleventh, and and they were able to spring up because the irs offered on expedited tax exemption approval, but very few of them exist now want to share your research, please? So i i found that there were two hundred fifty eight organizations, as you mentioned, that received expedited tax exempt status from the irs, and of those organizations on lee, thirty eight of them have have filed irs nine, ninety information returns in the past two years, which means more than likely that only those thirty eight continue to exist. I don’t necessarily. Think that that’s a bad thing. What it tells me is that many of those organizations may that have not filed nine nineties have gone out of business may have actually accomplished the goals they would have to accomplish, which was to provide immediate disaster assistance, most of the organization that continue to exist or those that have the strongest connection to nine eleven organisations of victims, families, organizations like windows of hope that our most connected and having most connected to nine eleven and haven’t enduring nine eleven related mission, too, to accomplish her to provide and so a lot of of new organizations with a short term mission but went out of business as soon as that mission was accomplished. I learned from the small non-profit chat earlier today that vermont public radio has created an audio memory quilt, and i thought that was by posted by at brendan kinney, and i just thought that that was an excellent example of tying e-giving today to the disaster and so not not wanted by certainly not trivializing but wanting to remember and tying the today’s giving to disaster ten years ago. And so there’s an example of organization that’s still around and doing that important nine eleven remembrance work. So david two hundred fifty eight seem like a small number two you that arose in direct response to september eleventh. I actually seemed like a relatively large number to me, but because and they raid six hundred seventy nine million dollars, perhaps the number of organizations is less important than the amount of money that they raised those two hundred fifty eight organization through six hundred seventy nine million dollars by the end of two thousand two. Although it was really dominated by a particular types of organizations. People who had really the closest relationship. Two, nine, eleven people from local communities affected by nine eleven people affiliate with firehouses, people in in a trade associations and other organizations of workers that i could identify with people who were affected. I guess my quick take away is that what i saw in these organizations as people who had son? Something about nine eleven resonated with them, and they felt the need to respond. And you see, in those two hundred fifty eight, that sort of connection and identity. Christine, what do you think? Two hundred fifty eight it makes sense to me because americans are just so charitably oriented. And if they are great, if their if they feel emotionally connected to something, it makes sense to them to start a charity. They often get into it, not realizing how much is involved. But it’s not surprising to me at all, because i just see this every day. Yeah, david going, i would have one other thing about this. Remember that starting a new organization is in contrast to giving to an existing one. And so i suppose you can evaluate that two hundred fifty eight as a number on ly, in contrast to all the other existing organizations that people gave teo. And if you think of it in those terms, perhaps the two hundred and and all the opportunities people had to give to existing organizations, the two fifty eight probably looked pretty big. Okay, fair enough. And certainly that staggering number six hundred seventy nine million by the end of two thousand two is quite large. Yeah, so? So, david there’s. Some terrific lessons. I think in your in your piece on again. There’s a link to david’s op ed piece in the chronicle of philanthropy. On my blogged mpg devi dot com about existing non-profits not fearing and, in fact needing to collaborate with new non-profits and and us not discouraging new non-profits anything more you want to say about the lessons learnt because that’s, the that’s, the crux of your piece what i took away from the folks at windows of hope was i told you that they were committed to helping this population that they felt with otherwise be ignored, largely immigrant families, hospitality industry workers they raised this remarkable amount of money six million in a month, seventeen million by the end of two thousand two. What really impressed me, however, today and they felt riel responsibility for that population. What really impressed me was that they were willing to let go of some troll and collaborate with an organ unorganised ation they didn’t know i met the leaders of windows of hope for the first time in a few weeks after they had raised their money, but they were willing to sort of let go and collaborate with us because they saw that is the best way to accomplish their mission. I think that sort of willingness to try something new. And to to open themselves up to another organization is really resonates with me as professor david campbell he’s, a professor at binghamton university, and his op ed pieces in this week’s chronicle of philanthropy titled the lessons of nine eleven philanthropy a decade later. David, thank you so much for being on the show. It’s been a pleasure having you and christine cronin, thank you very much. Christine is president of charities dot organ. We talked about her firsthand experience from september eleventh wave charities. Christine, thank you so much. Thank you, toni also want to thank everybody who’s in small non-profit chat on twitter we today was our first collaboration. They have the the chat every other friday from noon to one so right before this show and i hope to collaborate with them again. The hashtag there is sm np chat and you get more information from at pamela grow because she’s, the moderator of small non-profit chat. So thanks to the folks who are participating in that jet, i also want you to know that david campbell’s op ed piece from two thousand eleven is still up again. Titled the lessons of nine eleven philanthropy, christine kronen is with me, and she is still the president of n y charities. Dot org’s. Hello, christine. Hi, tony. How are you? Well, thanks. Thank you. Thank you very much for being with me on the september eleventh show. I i really appreciate that. Thank you. Well, i appreciate having this conversation again. Any reaction to what? You just heard the conversation the three of us were having? Well, it brings back such sad memories and as i think it does for all new yorkers. But it’s it’s, what i learned during that time period was how difficult it is to function during a disaster which affect people, you know, and friends and and then people down the street who you didn’t know. And i now have so much admiration for people who respond to disasters as the profession and, you know, and who go in volunteer when a disaster happens because you’re facing the consequences every single moment, and you just have to keep pushing yourself. I have a much more appreciation which which you and david did mean in your own ways. You each did respond. You know, you were in question. You were first responders, and on dh, staggering amounts of money raised and in just a short amount of time, i’ll never forget that afternoon. You know, when we were all sitting in shock around a conference table, it was the youngest person on the staff who turned to me and said, we need to set up with this after release site, and i just stared at him for several minutes because even though we were already doing disasters with united way international and we were doing them for disasters all over the world, it never, ever, ever occurred to me that we would do one for new york, and i just it was incomprehensible, and i finally realized he was right. Yeah, do you think september eleven still has a nim packed on e-giving i think that most of us can’t wipe it out of hyre memory bank, it was such a stunning, you know, event and the emotions around it were so overwhelming that yes, i do believe it definitely has an impact. Yeah, i find it hard to imagine that that would go away. I mean, i guess it’s it’s natural that that it will now we’re fourteen years out and you know, i i i always maybe it’s just, you know, i’m imposing my thoughts on everyone else, but i i just i think about it, you know, pretty may be intensely each year, even though, you know, this is like, you know, it’s fourteen it’s fourteen years later, not a not a five year anniversary sort of milestone, i imagine maybe fifteen years will be a bigger a bigger deal, but i don’t know, it’s, just i agree with you, it’s still it’s still impacts me, you know, around the day and, like, you know, certainly the day and maybe the day after two it’s ah, and then also in another disaster comes up like hurricane katrina, for example, and you immediately, or at least we immediately, you know, try to decide what can we do? What charities will we feature? You know, it all just starts coming back and the emotions around the disasters that you’ve experienced, and i don’t think i mean, i certainly hope that there will never be one as bad as nine eleven, but you just never wipe it out of your memory bank something that came from the discussion we had four years ago. That is sort of uplifting, i think. Is that that that small organizations have that nimbleness advantage, that they can quickly adapt and learn? As you and david and i were talking about and respond there’s, no question about that. And, you know, we still see it all the time. I mean, a lot of ideas emerged from neighborhood groups and from parent teacher association. And those were the ones who know each other well and they quickly get together and they, you know, develop. Ah, plan to react to the latest emergency at n y charities dot organ. You work a lot with small, small and mid sized shops, right? Definitely it’s. Interesting. How evil answer she has changed in the left. You know, ten years i started in it in nineteen ninety nine, but it’s like a moving target. Tony, you know it’s like one day a charity’s working with you the next day, they’re trying to do their own merchant account. The next day they come back because having a merchant account is very difficult. So it’s it’s really just keeps changing all the time and you just have to be prepared to say okay, today this is what we’re dealing with and let’s go with it. Yeah, those air, you know, that’s a lesson that i hear from a lot of guests and there’s that small and even midsize shop advantage, but this smaller size, you know, when i was just a few people deep, you can you can be quick and and a lot of, you know, certainly in terms of a disaster, you’re reacting not a hundred percent rationally, but you’re doing the best that you can and that’s all that’s all we really can expect and then the passion that goes with disaster, you know, or the personal connection, i mean, so many people knew someone in the towers, and many of us didn’t know for a series of days, you know, who was alive and who wasn’t and, you know, you just you just keep moving. I mean, i stayed in the office probably for two months till about eleven o’clock at night, answering emails from people all over the world. Yeah, those were the emails that asked, how does that sound, right, exactly, exactly or what do you think of this idea? I’m going to try to you go to my school today and, you know, sell cookies, you know, and send it. Where should i send it? And what do you think? Everything ended with what do you think? You know, i would spend hours and hours just trying to respond because i felt so strongly that people needed to know someone was listening. We need to leave it there. Thank you again for joining me today. My pleasure. Thanks. Cracking. Thanks, christine. Next week run like a biz. Hillary schaefer has a wall street background. Now she runs a non profit and shares her advice on applying wall street to the jefferson awards foundation and program your board, your boards responsibilities for your program side with jean takagi are regular monthly legal contributor. If you missed any part of today’s show, find it on tony martignetti dot com. Thanks for being with me. The singing will return pursuant. Full service fund-raising you’ll raise car loads of money. I’m not talking about mini coopers or smart cars. I’m talking humvee fourteen passenger stretch limousines and don’t those things are ridiculous, but not when they’re filled with money. Pursuant dot com. Our creative producer is claire meyerhoff. Sam liebowitz is the line producer show social media’s, by susan chavez, susan chavez, dot com and our music is by scott stein. Thank you for that information. Scotty. You’re with me next week for non-profit radio. Big non-profit ideas for the other ninety five percent. Go out and be great.

Nonprofit Radio for September 4, 2015: Video Storytelling & Don’t Tell MY Story

Big Nonprofit Ideas for the Other 95%

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Yasmin Nguyen & Sheri Chaney Jones: Video Storytelling

In a crowded video internet, how do you tell that compelling story so your message moves others to take action? Sharing their smart strategies are Yasmin Nguyen, CEO of VibranceGlobal, and Sheri Chaney Jones, president of Measurement Resources. We talked at NTC, the Nonprofit Technology Conference, hosted by Nonprofit Technology Network (NTEN).

 

 

Maria Semple: Don’t Tell MY Story

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The right to be forgotten. Maria Semple explains last year’s EU opinion that Google must remove outdated links from search results. What’s the impact on your prospect research? Also, your donors’ right to privacy. Maria is our prospect research contributor and The Prospect Finder. (Originally aired 6/13/14)

 

 


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Hello and welcome to tony martignetti non-profit radio big non-profit ideas for the other ninety five percent. I’m your aptly named host. Oh, i’m glad you’re with me. I come down with a case of her panji nna if my mouth had to say the words you missed today’s show video storytelling in a crowded video internet, how do you tell that compelling story? So your message moves others to take action. Sharing their smart strategies are yasmin win, ceo of vibranceglobal and sherry cheney jones, president of measurement resource is we talked at ntcdinosaur non-profit technology conference hosted by non-profit technology network and then and don’t tell my story the right to be forgotten, maria simple explains last year’s you opinion that google must remove outdated links from search results what’s the impact on your prospect research also your donors right to privacy? Maria is our prospect research contributor and the prospect finder that originally aired june thirteenth of last year on tony’s take to the ntc videos responsive by pursuant full service fund-raising data driven and technology enabled, you’ll raise more money pursuant dot com here are yasmin win and sherry cheney jones with video storytelling welcome to tony martignetti non-profit radio coverage of ntc twenty fifteen the non-profit technology conference we’re at the austin convention center austin, texas we’re kicking off our coverage with this interview. Are my guests now? Are jasmine win and sherry cheney jones welcome. Thank you. Thank you, it’s. Good to be here. They’re seminar topic is stop shooting videos. Start unlocking stories. Jasmine win is founder and ceo of vibranceglobal and sherry cheney jones is president of measurement resource is let’s start sherry, what are non-profits not doing quite a cz? Well as they could with video interviews, storytelling? What? From my perspective, because we help non-profits measure and communicate their impact in value, they often are focusing on their impact. So how are they changing lives and changing circumstances there, too focused on the activities. So, really understanding what your true impact is and telling your stories from there, and you’re trying to elicit really heartfelt story telling stories. You know, emotional, we want emotional impact. Okay, what would you have you have? You know, i think that a lot of times we focus so much on the technology, the process of doing video and also the questions that we ask people, and so we don’t focus enough on the connection, and really, when you are able to provide a space for someone to open up, to feel that they can speak about their passion, be grateful, they then create that connection that we can then capture and witness through videos and so it’s that focus on that connection rather than just the information or that exchange. Now, as we are today, you’re asking people to get in front of lights and cameras or and mike’s on dh and open up yes, men. How are we going toe start this process first, let’s start with how do we find the right people? And then we’ll get into coaching them and and getting their best performance and storytelling out of them. But how do we find the right one? Yeah, absolute tony that the key thing is selecting the right people, and that starts with being mindful of who your audience is. You know, we found that the most impactful, relevant, ah person to interview talk with are a representation of our audience. So, for example, for appealing to a donor’s, then it be great to have a financial supporter donors to be able to speak in their language in the same mindset for them to connect and relate. So think about the group’s. We want this interview to be meaningful for and select people from that constituency. Right? Volunteers, donors, board members. Yeah. Ok. And someone who’s were well respected. Who’s. Our ticket who’s also a very passionate and a champion of of our particular cause to be able to speak for us but also at the same time, carry the torch for our audience so that they can connect with them. Sure, anything you want to add to finding the right person is sure. I always say, think about your wise. Why do you do it? You do, but not just why does your organization do what it does? But why does your funders fund you and whitey here? Participants participate. And when you’re finding people to tell your story, you want to make sure that you are covering those three perspectives. Okay, three wives. The three wise yet three wise men know e wise? Yes, different wise. Okay, sure. Let’s, say with you now. So we found the right people. How do we start the process of making them? Comfortable evoking the really heartfelt emotion that we’re tryingto chief? Sure. Well, i will actually default to us because he’s really good at that, you know, i’m i’m the one that helps you create the content think about what you should be eliciting and he’s when it does the great interviews, maybe you’re more on the on the production side. I’m more on the defining what what questions? You should be asking what impact you should be drawing out of them stuff like, okay, we’ll come to you very shortly. Okay, okay. We got plenty of time together. Twenty five. Just great. Yeah. You know, for someone to be at ease. You really it’s it’s? Really? About how you think about the interview or how you think about being on video? A lot of times, people focus on the act of, you know, being on camera so they feel like they’re being evaluated. They’re being judged or in an interview, maybe you think of, like, a job interview or or some others where they have to perform and they have to be perfect. And what that does is it raises this level of anxiety where you have tio feel like you have to know, not necessarily be your best to be your most authentic. Authentic. Yeah, you’re you’re going to be your best if you’re most if you you’re most authentic, you just you write which is hard to get and even on steven instill videos, pictures it really is okay? Yeah. How are we gonna do so down? So so part of that is in the initial invitation is instead of hey, can you do a testimonial keen? And you come on camera and do a video it’s about framing it in a way that helps them give instead of being put in a position to perform. And so what i mean by giving is, you know, i’d like to invite you to come and share your story so that we can help inspire others like you. You know, we we want to put you in a place where you can be of service to others, and when you’re in that mindset of being of service, to be able to share your experience and insight so that it can help others, it takes that pressure off because now it’s about your own story, your own experience and there’s no. Right or wrong. And so that that’s the first step is the mind set piece. Okay, so let’s try to avoid characterizing it as testimonial. Do you know, do something that way. Put a label on right or even an interview? It should be more of a conversation. And i find that mom i doing so far, you’re doing great. My failing is a failing grade know you’re at least a b plus or something. You’re doing great. You’ve done this a few times. I have securities right already. Absolutely cool. Yeah. All right, s so tell me more. Yeah, so? So. So that’s the first step is setting up the frame for for what? That experience is like giving them information so that they feel prepared, you know, even some questions. Not necessarily for them to prepare a script, but for them to at least be a tease to know what to expect, that there’s not going to be this sort of curveball, or they’re gonna be blindsided because people have a lot of anxiety around, you know the uncertainty. And so that that’s another element. And then once you actually get into the session, then then it’s really about creating that space. I go through a specific routine if i find that someone’s either really nervous or they’re very tense, where we do an exercise called a ci gong slap, and what that is is where you basically take your hand and one hand and you slap the part of your front part of your arm all the way back to up to your chest, and then you do on the other side and then down to your legs and then back up through your back and then on your head as well. You do that a couple times having how hard you’re slapping, just just so just like just like this. So you’re going back like this and that and then down to your chest and then back-up and what you’re doing is you’re activating the various different meridian parts and your body, your head too as well, too. And then once you do that a couple times, you’ll notice this sort of tingle. It just activates the energy and yourself. And so that’s physically gets you ready. Another gong xi gong slap. Yeah, yeah, you can google that nok will be on youtube. The other parties is also getting you into what we call the vortex or the zone or, you know, the peak performance state and so, you know, i listen to some music, so whatever music kind of gets you going here, the whole goal is to are we asking the person i interrupt all the time, you know, that’s bad that’s, bad technique, a weapon? You don’t have a conversation, really? So we’re asking the person in advance, what’s your kind of music or bring bring some of your favorite music, you’re going bring some of that, but even before the actual interview, i will take time to have a phone conversation, just tow, learn about that, build that report so it’s not. We’re not meeting for the first time on camera and, uh, and that way, we feel like we’re friends and i can ask them about different things, so the whole goal is to get them out of their head and into their hearts, because when they start speaking from the heart when they start opening up yeah, that’s when the magic happens, outstanding. All right, you’re tuned to non-profit radio tony martignetti also hosts a podcast for the chronicle of philanthropy fund-raising fundamentals is a quick ten minute burst of fund-raising insights, published once a month. Tony’s guests are expert in crowdfunding, mobile giving event fund-raising direct mail and donor cultivation. Really, all the fund-raising issues that make you wonder, am i doing this right? Is there a better way there is? Find the fund-raising fundamentals archive it. Tony martignetti dot com that’s m a r t i g e n e t t i remember there’s, a g before the end, thousands of listeners have subscribed on itunes. You can also learn maura, the chronicle website, philanthropy dot com fund-raising fundamentals, the better way. Surely now let’s, come to you with questions. Durney um, we really jasmine alluded to a little bit, but the types of questions where you’re aware your expertise comes in. Sure in terms of thinking about what? Why are you doing this video? I’m sorry i called you jasmine. Jasmine? Pardon me. Sorry about that. Yes, you have been eluded. So what’s the purpose of the video you’re shooting. Who is your audience? What do they care about? And what we know about is although fund-raising is up from where it was pretty great recession levels, people want to know that there their money is actually making a difference. So no longer can we just say, oh, here’s a cute kid, i’m going to tell you my story about, you know, my family people really want to know that there’s a collective impact going on that there’s, you know, in the measurement world, the outcomes that you’re achieving. So you want to think about what are those outcomes that you know that people want you two to be showing and then making sure your interview questions are addressing those? So people are telling their stories around how they experience the outcomes that you are saying that you’re achieving, how they’re experiencing a perfect and we’re going to get really kind of personal, right? Like how i saved your life improved your life, help your child, you know, etcetera, yeah. So, you know, we have a list of twelve outcomes that typically non-profits air achieving, like increased knowledge increased, gilles, you know, maintenance of new behavior, reduction of undesirable behavior. So no, those going in before you start asking your questions and let your interview we know that you’re going to want to know about, you know, how did this program increase your knowledge or help you get a job or, you know, decrease your risk for heart disease or whatever it is that you’re non-profits doing, make sure the questions are aligned with those important outcomes. Should we stay away from giving exact questions? You will be asked one, two, three, four, because i find in doing my show that that then leads to scripted questions, lead descriptive answers, and and that’s not from the heart, that’s from appearing like memorized so so sherry but we want to give them topics, right, but not exact questions is that is that the best practice or what? Either either. Yeah, i found that i could give them some questions and with a disclaimer that, you know, these are some of the similar types of questions that will be asking and then also explain to them how to prepare. So just think about some bullet points or just some stories that may be relevant, but not necessarily prepare a script per se as well to so that that, uh it alleviates the anxiety, but you’re also making sure that they don’t have a prepared answer. Percent. Yeah, yeah. Like i said, then that’s not that’s, not the impact you’re gonna want. Um, all right, anything else, before we get to the actual either of you need anything else before we get to the actual session with mike’s and lights and cameras that we should be thinking about? We didn’t talk about yet, you know, i think that’s that’s pretty much covers it for now. We’re going to go and dive a little bit deeper into ours session then during that time. Yeah. Oh, well, i mean, there’s stuff you’re going to say in this session. You you won’t say here is that well? Actually, you know, know what? We’ve got someone holding back. Of course not. Your size is okay. Okay? I want shortchange non-profit ready. You know, of course, that all right. All right. So now we’re in the session, so presumably we’re in some kind of studio. These got a microphone because it might just we could just be doing audio, right? Possible? Absolutely. But might be lights and camera also who’s best toe ask, what do we do when we’re in the studio? Now? I could i could do that. Okay, yeah, you know it’s again, it’s first getting them into that state it’s a two part process getting them into that place where they’re not thinking from their minus their speaking for the heart, then the next step, then it’s it’s like a dance. Then you’re the lead. And so through your mindful questions that you’ve designed, you’ve created both to communicate, impact illicit to bring it out from them, per se. You’re also thinking about what is the overarching storyline that you’re trying to create. So one of the things that well, that we’re going to discuss in our sessions is the ah frame. Where for an appeals type of video you know these air the videos that ah, non-profits play at their events to appeal to, you know, fundraisers and donors and so there’s a seven start, seven step formula that i generally recommend to my clients as a guide for creating questions to elicit out those components. So the first part is, is that emotional hook or that connection? Something, whether it be ah piece of data, something that’s compelling or a story that just gets people that initially engaged. So they want to continue to watch the next step then is gratitude appreciating the people that are there the people that have already supported you recognizing them so then they personally feel connected engaged. The third part then is impact showing the difference that that their support up until this point has made to show that you have traction, and that your stewards of their support this far then the next step is really diving into the importance of the purpose of the mission. Why are we all here? Why is it important to support us then? The next step is to ah is to paint a picture of what the future khun b so this is where we are. But this is how much we can. This is how many more people we can serve. This is the greater impact that we can do. And then then goes the call to action, which is this is how you can help. This is how you can be a part of us achieving this bigger future. And the final part is that emotional close wrapping it up, tying it back to either the mission or or completing the circle of this story that leaves them with this emotional connection. But now they’ve see why why we’re doing this. They also know how they can be a part of it and that’s the framework in which we start to create questions that we start to elicit out in each of the different interviews. We sure this is a real art because that’s a lot to pack into what’s probably gonna be, you know, like a ford of five minute video or so bands. It’s doable? Yeah, of course. Yeah. Okay. Yeah. And i mean, in the session we’re going toe share case study where one organization was ableto talk about their recreational programme with kids, but at the end of the day, they were able to demonstrate how they had a fifty seven thousand seven hundred seventy percent return on investment in those chilled children in terms of really transforming their earning potential over their lives. Just buy this, you know, recreational after school program and and talk about in your fund-raising appeal if you’re able teo to share those stories, talk about those kids experience and at the end of the day, say, oh, by the way, give us five hundred dollars, and we’ll turn that into two hundred eighty nine thousand dollars for on these children over the course of, you know, their lifetime that’s, very powerful, and, you know, checkbooks are flying nah bins. What if we’re in our studio session and it’s not going so well? Our interview is not really loosening up very tense. You’re not getting the kind of emotion you’re hoping for. What what can we do to you? Break that besides achy gong slap anything else we can do? Like in them in that moment? Loosen him or her up? Yeah, yeah, you know, first of all, i always try with something with physiology. So some physical movement, whether it be breathing or others just to kind of, you know, shake out some of the stiffness there. If that doesn’t work, then i should start to shift into what are they passionate about? We totally go off or off camera off mike now, mike, or even even if the camera’s still on, but i shift their focus on hey, you know what? What do you know? What are you most passionate about? Tell me about your favorite, you know, and start getting really personal and when they start to then connect with what really means, you know something to them, then it slowly they slowly start to kind of open up in that way. So i found that to be really effective, it might actually be a good idea to keep the camera rolling or the mike rolling because you might capture something really good whether they know it’s being captured or not, they’re they’re more at ease because you’ve broken that i see you looking the tension about okay, let’s, create anything you want, but i was just saying, you know, a lot of it is the magic and editing, so if you know that framework, that yasmin laid out and, you know, that’s what you’re going for your looking for those nuggets that you’re going to put into that framework when you go to create your video and edit it together. And that that’s a really good point, sherry, is that, you know, when you’re looking at the post production editing process, you wanna have someone on your team that understands the story framework here? Not just someone that’s really a great good, you know, on editor or your your brother in law, who knows howto video. But someone who understands the purpose understands the story’s understands elements of marketing as well so that they can put those pieces together in a meaningful way. Alright, we have plenty of time together. So you took some now about postproduction. We moved into that suddenly that was well done. Thank you, baizman. What? What more about postproduction? Aside from let’s not have an amateur doing it. What else? What else can we say? You know, post production actually starts with preproduction. Always found that it’s very, very important to know the roadmap rather than shooting a bunch of content audio or visual and then just dumping it on to someone and saying here, figure it out so it’s it’s it’s essential to be involved throughout the process. S so that’s, really, the key part here and then the other part is, is to understand, to have someone who really understands the dynamics of human conversation, per se you know, there is certain ways in which people speak that are ah, more flattering than others. And so it’s it’s a very subtle nuance of how to cut the foot the pieces and then start to assemble them together and then tie in either music or other elements that enhance that experience, whether it be visuals or other things as well, too. It sounds like you’re strongly suggesting that this be done by a professional, yes, absolutely on baby involved from the beginning, not just that you’ve given them a raw video file, and now they have to try, too. Kraft, what you’re describing? Great, yeah, yeah, i think specially for your your fund-raising appeal videos and maybe the things on your website you’re going to ask people tio to donate to your cause, but i think for and you can correct me if you disagree, but for your maybe website. Testimonials or other things, you know, in our session, yasmin’s going to actually do one on his iphone. So just depends on what the purpose again understanding what is the purpose of the video, your beauty that’s an excellent point, you know, i mean, we were we were talking last several minutes about the least, i think the the video that shone at the gala that ideally is evoking tears and and moving a room of seven hundred people or, you know, whatever. But on the other end of the spectrum share your point is really well taken. This could be very low production value with somebody with an iphone, and it can still be very, very moving. Yeah, absolutely. Doesn’t the production values don’t have to be high to be compelling? Yes. Depends what your purpose is. Yeah, and and and again, it’s, just starting with understanding, understanding your purpose, understanding your audience, understanding your call to action and then finding the right medium for that. Go ahead. Yeah, absolutely. It’s it’s really about having a storytelling mindset, it’s about having a mindset of thinking about what? What are we doing right now? And is who is this meaningful? For and then let’s just capture that moment, especially with technology these days with, you know, our smartphones or iphones or android phones, you know, the cameras and the equipment is so advanced and it’s, i mean, you could capture a great experience bar trying to do it in the dark, but, i mean, if you think about wow, if i’m constantly thinking about how can i share this moment with someone else and who would benefit and why they would benefit, then then you’re you’re ready to go and as far as like professional editing, you know, quite honestly, people can edit themselves, but really, i find that like ninety plus percent of the clients and people i work with it’s a tedious process and that’s something that if they can learn how to improve the quality of capturing the experience that they can handed off to someone else, even if it’s simple edits it’s accessible and affordable for just even the average person who’s just doing a video for their they’re easing or something like that by phone. Yeah, you has been picked up his phone as he was talking for those who are not watching the video. A zoo visual. So i mean it’s just it could be just that simple. Sure, you look like you want to add something? No, i’m just a green. Okay, oppcoll we still have another couple of minutes left together. What if i not ask you that? Uh, what have we not talked about? It doesn’t matter what stage of it is, what more would you like to say on it? It’s a great topic, i think. Just a kind of reiterate it’s about thinking about this experience, the interviewer, the video really, as an opportunity for for you to help someone else give and and the way that they give is through their insights and experience. So we appreciate the opportunity to be here with you, tony, to be able to share and so it’s a it’s a conversation and it’s an opportunity to give. And i think that really when you start thinking of it this way, it alleviates a lot of stress and anxiety around the experience. Okay, yeah, i’d love to leave loved leave it there, but we still have a couple minutes left, so i’m gonna press it’ll further on something i was thinking about when you’re recording, do we do we need tohave an interviewer? Or should we just let the person kind of go free form and on dh hit on the topic questions hoping that they’ll do that, or we need to have an interviewer? I i think yes, i think so. And unless the person is experiencing very skilled with being able to create a connection themselves with either the camera, they’ve they’ve had either training or they could do it naturally. But i would say that the majority of the people are looking to have an interview because the goal is to experience a moment of connection. And how can you experience a connection without having some other person person? Lester trained to connect? Yeah, directly to account. And so to answer your question, yes, it’s important to have at least someone there to connect with? Okay, yeah, sure, because i think it’s not it can be very scripted, and we’re trying to avoid that scripted feel so an interviewer helps reduce that that scripted feel better, more connection, okay? And ah, there is one story i’d like to share and it’s about giving as well too, and sherry’s heard this. Story a number of times because we actually start third time speaking together here. But last year, we were at the non-profit technology conference, and both of us were there to writing. So you guys last year, samaritan picking up last year, we missed each other in d c yeah, so ah, sure. And i were both staying with our good friends, neil and heather. Now kneel on heather have this amazing ten year old daughter named kendall. And every morning when we sit down for breakfast, kendall would just light up the room and she’d ask questions, and she will have about a minute left. Okay. Okay, so, so so anyway, you’re trained, so i know what you know. I’m gonna tell part of theirs just to the store here, and i will re kapin the session here. Don’t worry about the way we wanna hear your story. Okay. All right. So so then ah, went the last morning that were there. She just barely looked up from her bowl and i said, hey, what’s going on, you seem different and she said, yeah, i’ve got to go sold girl scout cookies today i said, well, what’s wrong with that people love cookies, she said, yeah, but every time i get out there, i get rejected and so i said, yeah, gosh, you know, i totally understand, so i asked her i said, hey, kendall, how much of your cookies? She said they’re four dollars a box? So i said here, here’s, twenty dollars, once you give me five boxes, she said really has, like, yeah, it’s like, but here’s the thing i don’t eat cookies myself and so she but i want you to do what what i want to do is i want you to give these cookies to five people that you’ve never met before officer and her eyes lit up, she ran to her mom and said, mom, guess what? We get to give cookies away, then i said, now here, kendall here’s, the reason why i want you to give those cookies away because i want you to know what it’s like to make someone’s day. I want you to see, hear and feel their appreciation, and then when you’re out there and you’re asking someone to ask by a box of cookies, try this instead. Ask them hey, is there someone in your life that you really care about because i’d like to help you make their bay by giving them a box of cookies. So what we’re doing is we’re creating an opportunity for someone to give and so similar to this interview experience when you create an opportunity to give you shift, that dynamic latto outstanding, we’re gonna leave it there. Thank you very, very much. You your favorite cookies with thin mints, by the way about us so good on this. Emotions are number two yasmin win he’s, founder and ceo of vibranceglobal and sherry cheney jones’s, president of measurement resource is non-profit radio coverage of ntc twenty fifteen the non-profit technology conference thanks so much for being with us. It’s. Time for live listener love you know how grateful i am, in fact, not just gratitude love going out to all our live listeners wherever you might be. Podcast pleasantries always those listening in the time shift over ten thousand of you pleasantries to you, wherever you are, whatever you’re doing as you listen and are all important affiliate affections to our stations throughout the country. So glad you are with us. The thousands of you as well must. Be maybe another ten thousand who knows affiliate affections to all those affiliate listeners. Tony, take two and mohr coming up. Don’t tell my story, but first, pursuant you need more money pursuing helps you it’s just that simple. They have online tools made for small and midsize non-profits that help your fund-raising prospect of platform finds your upgrade ready donors there in your database, they’re buried. Who are they? Find them with prospector platform and you’ll raise more money pursuant. Dot com from the desk of world news tonight, i’m featuring non-profit technology conference video interviews at tony martignetti dot com check it out! I’m sitting at the desk at the anchor desk world news tonight, therefore, video interviews from auntie si, including today’s with jasmine win and sherry cheney jones. Also, any sample ward on what non-profit technology network does and how they can help you to use tech smarter, plus keeping your website current after launch and a panel of four on what to do when technology is being blamed. But it’s really not your problem? My video and the links to those four conference video interviews are at tony martignetti dot com and that’s tony’s take two for friday, fourth of september thirty fifth show of the year here’s maria semple don’t tell my story you know maria simple she’s, the prospect finder she’s a trainer and speaker on prospect research. Her website is the prospect finder dot com, and her book is panning for gold. Find your best donor prospects now exclamation mark she’s, our doi n of dirt, cheap and free. You can follow maria on twitter at maria simple. Welcome back, maria, good to talk to you. Good to talk to you. Thank you very much. You’re going to say glad to be here or anything. Well, i am glad to be here, actually and it’s a nice summer months and i’m always happy in the summer. So this is a good thing, excellent and even happier on non-profit radio day, right? Absolutely. Now that i ve pimped you twice and you have no choice but to say yes and i’m happy about everything we’re talking about the right to be forgotten. This came from a spaniard who brought a case in the european court of justice. Yes. So, you know, i thought it was very interesting and i was wondering, you know there might not be immediate applications for prospect researchers in the united states, but you know it. It got me to thinking what implications this might have five or ten years down the line in terms of information that might end up getting a raise from google searches. Um, and it just got me to wondering, you know how how we have to maybe cross check data in other places, especially going forward? If if we’re going to start seeing data, you know, becoming race, could it could even be more imminent than five or ten years? I think very well could be, you know, right now, one of the one of the stats that i had seen was that over forty one thousand europeans, i have actually asked through this online form that google has created to be for gotten so they want mention of themselves erased off of google search results and that huge let’s set the scene in case everyone hasn’t heard of this. This was ah man in spain who brought a case to the european court of justice because there were links in searches of his name is just searching his name. There were links. To old events that he thought were no longer relevant, right? It had to do with a realist state auction that was held, teo, settle some of what they call social security death, whatever that meant. But he was, you know, not happy that that was still out there because he felt that the debts have been settled and so forth. And so he petitioned through this, uh, europe europe’s top court, which is the court of justice of the european union, i guess it’s somewhat similar to our supreme court and petitioned, and it was ruled in his favor that, yes, google is going to have to comply. So of course, if google’s going to have to comply, you have to think that the other major search engines like yahoo and microsoft being will also have to do the same. And to comply. Google came up with this online form. I don’t know if you can. I don’t know how you go directly to the form. I guess you can just search it. I was i i ended up finding a link in one of the articles led me directly to the form and it’s. Pretty interesting, because you actually have to select from a drop down menu one of the thirty two countries that are listed that you would reside in. You do need to provide some sort of a photo id. Ah, so that i guess, you know, if you’re trying to get maybe say, a competitors, you know, information swipes or something like that, they want to make sure that yes, you are you’re the person and it’s information about you, etcetera, and so there are, you know, there’s certain things that you do need to do in order to comply, to get it, to get the data removed, but they really think it’s going to be a very long time before google can’t even get through all of these request and right now it on ly pertains to the european union, as you said, the thirty two countries so this does not apply teo u s residents, but it could there’s potential that someone could bring a similar action on dh similarly succeed in the us i’m not i would not put it past somebody to come up with that idea. Having read, you know, all the press that there is available out there about this particular ruling in europe, one thing that i didn’t realize i mean, i just thought that you go to google dot com and that’s just the one place to do research bedevil evidently there’s, a google dot ceo dot uk, which is, i guess, the european equivalent of google’s search engine, so i think what they’re from my understanding of what i’ve read is that it’s going toe wife clean the search results that you would find on the european search engine and maybe not necessarily google dot com again, it’s also new and all such a grey area and google themselves trying to figure out how they’re going to end up complying with this whole thing. The implications than for prospect research are becoming apparent as we’re talking. You might not find everything that you’d like to find on someone, right? Right? And, you know, i can give you an example. Tony, of a search i was doing a number of years back, i was probably about ten years ago, i was doing some donors threespot church. Actually, i was just doing research. I wasn’t sure that this person was actually considered a donor prospect or not, because sometimes i’m doing the research because they’re considering having this a person as a high profile boardmember and so i’m doing the research, and i kept coming up with this person’s name connected to corporate insider trading, so the bad kind of insider trading and at first i dismissed it because i thought, well, maybe it’s just the same name, but then i came across one article that actually did link the person to the insider trading and linked the person to current employment situation. So then i knew this was indeed the prospect, so i came i had a dilemma because, right, if i put this information into a written profile, then, uh, any donor and he don’t prospect really has the right to walk into your organization and say, show me what information you’ve compiled on may i want to see my donor record on? And so i really had this dilemma, and i thought, well, what do i do with this information? So i decided to call the person who had hired me to do the research, and i asked, why are you having me do this research on this individual? Is it for a simple donation? Or is there something more to this? And she said, oh, there’s a lot more to it. We are considering bringing him on the board, and our board chair thinks he would make a great treasurer for organization. Oh, my so that was, you know, i thought, okay, well, red flag. So i decided to verbally give the information that i had found. I mentioned that the person had paid their fine had done their time. It was well in their past, but i did feel that the executive director didn’t need to know that this existed. Now why this is really interesting dilemma, but why? Just verbally? Why? I mean, if if it’s bonified and you had confirmed it, why not put it in the written prospekt reports? Well, we discussed that. I told her that i would i don’t like to put information into a written profile that would potentially sever our relationship with somebody, and it could, you know, it was a potentially great relationship that could that could have existed. Um, so i did not want to eliminate that possibility for her if if he’d read this and said, well, you know, this was dug up. On me and, you know, i’m uncomfortable with this, and i’m walking away from this organization, you know, clearly it was in his past, everything had, you know, all fine has been paid, and as i said on time, his concert, i just felt that it could end up, um, severing the relationship ultimately, and i didn’t want to several relationship before it even began, since they’re you know they’re may not have been any issues in the future. I just told you to tread carefully. You always have in the back of your mind what the donor or dahna prospect might think if they were to read this in the organizations report that you had written, yeah, itwas absolutely there is always the same reason. I don’t like to delve into divorce records. Yeah, well, now i can see how that wouldn’t belong but alright, it’s, just interesting. You always have this in mind that what would happen if the person were to read this about themselves in the organ in the organization’s files are always thinking away. Okay, interesting. And what what happened in that case? Did they end up inviting the person to be on the board? Do you know, or did they not? They did. They ultimately did. But i don’t think they put him in a treasurer position immediately. You know, i’m not sure down the line if that ended up coming to fruition, but it was certainly at least something that the executive director needed to be aware of. Excellent. Okay, excellent story. Thank you. Um, this all, you know sort of brings up also the the potential, the discretion, really, that google is goingto have and other search engines as they have to comply with this. The way i read the the description i read, i didn’t read the court’s decision itself, but the description i read was that, you know, there’s some vague description or vague direction about, um, what google should consider inappropriate and what not, but but but nothing’s very, very specific. And so that leaves a lot of discretion for google as to whether something like what you described still belongs. I mean, it still could be very relevant, even though it’s in the past, you know, i mean, history is all in the past, we we were studying history all the time. So just because something is in the past google and detrimental to the person google could still very well determine that that belongs under that person’s search results. Right? So now people are wondering, you know, it’s a matter of fact, i read an article that was in a may fifteenth edition of usa today where, you know, they talked about, you know, that the court basically is here is blaming the messenger and, you know, this person had this, you know, situations in their past, google is simply me giving you access to the information, and you know, it e if if reputations can now be somehow, you know, as they’re calling it in this article, airbrushed on demand, right, you know you’re going to have to think about, you know, well, it’s people who have done things, you know, maybe doctors who have botched surgeries and you just think about the implications of all the types of people that would be thinking about having this this shady past erased there’s just a scary amount of discretion that google has because the past is still relevant, but maybe some things are irrelevant. Howto how do you decide what’s relevant to other people and what’s not the other, the other very interesting thing about this is the information isn’t going away it’s not going to be removed from the internet if that’s even possible it’s just going to be removed from a search result with that from of that person’s name. So the personally is a matter of fact, the very newspaper articles that this spaniard, you know, was sad about it on the internet. More people have probably read the articles now that otherwise would have ever read them if he hadn’t brought this to court. And so the articles still exists. It’s just getting to the articles by searching on this individual’s name is something that has been or will be very soon. I’m not sure if it was removed or not, but i think it may be it wass at this point, um, but, you know, is see data is probably still going to exist, but as a prospect researcher, your main starting point is always with a person’s name. Yes, that’s why? I was wondering how this was really going to affect donorsearch research. I mean, we have a lot of info metoo shins buy-in particularly hyre ed that do their research. Donors who reside in europe, right. So you’ve got people who come to this country for their education on they go back or people who started, you know, as a u s citizen and are now living is expats in another country, so you know the borders being as fluid as they are. You can imagine, i know, maybe a very small social service organisation non-profit might not be in that situation is there researching their donors because for the most part, they’re serving a geographic region and their donors come from that very small, smaller pool’s people. But larger organizations that serve that our international and it doesn’t even have to be hyre ed, imagine the wise of the world or united ways we have to go out for a break. When we come back, marie and i are going to keep talking about this, and we’re gonna move teo, subject of the donors right to privacy and the code of ethics around around prospect research. So stay with us. Like what you’re hearing a non-profit radio tony’s got more on youtube, you’ll find clips from stand up comedy tv spots and exclusive interviews catch guests like seth godin craig newmark, the founder of craigslist marquis of eco enterprises, charles best from donors choose dot org’s aria finger, do something that worked neo-sage levine from new york universities heimans center on philantech tony tweets to he finds the best content from the most knowledgeable, interesting people in and around non-profits to share on his stream. If you have valuable info, he wants to re tweet you during the show. You can join the conversation on twitter using hashtag non-profit radio twitter is an easy way to reach tony he’s at tony martignetti narasimhan t i g e n e t t i remember there’s a g before the end he hosts a podcast for the chronicle of philanthropy fund-raising fundamentals is a short monthly show devoted to getting over your fund-raising hartals just like non-profit radio, toni talks to leading thinkers, experts and cool people with great ideas. As one fan said, tony picks their brains and i don’t have to leave my office fund-raising fundamentals was recently dubbed the most helpful non-profit podcast you have ever heard. You can also join the conversation on facebook, where you can ask questions before or after the show. The guests were there, too. Get insider show alerts by email, tony tells you who’s on each week and always includes link so that you can contact guest directly. To sign up, visit the facebook page for tony martignetti dot com. And i’m tony martignetti and with me is maria simple, the prospect finder, maria appa ra, the association of prospect researchers for advancement, they have something to say about donors they dio there, they actually on their web site, a statement of ethics, and i’d be glad to provide that link to your tear listeners. Tony on your facebook page, we’ll put that after the takeaways. Yes, yeah, sure. And so the main pages apra home dot org’s a pr, a home dot org’s and so there you know that that is the association that most professional prospect researchers would align with and rely on for their professional development. So there is a statement of ethics that the opera has and, you know, accountability and practice as well. I mean, i’m looking at one specific line that they have in their code of ethics around practice. It says that, you know, they shall on ly record data that is appropriate to the fund-raising process and protect the confidentiality of all personal information at all times. Um, so, you know, they take donor-centric mation is safeguarded at their organizations password protect the software, for example, making sure that only people who need access to that information are going to get the access to the information. Well, let’s, go back to this donor-centric ality. I mean, how do you protect the person’s confidentiality when your task is to prepare research about the person? I mean, at the top of the page is the person’s name and, um the pages are loaded with stuff about the person. How do you how do they balance? What do they mean? Their protect confidentiality? So you want to make sure that on ly the people who need access to this information to advance fund-raising are going to have access to the information? First of all, the information is all derived from publicly available sources, right? So google obviously is one of those publicly available sources that we get information from. We’ve talked about hundreds of those on the show. Yeah, yeah, absolutely. And so what? You go to a lot of different sources to gather the information and bring it all together? The role of the prospect researcher is, too. Take all of that information, wade through it and come up with a concise profile. Most of the time, the information is is going to be embedded right into the donor record because then you can pull the reports, you know, as you need in the in the donor software, when i’m preparing the profiles, i just do it in a word document so that they can easily cut and paste the information and if need be into their at their end. Obviously, i don’t have access to donor software that my clients are using, so you want to be sensitive to then who you’re emailing these two i don’t mean you as the prospect. Well, i don’t mean you personally, but the prospect researcher and they may very well in a smaller midsize shop not even be devoted to prospect research, so that let’s say, right, the person doing this research on donors and potential donors, you want to be very conscious of who you’re emailing. These reports, too, has who has access to the to the nested folders where these prospekt reports are stored? Yes, absolutely mn it, and then you can imagine a situation where you get your development committee together and you’re doing perhaps some sort of peer review sessions so you might have printed profiles or data pieces of data pertaining. To these individuals on the table, you know, every every development office really should have a good shredder in the office, and i would really encourage people not to allow boardmember sze other volunteers involved in the development process tow, walk out with hard copies because you just don’t want this information, you know, floating around out there that’s very good admonition caution? Yeah, that that where the hard copies go and then they end up in the person’s office or home or something. Yeah, right now. Okay, talking about shredders, you know, i can’t stand seeing those shredders where it’s like quarter inch strips like a four year old could put those back together if if they wanted to there’s quarter inch long strips. I mean, you should get at least cross cut, if not the not the ones that make those little little paper tiny bullets, which you’re supposed to be impossible to put back together, right? And there are companies that you can hyre depending on how much you really have to shred, there are companies that you can you can hire to do shredding. I think that even in local companies like u p s stores they have shredders located within those facilities, maybe even staples. I’m not sure i know ups does, but, you know, there are places that you can go then and taken have it securely shredded. So that might be something to consider. If you do have an awful lot, maybe maybe your office’s air moving and suddenly you find that. Okay, you’ve got files and files from maybe past years, and now things are going all electronic. What are you going to do with all of this? You don’t want to move it right, because you might not need to bring all of that old data with you, but yet it contains some potentially, you know, sensitive information that people would not want just floating around out there. Yes. And as you mentioned, there are services where they’ll just place a bin in your office. And then when it fills up, you call them and then they come and shred it, and they give you back the empty bin. Yeah. What else? What else you thinking around? We’ve just about another minute or so. What else around this data? Data? Privacy and confidentiality? Well, again, just making sure that everything is very well password protected on lee allow people have access to the donor, soft to your donordigital base that absolutely needed shred anything that is printed and keep on top of what’s happening with this with this particular law that that occurred in the european union. And just you know what? Maybe you know, i will of course keep on top of it, tony, and weaken maybe revisited as things develop, um, even if we make it part of, you know, a small piece of the future show, but i think that that non-profits do need to be aware that this is out there and see the potential for its effect in the united states ask and you’ll you’ll be most successful, i think, in searching if you look for right to be forgotten, maria, thank you very much. Thank you, tony. My pleasure, maria simple the prospect finder on twitter she’s at maria simple her sight is the prospect finder dot com next week, it’s september eleventh hard to know what to do on that exact day. I’m going to replay a show called the september eleven e effect about giving immediately after nine eleven and the longer term. Impact. If you missed any part of today’s show, find it on tony martignetti dot com. Where in the world else would you go so glad i brought that singing back? You may not be, but but i am pursuant full service fund-raising you’ll raise baby carriages more money. I’m not talking about those paltry little one cedars that most couples push around. I’m talking couples with quadruplets four abreast, they come down the sidewalk like the middle coach row out of a dreamliner seven eighty seven remember last week was the studio apartments in first class they come and dear the crosswalks and they part pedestrian herds like arctic ice breakers filled with money. That’s how much you’re going to raise pursuant dot com. Our creative producer is claire meyerhoff. Sam liebowitz is the line producer. The show’s social media is by susan chavez, susan chavez, dot com and our music is by scott stein duitz thank you, scotty. Be with me next week for non-profit radio. Big non-profit ideas for the other ninety five percent go out and be great. Snusz dahna what’s not to love about non-profit radio tony gets the best guests check this out from seth godin this’s the first revolution since tv nineteen fifty and henry ford nineteen twenty it’s the revolution of our lifetime here’s a smart, simple idea from craigslist founder craig newmark yeah insights, orn presentation or anything? People don’t really need the fancy stuff they need something which is simple and fast. When’s the best time to post on facebook facebook’s andrew noise nose at traffic is at an all time hyre on nine a m or eight pm so that’s when you should be posting your most meaningful post here’s aria finger ceo of do something dot or ge young people are not going to be involved in social change if it’s boring and they don’t see the impact of what they’re doing so you got to make it fun and applicable to these young people look so otherwise a fifteen and sixteen year old they have better things to dio they have xbox, they have tv, they have their cell phones. Me dar is the founder of idealist. I took two or three years for foundation staff, sort of dane toe add an email address card, it was like it was phone. This email thing is right and that’s, why should i give it away? Charles best founded donors choose dot or ge somehow they’ve gotten in touch kind of off line as it were on dno, two exchanges of brownies and visits and physical gift. Mark echo is the founder and ceo of eco enterprises. You may be wearing his hoodies and shirts. Tony talked to him. Yeah, you know, i just i i’m a big believer that’s not what you make in life. It sze, you know, tell you make people feel this is public radio host majora carter. Innovation is in the power of understanding that you don’t just put money on a situation expected to heal. You put money in a situation and invested and expected to grow and savvy advice for success from eric sacristan. What separates those who achieve from those who do not is in direct proportion to one’s ability to ask others for help. The smartest experts and leading thinkers air on tony martignetti non-profit radio big non-profit ideas for the other ninety five percent.