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Nonprofit Radio for September 11, 2015: The 9/11 Giving Effect

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David Campbell & Cristine Cronin: The 9/11 Giving Effect

David Campbell is associate professor of public administration and department chair at Binghamton University. He has first-hand 9/11 experience from his work as vice president at Community Service Society (NYC) on September 11, 2001.

We talk about his opinion piece from 2011 in The Chronicle of Philanthropy, “The Lessons of 9/11 Philanthropy.”

Then Cristine Cronin, president of NYCharities.org is with me to discuss the first online giving responses to the attacks; what’s changed as a result; lessons learned about responsiveness and collaboration; and the future of the “Donate Now” button.

Both interviews are from Nonprofit Radio on September 9, 2011.

 


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Hello and welcome to tony martignetti non-profit radio big non-profit ideas for the other ninety five percent. I’m your aptly named host it’s september eleventh that’s always a touchy day for me, which makes it me especially glad that you’re with me, i’d bear the pain of otitis media if i had to hear that you missed today’s show the nine eleven giving effect. Christine cronin, president of n y charities dot org’s is with me to discuss the first online giving responses to the attacks what’s changed as a result, lessons learned about responsiveness and collaboration and the future of the donate now button. And david campbell, associate professor of public administration and department chair at binghamton university, he has first hand experience from his work as vice president at community service society and why, see, on september eleven, two thousand one, we talked about his opinion piece from two thousand eleven in the chronicle of philanthropy. The lessons of nine eleven philanthropy those two interviews air from non-profit radio on september ninth, two thousand eleven. Then christine cronin joins me live to share her reaction to what she said four years ago, and consider whether nine eleven still impacts giving on tony’s take two. Where were you on september eleventh? We’re sponsored by pursuant full service fund-raising data driven and technology enabled, you’ll raise more money pursuing dot com let’s get started with the nine eleven giving effect here’s christine cronin with me in the studio now is christine cronin. She led the creation and launch of charity wave dot com, which was one of the internet’s first e-giving sites started in nineteen ninety nine and as a result, she was on the front line of e-giving on september eleventh, two thousand one, she has worked in washington d c including as national president of women’s equity action league, which led the successful passage of title nine originating sports equity for women. Christine is now president of n y charities dot or ge. And i’m very glad that her work from september eleventh and today brings it to the studio. Christine conan, welcome. Hi, tony. How are you, it’s? A pleasure to have you. What was the state of e-giving in two thousand won? Well, right from the start, which i got involved in nineteen, ninety nine people were very cautious about using their credit cards online and so the ones who were who had even been there yet were what i would call the early adapters. So people who are always the first to do everything and and i also noticed that a lot of credit cards were being used because of awards and points. And so people love switching from check writing to credit card use for philanthropy because it allowed them to collect more points that charitable pursuits the thousand dollar gift gets me a thousand miles. So that was actually a help to getting app getting use of cards online. Absolutely. And i still see that today with our clients, people who want to do gif ts in the five and six figures by credit card for all those valuable points you were at charity wave tell us about charity wave. This was on september eleventh, two thousand one tells about charity wave. Well, justice charitable giving is often a small project within any company. Charity wave was built at the instigation of the chairman of a computer encryption firm called wave systems and the chairman who his name, peter sprague and he’s, the former chairman of national semiconductor. For thirty years, i wanted to use his fledgling e commerce infrastructure for charitable giving, but nobody in his company, which was scientists computer geeks, you know, really understood what he was talking about. And so he was helicopter skiing with a mutual friend one day, and he said, i want to use my e commerce infrastructure, charitable giving nobody understands what i want to do, and my mutual friends said, i think i know someone who would understand and of course, a lot of my background was non-profit so they called me from the mountain, and they said, would you meet? And i said yes and that’s how it all began, okay? And then, well, let me remind listeners that we’re live tweeting and the hashtag to follow is non-profit radio hashtag non-profit radio and just to sort of set the scene for moving us to september eleventh, i was monitoring a chat small non-profit chat, which is hashtag sm and pee chat, and i was not just monitoring, but i was on that this morning run by pamela grow and you can follow pamela on twitter, using that name at pamela grow and one of the quotes that i was really poignant to. Me was from someone who said he was in the tenth grade. And on september eleventh, casey deal away. He’s at k c, j, d and he said, you know, a tenth grade, just trying to figure out what it all meant september eleventh what? What was the charity wave response was immediate? You were up that afternoon, right? Tell us that. I know, and it actually wasn’t me who was the original instigator. We were a cz much in shock as everybody else in new york city, and we actually were at fifty seventh and sixth avenue, and i look down, you could see everybody walking because public transportation had stopped and everybody was silent and we were glued in front of a television, and suddenly a young staff person turned to me, and he said we should set up an emergency relief site, and i just stared at him for several seconds because never in my wildest imagination had i thought i would ever set up an emergency relief site for new york city, and we were already working very closely with united way international. So we were handling charitable giving two disasters all over the world for united way international. And yet this was still just such a stunning concept to me. But then i realized he was right, and i called our engineers, who were based in massachusetts and where our servers were, which were completely safe, and everybody just jumped on the idea, and we had a sight up that afternoon with united way international. So you pulled yourselves away from what everybody else was watching toe actually dig into work, right? It was up that afternoon, you know? And what was the what was the first response i know in the first few days or a week? Well, it was interesting that evening, i was still at the office, and i just wrote an email and i said at this time of, you know, profound tragedy, you know, i just want you to know that we’ve set up an emergency relief site for washington, new york and pennsylvania, and one hundred percent of your gifts will go two victims of these tragedies and what really surprised me because i think many of us did not know that the phones were down and we were so swept up in watching television and in the in the moment that we didn’t realize the phones were ringing and people all over the world because i wrote to everyone in my address book, people all over the world wrote back, and their first words were, thank god you’re alive because no one could reach any of us, and we didn’t even know that i mean, it had just went past us, but then immediately the gifts started coming in, people were desperate to do something, and the gifts came in from all over the world all over the world, and we are going to talk a little about the international response you got. But so even that afternoon and that evening, gifts were coming in. Yes, you have to take a break with christine cronin. We’re talking about the nine eleven effect she’s, the president of my charity’s dot or ge take a break and stay with us. You’re tuned to non-profit radio tony martignetti also hosts a podcast for the chronicle of philanthropy fund-raising fundamentals is a quick ten minute burst of fund-raising insights published once a month. Tony’s guests are expert in crowdfunding, mobile giving event fund-raising direct mail and donor cultivation. Really all the fund-raising issues that make you wonder am i doing this right? Is there a better way there is? Find the fund-raising fundamentals archive it. Tony martignetti dot com that’s marketmesuite n e t t i remember there’s a g before the end, thousands of listeners have subscribed on itunes. You can also learn maura, the chronicle website. Philanthropy. Dot com fund-raising fundamentals the better way. Welcome back to tony martignetti non-profit radio big non-profit ideas for the other ninety five percent, you can join us on twitter the the hashtag to follow is non-profit radio if you’d like tio call and talk to christine kronen were at eight seven seven for eight o for one two oh eight, seven, seven, four ito for one two oh, from the small non-profit chat that i joined earlier this afternoon earlier this morning, this came from amy cept. She said, my stomach still drops thinking of nine eleven. Amy cept is at nim beust. And i am b y christine cronan is with me and she’s, the president of n y charities dot organ had direct firsthand experience on september eleventh. Christine, um, we talked just briefly, but what? I want to get into this a little about the international response that you got from from charity wave what was happening? It was amazing because we were affiliated by the next day with the new york times nine eleven fund and united way international. I mean, we were seen as a very serious player in the e philanthropy space. And so people wrote to us from all over. The world and we were in the new york times every single day as part of their giving campaign, because i just want to clear united way as well as new york times media’s giving right was need e-giving cases was where the charities you had started with, right? Right? Well, i called jack rosenthal, the president of the new york times company foundation, who we were already working with on neediest cases, and he said, you know, give me a few hours, and so by the next day, the new york times nine eleven fund had been initiated, and so we we went with those two major charities, so as a result, we were getting emails from people all over the world and and very, very touching emails. I mean, even today when i read them and i re read them, i realized how important it is for people to be able to reach out and express their feelings during a disaster and people all over europe and japan and other parts of the world, we’re writing to say something about their feelings about new york and in the depth of how they felt strongly about new york city. Whether they had been there or there, they had grown up there and that they wanted to do something and so many people throughout ideas like we can create these t shirts and we’ll sell them here and then we’ll send the money and every email it seemed at the time ended with what do you think? And i and i felt absolutely compelled to stay every single night, you know, until eleven and midnight responding to all of those. What do you think? Even though i didn’t necessarily know the answers, people were looking for an outlet, a place to do something and you charity wave and other outlets that eventually a rose. I gave them that opportunity. A little boy wrote from switzerland, and he said, i want to do something, but don’t ask me to raise any money, tell me what i can do. I mean, it was just some of them were just heartbreaking, so it was so it was very time consuming, but i did it on. And how about financially? Just in terms of the response to the site that way? Yes. Now remember, people were still hesitant about credit cards online at the point in time, but there’s something about a disaster which helps people, you know, jump over the fence and start using them and to quit writing checks. And so there was quite a surge in online giving, i think you know, overall within about six months, thes site raised just under two million dollars, which at that time was a lot for online giving for those who will be listening to the show on the archive. Trending right now on twitter is the hashtag biggest lesson learned from nine eleven so if if you’re listening live, you can look at that hashtag but for those who are in the archive you khun listening to the archive you khun, listen, look back to the hashtag biggest lesson learned from nine eleven and so let’s christine let’s turn to some of the lessons first, how how do you see online giving compared to other other methods of giving? Well, i was very used as everybody was in the non-profit space to direct mail and the average gift through direct mail for years had been around thirty five dollars, when i began working at wave systems than charity wave in nineteen ninety nine. One of the first things i noticed was the size of the gifts, and i thought to myself, wired there’s so many hundred dollars gifts, you know, it didn’t make sense to me, and i finally began to realise, as did others who were involved in philanthropy around the world, that people will give more with their credit cards than they will win the writing checks, and i sort of explained it to myself if i’m in macy’s and i only have a check in some cash, i’m going to spend less then if i’m in macy’s and have a few credit cards on me and so that’s sort of how i explained it, okay, but then the challenge, of course, becomes acquiring the donors online versus doing more traditional direct mail. Any advice around around that? Well, often they find you. I mean, i’ve actually found it easier to be online and to be in search engines, and two people find us more than we’re not spending at all this much time looking for donors, as we did before and let’s explain what is and why charities dot or ge? Well, after the internet bust, the wave systems had to shut down various parts of the company, and we were we were never something they made money on, in fact, you know, they were funding their funding it and and they were absorbing credit card fees, so we were oh, so truly one hundred percent of the gifts in the credit card processing fees went directly to the charities that that wave charities was they never anticipated nine eleven when they set up that procedure, and so we were, you know, immediately targeted as something they had to shut down. And so the chairman, at that point peter’s break said to me, well, what do you want to do next? You know, i’d be happy to help you, and i said, we know so much i said we should do this as a non-profit and he looked at me, he wasn’t sure you were okay, he was going to be part of that, and i said, oh, you’re going to be chairman started recruiting your board instantly in the first conversation, brilliant, and i said, but i would like, i don’t want our efforts to be so dispersed. I mean, we were really national and any charity in the country could have started using us his charity way, but it was very difficult to do. Unlimited resource is and so i said, let’s, just target a space and do it really well. And after nine eleven, you know, it was so obvious to me that i wanted to target new york because of the emotionalism of that entire time period. Okay, so and why charities dot organism is a portal that leads people to e-giving and also information and even volunteering right for new york chadband tax returns on every charity in new york state. And i figured there were about twenty five thousand, but there were really closer to sixty. And now there’s closer to over one hundred hundred thousand, right? So a little less than ten percent of all the charities in the country with all the public five o one c three charities, which is, like one point three million. Roughly one point, four are in new york state are their sites like and white charities dot or ge in other states? Well, just about everything has been tried. And there was certainly one called touch dc, which has now been sort of absorbed into network. For good, and then there was one out of louisiana, which was started by the louisiana givers, but it didn’t last. It was sort of what the internet boom was all about, just hundreds and hundreds of efforts to try to make something go. But i would say probably eighty to ninety percent of these things died because there weren’t the resource is to keep it going. And later on, we’re going to be joined by professor david campbell from binghamton university, who has an op ed piece in this week’s chronicle of philanthropy about lessons from nine eleven and the three of us will be talking a little about some of the charities that were created right around nine eleven and how few of those have actually exactly of those have actually survived? So let’s let’s move a little to the future of of online giving. What? What do you see as important? Or maybe some things that charities generally are not doing online, that they should or trends? Well, everybody pretty much knows they’ve gotta have a vibrant website, and they’ve got tio got to make sure the meditate eggs air, working with the search engine, but the problem really is is that often the staff at small non-profits aren’t trained in these areas and as you know, like ninety percent of the non-profits air subsisting on five hundred thousand dollars or less that’s why we’re big non-profit just for the other ninety five percent exactly, and so, but but the internet really has made many, many things easier, and i intentionally hyre young people because they know so much more about technology. Well, and even that idea on september eleventh, you said, came from a young staff person person absolutely so hyre the young certainly we’ve had lots of shows devoted to social media presence for non-profits how important that is and how even just get started. So listeners, you can look back to the archive for how to get started in social media, even if you’re a small shop and why charities dot org’s, there are facebook presence. Oh, yes, but that is his vibrant as it should be. So we we do run unlimited resource is and and we’ve had over fifty million dollars go through when, you know, we started on a shoestring in late two thousand four and so that’s a lot of work it so it’s a lot of effort on the part of staff to make sure everything goes well. Yes, and every charity, nearly every charity starts on a shoestring. There may be the the well endowed family that supports a charity in the outset because a family member because of a family member’s passion but that’s the unusual case nearly everybody starts out with a very small budget, very small board and a lot of passion. And how do you turn that into move that toward, you know, more of a business model, and there are ways for small non-profits do that as you’re you’re describing, but it also, you know, sort of explains, as you said, so many of them then go out of business because they are all start with passion, and if they’re lucky, they start with money. But, you know, you can’t it’s this it’s a heavily regulated area, and so there is a lot to do to keep a non-profit going and there’s a lot of paperwork that needs to be filled out by people who didn’t realize that that’s what they were getting into that’s, right? We had a show, just a couple. Weeks ago with jean takagi and emily chan are regular legal legal contributors talking about alternatives to starting a non-profit and some of them one of the ones that they like to quote the first when they’re talking to someone who wants to start non-profit is collaborating with an existing organisation, and we’re gonna talk about that with professor campbell when he joins us, we have just about a minute before the break, what do you see is the future in online giving? Well, it’s very exciting because i mean, the young people coming up, i feel like they almost have ah, charitable jean, you know, that we didn’t necessarily have, you know, and they i really can’t even envision a life without charity being a portion of it. Plus they been handling and dealing with technology since they were, you know, two and three and four, and so they have a level of comfort with technology that many of us never had. And so i think we’re going to be seen so many exciting effort’s online and on the internet as a result of this generation coming and rushed on dh younger than generation y with christine cronin she’s the president of n y charities dot or ge? She has first hand experience from september eleventh in online giving. We’re going to take a break right now after the break, we’ll be tony’s take two and then i’ll be joined by professor david campbell. We’ll be talking about his op ed piece in this week’s chronicle of philanthropy, which is based on lessons learned from his firsthand experience in september eleventh giving so i hope you’ll stay with us all that coming up first, pursuing you need more money pursuant helps you raise more money. They’re perfect for small and midsize shops because they have online tools and that means you pick what you need. You don’t have to be all in for some big program package that’s more than what your organization really requires prospector platform. I’ve talked about this before finds your upgrade ready donors who are lurking in your database, you know they’re in there, but which ones are they find them and engage with them through prospector platform. Pursuant dot com, you’ll raise more money. Where were you on september eleventh? I was on the campus of st john’s university in queens, new york, that school is up on a hill, and i was able to see the world trade center in lower manhattan, and i remember switching between watching close ups on tv and looking out my own view out my window at my office window, the office next to me had a tv in it, and i remember going back and forth between the tv and the window like the tv didn’t seem riel because it was removing me from something so close just a few miles away, but obviously looking out the window made it ah made it quite riel and there’s, no mistaking or forgetting about what you see with your own two eyes and asked on facebook and twitter where people were patrice morgan, she was home in greenwich, connecticut, watching on tv and knowing that her husband, rick, was on a train to grand central terminal in new york city no smartphones than two thousand won, so she knew that he didn’t know what was going on our own. Claire meyerhoff was in her radio days. She was anchoring the news for yusa today channel on x m radio and from their washington dc from their washington, d c studio teo, she was doing breaking news for them on on that day, michael graciano he was walking into seven world trade center and remembers seeing the first crash and debris falling around like rain. He says september eleventh. Like i said, always a little touchy for may. Still, fourteen years later, that’s tony’s take two for friday, eleventh of september thirty sixth show of the year, affiliate affections affections out to all the listeners and our many affiliate stations throughout the country. Affections? I mean, i’d love to say affiliate love, but i don’t get the liberation there, so you know it’s love, but we call it affiliate affections. Likewise, i’d like to say podcast love to all the podcast listeners, but, uh, it’s, this doesn’t work for me, so sending pleasantries toe all our podcast listeners over ten thousand of you, you know, it’s really love but podcast pleasantries and live listener love where’s that going let’s, start let’s start here in the u, s st louis, missouri, new bern, north carolina and do cane, pennsylvania live listener love to those listeners in those cities and going abroad. Xiao yang, china, ni hao seoul, south korea always checking in seoul. So grateful to you, i know i saved all time, but that’s, because because i am so grateful. Anya haserot and tokyo, japan konnichiwa also joining us tashkent, uzbekistan welcome, uzbekistan, lovett live with their love to you let’s continue with the nine eleven e-giving effect. David campbell joins the conversation i’m joined. Now i’m going to bring in professor david campbell. He is a professor at binghamton university and chair of the public administration department there. On september eleventh, two thousand one, he was vice president for programs at the community service society in new york city, and they were affiliated with the new york times need his cases, which christine cronin was just talking about will bring all that together. We’re talking about david campbell’s op ed piece in the chronicle of philanthropy this week titled the lessons of nine eleven philanthropy a decade later, i’m very pleased to welcome to the show from binghamton, new york. David campbell. Thank you, tony david, i well, i know you’re actually not in becomes and right now you’re unethical, but has binghamton doing there’s? A lot of flooding there and evacuations. Twenty thousand people have been evacuated in in binghamton, still a state of emergency, the building where i work has been flooded, at least the basement and and the first floor things are pretty grim, so i guess i would ask your listeners, too. Check out the local charities in broome county, united way of broome county and others that are looking at ways to provide assistance to the many people in the southern tier who’ve been affected by the flood. David on september eleventh you were vice president at community service society. Why don’t you explain what that organization did? Community service society is on old line social welfare organization that has always focused on the needs of low income new yorkers, and after nine eleven, we were sort of faced with the challenge. How does the organization adapt to this very riel and new set of circumstances facing new yorkers? And and a lot of my offense piece dealt with how we responded and how other established organizations responded to nine eleven as well. If you wanna link teo david campbell’s op ed piece, go to my blog’s m p g a d v dot com and in the post for today’s show there’s a link teo read david’s op ed piece we’re live tweeting the hashtag is non-profit radio were also on the phone, so if you want to call eight, seven, seven four aito for one two oh, for those who may still use the phone and maybe you’re not on twitter, david, you point out. Well, actually, before we go there, community service society was related to the neediest cases in new york, the new york times charity, right? Yes, for the new york times neediest fund, a seven or eight established non-profit organizations, the community service society is one. And after nine eleven, the new york times created a special new york times nine eleven media’s fund and, uh, supported those same seven or eight organisations and one or two more that were so specifically focused on disaster relief. So christine cronin, were you aware of community service society? Very much so we had a we had a donation screen and dropped down with every one of the seven agencies listed. So we were very involved. And david. Then on september eleventh, you well, from september eleventh, you’ve just to point out some some lessons for existing charities. And one of them is that that they’d be willing to step outside their traditional role. Can you can you say a little about that? Yes, i mean, this was the thing that troubled me the most. The story i tell in the op ed is having come back to new york on september thirteenth and talking to david jones, the ceo at community service, a sizing. Well, what should we do? And i thought disaster relief that’s not what community service society does and david’s comment to me was any organization to be relevant has to be responsive to this new big need facing new york city, and we had to figure out and he was right. We really had to figure out how do we adapt the capacities and skills we have as an organization to be responsive to these new needs? Faith thing, new york city residents, and we did it. It wasn’t as big a stretches, i thought, and i think one of the lessons is that organizations can adapt to new circumstances and make a big difference that way. And how quickly would you say you? You adapted and we’re ready to go? Well, we had always provided emergency assistance to families facing housing challenges so we were able almost immediately, to say we’re going to move away from finding providing exclusively eviction assistance to providing emergency financial assistance. We could do that within days, subsequent to that, we had to really learn what is this? What are the new needs that other new yorkers air facing? And how can we change our services, for example, providing information toe local non-profits about new disaster relief benefit? We did that kind of education that took us two, two, three, four weeks, but it was really sort of based on how the, how the system of disaster relief was evolving. So we had to evolve with other new york city charities who were trying to figure out what to do at the same time. The learning and adapting and christine, that was your lesson you you learned and adapted immediately when you’re young staffers suggested that you need to do something that right. Assume it’s a disaster happens it’s no longer business as usual, and you’re sort of like playing it day by day, hour by hour, and suddenly you may be in a room with twelve other charities who you sort of have friendly rivalries with because you’re all pursuing the same pots of gold at various foundations. But all of those rivalries have to end during a disaster, and it becomes simply what can we do? What we do is a group. How can we work together? How can we supplement each other’s efforts? And, you know, it’s not always the easiest thing to do, but you have no choice during a disaster. And david campbell, your your op ed points out in a quote, i think from the your ceo that ah, charity risks irrelevance if it doesn’t react too two to the disaster, in fact, that’s what that was the reality for new yorkers on september twelfth was that we had been attacked and three thousand new yorkers had been killed and many were displaced and struggling. And it was the only way to be relevant was to be responsive. In some ways, that was sort of what the community needed. And and that lesson took me a couple of days to figure out. But as christine point that we had to adapt because that’s what new york needed at that point and i want to bring in something that comes from the small non-profit chat that i was privileged to be with this morning before the show quote is from from shannon do little her her, she said that you must connect services to the tragedy in the aftermath of fund-raising and i think that’s pointing out sort of the same thing. You otherwise you risk irrelevance not only that you have to act, but that your services have to be related to the tragedy at hand. That’s chan and do a little and her twitter ideas at sl do little so christine, you just we’re talking about collaboration and david, you have a terrific story about collaboration around the windows of hope organization in september eleventh. Can you can you tell that story? Yes. So the windows of hope family relief fund is a a new organization that was created by a chef who who wanted to provide some assistance to the families of hospitality industry workers who died on nine eleven. And in that case, it was the families of workers that windows on the world than anyone else who worked in the hospitality industry who was killed, and this group of chefs and other hospitality industry professionals got together. And the month after nine eleven, some of you may remember a special event called dine out on october eleventh, two thousand one, and from that event and others raised six million dollars and subsequent another eleven million dollars within the year. And in october two thousand won the leaders of windows of hope came to community service society and said, we’ve raised this money. We want to help out this group of of the families of hospitality industry professionals who were killed. But where, chef, not social workers, we really need to figure out how to get the expertise to provide assistance quickly and effectively to the families who are affected. Can you help us? And so we, uh we agreed to collaborate with them because we had the expertise and how to how to provide this assistant. And we had knowledge as a social service organisation about how to distribute it effectively. So we leverage they leverage their expertise and their connections with people in the hospitality industry to raise money and focus on the concerns of the specific population, and we were able to provide the technical expertise to distribute. That money, so it was possible to help those families of hospitality industry workers who were killed. I just think that’s a great story about collaboration we have just about a minute before break. Christine, you have a comment on the story? Yes, i saw very much through jack rosenthal’s work, who is president of the new york times company foundation. He really focused in on the immigrant populations and and the people who are really out of the loop of social services, and he gave a lot of thought and and brought his resource is together to get to the people who would never be part of the normal social service structure and that’s that’s difficult to do because they often these people don’t want to be found, but they were desperately in need, you know, they’ve lost their their breadwinner. We’re talking about the nine eleven effect on tony martignetti non-profit radio we’re going to take a break and when we return, of course, so staying with me will be christine cronin, president of charities dot or ge, and david campbell who’s op ed pieces in this week’s chronicle of philanthropy about lessons from nine eleven stay with us like what you’re hearing a non-profit radio tony’s got more on youtube, you’ll find clips from stand up comedy tv spots and exclusive interviews catch guests like seth gordon, craig newmark, the founder of craigslist marquis of eco enterprises, charles best from donors choose dot org’s aria finger do something that worked and they only levine from new york universities heimans center on philantech tony tweets to he finds the best content from the most knowledgeable, interesting people in and around non-profits to share on his stream. If you have valuable info, he wants to re tweet you during the show. You can join the conversation on twitter using hashtag non-profit radio twitter is an easy way to reach tony he’s at tony martignetti narasimhan t i g e n e t t i remember there’s a g before the end he hosts a podcast for the chronicle of philanthropy fund-raising fundamentals is a short monthly show devoted to getting over your fund-raising hartals just like non-profit radio, toni talks to leading thinkers, experts and cool people with great ideas. As one fan said, tony picks their brains and i don’t have to leave my office fund-raising fundamentals was recently dubbed the most helpful non-profit podcast you have ever heard, you can also join the conversation on facebook, where you can ask questions before or after the show. The guests are there, too. Get insider show alerts by email, tony tells you who’s on each week and always includes link so that you can contact guests directly. To sign up, visit the facebook page for tony martignetti dot com. I’m christine cronin, president of n y charities dot orc. You’re listening to tony martignetti non-profit radio big non-profit ideas for the other ninety five percent. Welcome back. We’re talking about the nine eleven effect with christine cronin and professor david campbell. There are some lessons, david in your piece about small non-profits and how nimble they could be, and i think that windows of hope story is an outstanding one. That was it was a startup organization before we go a little further with that, christine cronin has some ideas about how big existing non-profits khun struggle in the midst of a disaster. Yes, often you find yourself in a pr disaster, even though it was so unintentional and you were really trying to do the right thing. And, for example, one of the major charities of the red cross explained that they often kept part of the money for future disasters, and they always had but that became a point of severe contention and ah, lot of bad press, and it haunted them for quite a while and then the including in congress? Yes, because red crosses congressional charter very, but as well as outside congress and then the salvation army, because so much money was coming in offered to pay basic expenses of people across the country, i mean across the state and city, they were flooded with people sending their bills in, and they couldn’t handle it. And then they found they had a pr disaster on their hands. And so, you know, you try to do the right thing, but often you find yourself in trouble later and david, the lesson you point out eyes that those big existing charities shouldn’t fear the small startups that emerge for disaster relief. Well, there’s always the fear, and you hear so much talk these days about we have too many non-profit organizations in a time of recession, we need to merge. And the takeaway i i took from nine eleven is that the windows of hope family relief fund, as christine was describing earlier, was able to meet the needs of a population that would otherwise be ignored, that those small organizations, really or the startup organizations can can fill a niche or metoo need that others are not meeting. And those immigrant workers those huh? Those families of hospitality industry people who were killed on nine eleven may not have been able to or willing to go to salvation army. They may not have been been nervous because of their, uh, their immigration status or or lack of familiarity with those traditional organizations, they go to a place they trusted, and that in that situation they went to the windows of hope family relief fund because they knew the chefs they knew the restaurant owners who started the fund and they trusted and felt confident with them. Community service society, founded in eighteen forty three, couldn’t offer that same assurance hard lesson for me to learn, but a really important one for leaders and nonprofit organizations to take away. You did some research on the two hundred fifty eight charities that sprung up as a result of september eleventh, and and they were able to spring up because the irs offered on expedited tax exemption approval, but very few of them exist now want to share your research, please? So i i found that there were two hundred fifty eight organizations, as you mentioned, that received expedited tax exempt status from the irs, and of those organizations on lee, thirty eight of them have have filed irs nine, ninety information returns in the past two years, which means more than likely that only those thirty eight continue to exist. I don’t necessarily. Think that that’s a bad thing. What it tells me is that many of those organizations may that have not filed nine nineties have gone out of business may have actually accomplished the goals they would have to accomplish, which was to provide immediate disaster assistance, most of the organization that continue to exist or those that have the strongest connection to nine eleven organisations of victims, families, organizations like windows of hope that our most connected and having most connected to nine eleven and haven’t enduring nine eleven related mission, too, to accomplish her to provide and so a lot of of new organizations with a short term mission but went out of business as soon as that mission was accomplished. I learned from the small non-profit chat earlier today that vermont public radio has created an audio memory quilt, and i thought that was by posted by at brendan kinney, and i just thought that that was an excellent example of tying e-giving today to the disaster and so not not wanted by certainly not trivializing but wanting to remember and tying the today’s giving to disaster ten years ago. And so there’s an example of organization that’s still around and doing that important nine eleven remembrance work. So david two hundred fifty eight seem like a small number two you that arose in direct response to september eleventh. I actually seemed like a relatively large number to me, but because and they raid six hundred seventy nine million dollars, perhaps the number of organizations is less important than the amount of money that they raised those two hundred fifty eight organization through six hundred seventy nine million dollars by the end of two thousand two. Although it was really dominated by a particular types of organizations. People who had really the closest relationship. Two, nine, eleven people from local communities affected by nine eleven people affiliate with firehouses, people in in a trade associations and other organizations of workers that i could identify with people who were affected. I guess my quick take away is that what i saw in these organizations as people who had son? Something about nine eleven resonated with them, and they felt the need to respond. And you see, in those two hundred fifty eight, that sort of connection and identity. Christine, what do you think? Two hundred fifty eight it makes sense to me because americans are just so charitably oriented. And if they are great, if their if they feel emotionally connected to something, it makes sense to them to start a charity. They often get into it, not realizing how much is involved. But it’s not surprising to me at all, because i just see this every day. Yeah, david going, i would have one other thing about this. Remember that starting a new organization is in contrast to giving to an existing one. And so i suppose you can evaluate that two hundred fifty eight as a number on ly, in contrast to all the other existing organizations that people gave teo. And if you think of it in those terms, perhaps the two hundred and and all the opportunities people had to give to existing organizations, the two fifty eight probably looked pretty big. Okay, fair enough. And certainly that staggering number six hundred seventy nine million by the end of two thousand two is quite large. Yeah, so? So, david there’s. Some terrific lessons. I think in your in your piece on again. There’s a link to david’s op ed piece in the chronicle of philanthropy. On my blogged mpg devi dot com about existing non-profits not fearing and, in fact needing to collaborate with new non-profits and and us not discouraging new non-profits anything more you want to say about the lessons learnt because that’s, the that’s, the crux of your piece what i took away from the folks at windows of hope was i told you that they were committed to helping this population that they felt with otherwise be ignored, largely immigrant families, hospitality industry workers they raised this remarkable amount of money six million in a month, seventeen million by the end of two thousand two. What really impressed me, however, today and they felt riel responsibility for that population. What really impressed me was that they were willing to let go of some troll and collaborate with an organ unorganised ation they didn’t know i met the leaders of windows of hope for the first time in a few weeks after they had raised their money, but they were willing to sort of let go and collaborate with us because they saw that is the best way to accomplish their mission. I think that sort of willingness to try something new. And to to open themselves up to another organization is really resonates with me as professor david campbell he’s, a professor at binghamton university, and his op ed pieces in this week’s chronicle of philanthropy titled the lessons of nine eleven philanthropy a decade later. David, thank you so much for being on the show. It’s been a pleasure having you and christine cronin, thank you very much. Christine is president of charities dot organ. We talked about her firsthand experience from september eleventh wave charities. Christine, thank you so much. Thank you, toni also want to thank everybody who’s in small non-profit chat on twitter we today was our first collaboration. They have the the chat every other friday from noon to one so right before this show and i hope to collaborate with them again. The hashtag there is sm np chat and you get more information from at pamela grow because she’s, the moderator of small non-profit chat. So thanks to the folks who are participating in that jet, i also want you to know that david campbell’s op ed piece from two thousand eleven is still up again. Titled the lessons of nine eleven philanthropy, christine kronen is with me, and she is still the president of n y charities. Dot org’s. Hello, christine. Hi, tony. How are you? Well, thanks. Thank you. Thank you very much for being with me on the september eleventh show. I i really appreciate that. Thank you. Well, i appreciate having this conversation again. Any reaction to what? You just heard the conversation the three of us were having? Well, it brings back such sad memories and as i think it does for all new yorkers. But it’s it’s, what i learned during that time period was how difficult it is to function during a disaster which affect people, you know, and friends and and then people down the street who you didn’t know. And i now have so much admiration for people who respond to disasters as the profession and, you know, and who go in volunteer when a disaster happens because you’re facing the consequences every single moment, and you just have to keep pushing yourself. I have a much more appreciation which which you and david did mean in your own ways. You each did respond. You know, you were in question. You were first responders, and on dh, staggering amounts of money raised and in just a short amount of time, i’ll never forget that afternoon. You know, when we were all sitting in shock around a conference table, it was the youngest person on the staff who turned to me and said, we need to set up with this after release site, and i just stared at him for several minutes because even though we were already doing disasters with united way international and we were doing them for disasters all over the world, it never, ever, ever occurred to me that we would do one for new york, and i just it was incomprehensible, and i finally realized he was right. Yeah, do you think september eleven still has a nim packed on e-giving i think that most of us can’t wipe it out of hyre memory bank, it was such a stunning, you know, event and the emotions around it were so overwhelming that yes, i do believe it definitely has an impact. Yeah, i find it hard to imagine that that would go away. I mean, i guess it’s it’s natural that that it will now we’re fourteen years out and you know, i i i always maybe it’s just, you know, i’m imposing my thoughts on everyone else, but i i just i think about it, you know, pretty may be intensely each year, even though, you know, this is like, you know, it’s fourteen it’s fourteen years later, not a not a five year anniversary sort of milestone, i imagine maybe fifteen years will be a bigger a bigger deal, but i don’t know, it’s, just i agree with you, it’s still it’s still impacts me, you know, around the day and, like, you know, certainly the day and maybe the day after two it’s ah, and then also in another disaster comes up like hurricane katrina, for example, and you immediately, or at least we immediately, you know, try to decide what can we do? What charities will we feature? You know, it all just starts coming back and the emotions around the disasters that you’ve experienced, and i don’t think i mean, i certainly hope that there will never be one as bad as nine eleven, but you just never wipe it out of your memory bank something that came from the discussion we had four years ago. That is sort of uplifting, i think. Is that that that small organizations have that nimbleness advantage, that they can quickly adapt and learn? As you and david and i were talking about and respond there’s, no question about that. And, you know, we still see it all the time. I mean, a lot of ideas emerged from neighborhood groups and from parent teacher association. And those were the ones who know each other well and they quickly get together and they, you know, develop. Ah, plan to react to the latest emergency at n y charities dot organ. You work a lot with small, small and mid sized shops, right? Definitely it’s. Interesting. How evil answer she has changed in the left. You know, ten years i started in it in nineteen ninety nine, but it’s like a moving target. Tony, you know it’s like one day a charity’s working with you the next day, they’re trying to do their own merchant account. The next day they come back because having a merchant account is very difficult. So it’s it’s really just keeps changing all the time and you just have to be prepared to say okay, today this is what we’re dealing with and let’s go with it. Yeah, those air, you know, that’s a lesson that i hear from a lot of guests and there’s that small and even midsize shop advantage, but this smaller size, you know, when i was just a few people deep, you can you can be quick and and a lot of, you know, certainly in terms of a disaster, you’re reacting not a hundred percent rationally, but you’re doing the best that you can and that’s all that’s all we really can expect and then the passion that goes with disaster, you know, or the personal connection, i mean, so many people knew someone in the towers, and many of us didn’t know for a series of days, you know, who was alive and who wasn’t and, you know, you just you just keep moving. I mean, i stayed in the office probably for two months till about eleven o’clock at night, answering emails from people all over the world. Yeah, those were the emails that asked, how does that sound, right, exactly, exactly or what do you think of this idea? I’m going to try to you go to my school today and, you know, sell cookies, you know, and send it. Where should i send it? And what do you think? Everything ended with what do you think? You know, i would spend hours and hours just trying to respond because i felt so strongly that people needed to know someone was listening. We need to leave it there. Thank you again for joining me today. My pleasure. Thanks. Cracking. Thanks, christine. Next week run like a biz. Hillary schaefer has a wall street background. Now she runs a non profit and shares her advice on applying wall street to the jefferson awards foundation and program your board, your boards responsibilities for your program side with jean takagi are regular monthly legal contributor. If you missed any part of today’s show, find it on tony martignetti dot com. Thanks for being with me. The singing will return pursuant. Full service fund-raising you’ll raise car loads of money. I’m not talking about mini coopers or smart cars. I’m talking humvee fourteen passenger stretch limousines and don’t those things are ridiculous, but not when they’re filled with money. Pursuant dot com. Our creative producer is claire meyerhoff. Sam liebowitz is the line producer show social media’s, by susan chavez, susan chavez, dot com and our music is by scott stein. Thank you for that information. Scotty. You’re with me next week for non-profit radio. Big non-profit ideas for the other ninety five percent. Go out and be great.

Nonprofit Radio for September 4, 2015: Video Storytelling & Don’t Tell MY Story

Big Nonprofit Ideas for the Other 95%

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Yasmin Nguyen & Sheri Chaney Jones: Video Storytelling

In a crowded video internet, how do you tell that compelling story so your message moves others to take action? Sharing their smart strategies are Yasmin Nguyen, CEO of VibranceGlobal, and Sheri Chaney Jones, president of Measurement Resources. We talked at NTC, the Nonprofit Technology Conference, hosted by Nonprofit Technology Network (NTEN).

 

 

Maria Semple: Don’t Tell MY Story

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The right to be forgotten. Maria Semple explains last year’s EU opinion that Google must remove outdated links from search results. What’s the impact on your prospect research? Also, your donors’ right to privacy. Maria is our prospect research contributor and The Prospect Finder. (Originally aired 6/13/14)

 

 


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Hello and welcome to tony martignetti non-profit radio big non-profit ideas for the other ninety five percent. I’m your aptly named host. Oh, i’m glad you’re with me. I come down with a case of her panji nna if my mouth had to say the words you missed today’s show video storytelling in a crowded video internet, how do you tell that compelling story? So your message moves others to take action. Sharing their smart strategies are yasmin win, ceo of vibranceglobal and sherry cheney jones, president of measurement resource is we talked at ntcdinosaur non-profit technology conference hosted by non-profit technology network and then and don’t tell my story the right to be forgotten, maria simple explains last year’s you opinion that google must remove outdated links from search results what’s the impact on your prospect research also your donors right to privacy? Maria is our prospect research contributor and the prospect finder that originally aired june thirteenth of last year on tony’s take to the ntc videos responsive by pursuant full service fund-raising data driven and technology enabled, you’ll raise more money pursuant dot com here are yasmin win and sherry cheney jones with video storytelling welcome to tony martignetti non-profit radio coverage of ntc twenty fifteen the non-profit technology conference we’re at the austin convention center austin, texas we’re kicking off our coverage with this interview. Are my guests now? Are jasmine win and sherry cheney jones welcome. Thank you. Thank you, it’s. Good to be here. They’re seminar topic is stop shooting videos. Start unlocking stories. Jasmine win is founder and ceo of vibranceglobal and sherry cheney jones is president of measurement resource is let’s start sherry, what are non-profits not doing quite a cz? Well as they could with video interviews, storytelling? What? From my perspective, because we help non-profits measure and communicate their impact in value, they often are focusing on their impact. So how are they changing lives and changing circumstances there, too focused on the activities. So, really understanding what your true impact is and telling your stories from there, and you’re trying to elicit really heartfelt story telling stories. You know, emotional, we want emotional impact. Okay, what would you have you have? You know, i think that a lot of times we focus so much on the technology, the process of doing video and also the questions that we ask people, and so we don’t focus enough on the connection, and really, when you are able to provide a space for someone to open up, to feel that they can speak about their passion, be grateful, they then create that connection that we can then capture and witness through videos and so it’s that focus on that connection rather than just the information or that exchange. Now, as we are today, you’re asking people to get in front of lights and cameras or and mike’s on dh and open up yes, men. How are we going toe start this process first, let’s start with how do we find the right people? And then we’ll get into coaching them and and getting their best performance and storytelling out of them. But how do we find the right one? Yeah, absolute tony that the key thing is selecting the right people, and that starts with being mindful of who your audience is. You know, we found that the most impactful, relevant, ah person to interview talk with are a representation of our audience. So, for example, for appealing to a donor’s, then it be great to have a financial supporter donors to be able to speak in their language in the same mindset for them to connect and relate. So think about the group’s. We want this interview to be meaningful for and select people from that constituency. Right? Volunteers, donors, board members. Yeah. Ok. And someone who’s were well respected. Who’s. Our ticket who’s also a very passionate and a champion of of our particular cause to be able to speak for us but also at the same time, carry the torch for our audience so that they can connect with them. Sure, anything you want to add to finding the right person is sure. I always say, think about your wise. Why do you do it? You do, but not just why does your organization do what it does? But why does your funders fund you and whitey here? Participants participate. And when you’re finding people to tell your story, you want to make sure that you are covering those three perspectives. Okay, three wives. The three wise yet three wise men know e wise? Yes, different wise. Okay, sure. Let’s, say with you now. So we found the right people. How do we start the process of making them? Comfortable evoking the really heartfelt emotion that we’re tryingto chief? Sure. Well, i will actually default to us because he’s really good at that, you know, i’m i’m the one that helps you create the content think about what you should be eliciting and he’s when it does the great interviews, maybe you’re more on the on the production side. I’m more on the defining what what questions? You should be asking what impact you should be drawing out of them stuff like, okay, we’ll come to you very shortly. Okay, okay. We got plenty of time together. Twenty five. Just great. Yeah. You know, for someone to be at ease. You really it’s it’s? Really? About how you think about the interview or how you think about being on video? A lot of times, people focus on the act of, you know, being on camera so they feel like they’re being evaluated. They’re being judged or in an interview, maybe you think of, like, a job interview or or some others where they have to perform and they have to be perfect. And what that does is it raises this level of anxiety where you have tio feel like you have to know, not necessarily be your best to be your most authentic. Authentic. Yeah, you’re you’re going to be your best if you’re most if you you’re most authentic, you just you write which is hard to get and even on steven instill videos, pictures it really is okay? Yeah. How are we gonna do so down? So so part of that is in the initial invitation is instead of hey, can you do a testimonial keen? And you come on camera and do a video it’s about framing it in a way that helps them give instead of being put in a position to perform. And so what i mean by giving is, you know, i’d like to invite you to come and share your story so that we can help inspire others like you. You know, we we want to put you in a place where you can be of service to others, and when you’re in that mindset of being of service, to be able to share your experience and insight so that it can help others, it takes that pressure off because now it’s about your own story, your own experience and there’s no. Right or wrong. And so that that’s the first step is the mind set piece. Okay, so let’s try to avoid characterizing it as testimonial. Do you know, do something that way. Put a label on right or even an interview? It should be more of a conversation. And i find that mom i doing so far, you’re doing great. My failing is a failing grade know you’re at least a b plus or something. You’re doing great. You’ve done this a few times. I have securities right already. Absolutely cool. Yeah. All right, s so tell me more. Yeah, so? So. So that’s the first step is setting up the frame for for what? That experience is like giving them information so that they feel prepared, you know, even some questions. Not necessarily for them to prepare a script, but for them to at least be a tease to know what to expect, that there’s not going to be this sort of curveball, or they’re gonna be blindsided because people have a lot of anxiety around, you know the uncertainty. And so that that’s another element. And then once you actually get into the session, then then it’s really about creating that space. I go through a specific routine if i find that someone’s either really nervous or they’re very tense, where we do an exercise called a ci gong slap, and what that is is where you basically take your hand and one hand and you slap the part of your front part of your arm all the way back to up to your chest, and then you do on the other side and then down to your legs and then back up through your back and then on your head as well. You do that a couple times having how hard you’re slapping, just just so just like just like this. So you’re going back like this and that and then down to your chest and then back-up and what you’re doing is you’re activating the various different meridian parts and your body, your head too as well, too. And then once you do that a couple times, you’ll notice this sort of tingle. It just activates the energy and yourself. And so that’s physically gets you ready. Another gong xi gong slap. Yeah, yeah, you can google that nok will be on youtube. The other parties is also getting you into what we call the vortex or the zone or, you know, the peak performance state and so, you know, i listen to some music, so whatever music kind of gets you going here, the whole goal is to are we asking the person i interrupt all the time, you know, that’s bad that’s, bad technique, a weapon? You don’t have a conversation, really? So we’re asking the person in advance, what’s your kind of music or bring bring some of your favorite music, you’re going bring some of that, but even before the actual interview, i will take time to have a phone conversation, just tow, learn about that, build that report so it’s not. We’re not meeting for the first time on camera and, uh, and that way, we feel like we’re friends and i can ask them about different things, so the whole goal is to get them out of their head and into their hearts, because when they start speaking from the heart when they start opening up yeah, that’s when the magic happens, outstanding. All right, you’re tuned to non-profit radio tony martignetti also hosts a podcast for the chronicle of philanthropy fund-raising fundamentals is a quick ten minute burst of fund-raising insights, published once a month. Tony’s guests are expert in crowdfunding, mobile giving event fund-raising direct mail and donor cultivation. Really, all the fund-raising issues that make you wonder, am i doing this right? Is there a better way there is? Find the fund-raising fundamentals archive it. Tony martignetti dot com that’s m a r t i g e n e t t i remember there’s, a g before the end, thousands of listeners have subscribed on itunes. You can also learn maura, the chronicle website, philanthropy dot com fund-raising fundamentals, the better way. Surely now let’s, come to you with questions. Durney um, we really jasmine alluded to a little bit, but the types of questions where you’re aware your expertise comes in. Sure in terms of thinking about what? Why are you doing this video? I’m sorry i called you jasmine. Jasmine? Pardon me. Sorry about that. Yes, you have been eluded. So what’s the purpose of the video you’re shooting. Who is your audience? What do they care about? And what we know about is although fund-raising is up from where it was pretty great recession levels, people want to know that there their money is actually making a difference. So no longer can we just say, oh, here’s a cute kid, i’m going to tell you my story about, you know, my family people really want to know that there’s a collective impact going on that there’s, you know, in the measurement world, the outcomes that you’re achieving. So you want to think about what are those outcomes that you know that people want you two to be showing and then making sure your interview questions are addressing those? So people are telling their stories around how they experience the outcomes that you are saying that you’re achieving, how they’re experiencing a perfect and we’re going to get really kind of personal, right? Like how i saved your life improved your life, help your child, you know, etcetera, yeah. So, you know, we have a list of twelve outcomes that typically non-profits air achieving, like increased knowledge increased, gilles, you know, maintenance of new behavior, reduction of undesirable behavior. So no, those going in before you start asking your questions and let your interview we know that you’re going to want to know about, you know, how did this program increase your knowledge or help you get a job or, you know, decrease your risk for heart disease or whatever it is that you’re non-profits doing, make sure the questions are aligned with those important outcomes. Should we stay away from giving exact questions? You will be asked one, two, three, four, because i find in doing my show that that then leads to scripted questions, lead descriptive answers, and and that’s not from the heart, that’s from appearing like memorized so so sherry but we want to give them topics, right, but not exact questions is that is that the best practice or what? Either either. Yeah, i found that i could give them some questions and with a disclaimer that, you know, these are some of the similar types of questions that will be asking and then also explain to them how to prepare. So just think about some bullet points or just some stories that may be relevant, but not necessarily prepare a script per se as well to so that that, uh it alleviates the anxiety, but you’re also making sure that they don’t have a prepared answer. Percent. Yeah, yeah. Like i said, then that’s not that’s, not the impact you’re gonna want. Um, all right, anything else, before we get to the actual either of you need anything else before we get to the actual session with mike’s and lights and cameras that we should be thinking about? We didn’t talk about yet, you know, i think that’s that’s pretty much covers it for now. We’re going to go and dive a little bit deeper into ours session then during that time. Yeah. Oh, well, i mean, there’s stuff you’re going to say in this session. You you won’t say here is that well? Actually, you know, know what? We’ve got someone holding back. Of course not. Your size is okay. Okay? I want shortchange non-profit ready. You know, of course, that all right. All right. So now we’re in the session, so presumably we’re in some kind of studio. These got a microphone because it might just we could just be doing audio, right? Possible? Absolutely. But might be lights and camera also who’s best toe ask, what do we do when we’re in the studio? Now? I could i could do that. Okay, yeah, you know it’s again, it’s first getting them into that state it’s a two part process getting them into that place where they’re not thinking from their minus their speaking for the heart, then the next step, then it’s it’s like a dance. Then you’re the lead. And so through your mindful questions that you’ve designed, you’ve created both to communicate, impact illicit to bring it out from them, per se. You’re also thinking about what is the overarching storyline that you’re trying to create. So one of the things that well, that we’re going to discuss in our sessions is the ah frame. Where for an appeals type of video you know these air the videos that ah, non-profits play at their events to appeal to, you know, fundraisers and donors and so there’s a seven start, seven step formula that i generally recommend to my clients as a guide for creating questions to elicit out those components. So the first part is, is that emotional hook or that connection? Something, whether it be ah piece of data, something that’s compelling or a story that just gets people that initially engaged. So they want to continue to watch the next step then is gratitude appreciating the people that are there the people that have already supported you recognizing them so then they personally feel connected engaged. The third part then is impact showing the difference that that their support up until this point has made to show that you have traction, and that your stewards of their support this far then the next step is really diving into the importance of the purpose of the mission. Why are we all here? Why is it important to support us then? The next step is to ah is to paint a picture of what the future khun b so this is where we are. But this is how much we can. This is how many more people we can serve. This is the greater impact that we can do. And then then goes the call to action, which is this is how you can help. This is how you can be a part of us achieving this bigger future. And the final part is that emotional close wrapping it up, tying it back to either the mission or or completing the circle of this story that leaves them with this emotional connection. But now they’ve see why why we’re doing this. They also know how they can be a part of it and that’s the framework in which we start to create questions that we start to elicit out in each of the different interviews. We sure this is a real art because that’s a lot to pack into what’s probably gonna be, you know, like a ford of five minute video or so bands. It’s doable? Yeah, of course. Yeah. Okay. Yeah. And i mean, in the session we’re going toe share case study where one organization was ableto talk about their recreational programme with kids, but at the end of the day, they were able to demonstrate how they had a fifty seven thousand seven hundred seventy percent return on investment in those chilled children in terms of really transforming their earning potential over their lives. Just buy this, you know, recreational after school program and and talk about in your fund-raising appeal if you’re able teo to share those stories, talk about those kids experience and at the end of the day, say, oh, by the way, give us five hundred dollars, and we’ll turn that into two hundred eighty nine thousand dollars for on these children over the course of, you know, their lifetime that’s, very powerful, and, you know, checkbooks are flying nah bins. What if we’re in our studio session and it’s not going so well? Our interview is not really loosening up very tense. You’re not getting the kind of emotion you’re hoping for. What what can we do to you? Break that besides achy gong slap anything else we can do? Like in them in that moment? Loosen him or her up? Yeah, yeah, you know, first of all, i always try with something with physiology. So some physical movement, whether it be breathing or others just to kind of, you know, shake out some of the stiffness there. If that doesn’t work, then i should start to shift into what are they passionate about? We totally go off or off camera off mike now, mike, or even even if the camera’s still on, but i shift their focus on hey, you know what? What do you know? What are you most passionate about? Tell me about your favorite, you know, and start getting really personal and when they start to then connect with what really means, you know something to them, then it slowly they slowly start to kind of open up in that way. So i found that to be really effective, it might actually be a good idea to keep the camera rolling or the mike rolling because you might capture something really good whether they know it’s being captured or not, they’re they’re more at ease because you’ve broken that i see you looking the tension about okay, let’s, create anything you want, but i was just saying, you know, a lot of it is the magic and editing, so if you know that framework, that yasmin laid out and, you know, that’s what you’re going for your looking for those nuggets that you’re going to put into that framework when you go to create your video and edit it together. And that that’s a really good point, sherry, is that, you know, when you’re looking at the post production editing process, you wanna have someone on your team that understands the story framework here? Not just someone that’s really a great good, you know, on editor or your your brother in law, who knows howto video. But someone who understands the purpose understands the story’s understands elements of marketing as well so that they can put those pieces together in a meaningful way. Alright, we have plenty of time together. So you took some now about postproduction. We moved into that suddenly that was well done. Thank you, baizman. What? What more about postproduction? Aside from let’s not have an amateur doing it. What else? What else can we say? You know, post production actually starts with preproduction. Always found that it’s very, very important to know the roadmap rather than shooting a bunch of content audio or visual and then just dumping it on to someone and saying here, figure it out so it’s it’s it’s essential to be involved throughout the process. S so that’s, really, the key part here and then the other part is, is to understand, to have someone who really understands the dynamics of human conversation, per se you know, there is certain ways in which people speak that are ah, more flattering than others. And so it’s it’s a very subtle nuance of how to cut the foot the pieces and then start to assemble them together and then tie in either music or other elements that enhance that experience, whether it be visuals or other things as well, too. It sounds like you’re strongly suggesting that this be done by a professional, yes, absolutely on baby involved from the beginning, not just that you’ve given them a raw video file, and now they have to try, too. Kraft, what you’re describing? Great, yeah, yeah, i think specially for your your fund-raising appeal videos and maybe the things on your website you’re going to ask people tio to donate to your cause, but i think for and you can correct me if you disagree, but for your maybe website. Testimonials or other things, you know, in our session, yasmin’s going to actually do one on his iphone. So just depends on what the purpose again understanding what is the purpose of the video, your beauty that’s an excellent point, you know, i mean, we were we were talking last several minutes about the least, i think the the video that shone at the gala that ideally is evoking tears and and moving a room of seven hundred people or, you know, whatever. But on the other end of the spectrum share your point is really well taken. This could be very low production value with somebody with an iphone, and it can still be very, very moving. Yeah, absolutely. Doesn’t the production values don’t have to be high to be compelling? Yes. Depends what your purpose is. Yeah, and and and again, it’s, just starting with understanding, understanding your purpose, understanding your audience, understanding your call to action and then finding the right medium for that. Go ahead. Yeah, absolutely. It’s it’s really about having a storytelling mindset, it’s about having a mindset of thinking about what? What are we doing right now? And is who is this meaningful? For and then let’s just capture that moment, especially with technology these days with, you know, our smartphones or iphones or android phones, you know, the cameras and the equipment is so advanced and it’s, i mean, you could capture a great experience bar trying to do it in the dark, but, i mean, if you think about wow, if i’m constantly thinking about how can i share this moment with someone else and who would benefit and why they would benefit, then then you’re you’re ready to go and as far as like professional editing, you know, quite honestly, people can edit themselves, but really, i find that like ninety plus percent of the clients and people i work with it’s a tedious process and that’s something that if they can learn how to improve the quality of capturing the experience that they can handed off to someone else, even if it’s simple edits it’s accessible and affordable for just even the average person who’s just doing a video for their they’re easing or something like that by phone. Yeah, you has been picked up his phone as he was talking for those who are not watching the video. A zoo visual. So i mean it’s just it could be just that simple. Sure, you look like you want to add something? No, i’m just a green. Okay, oppcoll we still have another couple of minutes left together. What if i not ask you that? Uh, what have we not talked about? It doesn’t matter what stage of it is, what more would you like to say on it? It’s a great topic, i think. Just a kind of reiterate it’s about thinking about this experience, the interviewer, the video really, as an opportunity for for you to help someone else give and and the way that they give is through their insights and experience. So we appreciate the opportunity to be here with you, tony, to be able to share and so it’s a it’s a conversation and it’s an opportunity to give. And i think that really when you start thinking of it this way, it alleviates a lot of stress and anxiety around the experience. Okay, yeah, i’d love to leave loved leave it there, but we still have a couple minutes left, so i’m gonna press it’ll further on something i was thinking about when you’re recording, do we do we need tohave an interviewer? Or should we just let the person kind of go free form and on dh hit on the topic questions hoping that they’ll do that, or we need to have an interviewer? I i think yes, i think so. And unless the person is experiencing very skilled with being able to create a connection themselves with either the camera, they’ve they’ve had either training or they could do it naturally. But i would say that the majority of the people are looking to have an interview because the goal is to experience a moment of connection. And how can you experience a connection without having some other person person? Lester trained to connect? Yeah, directly to account. And so to answer your question, yes, it’s important to have at least someone there to connect with? Okay, yeah, sure, because i think it’s not it can be very scripted, and we’re trying to avoid that scripted feel so an interviewer helps reduce that that scripted feel better, more connection, okay? And ah, there is one story i’d like to share and it’s about giving as well too, and sherry’s heard this. Story a number of times because we actually start third time speaking together here. But last year, we were at the non-profit technology conference, and both of us were there to writing. So you guys last year, samaritan picking up last year, we missed each other in d c yeah, so ah, sure. And i were both staying with our good friends, neil and heather. Now kneel on heather have this amazing ten year old daughter named kendall. And every morning when we sit down for breakfast, kendall would just light up the room and she’d ask questions, and she will have about a minute left. Okay. Okay, so, so so anyway, you’re trained, so i know what you know. I’m gonna tell part of theirs just to the store here, and i will re kapin the session here. Don’t worry about the way we wanna hear your story. Okay. All right. So so then ah, went the last morning that were there. She just barely looked up from her bowl and i said, hey, what’s going on, you seem different and she said, yeah, i’ve got to go sold girl scout cookies today i said, well, what’s wrong with that people love cookies, she said, yeah, but every time i get out there, i get rejected and so i said, yeah, gosh, you know, i totally understand, so i asked her i said, hey, kendall, how much of your cookies? She said they’re four dollars a box? So i said here, here’s, twenty dollars, once you give me five boxes, she said really has, like, yeah, it’s like, but here’s the thing i don’t eat cookies myself and so she but i want you to do what what i want to do is i want you to give these cookies to five people that you’ve never met before officer and her eyes lit up, she ran to her mom and said, mom, guess what? We get to give cookies away, then i said, now here, kendall here’s, the reason why i want you to give those cookies away because i want you to know what it’s like to make someone’s day. I want you to see, hear and feel their appreciation, and then when you’re out there and you’re asking someone to ask by a box of cookies, try this instead. Ask them hey, is there someone in your life that you really care about because i’d like to help you make their bay by giving them a box of cookies. So what we’re doing is we’re creating an opportunity for someone to give and so similar to this interview experience when you create an opportunity to give you shift, that dynamic latto outstanding, we’re gonna leave it there. Thank you very, very much. You your favorite cookies with thin mints, by the way about us so good on this. Emotions are number two yasmin win he’s, founder and ceo of vibranceglobal and sherry cheney jones’s, president of measurement resource is non-profit radio coverage of ntc twenty fifteen the non-profit technology conference thanks so much for being with us. It’s. Time for live listener love you know how grateful i am, in fact, not just gratitude love going out to all our live listeners wherever you might be. Podcast pleasantries always those listening in the time shift over ten thousand of you pleasantries to you, wherever you are, whatever you’re doing as you listen and are all important affiliate affections to our stations throughout the country. So glad you are with us. The thousands of you as well must. Be maybe another ten thousand who knows affiliate affections to all those affiliate listeners. Tony, take two and mohr coming up. Don’t tell my story, but first, pursuant you need more money pursuing helps you it’s just that simple. They have online tools made for small and midsize non-profits that help your fund-raising prospect of platform finds your upgrade ready donors there in your database, they’re buried. Who are they? Find them with prospector platform and you’ll raise more money pursuant. Dot com from the desk of world news tonight, i’m featuring non-profit technology conference video interviews at tony martignetti dot com check it out! I’m sitting at the desk at the anchor desk world news tonight, therefore, video interviews from auntie si, including today’s with jasmine win and sherry cheney jones. Also, any sample ward on what non-profit technology network does and how they can help you to use tech smarter, plus keeping your website current after launch and a panel of four on what to do when technology is being blamed. But it’s really not your problem? My video and the links to those four conference video interviews are at tony martignetti dot com and that’s tony’s take two for friday, fourth of september thirty fifth show of the year here’s maria semple don’t tell my story you know maria simple she’s, the prospect finder she’s a trainer and speaker on prospect research. Her website is the prospect finder dot com, and her book is panning for gold. Find your best donor prospects now exclamation mark she’s, our doi n of dirt, cheap and free. You can follow maria on twitter at maria simple. Welcome back, maria, good to talk to you. Good to talk to you. Thank you very much. You’re going to say glad to be here or anything. Well, i am glad to be here, actually and it’s a nice summer months and i’m always happy in the summer. So this is a good thing, excellent and even happier on non-profit radio day, right? Absolutely. Now that i ve pimped you twice and you have no choice but to say yes and i’m happy about everything we’re talking about the right to be forgotten. This came from a spaniard who brought a case in the european court of justice. Yes. So, you know, i thought it was very interesting and i was wondering, you know there might not be immediate applications for prospect researchers in the united states, but you know it. It got me to thinking what implications this might have five or ten years down the line in terms of information that might end up getting a raise from google searches. Um, and it just got me to wondering, you know how how we have to maybe cross check data in other places, especially going forward? If if we’re going to start seeing data, you know, becoming race, could it could even be more imminent than five or ten years? I think very well could be, you know, right now, one of the one of the stats that i had seen was that over forty one thousand europeans, i have actually asked through this online form that google has created to be for gotten so they want mention of themselves erased off of google search results and that huge let’s set the scene in case everyone hasn’t heard of this. This was ah man in spain who brought a case to the european court of justice because there were links in searches of his name is just searching his name. There were links. To old events that he thought were no longer relevant, right? It had to do with a realist state auction that was held, teo, settle some of what they call social security death, whatever that meant. But he was, you know, not happy that that was still out there because he felt that the debts have been settled and so forth. And so he petitioned through this, uh, europe europe’s top court, which is the court of justice of the european union, i guess it’s somewhat similar to our supreme court and petitioned, and it was ruled in his favor that, yes, google is going to have to comply. So of course, if google’s going to have to comply, you have to think that the other major search engines like yahoo and microsoft being will also have to do the same. And to comply. Google came up with this online form. I don’t know if you can. I don’t know how you go directly to the form. I guess you can just search it. I was i i ended up finding a link in one of the articles led me directly to the form and it’s. Pretty interesting, because you actually have to select from a drop down menu one of the thirty two countries that are listed that you would reside in. You do need to provide some sort of a photo id. Ah, so that i guess, you know, if you’re trying to get maybe say, a competitors, you know, information swipes or something like that, they want to make sure that yes, you are you’re the person and it’s information about you, etcetera, and so there are, you know, there’s certain things that you do need to do in order to comply, to get it, to get the data removed, but they really think it’s going to be a very long time before google can’t even get through all of these request and right now it on ly pertains to the european union, as you said, the thirty two countries so this does not apply teo u s residents, but it could there’s potential that someone could bring a similar action on dh similarly succeed in the us i’m not i would not put it past somebody to come up with that idea. Having read, you know, all the press that there is available out there about this particular ruling in europe, one thing that i didn’t realize i mean, i just thought that you go to google dot com and that’s just the one place to do research bedevil evidently there’s, a google dot ceo dot uk, which is, i guess, the european equivalent of google’s search engine, so i think what they’re from my understanding of what i’ve read is that it’s going toe wife clean the search results that you would find on the european search engine and maybe not necessarily google dot com again, it’s also new and all such a grey area and google themselves trying to figure out how they’re going to end up complying with this whole thing. The implications than for prospect research are becoming apparent as we’re talking. You might not find everything that you’d like to find on someone, right? Right? And, you know, i can give you an example. Tony, of a search i was doing a number of years back, i was probably about ten years ago, i was doing some donors threespot church. Actually, i was just doing research. I wasn’t sure that this person was actually considered a donor prospect or not, because sometimes i’m doing the research because they’re considering having this a person as a high profile boardmember and so i’m doing the research, and i kept coming up with this person’s name connected to corporate insider trading, so the bad kind of insider trading and at first i dismissed it because i thought, well, maybe it’s just the same name, but then i came across one article that actually did link the person to the insider trading and linked the person to current employment situation. So then i knew this was indeed the prospect, so i came i had a dilemma because, right, if i put this information into a written profile, then, uh, any donor and he don’t prospect really has the right to walk into your organization and say, show me what information you’ve compiled on may i want to see my donor record on? And so i really had this dilemma, and i thought, well, what do i do with this information? So i decided to call the person who had hired me to do the research, and i asked, why are you having me do this research on this individual? Is it for a simple donation? Or is there something more to this? And she said, oh, there’s a lot more to it. We are considering bringing him on the board, and our board chair thinks he would make a great treasurer for organization. Oh, my so that was, you know, i thought, okay, well, red flag. So i decided to verbally give the information that i had found. I mentioned that the person had paid their fine had done their time. It was well in their past, but i did feel that the executive director didn’t need to know that this existed. Now why this is really interesting dilemma, but why? Just verbally? Why? I mean, if if it’s bonified and you had confirmed it, why not put it in the written prospekt reports? Well, we discussed that. I told her that i would i don’t like to put information into a written profile that would potentially sever our relationship with somebody, and it could, you know, it was a potentially great relationship that could that could have existed. Um, so i did not want to eliminate that possibility for her if if he’d read this and said, well, you know, this was dug up. On me and, you know, i’m uncomfortable with this, and i’m walking away from this organization, you know, clearly it was in his past, everything had, you know, all fine has been paid, and as i said on time, his concert, i just felt that it could end up, um, severing the relationship ultimately, and i didn’t want to several relationship before it even began, since they’re you know they’re may not have been any issues in the future. I just told you to tread carefully. You always have in the back of your mind what the donor or dahna prospect might think if they were to read this in the organizations report that you had written, yeah, itwas absolutely there is always the same reason. I don’t like to delve into divorce records. Yeah, well, now i can see how that wouldn’t belong but alright, it’s, just interesting. You always have this in mind that what would happen if the person were to read this about themselves in the organ in the organization’s files are always thinking away. Okay, interesting. And what what happened in that case? Did they end up inviting the person to be on the board? Do you know, or did they not? They did. They ultimately did. But i don’t think they put him in a treasurer position immediately. You know, i’m not sure down the line if that ended up coming to fruition, but it was certainly at least something that the executive director needed to be aware of. Excellent. Okay, excellent story. Thank you. Um, this all, you know sort of brings up also the the potential, the discretion, really, that google is goingto have and other search engines as they have to comply with this. The way i read the the description i read, i didn’t read the court’s decision itself, but the description i read was that, you know, there’s some vague description or vague direction about, um, what google should consider inappropriate and what not, but but but nothing’s very, very specific. And so that leaves a lot of discretion for google as to whether something like what you described still belongs. I mean, it still could be very relevant, even though it’s in the past, you know, i mean, history is all in the past, we we were studying history all the time. So just because something is in the past google and detrimental to the person google could still very well determine that that belongs under that person’s search results. Right? So now people are wondering, you know, it’s a matter of fact, i read an article that was in a may fifteenth edition of usa today where, you know, they talked about, you know, that the court basically is here is blaming the messenger and, you know, this person had this, you know, situations in their past, google is simply me giving you access to the information, and you know, it e if if reputations can now be somehow, you know, as they’re calling it in this article, airbrushed on demand, right, you know you’re going to have to think about, you know, well, it’s people who have done things, you know, maybe doctors who have botched surgeries and you just think about the implications of all the types of people that would be thinking about having this this shady past erased there’s just a scary amount of discretion that google has because the past is still relevant, but maybe some things are irrelevant. Howto how do you decide what’s relevant to other people and what’s not the other, the other very interesting thing about this is the information isn’t going away it’s not going to be removed from the internet if that’s even possible it’s just going to be removed from a search result with that from of that person’s name. So the personally is a matter of fact, the very newspaper articles that this spaniard, you know, was sad about it on the internet. More people have probably read the articles now that otherwise would have ever read them if he hadn’t brought this to court. And so the articles still exists. It’s just getting to the articles by searching on this individual’s name is something that has been or will be very soon. I’m not sure if it was removed or not, but i think it may be it wass at this point, um, but, you know, is see data is probably still going to exist, but as a prospect researcher, your main starting point is always with a person’s name. Yes, that’s why? I was wondering how this was really going to affect donorsearch research. I mean, we have a lot of info metoo shins buy-in particularly hyre ed that do their research. Donors who reside in europe, right. So you’ve got people who come to this country for their education on they go back or people who started, you know, as a u s citizen and are now living is expats in another country, so you know the borders being as fluid as they are. You can imagine, i know, maybe a very small social service organisation non-profit might not be in that situation is there researching their donors because for the most part, they’re serving a geographic region and their donors come from that very small, smaller pool’s people. But larger organizations that serve that our international and it doesn’t even have to be hyre ed, imagine the wise of the world or united ways we have to go out for a break. When we come back, marie and i are going to keep talking about this, and we’re gonna move teo, subject of the donors right to privacy and the code of ethics around around prospect research. So stay with us. Like what you’re hearing a non-profit radio tony’s got more on youtube, you’ll find clips from stand up comedy tv spots and exclusive interviews catch guests like seth godin craig newmark, the founder of craigslist marquis of eco enterprises, charles best from donors choose dot org’s aria finger, do something that worked neo-sage levine from new york universities heimans center on philantech tony tweets to he finds the best content from the most knowledgeable, interesting people in and around non-profits to share on his stream. If you have valuable info, he wants to re tweet you during the show. You can join the conversation on twitter using hashtag non-profit radio twitter is an easy way to reach tony he’s at tony martignetti narasimhan t i g e n e t t i remember there’s a g before the end he hosts a podcast for the chronicle of philanthropy fund-raising fundamentals is a short monthly show devoted to getting over your fund-raising hartals just like non-profit radio, toni talks to leading thinkers, experts and cool people with great ideas. As one fan said, tony picks their brains and i don’t have to leave my office fund-raising fundamentals was recently dubbed the most helpful non-profit podcast you have ever heard. You can also join the conversation on facebook, where you can ask questions before or after the show. The guests were there, too. Get insider show alerts by email, tony tells you who’s on each week and always includes link so that you can contact guest directly. To sign up, visit the facebook page for tony martignetti dot com. And i’m tony martignetti and with me is maria simple, the prospect finder, maria appa ra, the association of prospect researchers for advancement, they have something to say about donors they dio there, they actually on their web site, a statement of ethics, and i’d be glad to provide that link to your tear listeners. Tony on your facebook page, we’ll put that after the takeaways. Yes, yeah, sure. And so the main pages apra home dot org’s a pr, a home dot org’s and so there you know that that is the association that most professional prospect researchers would align with and rely on for their professional development. So there is a statement of ethics that the opera has and, you know, accountability and practice as well. I mean, i’m looking at one specific line that they have in their code of ethics around practice. It says that, you know, they shall on ly record data that is appropriate to the fund-raising process and protect the confidentiality of all personal information at all times. Um, so, you know, they take donor-centric mation is safeguarded at their organizations password protect the software, for example, making sure that only people who need access to that information are going to get the access to the information. Well, let’s, go back to this donor-centric ality. I mean, how do you protect the person’s confidentiality when your task is to prepare research about the person? I mean, at the top of the page is the person’s name and, um the pages are loaded with stuff about the person. How do you how do they balance? What do they mean? Their protect confidentiality? So you want to make sure that on ly the people who need access to this information to advance fund-raising are going to have access to the information? First of all, the information is all derived from publicly available sources, right? So google obviously is one of those publicly available sources that we get information from. We’ve talked about hundreds of those on the show. Yeah, yeah, absolutely. And so what? You go to a lot of different sources to gather the information and bring it all together? The role of the prospect researcher is, too. Take all of that information, wade through it and come up with a concise profile. Most of the time, the information is is going to be embedded right into the donor record because then you can pull the reports, you know, as you need in the in the donor software, when i’m preparing the profiles, i just do it in a word document so that they can easily cut and paste the information and if need be into their at their end. Obviously, i don’t have access to donor software that my clients are using, so you want to be sensitive to then who you’re emailing these two i don’t mean you as the prospect. Well, i don’t mean you personally, but the prospect researcher and they may very well in a smaller midsize shop not even be devoted to prospect research, so that let’s say, right, the person doing this research on donors and potential donors, you want to be very conscious of who you’re emailing. These reports, too, has who has access to the to the nested folders where these prospekt reports are stored? Yes, absolutely mn it, and then you can imagine a situation where you get your development committee together and you’re doing perhaps some sort of peer review sessions so you might have printed profiles or data pieces of data pertaining. To these individuals on the table, you know, every every development office really should have a good shredder in the office, and i would really encourage people not to allow boardmember sze other volunteers involved in the development process tow, walk out with hard copies because you just don’t want this information, you know, floating around out there that’s very good admonition caution? Yeah, that that where the hard copies go and then they end up in the person’s office or home or something. Yeah, right now. Okay, talking about shredders, you know, i can’t stand seeing those shredders where it’s like quarter inch strips like a four year old could put those back together if if they wanted to there’s quarter inch long strips. I mean, you should get at least cross cut, if not the not the ones that make those little little paper tiny bullets, which you’re supposed to be impossible to put back together, right? And there are companies that you can hyre depending on how much you really have to shred, there are companies that you can you can hire to do shredding. I think that even in local companies like u p s stores they have shredders located within those facilities, maybe even staples. I’m not sure i know ups does, but, you know, there are places that you can go then and taken have it securely shredded. So that might be something to consider. If you do have an awful lot, maybe maybe your office’s air moving and suddenly you find that. Okay, you’ve got files and files from maybe past years, and now things are going all electronic. What are you going to do with all of this? You don’t want to move it right, because you might not need to bring all of that old data with you, but yet it contains some potentially, you know, sensitive information that people would not want just floating around out there. Yes. And as you mentioned, there are services where they’ll just place a bin in your office. And then when it fills up, you call them and then they come and shred it, and they give you back the empty bin. Yeah. What else? What else you thinking around? We’ve just about another minute or so. What else around this data? Data? Privacy and confidentiality? Well, again, just making sure that everything is very well password protected on lee allow people have access to the donor, soft to your donordigital base that absolutely needed shred anything that is printed and keep on top of what’s happening with this with this particular law that that occurred in the european union. And just you know what? Maybe you know, i will of course keep on top of it, tony, and weaken maybe revisited as things develop, um, even if we make it part of, you know, a small piece of the future show, but i think that that non-profits do need to be aware that this is out there and see the potential for its effect in the united states ask and you’ll you’ll be most successful, i think, in searching if you look for right to be forgotten, maria, thank you very much. Thank you, tony. My pleasure, maria simple the prospect finder on twitter she’s at maria simple her sight is the prospect finder dot com next week, it’s september eleventh hard to know what to do on that exact day. I’m going to replay a show called the september eleven e effect about giving immediately after nine eleven and the longer term. Impact. If you missed any part of today’s show, find it on tony martignetti dot com. Where in the world else would you go so glad i brought that singing back? You may not be, but but i am pursuant full service fund-raising you’ll raise baby carriages more money. I’m not talking about those paltry little one cedars that most couples push around. I’m talking couples with quadruplets four abreast, they come down the sidewalk like the middle coach row out of a dreamliner seven eighty seven remember last week was the studio apartments in first class they come and dear the crosswalks and they part pedestrian herds like arctic ice breakers filled with money. That’s how much you’re going to raise pursuant dot com. Our creative producer is claire meyerhoff. Sam liebowitz is the line producer. The show’s social media is by susan chavez, susan chavez, dot com and our music is by scott stein duitz thank you, scotty. Be with me next week for non-profit radio. Big non-profit ideas for the other ninety five percent go out and be great. Snusz dahna what’s not to love about non-profit radio tony gets the best guests check this out from seth godin this’s the first revolution since tv nineteen fifty and henry ford nineteen twenty it’s the revolution of our lifetime here’s a smart, simple idea from craigslist founder craig newmark yeah insights, orn presentation or anything? People don’t really need the fancy stuff they need something which is simple and fast. When’s the best time to post on facebook facebook’s andrew noise nose at traffic is at an all time hyre on nine a m or eight pm so that’s when you should be posting your most meaningful post here’s aria finger ceo of do something dot or ge young people are not going to be involved in social change if it’s boring and they don’t see the impact of what they’re doing so you got to make it fun and applicable to these young people look so otherwise a fifteen and sixteen year old they have better things to dio they have xbox, they have tv, they have their cell phones. Me dar is the founder of idealist. I took two or three years for foundation staff, sort of dane toe add an email address card, it was like it was phone. This email thing is right and that’s, why should i give it away? Charles best founded donors choose dot or ge somehow they’ve gotten in touch kind of off line as it were on dno, two exchanges of brownies and visits and physical gift. Mark echo is the founder and ceo of eco enterprises. You may be wearing his hoodies and shirts. Tony talked to him. Yeah, you know, i just i i’m a big believer that’s not what you make in life. It sze, you know, tell you make people feel this is public radio host majora carter. Innovation is in the power of understanding that you don’t just put money on a situation expected to heal. You put money in a situation and invested and expected to grow and savvy advice for success from eric sacristan. What separates those who achieve from those who do not is in direct proportion to one’s ability to ask others for help. The smartest experts and leading thinkers air on tony martignetti non-profit radio big non-profit ideas for the other ninety five percent.

Nonprofit Radio for June 5, 2015: Your Video Strategy & How To Get Found

Big Nonprofit Ideas for the Other 95%

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Opportunity Collaboration: This working meeting on poverty reduction is unlike any other event you have attended. No plenary speeches, no panels, no PowerPoints. I was there last year and I’m going this year. It will ruin you for every other conference! October 11-16, Ixtapa, Mexico.

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My Guests:

Bridgett CollingYour Video Strategy

Video is the most popular and fastest-growing form of content. Bridgett Colling shares her advice on fitting video into your mission. Do you know about YouTube for Nonprofits? What are WooBox and TagBoard? Bridgett is director of content marketing at See3Communications. We talked at NTC, the Nonprofit Technology Conference hosted by NTEN, the Nonprofit Technology Network.

 

Elizabeth Beachy & Arika SanchezHow to Get Found

With Elizabeth Beachy (L) & Arika Sanchez at NTC

Your content strategy needs to consider that people now search YouTube, Twitter and Pinterest almost as often as they search Google. Now that search has changed, how do you create content that gets you found? From NTC, Elizabeth Beachy is director of strategic communication at Upleaf and Arika Sanchez was formerly the Communications Specialist at the Center for Nonprofit Excellence.

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Hello and welcome to tony martignetti non-profit radio big non-profit ideas for the other ninety five percent. I’m your aptly named host. Oh, i’m glad you’re with me. I’d suffer biliary calculus if you had the gall to tell me that you missed today’s, show your video strategy video the most popular and fastest growing form of content. Bridget calling shares her advice on fitting video into your mission. Do you know about youtube? For non-profits? What are woobox and tag board? Bridget is director of content marketing at sea three communications. We talked at and t c the non-profit technology conference hosted by n ten, the non-profit technology network and how to get found you’re content strategy needs to consider that people now search youtube, twitter and pinterest almost as often as they search google. Now that search has changed. How do you create content that gets you found from ntcdinosaur? Elizabeth beachy is director of strategic communication at upleaf and arika sanchez is communications specialist at united way of central new mexico. I’m tony take two thank you, responsive by opportunity collaboration, that working, meeting on poverty reduction that will ruin you for every other conference here is bridget calling from the non-profit technology conference on your video strategy. Welcome to tony martignetti non-profit radio coverage of the non-profit technology conference. Our hosts are n ten, the non-profit technology network. We are in austin, texas, in the convention center. My guest is bridget calling she’s director of content marketing for c three communications, and her topic on the workshop is video strategy how to compete and win in a video centric world. Richard calling welcome to non-profit radio. Thank you so much, tony. Pleasure to have you it’s so great to be here. Thank you very much. How does video strategy fit into our overall content strategy? Well, something that c three has been saying to non-profits for years is that you don’t just need one viral video. You need a video strategy video works five video please come get away from me. I know i know it’s so hard if it happens, but it hardly ever does. Alright. Well, especially with the ice bucket challenge happening last summer, i think a lot more non-profits now it’s, not just the viral video it’s, how can we get hundreds of viral videos in a campaign? But the truth is that that doesn’t just happen, it’s not something that you can construct inside your boardroom, it’s something that has to happen either organically or it happens over time with a lot of effort and a lot of practice and a lot of community building ondo something that we’ve seen happening really catching on with non-profits is the concept of content marketing s o producing content that’s geared towards a very specific audience with the intention of driving them toe action on dh that content is really focused around their goals and their needs and speaks very clearly to who that audience is. S o we see a lot of non-profits coming to us now asking about content strategy, wanting to know more about it wanting help with developing their own content strategy so that they can create thoughtful content around their causes on that make their constituents really excited to be involved, excited to volunteer, excited to donate on. And so we see video fitting into that really well, a za piece of i don’t know what that was. I don’t know if part of part of the science fair floor just fell down or what? Hopefully everything okay that that that that clolery but oh, it was probably the puzzle. You’re right. I don’t know what that weird little guy. You okay? Better what one i i pictured someone’s booth collapse happened. We got a little scared each foot told jungle. Yeah, well, also saying so we see video fitting into that really nicely because we we know that video is one of the most compelling forms with content you can produce on dh it really can get two people emotionally. It can really drive people to action in a way that other types of content can’t, because i mean compare i’m adding sound and video and images together just makes for a really compelling emotional story on dso, we see video fitting inside of a convict strategy really well, along with other pieces of content. So, along with your social media strategy, along with your website, along with their email, you can’t just think of video as its own entity. It’s smarter to think about it inside the lens of all the content that you’re creating from your non-profit ah, should should every piece of video in our strategy have ah have a call to action, even if it’s something small, like share should it always be a call of action? You know, i think you can’t go wrong with having a call to action. I don’t know, i wouldn’t say that every piece of video action absolutely has to have a called action, but i do think that more non-profits tend to shy away from putting a call the action at the end cause they don’t want to be too demanding was what we’ve seen in the non-profits we worked with in the audiences that we worked with is that people expect there to be a call to action. People want to take a meaningful action if they care about your cause on dh. So even if it is like you were saying something simple, like sharing or telling your friend about this or visiting this website, people tend to like somewhere to go after they see a piece of content that they find really engaging. So i i wouldn’t say that you have to, but i would say that if you want teo, you shouldn’t try away from it. Okay, i’m going, i’m going to presume to tell me if i’m wrong is the place to start with our video strategy fitting into our overall content strategy is our goals for video. Oh, yes. Okay, maybe you talk to michael about this last year. Thiss comes up a lot. Yes. Yes, absolutely. Why the hell are we doing this? My daughter? We’re talking about our goals. No, no. Why are we doing video? Our overall strategy, right? Yeah, well, i think the question isn’t why are we doing video? The question is, what do we want our non-profit to be achieving? What do we want? What kind of impact we want to make on our cause? And then once we figure out what that goal is, then we can figure out how video is an effective part of that on. And i think that’s true for all types of content. I came to see three relatively recently from a social media marketing agency and something that i heard from a lot of my social media clients was, oh, we want a facebook page so that we can get in front of young people or we want a twitter account so that we can reach more more people who are techies on and that’s great, but that doesn’t fit with your business goals or with your non-profits goals, then what’s the point on dso i think starting with what your objective zara’s a cause what you object, stars and organization is a very important place to always be able to refer back to it because otherwise things can get way out of scope. You, khun b reaching for things that don’t really matter. Michael talks about an organization not that see three works with but that michael and see three’s cofounder danny are friends with who made a really successful video, got millions of hits online, didn’t do a thing for their cause. Nobody visited the website nobody donated, nobody volunteered so you can have a viral video that actually makes no impact on and see three is definitely in the business of creating videos that actually create impact even if they don’t go go viral. Amending the michael we’re talking about. Michael hoffman was a guest of honor non-profit radio ntcdinosaur year and is the ceo? Is that right? Yeah. The cofounder of c three years ago, um, let’s spend some time talking about getting your videos found. Yes, the best video is not worth anything. If no one watches it? Absolutely where we need to be thinking about so something that we’re seeing a lot more of lately is video that’s actually directly uploaded to facebook, and i think we’re going to see a lot more video that struck the uploaded twitter as well. Youtube is still a very important platform, and we recommend that all the non-profits that we work with, upload their videos to youtube and optimize them for youtube. Eso youtube is actually the second largest search engine after google uh, number two okay, yeah, ah well, last time i check my stats, i believe that’s still true, so you choose the second largest search engine, so if you optimize your video on youtube, if you upload all the subtitles for your video, if you add really good tags to your video that will help people when they’re searching for it on youtube, you are much more likely to have it be found either in a google search argue tube search on dh if you could take the time tio upload a spanish transcript as well, we’re seeing a lot more spanish searching happening both on youtube and on google in general. On dh so uploading a transcript in spanish and english. Yes. Where do you where do you put the transcript? There is a space when you go to the creator studio and youtube to upload your transcript so you could do it there. Okay, so those are the okay, no need for me to ask what the how do you optimize for you two? You’ve just explained it. Yeah, well, that i mean there’s, other there’s other ways to optimize for you to do so i’d say i’d say creating a title and a description for your video. That is not something that’s thinking about your audience is you develop the title and the description for your video. So a lot of times in non-profit video will see things that up, things that are uploaded that say dahna gala video twenty fourteen and that’s fine if you’re just doing it internally. But if you want anybody, any of your constituents to see it who are outside of the organization, they’re not going to find it by searching dinner gala video. So you need to be thinking about your audience as you put your video on youtube and think about what? They would be looking for when they’re searching for that video in the same vein up putting are adding a description that says that tells a story about the video and invites people teo click play on not just saying, here is a video of our dinner gala in twenty fourteen um is a really smart strategy to get many more people clicking, playin and actually watching the video, alright, any other tips strategies for getting our video found? Yeah, well, i started talking about youtube and facebook at the beginning there, so we are this is a more recent trend that we’re seeing, and i actually think non-profits were a bit ahead of this curve with the ice bucket challenge last fall because so many people were uploading video to support a cause which was a less directly to facebook, and we saw that people were able to do that because we have these super computers in our pockets now and high production video teams that are located on our phones on dso, it’s amazing that people can take such high quality video insurance so easily and with the introduction of facebook auto play video, i don’t know if your facebook news feed looks anything like mine, but mine’s covered in auto player because, like, how do we stop these damn thing? You can think i can get it out now, isn’t there? That was the strategy, but there is a there is a setting for not having autoplay, isn’t they’re? Uh, they’re not off there. Maybe i think i saw i think i’ve heard about that, i don’t know specifically, yeah, but i think over time the facebook’s goal is to have mohr auto play video showing up in your news feed if you don’t have it set on auto play than at least more video showing up in news feed because both facebook and twitter positioning themselves as hosting platforms for video, not just spaces for youtube videos to be shared s so we see that all the social networks are looking at the value of video and finding ways to position themselves as a sharing mechanism between the people who are creating the video and their constituents who they want to share them with. S o, we’re actually seeing some creators who are leaving places like vine or youtube and moving to facebook as their platform. Where there is showing their videos directly, you’re tuned to non-profit radio. Tony martignetti also hosts a podcast for the chronicle of philanthropy. Fund-raising fundamentals is a quick ten minute burst of fund-raising insights, published once a month. Tony’s guests are expert in crowdfunding, mobile giving event fund-raising direct mail and donor cultivation. Really, all the fund-raising issues that make you wonder, am i doing this right? Is there a better way there is? Find the fund-raising fundamentals archive it. Tony martignetti dot com that’s marketmesuite n e t t i remember there’s, a g before the end, thousands of listeners have subscribed on itunes. You can also learn maura, the chronicle website, philanthropy dot com fund-raising fundamentals, the better way. What else does this mean? What are the other implications of of twitter becoming, for instance, twitter becoming a a, uh, cite a site where where direct content? Yeah, video video is directly uploaded. Yeah, well, i think i think the social networks want to own your content on so the way in the way that youtube, as ownership over all the videos that are uploaded on youtube, i think twitter and facebook want a cut of that as well. On day one, they want to have really direct access to that content because they know how powerful video is and they know how effective it is moving people to action. Good. Ah, let’s talk about some of the production if some production strategies yeah, i think you’ll agree that doesn’t have to be high production value moving and compelling. Absolutely no. Okay, sure, talk about yeah, well, won. And michael and i were just talking about this earlier xero propping for the presentation. Eso won really great example that if i could point your radio listeners there you look up. Twenty fifteen dot do gooder dot tv. We’re announcing the winners of our duvette video awards awards. Yeah, so those are the where it’s the ninth annual wars they celebrate the best in video for good on die only plugged this because we had a really awesome winner in the funny for good category. So this is not the official enough, it doesn’t go out till tomorrow morning, but ah, but the winner of that category was this organization called unbound, who created a parody video between two ferns with zach galifianakis. I don’t know if you’ve ever seen those videos on she’s seen the video, okay? Marissa has yeah, production assistant here at ntc geever says, yeah, but the between two friends is ah, parody of talk shows um, and so zach galifianakis and actor and usually a celebrity who come and sit between two fake for implants and zach alfano argast basically makes fun of the other actor the whole time, pronouncing their name wrong refers teo movies that they haven’t worked in and talk about how great their work was in that movie on dh so it’s, it’s it’s very funny, it’s very dry on and so this organisation unbound created a video called between two furnaces it’s a ten minute video it’s there may be two different cameras that they used on the two different interviewee are the person, the interview and the person interviewing s o they cut back and forth a bit, but aside from that, i mean there’s a little bit of sound at the beginning. Ah there’s, no motion graphics it’s, obviously, people who are in house who are doing this, the scripts are right in front of them it’s so basic, but it’s so funny on and i think it shows that, you know, we hear from non-profits all the time we don’t have the budget, we don’t have the budget and and budget could definitely be a limitation, depending on the type of video you want to create. But i think if you’re just talking about creating a video that’s getting the word out about your organization, if you think creatively, you could really push the boundaries and create something that’s, that’s really unique and very interesting. And so that video actually got over three thousand votes in the digger awards on dh we’re really poor, proud that it’s a winner because we think it shows non-profits that you could do something simple and still have a huge success. With it, how does their work related teo video they created between two furnaces, so so they actually use the video, too? Talk about the work that unbound does s o they work in, i believe it’s twenty one different countries to help alleviate poverty, and so they talk about the work that they do during the video, but they talked about it in a very funny comedy parody way on, so they kind of poke fun at the fact that it used to be a christian based our may still be a christian based organization, but they poke fun and say, you know, so don’t you hand everybody bibles? Everybody’s got to get a bible, don’t they? On dh, they poked fun of themselves, which we think was also very brave because a lot of non-profits khun feel very scared about being vulnerable like that and, you know, poking fun at their own image are their own mission or their own values, but it it was really cool seeing non-profit, you know, taking some, being a little bit bonem herbal and and getting a bigger reward in return, okay? And i guess generally the duke latto videos are good. Examples of video well done, yes. High or low production value? Absolutely. Yeah, so we definitely have a lot of other videos that contest that are very high production. I’d say our best non-profit video winner, which was cystic fibrosis trust they have a very high production video. Both of the videos that were submitted tend to be from more non-profits who have a bit of a budget? No, they’re they’re focusing on these videos, and they’re thinking about the distribution of the videos too. So when they create the videos, they know that one of the ways they’re going to promote them is by submitting them to the do gooder awards. So it tends to be organizations that have a more thought out video strategy. Um, so we do see a lot of hyre production videos, but there’s there’s a whole range in there so i’d recommend people if they’re interested in seeing examples of great video, they’ll be able to view all of our finalists in the winners on twenty fifteen that do gooder dot tv if they want to check it out. Okay. Excellent. Yeah, we still have some time left together. Okay. What more can you tell us about video strategy fitting into our overall content strategy. Yeah, well, i think so. I really i talked a lot about the low production between two ferns are between two furnaces rather, but some other video strategy chips that were going to be sharing tomorrow in terms of easy ways to produce more video, please, on some, some of those would be a really video curation using user generated content. Eso asking your fans to send our your fans i’m very i mean, youtube creator land, we’re working with a lot of youtube creators for the do gooder awards they have their fans have been a lot of videos to them, but ask your constituents. Teo create videos to help support your cause if you give them very specific talking points, tell them about what time you what length you want your video to be encouraging them to take videos but their smartphones and send them to you our upload them using a hashtag there are a lot of platforms you can use now third party platforms that will aggregate any content that sent to a certain hashtag on dh so we see a lot more non-profits using technology like that in order to really gather a lot of user generated content easy wife, what are some of those sites eso won that i’ve used before is called woobox wooo, botox, that’s good arika and so that’s actually, you can create absolute can embed on websites or you could add, is an extension to your facebook page. It’s very easy to set up on and you could you could do something like a hashtag contest that you could do, you know, hash tag non-profit radio and everyone who submitted a photo or tweet with a hashtag non-profit radio would have their content entered into this contest. Andi, it gives you all the tools basically run a contest from there another one another one of the good that’s, the main one that i’ve used in the one that i’ve used, not so much for your contest, but just just sift through content is called tag board uh, yeah on and so that’s a really good one. It it has a beautiful display. It’s totally free to use on dh i’ve used it a lot, especially when so for something like ntcdinosaur you create a tag board for fifteen and tc and see all the all of the stuff that people have submitted under, you know hashtag fifteen ntcdinosaur filter out videos, photos, tweeds, etcetera also, by the way, thank you for shouting out hashtag non-profit radio e do it often enough it’s! A pleasure to hear someone else’s thank you sort of well it’s reminding me of storify yes, but it’s maur automated yes, it’s more automated. So store five more you would take your pulling, you pull the trigger on story so this was this would be automated. So anything that kayman under that hashtag would be in there something like woobox would give you the control. Teo, sift out any content that you didn’t want to end up in there. So if someone was spamming you, someone is family. You could delete it, but something like tag board wouldn’t because a free service you wouldn’t have that, that kind of control. But i do. I find that it’s great, especially for conferences or things where if i’m live tweeting an event and i want to see it everything going on an event in one place. I use tide board to look at that. Okay, good. All right. So a little more time. Ok, tell me some more stuff that you haven’t told me yet. Yeah, sure. So tomorrow, let’s, see what else we’re talking about. A fact about video tips and tricks. We’ve talked about distribution a bit. Um, i guess i’d say some more ideas for generating video for your non-profit ah, that aren’t as high production argast high cost. We’ve been doing a lot of google hangouts recently, those great they’re awesome automatic video was completed it right at the end yet, so yeah, in order to do that, you have to do the google hangout on air. If you do, a google hangout on area video will be automatically upload to youtube. It looks great. It makes it so much easier. I know, especially for me. As a content manager, i’m looking for anything that will automate my process for me a bit and take away some of that time that that i would be taking to upload a video and optimize it. And so you could do all that in the front end through google plus, when you set up the hangout, um and it’s really great we’ve been doing hangouts we’ve been doing interviews with people in the non-profit community. So we did one a few weeks ago with jeff brooks of future fund-raising now, we did want a few months ago with joe waters and keep the lower miller on dh yeah, we’ve been really enjoying doing the girl hangouts on, and it makes it really easy to dio these quick, quick little powers with people and to be able teo transfer the video back and forth between users in a way that looks really advanced looked really polished but is very cheap and easy to dio it’s free and it’s easy today i’ve done some non-profit radio hangouts. Yeah, cool, yeah, especially when i see somebody or something that’s going to attract a lot of attention and comments. Yeah, so then we get people chatting or they’re coming into the video absolutely great, yeah, that’s so cool and the other thing i’ve been doing is webinars too, which i know is so old school, but i think especially in the age of content strategy, creating things that people that you can have people exchange their email address for in order to give them some content, so something like a webinar where you have to give your email to sign up is really valuable to non-profits we talk about condoms strategy, we talk a lot about subscription on making sure that you can have a way to collect people’s email addresses s o that you actually have their content contact information for the long term on i say a lot of times i’m not the lunar says this, but on i tell non-profits a lot that when you are building your community on facebook or on twitter, on youtube, even your but you’re building a house on rented land. Oh, and you don’t really own those network. So you know facebook could shut down tomorrow, and then your community of hundreds of thousands of likes is gone. But if you have people’s email addresses, it’s a much more secure way to stay in touch with the people who you wantto communicate within the community that you’re building. S o we always recommend that people build and email database and find ways to drive people to sign up for for your email lists and how can we use video toe? Do that so video, actually, so this is special for non-profits if you’re a part of the youtube for non-profits program, you are one of the select few on youtube who can actually take people from your video to a third party websites. So not another youtube video on and so you could take people directly to your email sign up form from a video. Ok, which is something that for-profit scant. Do what you have to be a member of your youtube for non-profit program the youtube non-profit program okay, find that sign up for it. Yeah, youtube dot com slash non-profits okay, very easy. You could drive people to third party use. A third party went from your video from your video. It was embedded clicking? Yes, exactly, yeah, and there’s a lot of other. There are a lot of other benefits to the youtube non-profit program tio they provide training and resource is especially for non-profits you get access to these things called youtube spaces, which they started creating for their youtube creators? S o they’re basically production studios that air good, especially for non-profits and their special youtube creators who want to be creating high quality video but don’t have the studios to do it themselves on and so i would say, look into the youtube non-profit program, there are a lot there are other benefits, too. I’m just signing up and it’s it’s free from non-profits to join, okay, we have another minute or two, okay, you’re loaded with information, i’m not looking like you hold back. No, i don’t remember everything from my from my presentation tomorrow i’m trying to think of anything in the topics that we haven’t covered already. Actually, the thing that we’re opening with that i’m very excited about is that buzzfeed obama video did you see that when i was making the rounds on facebook? Eso obama did a video with buzzfeed a few weeks ago that was used to encourage people to sign up for obama care by the february fifteenth deadline on and i thought that when i saw the video it’s like, gosh, this is so smart and this is going to be so this is going to be in my webinars and presentations for the next six months because it really showed that the white house understood who their audience was for that specific campaign s o they needed young people to sign up for obamacare in order to offset that a lot of people who were, you know beyond their twenties and thirties already signed up for obamacare, which is great, but they needed more young people to sign up to offset the medical costs of older people would already saying that we need help. The young people, yeah, the older but of course all the young people think nothing bad is ever gonna happen to them. They’re never going to die, so none of them were signing up. Eso aza let’s, last ditch effort the white house used busby to reach that audience on. They created a video i think it had within the first day it had over one hundred thousand shares. Had millions of hits on buzzfeed. Millions of hits on the thehe four double care act website on dh. So it was really the healthcare dot gov website, i should say on and so it was successful for the obama campaign. I looked at the stats and although i couldn’t obviously on my end, i couldn’t see specifically what factors led to this increase, but they had eight million people sign up for on healthcare dot com that govern in the last six months. What do you think? What do you think contributed to this? Well, they had. So i was going to say that eight million people saying up in the last six months, and they had one million people sign up in the last week after the video was released. So so that it was one eighth of the total sign ups, which seems pretty significant. Was it an outstanding video? So it was an outstanding video because they placed it on a network. That was really it was really targeted towards the young people who think the lights just went out in, uh, and in the science fair. But non-profit radio perseveres never own lights. We have our own electric. Unless they shut the electricity off. We’re fine. Yeah. All right. Here. We still can. You still see us in camp? Okay, wait. Persevere here. We would shut it down around us. Yeah. Means no, keep going. All right. So the name of radio but shows the right channel treyz so they knew who their audience was. First of all, they weren’t trying to reach all people. Ah, latto things were for non-profits is that? Oh, were for we’re caused for the general public and lord knows you’ve got to know your audience. They had a targeted audience. They reach him on the right channel and they use the right kind of messaging to they are on ly linked to the website once in the actual description of the videos at the very top. Ah, and then in the whole video itself, obama on lee said, you know, you have to sign up by february fifteenth, one time it was done as a joke. So and the whole rest of radio was just funny. Interesting share a bowl content. So it was really great. It was very humorous is successful. A successful video. We’re gonna leave it there. Great. Richard calling she’s director of content marketing for c three communications. Bridget thank you very much. Thank you. Johnnie. This is tony martignetti non-profit radio coverage of ntc the non-profit technology conference. The lights came back on. We don’t care if you turn them off. Turn them on. We are here at and t c for the duration ntcdinosaur when we end and not before absolutely thanks very much for being with us. Thank bridget. Time for live listener love so grateful to all our live listeners throughout the world, we had all kinds of continents checking in weekly. I am not live this week. I will be next week. But live listener loved everybody listening right now. Right now. Right now, all the live listeners. Thank you. Podcast pleasantries to every listening. Some other time, then now ah, in that time, shift pleasantries to the manny ten thousand plus podcast listeners and those affiliate affections going out toe every person who listens at one of our many affiliate stations throughout the us. Am and fm love you, affiliate affections and a special shout out to k y e r s f m ine medical lake, spokane, washington tony, take two and how to get found. Two coming up. First opportunity collaboration, opportunity. Collaboration is so well organized and very different from other conferences. We get to know each other in small groups and explore our values. But above all, the environment makes such a difference and the amount of free time to talkto many different people about each of our programs. The diversity of people is excellent. That is sakina yaqoubi, founder of the afghan institute of learning in afghanistan and pakistan opportunity collaboration you’ve heard me talk about this, for goodness sake. Are you checking it out for pizza? You know it’s the weeklong unconference in its top of mexico around poverty alleviation, you’ve heard this there’s not profits from around the world as well as impact investors, social entrepreneurs, academics, corporation’s, even grantmaker zoho i was there last year. I’ll be there this year. You’ve heard this. You know it, for goodness sake, would you just goto opportunity, collaboration, dot net if your work is around poverty alleviation, for goodness sake, thanks so much for listening and supporting non-profit radio this is tony’s take two not a very subtle transition, but showing my gratitude nonetheless. There are over ten thousand listeners, but i really i feel my connection to you. I’m talking to you. Yes, you i thank you so much for being with me for letting me share information that helps you that helps you in the work that you’re doing the lives that you’re saving, whatever it is that you’re doing toe make social change to make this world a better place. Thank you for letting non-profit radio help you do that i feel like that’s. A privilege that you share with me, listening, letting me into your inbox with the weekly email alerts following on twitter sharing, retweeting my post on twitter, following on the facebook page, emailing me telling me how valuable non-profit radio is to the work that you do, i just thank you. I thank you so much. Four sharing your time, a very precious commodity that we all have with me. Thank you. That is tony’s take two for friday, fifth of june twenty third show of the year, and i should say, by the way, if you want to email me tony at tony martignetti dot com, here is how to get found with elizabeth beachy and erica sanchez welcome to tony martignetti non-profit radio coverage of the non-profit technology conference twenty fifteen we’re in austin, texas, at the convention center. Our hosts are intend the non-profit technology network and my guests are elizabeth beachy, director of strategic communications for upleaf and arika sanchez, communications specialist for center for non-profit excellence at united way of central new mexico. Elizabeth erica, welcome. Thank you. Pleasure to have you both now, erica. I understand you were pulled in-kind of last minute to substitute for someone. So you’re really just talking about the organization’s website. Yes, right? So that so i just want people to know if they don’t hear from you that much. I’m not being rude and you’re not being shy, but you’re kind of a last minute. But we’re glad you’re with us. I’m glad to be here. Thank you. Record. Okay. Um elizabeth. Oh, and your subject matter for the workshop. Is does your content strategy now? Trump theo trends and tips to help you get found in two thousand fifteen elizabeth what is changing balance between content, strategy and ceo? So one big thing is changing the balance and that’s basically the introduction of smartphones. Yes, holding up her smartphone? Yes, for podcast listeners, we don’t have the benefit of the video she’s holding up their iphones. This ubiquitous smartphone is really changing everything in terms of how people discover information. So how people search for information, how people consume information and that’s it’s changing a lot of things with with regards to search engine optimization. And so if you just think about how much how much time people spend on their smartphones now, so now more than well over fifty percent of the u s adult population has smartphones, and over sixty three percent used them to regularly to go online, and the average smartphone owner will spend will look at their phone one hundred fifty times a day for like two hundred twenty one functions on their phone today. And so when you think about that and you think about how much time people are spending on facebook, and on other aps, they’re spending a very significant part amount of time consuming information on a full variety of that can’t even stop touching yours. Keep touching your phone e i want i want to demonstrate all the acts i have here on my phone, but so we spend so much time interacting with interacting with our with information through our phones and that’s changed so much so if you think about six years ago, if you wanted to find information about something you would put your first reflex was probably to go to google right now, you may go to pinterest to find certain types of information if i want to find ah recipe here, i want to find an art project i can work i can work on or i want to find interesting gardening activities. The first place i’ll go is interest if i want to get answers to other things, the first place i’ll go to search for information, maybe youtube if i want to see what’s happening with current events, i’ll go to twitter if i want to find and so those are just the social media apse that we tend to turn to. And where we spent a lot of time, so twenty five percent of time spent on the internet today is spent on facebook that’s very, very remarkable twenty five percent, twenty five percent of time spent on the internet in the united states is spent on face just on the phone. Now, just for on the internet is spent on facebook. Yes, and so millennials say that their first source of in front of news or the first source of information about, like breaking news that’s happening, they learn about it from facebook. So you think about all of the different social media apse that we’re interacting with on a regular basis, and then you also can think about the different acts that we use for just for finding a restaurant or for finding houses for sale in your neighborhood. There’s so many different maps that are available and so, with the rise of the smartphone and there’s been kind of a fragmentation of how people find an information on the web, so that has affected the volume of content coming to websites through search engine optimization or through organic searches. And so so that’s, very significant, but then of course, the search engines themselves are adapting their algorithms to take this new reality into account as well, and so they are looking at there they’re looking at a lot more factors than they used teo and certainly a lot of the traditional search engine optimization, traditional ceo things that we think of are still very important. So of course, making sure that you’ve got the right back and configuration on your website so that as soon as you published new content it’s, the search engines are notified its index, and it gets found that remains important. And still it’s estimated that around fifty percent of traffic to websites is still coming from organic searches, so it’s still important, but they are taking into account social cues so and from what they find on social media. And so this has been something that several organizations have proven, basically, that that google at least, is looking for recognition or looking for mentions on twitter and on facebook, very nufer said, this is very new, and this is something using twitter and they’re not they’re not really so yes, they seem to be paying attention to what’s to what’s being said on twitter and also on facebook and it’s more about mentioning an organization’s name. So how many times is an organization mentioned and that gives them an indicator of the level of authority that this particular organization has in their field? And then if an organization has has strong authority in their field than their content that’s published is likely to get it’s likely to bump up the ranking of that so that’s a that’s an interesting piece of this and there, and there are other elements as well, but definitely the search engines are also adapting to this new reality and a few other things that are probably worth mentioning. Are there also rewarding websites that are mobile friendly and that’s very much related to this whole idea of consuming information through mobile phones? So websites that are mobile friendly are both getting our rights hyre entire, but also now when you search for something and this is this has been going on for weeks now you’re touching your phone with e i wish i could pick it up, just demo it, right? Well, everybody’s, not everybody doesn’t have the benefit of video. A lot of this is podcast listening. So i don’t know, but so but now when you search for something on a search engine on your phone, then the results will show whether it’s mobile friendly or not so it will actually list mobile friendly or not so you can skip the websites that are not mobile friendly, so and then they’re also prioritizing so the mobile friendly peace is important. Also, security is important, so there’s several different updates that they’re making to their algorithms to kind of to adapt to this new reality. So we’ll be talking about that tomorrow, too, okay? And the engines we’re talking about are not only google, but yahoo yahoo serious search search player or not, really they’re they’re working hard at it, but i think they’re proportion of the search market is still still pretty small compared to google. How in being a swell, pretty small, small google is still google is still the the nineties ninety i mean, in terms of percentages of search is done within with with an internet search engine. Not not considering yeah, who are you or yeah, youtube without going into the content youtube, you mentioned pinterest without doing that, google is still google is still by far by far and i don’t have exact numbers, but google is still by far the leader. They say that youtube is the second most popular search engine. Okay, which is interesting do we know the proportion of fired-up global search vs within within a content provide within a within a social site search? So google vs searching in youtube and pinterest and searching in twitter we know that proportion of the amglobal versus the the channel searches e i don’t actually have exact statistics with me, but certainly pinterest is up and coming grow in terms of a search engine, so more and more people are turning to pinterest and i think pinterest is a really interesting case study also, just because they’re they have done this amazing job of getting there, and this kind of brings it back to one of the topics that will be talking about tomorrow also, which is community generated content and how powerful community generated content can be for a non-profits overall content strategy, but pinterest is an interesting example of that because they have seventy million users and they have been able to get their users basically, too. Index all of this content from across the web, but not so google indexed uses its its bots and its algorithms to index content where is pinterest is drawing on its users and on the way that they understand information and what users think is relevant and valuable and where, how users classify that information, and so it’s a very intelligent way of indexing all of that content, because it’s basically pulling together the opinions of millions and millions of people, and so i think that will seem pinterest become a more and more important search engine in the future, and certainly their visual searches very engaging, a swell. What kind of non-profit do around community created content? That’s a lot of what we’ll talk about tomorrow and let’s. Share some some tips for strategies for engaging your community to do that. Absolutely, these weigh all have multiple communities, volunteers, donors, vendor’s maybe even boardmember sze other volunteers? Yeah. How do we how do we get them engaged? Absolutely. So there are there. I would say they’re kind of two different angles to take on this one that will be talking about tomorrow is building community generated content into your infrastructure and that is something that we’ve seen work well e well, for many different non-profits and the center for non-profit excellence is a great example of this they have, and i know let erica talk a little bit more about this, too, but just to name a couple of examples to respond directly to your question, they have a volunteer connection section of the website, and that section of the website allows non-profits to post volunteer opportunities and allows community members to say, i want to take that coming that volunteer opportunity and connect and connect directly with that non-profit it has a non-profit directory that non-profits can update themselves, it has a grantmaker directory that grantmaker is khun submit information to it has a new section that the community of non-profits in new mexico can contribute news, too, and it has a community training section as well. So if there any trainings that are happening beyond what the senator non-profit excellence does, then people can submit that information as well. And there are i’m forgetting many other things, erica, you can conjunction here, there’s also a page where non-profits can post there needs for goods like computers or other donated items, and where the community and businesses composed items that they want to donate to non-profits. Another piece is where individuals or groups of individuals can post ways that they want a, donate their time or volunteer for non-profits and it’s, very much community building. And as you said, elizabeth, really a community driven mean, the content wouldn’t content only in these sections and only comes from the community. Absolutely. Postings for volunteer opportunities and volunteer needs on dh volunteer. I want to volunteer. Yeah, okay. Like what you’re hearing a non-profit radio tony’s got more on youtube, you’ll find clips from stand up comedy tv spots and exclusive interviews catch guests like seth gordon. Craig newmark, the founder of craigslist marquis of eco enterprises, charles best from donors choose dot org’s aria finger, do something that worked neo-sage levine from new york universities heimans center on philantech tony tweets to he finds the best content from the most knowledgeable, interesting people in and around non-profits to share on his stream. If you have valuable info, he wants to re tweet you during the show. You can join the conversation on twitter using hashtag non-profit radio twitter is an easy way to reach tony he’s at tony martignetti narasimhan t i g e n e t t i remember there’s a g before the end he hosts a podcast for the chronicle of philanthropy fund-raising fundamentals is a short monthly show devoted to getting over your fund-raising hartals just like non-profit radio, toni talks to leading thinkers, experts and cool people with great ideas. As one fan said, tony picks their brains and i don’t have to leave my office fund-raising fundamentals was recently dubbed the most helpful non-profit podcast you have ever heard. You can also join the conversation on facebook, where you can ask questions before or after the show. The guests are there, too. Get insider show alerts by email, tony tells you who’s on each week and always includes link so that you can contact guests directly. To sign up, visit the facebook page for tony martignetti dot com. And and the news all of the news on the home page that you see right when you land on the website all comes from the community as well, and we really wanted to highlight this as a as an opportunity for non-profits because content strategy is so is becoming so, so important for every non-profit oh, and you’re content strategy becomes so important online because it helps you actually push it provides content that you can push out to all of these aps and so to meet people where they’re at. It also helps boost the volume of content on your website and the key words that you can then deal that you then have to be indexed, and it broadens your net of how you can be found. But it also becomes really is absolutely critical to engagement, so bringing new people in bringing a new supporters, engaging existing supporters, building loyalty with existing supporters and then helps a really helps when organizations launched their campaigns than it helps those campaigns be really effective. And so, but often the one of the biggest challenges that non-profits face is having the resource is for a really robust content strategy. It takes a lot of time and it takes a lot of creativity to keep that content strategy going, and so some of our client, we do a lot of trainings and a lot of non-profits will come to us and say, you know what i know it’s important, but it’s hard for us to dio it’s hard for us to get more than one article published on our website every three weeks or what? What advice do you have? And you’re after one of the smaller midsize shops? That’s it doesn’t have the resources to spend a lot of time, but there still are some things you can do. So what advice is absolutely that bring your community in so find ways to get your community to contribute content. Don’t think about your your content strategy is just coming from one person or the person that you may have fifty percent of one person’s time to manage your entire your entire communications strategy, right? That’s? Not enough so think about can you bring in your volunteers? Ask your volunteers to contribute content, other staff members to contribute content you’re bored to contribute, content your clients to community to contribute. Content other community members to contribute content and what types of interest of of infrastructures or kind of spaces within your website can you create tau host all of this information and inspire people to share and so there’s so many what is appropriate for each non-profit really depends on the non-profits mission in-kind of what makes sense for their community, but we would encourage every single non-profit to think about how can you get your community involved and and bring them in to be a part of that content generation strategy? Erica, what have you seen some of the outcomes among the community that communities that are contributing well, what? What we’ve seen, we initially started the first area that that we opened up for non-profits to post their own content was the job section of our website and on our and we’ve seen a huge increase in visits to our website, and where are our website appears in different search engine results and an increase in the number of non-profits that air posting these listings, but we also we receive so much feedback from the non-profit saying that they’ve received a lot of of really good job applicants. And so the same goes across for volunteer connection. We receive a lot of positive feedback from the non-profits who might not have, um, the timer, the resource is two to promote their volunteer opportunities, so allowing them to post them on our website, they’re receiving more traffic and more volunteer applicants. Elizabeth what? We have another, like, five minutes or so together. What other strategies can we share for, uh, getting found is basically what we’re talking about, right? Absolutely. What else haven’t i asked you? Have you have you share? So certainly so one thing that’s really important and you in looking at the infrastructure of your website and that will help this whole content strategy work is making sure that the website is social media optimized, and by that we mean that when that any piece of content that somebody wants to share on their social network, they should be able to just click a button and immediately share it. And you would be surprised how many organizations do not have their website properly configured so they may have put a simple, sure social sharing. Yeah, and so you can use a tool like add this you add that to your website, but you’ve also you’ve gotta have the meta tags that are pulled correctly, configured so that it pulls the right thing, so if you so, when somebody clicks to share on twitter, it should be set up and then and this is something that you really just have to ask your web master to do, but it should be set up so that you click to share on twitter and it’s going to pull the title of the article a shortened link, and then it should say via at your twitter handle so that you get recognition for that content that’s coming out on facebook, it should pull the right thumb now image associated with the article, a blurb about the article and a link back to the website, and you’d be surprised how often we see that that’s not actually configured like that, so someone will try to share something on facebook or you’ll try to share something on facebook and it’ll pull the logo of the organisation instead of the thumbnail of the article. Or it’ll pull the name of the organisation instead of the page that you’re trying to share so that’s a really important pieces that social, the social media optimization piece that’s a great one and great that’s a great tip toe. Everybody could understand it. And it’s it’s not incredibly technical know and it’s, not something that’s going to take your what is your web master too long to dio but it’s something that’s absolutely critical for doing two d’oh, and then another piece is make sure that your website is responsive because if if somebody is, you could be working really, really hard too create all this content put this content out across the web, and then if somebody clicks kliks through from facebook to your website because they’ve seen this link to an article that they’re really interested in and suddenly they can’t read it on their phone because your website is not responsive and mobile adapting to the size of your phone that’s a frustrating experience that they’re gonna have with your organization and they’re going to be less likely to come back so absolutely your website should be responsive and well, you said earlier, if you it’s not mobile responsive that’s going to hurt you in search results? Absolutely, it’ll hurt your search results and it also hurt it will hurt engagement with the organization, but also at the time of launching your campaign, so you’re asking people to take action. So maybe you’re launching a fund raising campaign or you’re launching a campaign to get people to sign up for an event or to take advocacy action if they’re clicking through from social media and it’s not responsive, they are not very likely to donate to take action or to sign register for your event. So you’re basically shooting yourself in the foot. You don’t have it so much trouble forget i’ll find something else. Yeah, absolutely so that’s that’s really critical, and if we have time, do we have another minute or so? And then one more piece that that we often get questions from organizations about two is the campaign piece, and that should be a piece of every organizations content strategy. So you’re putting out your regulate your articles and you’re doing a lot of messaging on social media, but periodically you need to launch very specific campaigns asking people, mobilizing people around a very specific goal because often people don’t take action unless you ask pacific also a specific call. To action. So that specific fund-raising campaign that made that ideally lasts, you know, five to seven days it’s a short campaign, you have a very specific goal, and you can just message repeatedly during that five to seven day period asking your community to help mobilize and to help you meet that goal and that’s something that we see too many organizations kind of you may go for a year or two years with all of their messaging and their articles, and they don’t launch campaigns and it’s the campaign radcampaign time that you see the return on the investment of all of the time that you’ve invested in creating this content. So the campaigns are absolutely critical. I’ve seen something that said, every piece of content you create should have some call to action ultimately, even if it’s just a simple share, but maybe it’s sign up for the email list that’s related to this issue? Yes, something in every every music content. Yes. Absolutely, absolutely. Okay, we’re gonna leave it there. All right. Thank you, elizabeth. Erica, thank you very much. They are elizabeth beachy, director of strategic communications for upleaf and erica sanchez, communications specialist for the center for non-profit excellence at united way of central new mexico. Ladies. Thank you again. Thank you. This is tony martignetti non-profit radio coverage of the non-profit technology conference. Twenty fifteen. Thank you very much for being with us. Thanks to everybody at ah ntcdinosaur and and ten, the non-profit technology network next week. I’m not sure yet. It’s weeks away. I’m a couple of weeks ahead, pre recording this. So give me a break, please. But you know it’s going to be a good show. You know, it’s not going to crummy. It’ll be better than not crummy it’s going great. If you missed any part of today’s show, find it on tony martignetti dot com opportunity collaboration. The world convenes for poverty reduction. I’m telling you, it’s an outstanding unconference that will ruin you for every other conference opportunity collaboration dot net for pete’s sake, check it out. Our creative producer is claire meyerhoff. Sam liebowitz is at the board on the law as line producer. The show’s social media is by susan chavez, susan chavez dot com and our music is by scott stein be with me next week for non-profit radio big non-profit ideas for the other ninety five percent go out and be great. Hey! What’s not to love about non-profit radio tony gets the best guests check this out from seth godin this’s the first revolution since tv nineteen fifty and henry ford nineteen twenty it’s the revolution of our lifetime here’s a smart, simple idea from craigslist founder craig newmark yeah insights, orn presentation or anything? People don’t really need the fancy stuff they need something which is simple and fast. When’s the best time to post on facebook facebook’s andrew noise nose at traffic is at an all time hyre on nine a m or eight pm so that’s, when you should be posting your most meaningful post here’s aria finger ceo of do something dot or ge young people are not going to be involved in social change if it’s boring and they don’t see the impact of what they’re doing. So you got to make it fun and applicable to these young people look so otherwise a fifteen and sixteen year old they have better things to do if they have xbox, they have tv, they have their cell phones. Me dar is the founder of idealist. I took two or three years for foundation staff to sort of dane. Toe add an email address their card it was like it was phone. This email thing is fired-up that’s why should i give it away? Charles best founded donors choose dot or ge somehow they’ve gotten in touch kind of off line as it were on dno. Two exchanges of brownies and visits and physical gift mark echo is the founder and ceo of eco enterprises. You may be wearing his hoodies and shirts. Tony talked to him. Yeah, you know, i just i’m a big believer that’s not what you make in life. It sze, you know, tell you make people feel this is public radio host majora carter. Innovation is in the power of understanding that you don’t just do it. You put money on a situation expected to hell. You put money in a situation and invested and expected to grow and savvy advice for success from eric sacristan. What separates those who achieve from those who do not is in direct proportion to one’s ability to ask others for help. The smartest experts and leading thinkers air on tony martignetti non-profit radio big non-profit ideas for the other ninety five percent.

Nonprofit Radio for June 13, 2014: Online Canadian Connection & Right To Be Forgotten

Big Nonprofit Ideas for the Other 95%

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Holly Wagg & Jason Shim: Online Canadian Connection

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Two fundraising Canucks share online strategies from above the 49th parallel for small-and mid-size shops, including an explanation of accepting bitcoin donations. Holly Wagg is philanthropic counsel for Good Works and Jason Shim is digital media manager at Pathways to Education Canada. We talked at the Nonprofit Technology Conference. df

 

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Duitz hello and welcome to tony martignetti non-profit radio big non-profit ideas for the other ninety five percent. I’m your aptly named host. I got to give a shout out to our listener of the week lynette singleton she’s our very first listener of the week when that is in atlanta, georgia, on twitter she’s at s c g number four non-profits she’s been a longtime supporter of the show, frequent re tweeter and live tweeter of the show just a very, very good friend and we’re very grateful and that’s why i say thank you very much, lynette, and congratulations being our first listener of the week, i’m glad you’re with me i’d be forced to endure the pain of dermatitis her peta for mus if i had heard that you had missed today’s show online canadian connection two fund-raising canucks share online strategies from above the forty ninth parallel for small and midsize shops, including an explanation of accepting bitcoin donations. Holly wagh is philanthropic counsel for good works, and jason shim is digital media manager at pathways to education canada. We talked at the non-profit technology conference and right to be forgotten. Maria simple is paying attention to a european court of justice opinion that google must remove outdated links from search results what’s the impact on your prospect research maria is our prospect research contributor and the prospect find her on tony’s take to a new non-profit radio knowledge base on your board relationship. We’re sponsored by generosity, siri’s hosting multi charity five k runs and walks very appreciative of there support here’s my interview from the nonstop non-profit technology conference on online e-giving welcome to tony martignetti non-profit radio coverage of the non-profit technology conference two thousand fourteen and t c we’re at the marriott wardman park hotel in washington, d c on with me is jason shim, who is digital media manager for pathways to education canada and holly wag philanthropic counsel for good works there. Their workshop topic is the canadian connection. What you can learn about fund-raising from people who wear two cc’s howie! Jason, welcome thanks for having us. Thanks for having us. That’s a pleasure. Thank you. Ah, did you, uh, did you feel that canada doesn’t get the sufficient representative rebel representation that you had toe explicitly create? A workshop called learned from us above the forty ninth parallel i would say so. You get short shrift, or do you think so? Yeah, i would totally say. So. We also thought that americans should know what tuks are and that’s a really important cultural piece of education. Okay, tuks are the word is spelled t o qu es correct. What i’ll gonna jason, why don’t you explain what it is? A two is a canadian winter. A traditional canadian winter hats. What do they look like? They look like all sorts of things. Like so some of them, you know, they just have you pull it down, and some of them may have labs. Someone may have, like, prom phones, but generally it’s the just pull over there, knitted generally. Okay, so right. So they’re in place of a hood. I’m seeing those in new york city. I’m seeing a fair number of two. Cc’s. I saw one adorable one had little ears little for years. Um, so it took so it’s the difference between america, some places that would be for style and arthur definitely for survival. Okay. And where each of you from in canada? I’m from toronto right now. Okay? And i’m from ottawa latto and what? Will toronto is ontario, and ottawa is also ontario. Is it? And what else is otto? What do you know? What else is ottawa? The capital of canada. And see now you know why the caged ian’s air at t c all right? Yeah. I was thinking of auto manufacturing. So is auto and auto manufacturing center. No total government city. Forty percent of our population are government employees were learning. But i took sinew. But the capital. I did not. Okay, what can we learn? So you each work for non-profits pathways to education canada and good works. And you have some lessons you can share for those of us down south here. Who wants to go first? I’ll leave it to you. You want me to go first? Okay, so i’m not holding good works is actually i’m fund-raising consultant now on s oh, no, no that’s. That’s not a problem s o we work with a variety of not-for-profits across the country we work with, like national healthcare, charities, international charities. We also work with local hospital foundations or social services on and when i came away from end ten last year i was really aware of what all these cool things that other americans were doing on day would say it didn’t work and i’m like, but what are you talking about? Like in canada? That’s actually really good. So for example, i heard a lot of people dissing the phone and saying, you know, telemarketing doesn’t work or we’re not getting the good numbers or don’t invest there, and it got me to thinking, you know, some of differences between canadian american fund-raising on there definitely is in the direct mail market how we do our asks and how we structures are letters like canadians or just a little bit more polite and less forthright and asking for money, but it was amazing to me going back to the phone to see that i could acquire online donors, and i’m seeing on the phone, you know, five to ten percent conversion rates, which nobody else was seeing here, so the question is, if the phone about tool or you just hiring a bad vendor, you know, okay, okay, jason yeah, and i worked for pathways education canada and we’re an organization that focuses on lowering the drop of a great among youth who are living. In economic fear, just advantaged areas, and so is the high school dropout rate. Yes, do you have a you have equivalent is a high school and then and then hyre ed same thing in the states goes ninety nine to twelve and then college or university afterwards, okay? And i was finding that, you know, when i was doing presentations focused on youth and talking about the technology, adoption and things that, you know, the numbers that we’re seeing in the u s were lower compared to canada and historically, you know, for adoption, for things like facebook bonem that the adoption rate among youth has been quite a bit higher and, you know, i i don’t know if it’s because, you know, we’re just more spread out and we use more, you know, technology to connect with one another, like just pure speculation on my part, but in terms of numbers wise, like, you know, technology facebook, adoption among youth was, you know, in the upper ninety percent where is at the time of the u s it was closer, you know, but the eighty eight percent among high school students, so that also influences how, you know we do our work in that, you know, it’s way have to be on facebook to interact with her youth, and but it also is much more readily apparent when making policy and trying to convince people. But, you know, facebook is the way to go when dealing with youth and but it’s neat because, you know, we’re able to run these projects that essentially it’s, where the u s may be on some technological respects and, you know, three or four years, and we could just, you know, everyone heads up because, you know, generally what has happened? Dahna technology round, you know, ends up happening in the us a few years later in terms of the adoption related kind of things really? Is that how you see trends go? I think so. I mean, ghoul recently had a program called google partners that was geared towards our advertisers, and they’re they’re pilot audience essentially was in canada, and i mean, it makes sense because it’s a it’s a small like relative to the population of some entire states, i mean, you know, population in canada thirty five million, thirty five million, yeah, yeah, that provided a place where you know, they could test it out and make sure that the communities where, you know well serviced and that people could provide feedback, and they made sure that everything worked for the canadians before they released it to all of the us audience as well. And i mean, from a non-profit perspective, i mean, it’s not like you can necessarily, you know, copilot non-profit projects in canada before deploying them to the u s but i think when looking at broader technology trends and how some canadian non-profits have adapted to things that you know, there’s, some can be some lessons i could be running from the canadian border. Okay, we’re going. We’re going talk in detail about what those lessons are, uh, i’m learning here thirty, thirty five million in in in the entire country, and then it’s about the population of california way actually going to research that tonight. That’s good baby, i was laughing because i’m speaking this afternoon on a different topic about email and one of the panellists i was speaking with those original supposed to be danny boo from the american cancer society, and so he was talking about the size of his list on dh he said it was around fifteen million people, and i started laughing and i was like, you’re half my country that’s actually, probably like the eligible age of everybody you can actually donate over. Teo was like, wow, like, you know, so when were also coming here, you know, you’ve come to this conference, a lot of the people who were presenting are often from really big organizations who are really well resourced, and so i thought it was really interesting that our definition of a small or a medium not-for-profits and for the purposes of our thing, we were kind of saying, like under five hundred thousand dollars annually and fund-raising revenue you’d be small and between five hundred thousand and two, point, five million being medium, but i don’t know if many organizations here if i settle this organization’s raising two point one million through their entire fund-raising program, they would probably be like that’s really small but it’s, not necessarily in canada. Yeah, well, be careful now in in the u s i’m pretty sure it’s just around fifty percent of the of the non-profits i think like fifty one percent have have have annual budgets of under fifty thousand dollars, so yeah, so it’s like that on our audience here non-profit radio is all small and midsize shops, i know that i’m not talking to, and i don’t produce the show for stanford university or hyre a memorial stone kettering hospital or, you know, any of these huge organization’s, although i do think they could benefit but there’s their lives, they’re missing out, i can’t reform them oppcoll but yeah, the vast majority of non-profits are small by your definition, and i’m pretty sure it’s, like fifty one percent have budgets, annual budgets under fifty thousand dollars that’s, that’s, crazy there’s, about eighty five thousand charities in canada and half of those are don’t even have a staff member like they’re all entirely volunteer driven. So even the context that we’re talking about, we’re guaranteeing at least, that these people have one staff member or at least organized enough to have some sort of fund-raising program of some, you’re not really very aware of what’s happening in the u s do you know the u s capitol? I’m in it, thank goodness, but i didn’t know about the mall because everybody kept on talking about the mall. You figured shopping? Yeah, i was like, why? Whatever. You want to come to the mall. And then i realized it was not about a shopping center. Embarrassing, but okay. All right. Um, well, holly let’s. Stay with u and s o your old working your each working either in a small, small, mid sized organization, jason or supporting them as a consultant. Holly okay, so what are some of the technology lessons that we can bring from from above? I think one of my favorite lessons because our agency tends to we have a direct mail history. So one of the reasons why i was hired is toe build the digital size of our business. Digital side of our business on dh what’s amazing to me is nobody that i work with. Has anything that’s integrated or even a comprehends of systems approach to, like, capture their data or even an email program? So i’m really struggling with organizations who know that they need to. Aye. Like, say, for example, i need tohave an email program. I need to be able to get people to sign up on my website. So part of what we do is teaching them on coaching or executing it for them, depending what the scope of work is. But all a lot of it is, is change management and culture management within organizations like a hospital foundation, you know, didn’t didn’t didn’t dick dude e-giving dink, dink, dink, you’re listening to the talking alternative network duitz waiting to get you thinking. Dahna good this’s, the cook said about sonya wear hosting, part of my french new york city. Guests come from all over the world, from mali to new caledonia, from paris to keep back french is that common language. Yes, they all come from different cultures, background or countries, and it comes and desires to make new york they’re home. Listen to them. Share this story. Join us. Pardon my french new york city every monday from one to two p m. Are you stuck in your business or career trying to take your business to the next level, and it keeps hitting a wall? This is sam liebowitz, the conscious consultant. I will help you get to the root cause of your abundance issues and help move you forward in your life. Call me now and let’s. Create the future you dream of. Two, one, two, seven, two, one, eight, one, eight, three, that’s to one to seven to one, eight one eight three. The conscious consultant helping conscious people. Be better business people. Dahna you’re listening to the talking alternative network. And let’s let’s work within an example of ah client that you know, unattributed, but how not not just what you did, not just how you help them generally, but how you help specifically and what the lessons khun b for small and midsize shows here, one of one of the clients that i’ve worked with and they will see which i think is an awesome case study is that they’ve only had a gn online program, and all that online program really evolves around is email nothing else on dso they for the first time, we’ll see probably this year they’re online revenue surpassed their direct mail revenue and their direct mail revenue was pretty healthy to begin with on and some of the lessons when i came in was being ableto, for example, we have a big bulk list of people, but we had no idea who was actually honor email list. We didn’t know where they came from. We didn’t know if they were donors, if they were supporters, what kind of information? And so one of my first techniques is sort of to go in, you have to find out what information is of value to your supporters have to find out, you know, where they’re coming from, what they want. So we’ll work with our charities to really understand who their donors are on one of the things that were really big on his storytelling works exceptionally well. Let’s talk about that. Yeah, on dh. So we will help our clients find a story that will resonate with donors and then translate that and help them tell that story in an email. Mediums. So how do you how do you pick the right stories? Um, i used the very unscientific i will use a shiver that or the cry test. So if i read a story or zoho shiver a shiver castro, i got okay, but so if i hear of a story that stops and makes me pause and makes you feel like it punches me in the gut, then i know that that is the absolute right story for me. And so, you know, part of you know, sometimes i’m talking to the person to get the story. Sometimes i’m developing it, you know, off paper on dh. So for me, it’s getting teaching not-for-profits how to write a good story in an email andi think storytelling ski, but i also think regular communications is something that small not-for-profits really struggle with their, like all these big organizations, they say they send out, you know, thirty emails or, you know, five emails a month, and i we start planning out a schedule so that they don’t all get bulk dough, but like let’s say, we’re going to do one email a month and it’s just going to be telling about something in your organization that’s really important. So for example, one of the organizations i volunteer with his cold on the ten oaks project to me run summer camps for kids who have clear parent, and so we were never telling any of our donors what we were doing with their money. And so this year we have a plan series of six stories that we captured and sometimes their campers we’re talking about, you know, one girl i just finished writing her story. Her name is bernadette, and she talked about the moment when she was at school, and she found out that her friends had passed around a petition asking her to be kicked out of the girl’s changer during visit. Because her parents were gay and they presume that she was going to be making, you know, sexual passes at her. I mean, how did that story not kick you in the gut? Right? To feel like this kid, who at that time was in grade seven. This is a bunch of kids doing it, a bunch of kids and her finding out. And so really talking about the rule that this organisation has played in transforming and building her self confidence and her self esteem and, you know, helping her to successfully girl been building this community appears so for us in that organization, we’ve decided every other month we tell one of those stories so their camper stories, their family stories, their volunteer and the commonality between all of them is that look, you just got on your face. Tony was getting kicked out by your peers because it really people understand why they’re giving to this they they were there themselves. They can relate to that somewhere. They know that that’s a really important issue on dso. My job with everyone we work is to find that kind of moment until it well, that’s just remarkable kids. Becoming so bigoted at that age, kids becoming bigoted, period? Yeah, it’s horrific. And this is candy, and this is canada and we pride ourselves, you know, on diversity and tolerance. So i can’t even imagine what would happen in places that, you know aren’t as progressive is so finding that compelling story, how do you encourage the story? Teller? Teo, teo, open up. Maybe you hear about the story from program staff, for instance, some some of the way how do you induce the person teo to share personally? Well, actually, surprisingly, the best way to interview someone is over the phone, and you wouldn’t necessarily think that, but because of that little bit of distance between you and the person on, they often just open up and it’s, taking them through a journey through their questions and ask, and you should always, when you’re interviewing, someone asked the kind of leading questions if they’re not giving you what you want. But, you know, you ask him about a situation and you say, tell me how that that make you feel if they’re describing a situation, tell me what it sounded like. Tell me what it smelt likes you. Know, and you really want to get into the sensory processes when you’re interviewing that person, and sometimes a person will just go when they will tell you a story it’s and it’s an hour, and it’ll be your job to cut it back. I mean, sometimes it’s making them really comfortable in making points of identification i’m with them. And the skill i think that you develop as a fundraiser over time is that people actually tell me really everything, like, really candid because i’m a very honest and open person, and i think that relates through and they’re really comfortable being transparent with me. So it’s kind of a gift, you know, you might be a really good fundraiser of you have a natural gift for having people disclose very personal things. Teo the your advice about interviewing people on the phone reminds me of terry gross who’s who’s, the host of ah national public radio show fresh air. Yeah, she insists that her guests not not being the studio with her, they’re always remote and not just in another room, but they’re in other cities she doesn’t want them doesn’t want doesn’t want me looking at them. She feels she gets a better connection, just just having their voice in her in her head and same for them, exactly it’s unusual. But it works for it works perfectly well for her, but it’s not because eighty percent of communication is nonverbal and so all of the body language, all of the facial discomfort. Maybe if somebody’s telling you something that upsets you, none of that translates through. All you have to do is control your voice with absolutely no judgment is there, you know, sharing these really important, transformational woman’s that your cause or your organization has had in your life and there’s really nothing more beautiful or privilege to get to talk to these people who talk about how x organization helped their wife die or to talk about how they were able to get a mastectomy and then an immediate breast reconstruction at a hospital because of a piece of equipment that donors have purchased, how, you know, they were able to be get refugee status and come to canada about how they donated a kidney meat there, brother so he could live it’s a privilege to be able to hear those stories jason on the education side what uh, what can we learn from from above? Well, ah project that i was working on last year with the implementation of bitcoin donations at our non-profit and you know, within the non-profits unit is across north america are are indeed all around the world is quite unique because, you know, it’s, something that i cz perceived to be requires a lot of technical implementation, but it was actually quite straightforward, but it was further supplemented by the fact that the canadian government issued very quickly after bitcoin came out an advisor treyz saying, hey, this is how we deal with the tax implications of, you know, the coin and currency and you know, that provided guidance for people to start implementing it within the organizations and things. So in november, we became the first organization in canada to issue tax receipts for bitcoin donations, and i would like to go as far to say that, you know, the first organization in north america is your tax receipts have yet to find us organization that issues before we go much further, which we do have time for, but we better acquaint listeners with what bitcoin is. All about, i think a lot of people have heard of it. Very few people use it let’s, let’s flush that out for people and how you get it and it translates into real money because i still don’t really know. Yeah, okay, how does it translate to real mentor? So please tell us the story, but what bitcoins about so in a nutshell, bitcoin is on online crypto currency that so i use the analogy of imagine if you had to give someone who lived on the other side of the country off five dollars. Now, the options that may be available to you is you could mail that five dollars, to them. You could maybe send them a bank transfer. You could send it to them via paypal oppcoll, with the exception of emailing on an actual five dollar bill, requires central authority. So, you know, you would with your bank, you would say, you know, minus jason five dollars, plus tony five dollars, and that the bank would be in control of that for you. No papal would do the same thing part of their central ledger, but imagine a system similar to the internet where it’s peer-to-peer and no one actually has direct control as to whether or not the transaction goes through that it is the closest thing to cash that is electronically available, so if i want to send you five dollars there’s, no one in between that could stop that transaction that it’s as good as me giving you the cash there’s no government agency or organization or company that could say that could block the transaction, which is the system that currently exists now. It’s it’s, quite a revolutionary concept similar to the internet in which, you know dahna for the internet, you know, people accessing, like bulletin board zsystems that you’re dialing into a central server and, you know, people close messages, but if someone doesn’t like you being there, they could kick you out, but the magic of the internet being that anyone can communicate with anyone else in the world and, you know, if people you know, i can’t say that, you know, this piece of data is in venturing my country like you know of these what the ideas of ideals of net neutrality, um, so imagine that applied to a financial system on it’s, quite a revolutionary. Concept that, you know you could i’ll be sending, you know, large sums of money what i actually transferring what do what do you get if what do i get when you’re giving me this five dollars? What do i see? You would see just a whole bunch of code s o it bitcoin is transferred to what’s called wallets and these air usually expressed in q r code. So you would you would get a wallet that would essentially be a cure for that people could deposit. And of course, the q r codes those little black and white diagrams that that air scannable and lead to lead to websites. Yeah, okay. And if if you wanted teo hyre generates bitcoin so that this is something that’s created by the network. So every every computer that is part of the bitcoin network is actually helping facilitate these transactions in return for helping facilitate these transactions, and being the network that bitcoin in a program or algorithm itself will give those computers that are transferring everything like small bits of bitcoin. So it’s sort of like an incentive system two to keep the network flowing and everything and it’s it’s designed in such a way that you can’t just, like, manufacture more money like, you know, just you can just print more bitcoin or create more bitcoin. It’s it’s not a preset rate that you know it’s tributes at a set amount and that can only ever be like twenty one million bitcoin in the system. And yeah, okay, wait, i do have a couple questions, but we don’t really have time to go into any more details about bitcoin. We’ll have to have to leave it there. I’m sorry listeners about bitcoin buy-in because we want to get the technology lessons from jason. All right, so now we have some grounding in bitcoin let’s get to the your take away that u s o show in terms of implementation. I mean, this is a technology like we we chose to pursue it because the canadian government itself through the world canadian mint, they’ve been working on a project called the midship. Now this is a government backed project that’s what they are pursuing digital currency. So imagine the way that they’ve structure is, you know, the ideal science fiction ideal of you top two cards together and you can transfer the money straight there. So there’s no such thing anymore is like five dollar bills, a ten dollar bills that you know you could just touch the two tarts cards together and it’s just a currency transfer. No bank in between to to do that. And when we look ahead, i think one of the absolutes will be like currency will change. I think they’re that’s the way that things will be moving, like in terms of wave moving from cash systems to electronic systems. You know, like things like papale, this is the next natural evolution of currency transfer. So whether it was bitcoin or anything else, you know, that was the rational that we used to it to pursue it because the canadian government already exploring digital currency. So bitcoin came out, which seems to be a global kind of currency. So why not pursue it? So we went through the process of implementing it was actually quite straightforward men there’s a there’s, a great fund online actually goldenburg point one hundred and it’s ah, a fund that was developed by early between adopters. And they put a whole bunch of bitcoin into a wallet, and i think they started off something like over a hundred thousand dollars, and they said if a non-profit eyes interested in exploiting bitcoin and implements that further non-profit and puts the q r code on the web site, we’ll just give me a thousand dollars oh, and it’s the simplest thousand dollars that i think the organization has ever received, like you just let him know that hey, we’re accepting bitcoin and no grand proposal, they just sent the thousand dollars and be like, okay, well, have a nice day. I was like, oh, do you want to follow up on that and he’s like, no, just the best thing you could do for me is help me get rid of this fund. The money is going faster than i can spend it, like, serve your ideal philanthropy, right? But this’s only available to canadian no non-profits the gentleman’s actually based out of maryland inside dimitri and he he runs the final target. He’s he’s access a community trustee for this funds that was built around an online forum. So you know, he’s charged with distributing on how can we find him just google bitcoin one hundred and believe the website is bitcoin one hundred dahna allergy? I just let him know that you’re interested in getting the thousand dollars and you know, you should follow-up okay, that’s actually an excellent takeaway, because now we have a site we could go to weaken, learn more about bitcoin and the possibility of accepting it and, of course, bigger takeaway being the transformation. What i was thinking, yeah, there’s a thousand dollars. But i was thinking of the thinking well, brother ali, that there’s a little more profound thought that jason had dahna which was the transformation of currency, and i think that’s, you know, that’s where it will happen. I can’t say what the timeline will be. Five years, ten years, flying cars, digital currency, grandchildren yeah, those are excellent. All right, two very good lessons and think things to think about. Thank you very much. Thank you so much for having us. My pleasure. Thanks. You’re welcome. Jason. Jason shim is a digital media manager for pathways to education canada and holly. Wag philanthropic counsel for the consulting firm. Good works. I want thank you very much again. Thank you. Thank you. Pleasure. You’re listening to tony martignetti non-profit radio coverage. Of the non-profit technology conference and t c twenty fourteen, thanks so much for being with us. Thank you very much and ten and and t c generosity, siri’s, sponsor’s non-profit radio and they helped me make it. They helped make get possible for me to go to conferences like ntc and to get valuable info for you from interviews like that, general city siri’s hosts multi charity peer-to-peer runs and walks you know them? You’ve heard me talk about them if you’re thinking about including a run or a walk in your fund-raising i asked you to check them out as a possible provider. Tell dave lynn that you’re from non-profit radio he’s the c o o you could reach dave lynn at seven one eight five o six nine triple seven or generosity siri’s dot com many thanks to them for their support of non-profit radio i have a new non-profit radio knowledge base, this one is on your board relationship. I know that lots of charities are struggling with their relationship with boards and board members. Just yesterday i had lunch with a ceo and a boardmember who were sharing their frustrations with there underperforming board, i’ve got links to non-profit radio interviews on getting the best out of your trustees. There’s a panel of three women who work in non-profits talking about that building a more effective board with gail gifford working with your small organization board. That was another panel board, a six with jean takagi and a couple of other links also all about your relationship with your board and getting the most out of your board. The video and the links are at tony martignetti dot com that is tony’s take two for friday, thirteenth of june twenty fourth show of twenty fourteen you know maria simple she’s, the prospect finder, she’s a trainer and speaker on prospect research. Her website is the prospect finder dot com, and her book is panning for gold. Find your best donor prospects now exclamation mark she’s, our doi n of dirt cheap and free you follow-up maria on twitter at maria simple. Welcome back, maria, good to talk to you. Good to talk to you. Thank you very much. You’re not going to say glad to be here or anything. Well, i am glad to be here, actually and it’s in my summer month and i’m always happy in the summer. So this is a good thing, excellent, and even happier on non-profit radio day, right? Absolutely. Now that i ve pimped you twice and you have no choice but to say yes. And i’m happy about everything. We’re talking about the right to be forgotten. This came from a spaniard who brought a case in the european court of justice. Yes. So, you know, i thought it was very interesting and i was wondering, you know, there might not be immediate applications for prospect researchers in the united states, but you know it. It got me to thinking what implications this might have five or ten years down the line in terms of information that might end up getting erased from google searches. Um, and it just got me to wondering, you know how how we have to maybe cross check data in other places, especially going forward? If if we’re going to start seeing data, you know, becoming race could it could even be more imminent than five or ten years? I think. Very well could be. You know, right now, um, one of the one of the steps that i had seen was that over forty one thousand europeans have actually asked through this online form that google has created to be for gotten so they want mention of themselves erased off of google search results. And that huge let’s set the scene in case everyone hasn’t heard of this. This was ah man in spain who brought a case to the european court of justice because there were links in searches of his name is just searching his name. There were links to old events that he thought were no longer relevant, right? It has to do with a realist state auction that was held, teo, settle some of what they call social security debts, whatever that meant. But he was, you know, not happy that that was still out there because he felt that the debts have been settled and so forth. And so he petitioned through this, uh, europe europe’s top court, which is the court of justice of the european union, i guess it’s somewhat similar to our supreme court and petitioned. And it was ruled in his favor that yes, google is going to have to comply. So of course, if google’s going tohave to comply, you have to think that the other major search engines like yahoo and microsoft being will also have to do the same and to comply. Google came up with this online form. I don’t know if you don’t know how you go directly to the form, i guess you can just search it. I think i ended up finding a link in one of the articles led me directly to the form and it’s pretty interesting because you actually have to select from a drop down menu one of the thirty two countries that are listed that you would reside in. You do need to provide some sort of a photo id, uh, so that i guess, you know, if you’re trying to get maybe say, a competitors, you know, information swipes or something like that, they want to make sure that yes, you are you’re the person and it’s information about you, etcetera, and so there are, you know, there’s certain things that you do need to do in order to comply, to get it to get the data removed, but they really think it’s going to be a very long time before google can’t even get through all of these. Requests. And right now it on ly pertains to the european union, as you said, the thirty two countries so this does not apply teo u s residents, but it could there’s potential that someone could bring a similar action on dh similarly succeed in the us i’m not i would not put it past somebody to come up with that idea, having read, you know, all the press that there is available out there about this particular ruling in europe. One thing that i didn’t realize i mean, i just thought that you go to google dot com and that’s just the one place to do research the devil, evidently there’s a google dot ceo dot uk, which is, i guess, the european equivalent of google’s search engine, so i think what they’re from my understanding of what i’ve read is that it’s going toe wife clean the search results that you would find on the european search engine and maybe not necessarily google dot com again, it’s also new and all such a grey area and google themselves trying to figure out how they’re going to end up complying with this whole thing. The implications than for prospect. Research are becoming apparent as we’re talking. You might not find everything that you’d like to find on someone, right? Right? And, you know, i can give you an example. Tony, of a search i was doing a number of years back, i was probably about ten years ago, i was doing some donorsearch research actually, i was just doing research. I wasn’t sure that this person was actually considered a donor prospect or not, because sometimes i’m doing the research because there’s, considering having this person as a high profile boardmember and so i’m doing the research, and i kept coming up with this a person’s name connected to corporate insider trading. So the bad kind of insider trading and at first i dismissed it because i thought, well, maybe it’s just the same name? Um, but then i came across one article that actually did link the person to the insider trading and linked to the person to current employment situation. So then i knew this was indeed the prospect, so i came i had a dilemma because right, if i put this information into a written profile, then, uh, any donor and he don’t prospect really has the right to walk into your organization and say, show me what information you’ve compiled on may i want to see my donor record on. And so i really had this dilemma, and i thought, well, what do i do with this information? So i decided to call the person who had hired me to do the research, and i asked, why are you having me do this research on this individual? Is it for a simple donation, or is there something more to this? And she said, oh, there’s a lot more to it. We are considering bringing him on the board, and our board chair thinks he would make a great treasurer for organization. Oh, my. So that was you know, i thought. Okay, well, red flag. So i decided to verbally give the information that i had found. I mentioned that the person had paid their fine had done their time. It was well in their past. But i did feel that the executive director didn’t need to know that this existed. Now why? This is really interesting dilemma. But why? Just verbally? Why? I mean, if if it’s bonified and you had confirmed it, why not? Put it in the written prospekt reports, well, we discussed that i told her that i would i don’t like to put information into a written profile that would potentially sever our relationship with somebody, and it could, you know, it was a potentially great relationship that could that could have existed. Um, so i did not want to eliminate that possibility for her if if he’d read this and said, well, you know, this was dug up on me and, you know, i’m uncomfortable with this, and i’m walking away from this organization hey, you know, clearly it was in his past, everything had, you know, all fine has been paid, and as i said on time, his concert, i just felt that it could end up, um, severing the relationship ultimately, and i didn’t want to several relationship before it even began, since they’re you know they’re may not have been any issues in the future. I just told her to tread carefully. You always have in the back of your mind what the donor or dahna prospect might think if they were to read this in the organizations report that you had written, yeah, it was absolutely there was the same reason i don’t like to delve into divorce records. Yeah, well, now i can see how that wouldn’t belong, but alright, it’s, just interesting. You always have this in mind that what would happen if the person were to read this about themselves in the organ in the organization’s files are always thinking away. Okay, interesting. And what what happened in that case? Did they end up inviting the person to be on the board? Do you know, or did they not? They did. They ultimately did, but i don’t think they put him in a treasurer position immediately. You know, i’m not sure down the line if that ended up coming to fruition, but it was certainly at least something that the executive director needed to be aware of. Excellent. Okay, excellent story. Thank you. Um, this all, you know sort of brings up also the the potential, the discretion, really, that google is goingto have and other search engines as they have to comply with this. The way i read the description i read, i didn’t read the court’s decision itself, but the description i read was that, you know, there’s some vague description or vague direction about, um, what google should consider inappropriate and what not, but but but nothing’s very, very specific. And so that leaves a lot of discretion for google as to whether something like what you described still belongs. I mean, it still could be very relevant, even though it’s in the past, you know, i mean, history is all in the past, we we were studying history all the time. So just because something is in the past google and detrimental to the person, google could still very well determine that that that belongs under that person’s search results, right? So now people are wondering, you know, it’s a matter of fact, i read an article that was in a may fifteenth edition of yusa today where, you know, they talked about, you know, that the court basically is here is blaming the messenger and, you know, this person had this, you know, situations in their path, google was simply giving you access to the information, and you know it e if if reputations can now be somehow, you know, as they’re calling it in this article, airbrushed on demand, right, you know, you’re going to have to think about, you know, well, it’s people who have done things, you know, maybe doctors who have botched surgeries and you just think about the implications of all the types of people that would be thinking about having this this shady past erased there’s just a scary amount of discretion that google has because the past is still relevant, but maybe some things are irrelevant howto how do you decide what’s relevant to other people and what’s not the other? The other very interesting thing about this is the information isn’t going away it’s not going to be removed from the internet if that’s even possible it’s just going to be removed from a search result with that from of that person’s name. So there really is a matter of fact, the very newspaper articles that this spaniard, you know, was it sat about still exist on the internet, more people have probably read the articles now than otherwise would have ever read them if he hadn’t brought to court. Um and so the articles still exists. It’s just getting to the articles by searching on this individual’s name is something that has been or will be very soon i’m not sure if it was removed or not, but i think it may be it wass at this point, but, you know, is you. Yeah, data is probably still going to exist. But as a prospect researcher, your main starting point is always with a person’s name. That’s. Why? I was wondering how this was really going to affect donorsearch research. I mean, we have a lot of institutions. Buy-in particularly hyre ed, that do their research. Donors who reside in europe, right. So you’ve got people who come to this country for their education on they go back or people who started, you know, as a u s citizen and are now living is expats in another country, so you know the borders being as fluid as they are. You can imagine, i know, maybe a very small social service organisation non-profit might not be in that situation as they’re researching their donors, because for the most part, they’re serving a geographic region and their donors come from that very small, smaller pool of people. But larger organizations that serve that our international and it doesn’t even have to be hyre ed, imagine the wise of the world or united ways we have to go out for a break. When we come back, marie and i are going to keep talking about this, and we’re gonna move teo, subject of the donors right to privacy and the code of ethics around around prospect research. So stay with us. You’re listening to the talking alternative network. Have you ever considered consulting a road map when you feel you need help getting to your destination when the normal path seems blocked? A little help can come in handy when choosing an alternate route. Your natal chart is a map of your potentials. It addresses relationships, finance, business, health and, above all, creativity. Current planetary cycles can either support or challenge your objectives. I’m montgomery taylor. If you would like to explore the help of a private astrological reading, please contact me at monte at monty taylor dot. Com let’s monte m o nt y at monty taylor dot com. Are you suffering from aches and pains? Has traditional medicine let you down? Are you tired of taking toxic medications, then come to the double diamond wellness center and learn how our natural methods can help you to hell? Call us now at to one to seven to one eight, one eight three that’s to one to seven to one eight one eight three or find us on the web at www dot double diamond wellness dot com way. Look forward to serving you. Talking alternative radio twenty four hours a day. Lively clamber station top trends, sound advice, that’s. Tony martignetti, yeah, that’s. Tony martignetti non-profit radio. And i’m travis frazier from united way of new york city, and i’m michelle walls from the us fund for unicef. And i’m tony martignetti and with me is maria simple, the prospect finder, maria appa ra, the association of prospect researchers for advancement, they have something to say about donorsearch they dio there, they actually on their web site a statement of ethics, and i’d be glad to provide that link to your tear listeners. Tony on your facebook page, okay, we’ll put that after the takeaways. Yes, yeah, sure. And so the main pages apra home dot org’s a pr, a home dot org’s and so there, you know, that is the association that most professional prospect researchers would align with and rely on for their professional development. So there is a statement of ethics that the opera has and, you know, accountability and practice as well. I mean, i’m looking at one specific line that they have in their code of ethics around practice. It says that, you know, they shall on ly record data that is appropriate to the fund-raising process and protect the confidentiality of all personal information at all times dahna so, you know, they take donor-centric mation is safeguarded at their organizations password protect the software, for example, making sure that only people who need access to that information are going to get the access to the information. Well, let’s, go back to this donor. The confidentiality. I mean, how do you protect the person’s confidentiality when your task is to prepare research about the person? I mean, at the top of the page is the person’s name and, um the pages are loaded with stuff about the person. How do you how do they balance what they mean their protect confidentiality? So you want to make sure that on ly the people who need access to this information to advance fund-raising are going to have access to the information. First of all, the information is all derived from publicly available sources, right? So google obviously is one of those publicly available sources that we get information from. We’ve talked about hundreds of those on the show. Yeah, yeah, absolutely. And so what? You go to a lot of different sources to gather the information and bring it all together? The role of the prospect researcher is, too. Take all of that information, wade through it and come up with a concise profile. Most of the time, the information is is going to be embedded right into the donor record because then you can pull the reports, you know, as you need in the donor software, when i’m preparing the profiles, i just do it in a word document so that they can easily cut and paste the information and if if if, need be into their at their end. Obviously, i don’t have access to donor software that my clients are using, so you want to be sensitive to then who you’re emailing these two i don’t mean you as the prospect. Well, i don’t mean you personally, but the prospect researcher and they may very well in a smaller midsize shop not even be devoted to prospect research, so that let’s say, right, the person doing this research on donors and potential donors, you want to be very conscious of who you’re emailing these reports, too, right? As who has access to the to the next two folders where these prospekt reports are stored? Yes, absolutely mn it, and then you can imagine a situation where you get your development committee together and you’re doing perhaps some sort of peer review sessions so you might have printed profiles or data pieces of data pertaining to these individuals on the table, you know, every every development office really should have a good shredder in the office, and i would really encourage people not to allow boardmember sze some other volunteers involved in the development process tow, walk out with hard copies because you just don’t want this information, you know, floating around out there that’s very good admonition caution? Yeah, that that where the hard copies go and then they end up in the person’s office or home or something. Yeah, right? Yeah. Okay, talking about shredders, you know, i can’t stand seeing those shredders where it’s like quarter inch strips like a four year old could put those back together if if they wanted to there’s quarter inch long strips. I mean, you should get at least cross cut, if not the not the ones that make those little little paper tiny bullets, which you’re supposed to be impossible to put back together, right? And there are companies that you can hyre depending on how much you really have to shred, there are companies that you can you can hire to do shredding. I think that even in local companies like u p s stores. They have shredders located within those facilities, maybe even staples. I’m not sure i know ups does, but, you know, there are places that you can go then and taken have it securely shredded. So that might be something to consider. If you do have an awful lot, maybe maybe your office’s air moving and suddenly you find that. Okay, you’ve got files and files from maybe past years, and now things are going all electronic. What are you going to do with all of this? You don’t want to move it right, because you might not need to bring all of that old data with you, but yet it contains some potentially, you know, sensitive information that people would not want just floating around out there. Yes. And as you mentioned, there are services where they’ll just place a bin in your office. And then when it fills up, you call them and then they come and shred it and they and they give you back the empty bin. Yeah, what else? What else you thinking around? We’ve just about another minute or so. What else around this data? Data? Privacy and confidentiality? Well, again, just making sure that everything is very well password protected on lee allow people have access to the donor, soft to your donordigital base that absolutely needed shred anything that is printed and keep on top of what’s happening with this with this particular law that that occurred in the european union. And just you know what? Maybe you know, i will of course keep on top of it, tony, and weaken maybe revisited as things develop, even if we make it part of, you know, a small piece of the future show, but i think that that non-profits do need to be aware that this is out there and see the potential for its effect in the united states ask and you’ll you’ll be most successful, i think, in searching if you look for right to be forgotten, maria, thank you very much. Thank you, tony. My pleasure, maria simple. The prospect finder on twitter she’s at maria simple. Her sight is the prospect finder dot com next week, cindy gibson, our grants fund-raising contributor on the logic model, and deborah sharp from non-profit technology conference on user personas. If you missed any of today’s show, find it on tony. Martignetti dot com. Our creative producer is claire meyerhoff. Sam lever, which is our line producer, shows social media is by julia campbell of jake campbell. Social marketing on the remote producer of tony martignetti non-profit radio is john federico of the new rules. The music is by scout stein of brooklyn, with me next week for non-profit radio. Big non-profit ideas for the other ninety five percent. Go out and be great. Yeah. E-giving didn’t think dick tooting getting thinking. You’re listening to the talking alternative network. E-giving nothing. Cubine are you stuck in your business or career trying to take your business to the next level, and it keeps hitting a wall? This is sam liebowitz, the conscious consultant. I will help you get to the root cause of your abundance issues and help move you forward in your life. Call me now and let’s. Create the future you dream of. Two, one, two, seven, two, one, eight, one, eight, three, that’s to one to seven to one, eight one eight three. The conscious consultant helping conscious people. Be better business people. Dahna hi, i’m ostomel role, and i’m sloan wainwright, where the host of the new thursday morning show the music power hour. Eleven a m we’re gonna have fun, shine the light on all aspects of music and its limitless healing possibilities. We’re gonna invite artists to share their songs and play live will be listening and talking about great music from yesterday to today, so you’re invited to share in our musical conversation. Your ears will be delighted with the sound of music and our voices. Join austin and sloan live thursdays at eleven a. M on talking alternative dot com, you’re listening to talking alternative network at www dot talking alternative dot com, now broadcasting twenty four hours a day. Have you ever considered consulting a road map when you feel you need help getting to your destination when the normal path seems blocked? A little help can come in handy when choosing an alternate route. Your natal chart is a map of your potentials. It addresses relationships, finance, business, health and, above all, creativity. Current planetary cycles can either support or challenge your objectives. I’m montgomery taylor. If you would like to explore the help of a private astrological reading, please contact me at monte at monty taylor dot. Com let’s monte m o nt y at monty taylor dot com. Are you suffering from aches and pains? Has traditional medicine let you down? Are you tired of taking toxic medications, then come to the double diamond wellness center and learn how our natural methods can help you to hell? Call us now at to one to seven to one eight, one eight three that’s to one to seven to one eight one eight three or find us on the web at www dot double diamond wellness dot com. We look forward to serving you. Talking. Bonem

Nonprofit Radio, November 18, 2011: Your IT Plan & The Goods on Google+ Pages

Big Nonprofit Ideas for the Other 95%

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My Guests:

Jason Hutchins

Jason Hutchins: Your IT Plan

Jason Hutchins, president of Nonprofit Solutions, tells you why you need an IT plan and what belongs in it. He’ll get you thinking about budget, equipment, outsourcing, the cloud and a lot more, so you avoid an IT crisis.

Please take a moment to take the survey for this week’s segment with Jason! You’ll find it here at the end of the guest and segment descriptions. Thanks!
 

Scott Koegler
Scott Koegler: Your Mobile Website

Our tech contributor, Scott Koegler, the editor of Nonprofit Technology News, kicks the tires on the recently released Google+ Pages for organizations. Should you take one for a test drive? How are they different than Facebook pages? How do you interact with supporters? What’s the mileage on these babies?
 

 


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