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Nonprofit Radio, April 5, 2013: Talk Between The Generations

Big Nonprofit Ideas for the Other 95%

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Tony’s Guests:

Phyllis Weiss Haserot
Phyllis Weiss Haserot
Phyllis Weiss Haserot: Talk Between The Generations

Phyllis Weiss Haserot, president of Practice Development Counsel, is a consultant and coach in cross generational communications. Think 60ish boss and 25ish employee. Or 70-year-old fundraiser and 30-year-old donor. Phyllis has strategies for understanding and working across the generations.

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Durney hello and welcome to tony martignetti non-profit radio big non-profit ideas for the other ninety five percent. I’m your aptly named host. I hope you were with me last week. I would develop gastroenteritis if i heard that you had missed discover your brand. Nadia touma is a brand innovation strategist with clark vertical line mcdowell your brand goes much deeper than logo and tagline what’s the process to discover your brand strategy once you’ve found it, how do you manage it? Nadia and i discussed and content marketing scott koegler was with me he’s, our tech contributor on each month and the editor of non-profit technology news. What content should you post for consumption? And where should you put it? How do you start your content? Marketing scott and i discussed this week talk between the generations. Phyllis weiss haserot president of practice development council, is a consultant and coach in cross generational communications. Think sixty is bosh sorry, think sixty issue boss and twenty five ish employees or seventy year old fundraiser and thirty year old donor phyllis has strategies for under standing and working across the generations midway into the show at roughly thirty two minutes into it tony’s take two. The transcript for my web chat with maria sample is posted on my block. I’ll say little about that, and also reminder of how important it is for you to be registered in each state where you solicit donations. My pleasure. Now to welcome phyllis weiss haserot she’s president of practice development council she champions cross generational conversation to help non-profits and for profits, solve intergenerational challenges that can hinder productivity, employee attraction, employee retention and succession planning. Her newest project is national cross generational conversation day. Phyllis weiss haserot welcome to the studio. Oh, thank you for inviting me. Delighted to be, have you? Thanks for sharing your expertise. Is today national cross generational conversation day? No, it’s, not also. Why we why we talk of why we’re here. We should be here. We should be celebrating the day. When is the day? Well, we should celebrate every day and i booked way. We should have a cross. A cross generational conversation every day. I’m really encourage off all kinds of organizations to foster that welfare people. One’s national day. What is this project of yours? Way? Haven’t designated yet or not yet. The national day will be in twenty fourteen were expecting to do some pilots and late fall okay, so i will let you know what you mean. The date national cross generational conversation day will be in late fall of next year. No late fall of twenty thirteen, where we’re planning to do that with some pilot cites nationally, will be a year off, okay, but are you are you willing to announce the day when you two so i can mark my calendar? I don’t have the day you don’t have a day yet, okay, you’re working on it, i gotta go. I am working on it. Well, i got two people working on, okay, well, i want to mark my calendar, and i will let you know there’s, an anniversary, absolutely. Let’s just set our terms straight. So we know what that everybody is thinking about the same brackets and generations. What are the generations on? Dh? Their approximate age is okay. We have for now that are in the workplace, mostly three. But but also the traditionalists were still there and we haven’t gotten to the youngest generation yet. So starting with the oldest, we have the traditionalists. And those are people who are generally over seventy. Now. Ah, boomers are bumping up on seven seventy and to, um, late forties. And then we have the generation x which is from late forties down to about thirty four. And then from something like, you know, seventeen or eighteen to thirty three or four is what we call either generation. Why? Or millennials those of the most popular names? There are many others as well. Okay, how do we how do we choose these cut off ages? You say roughly thirty three or thirty for between gen y and gen x how did those get selected? Who to door? Who are? Well, they’re you know, they’re they’re a number of people who have just studied what’s what’s going on and there’s you know, it’s, not absolute. Ah, there are many things that will determine what generation you’re in because it’s really about what influenced you in your formative years, and i when i’m saying the formative years, i’m talking about probably high school and college ages, not not toddlers that was too inert, too young, so people have common things that they, you know, tend to be influenced by wars, economy, music, political, social, economic, cultural and influences so that there is some common things that form patterns. Do we have a name for people who are, say seventeen and under today is any kind of, ah, moniker emerging for them? They’re a couple there’s a corporate naming opportunity way we call them the goldman sachs or the facebooks or something that could be a corporate naming opportunity? Maybe, but it could they might try all right, but they’re they’re they’re a couple of things, you know, those like x and why have have said, well, the next one could be z andi have about a prime something, right? You start at the beginning, but you wouldn’t want to be just a a prime or a double primer so well, a prime would do it. It doesn’t seem like a very what else? What else is emerging on? A couple of i don’t like kensi so that’s out. I actually, like see, i have my son’s name is ain’t we like these, but i wouldn’t use it for the thing that was missing. So a couple of people are using regeneration the re the regeneration re hyphen generation. Yeah. Okay. What? What does that refer to? It refers to all the kinds of things we have to change in the world. For one thing there, you know, there were a number of things that that’s defensible released. I’m just trying to get away, you know? Yeah, i’m not sure that that that’s what i would choose, but there are some people, is that one emerging that you like or you’re you’re still open minded or what? Oh, and i think we’re we’re looking so much on the whole digital native thing, you know? And if there’s some demarcation between the general room, millennials and the and the younger ones, and i think i think we have to watch what’s happening and another thing that i that i feel strongly about accepted it complicates things is that a generation of sixteen to twenty years, it’s much too large and the older and the younger ends were halfs of the various generations are very different from each other, and so, you know, i think you have to slice and dice a lot more war more than then have these, but it just confuses people and complicates things. I certainly when i entered ah, the boomers, so i guess we’re not late forties. I didn’t feel much kinship with those who are seventy or so now, now that i’m or in the middle or a little a little closer to the middle anyway, i feel a little more kinship on both sides, but i’m at fifty one, but yeah, i i didn’t i felt that when i was like i said, when i was forty, i didn’t feel much in association with seventies, but but we were those in their seventies, but we were we were in the same group and i tried to opt out, but there’s no, nobody sent me a check off, you know? And now he was checking on my direct now response pieces there’s never a check off for opting out and, you know, opting may be for the lower the gen x, you couldn’t. You can’t do that, right. Well, i’m cross generational, and i strongly identify with boomers x and y i am actually age, wass boomer. But, yeah, i do. I really, you know, i see the world the way younger people do, and i have lots of young friends and get a lot of energy out of that lab, very allowed to socialize outside my my boomer group, right, i hope. I hope you didn’t do no, yes, of course i did, but i can think thoughts to that gen xers and generalize, think its okay, i hope you do. You can go outside, okay, very good, all right. Let’s see, so we have just, like, a minute a half or so before break. So but well, twenty time you know you’re here for the for the hour. What are what are some of the factors? Well, you mentioned economic could be wars, the digital age. Are there other things that that divide the that that are different across the groups? Um, well, i think, you know, we put those are big categories, if you say cultural, political, social, economic, but there are lots of things within each of these categories that that will divide them. And and i think also that people are so much affected by their background, where they come from and whether it’s a conservative family, a religious family or, you know, other things in the life cycle may be important factor, and that could actually could trump certainly absolutely rule what what person rocket, right and personal style, i think, personal behavioral style and some of that you’re born with and some of it is just your, um, how you respond to your environment, but very often you’ll find the people of two very different ages might get along much better than people who were peers and age, just because they have a much more similar personal behavioral stuff. We’re going to go away for a couple minutes, and when we come back, phyllis weiss haserot stays with me, and i hope that you do, too. Talking alternative radio twenty four hours a day. Are you confused about which died it’s, right for you? Are you tired of being tired? How about improving your energy strength and appearance? Hi, i’m ricky keck, holistic nutrition and wellness consultant. If you have answered yes to any of my questions, contact me now at n y integrated health dot com, or it’s, six for six to eight, five, eight five eight eight initiate change and transform your life. Are you concerned about the future of your business for career? Would you like it all to just be better? Well, the way to do that is to better communication, and the best way to do that is training from the team at improving communications. This is larry sharp, host of the ivory tower radio program and director at improving communications. Does your office need better leadership, customer service sales, or maybe better writing or speaking skills? Could they be better at dealing with confrontation conflicts, touchy subjects all are covered here at improving communications. If you’re in the new york city area, stop by one of our public classes, or get your human resource is in touch with us. The website is improving communications, dot com, that’s, improving communications, dot com, improve your professional environment, be more effective, be happier, and make more money improving communications. That’s the answer. Hey, all you crazy listeners looking to boost your business? Why not advertise on talking alternative with very reasonable rates? Interested simply email at info at talking alternative dot com welcome back to big non-profit ideas for the other ninety five percent. I’ve got lots of live listener love, olive et michigan, reston, virginia, brooklyn, new york welcome live listener love going out to all those cities and we’ve got more to come. We’ve got dublin and mullingar, ireland well, good welcome shaman china, guangzhou, china and chang ching china ni hao he’s happy to have all of you and there are many more listening. Before the show, i pulled listeners, and one of the questions i asked was do you directly supervise? Or are you directly supervised by someone who is twenty or more years from your age? So that’s roughly a generation, right twenty years is approximately b and fifty percent said yes. Fifty percent said no, so half half our listeners have to listeners who were polled our inn in a work relationship that’s at least one generation from them. And the second question i asked is if you answered yes. So now we just have half the half the group from the first question if you answered yes, do you feel communication between the two of you is often hampered by your age difference? And i said often hampered and ah, twenty five percent said yes. Fifty percent said sometimes, but not often, and the other twenty five percent said, no. So it’s, sort of a mix, right. Okay, um, we certainly wouldn’t want here. That was one hundred percent who were having trouble relating to each other often, right? It’s. Only twenty five percent. Yes, on behalf said sometimes, but not often, so maybe we can help. We can especially help those twenty five percent who are often having communication troubles. What are what are the what of the feelings that people are are experiencing when it’s ah, you know, maybe sixty year old fundraiser and a ah, a donor who’s a millennial or or gen x? What? What, what? What are the feelings across these across these people? Well, i think i think it really depends on the people and whether, you know, some of it might even be their own relationship with their own children or their parents, and if we’re looking at the boomers and generation, why, that those two generations are the closest parent child relationships that we’ve ever had in history? And so it is the debt dynamic can be very interesting about that. Ah, a lot of the younger people really have a good warm feeling for older people because they have those good relationships, but it may be and, you know, even if we’re talking about donors and fundraisers, ah lot of the younger people have different ideas about philanthropy, then then the older generations do the kind of things that they want to give to how they want to do it, wanting to be more hands on involved, not just writing checks or you know, doing it electronically, but, you know, knowing getting to know, interact in some way with the people that they are donating to, and i think that’s something that we see really growing, i’m not an expert in the philanthropy area, particularly although i have cause i, you know, so fascinated by everything generational i’ve done that, and i’ve done some speaking to corporate philanthropy people too, and do follow that you have, um, for instance, a lot of the silicon valley people who have made a lot of money now and there are are getting born in their forties, yeah, and they they’re doing their philanthropy in different ways than the generation older than you. So i guess we have to generalize to some extent we’re gonna be able to have the conversation is talking generalizations. And there a cz you identified there are factors that transcend these generalizations. Individual people, your relationships with family, you’re your own personal style. Okay, so but we have to generalize in that in that situation where it’s ah, a fundraiser who’s, you know, could be thirty years older than the then the donor is there. Is there insecurity with typically from the the fundraiser is feeling that here she is talking to somebody so much younger, and they and that younger person really has the power in this relationship. Is there the donor there? The one with the money is there in security? Feelings are, i suppose it could be, but not nearly as much as it probably is when it’s the other way around, when the younger person is asking for money from an older person or the same thing in a in a work situation, when you have a new, older boss, and i mean a younger bus and an older worker reporting to him. Okay, so let’s, look at that, then. So the older, older worker, younger boss, what the one of the feelings are, how do we work with that team to transcend those feelings? Okay. It may be that the younger boss, especially if they have no come newly to that position, maybe feeling, ah, you know, uncertain about how to how to do it and how do you manage other people and even their own age? That’s another, another issue of managing your your friends that you were, you know, just coworkers with with but with older, with other people, you know, sometimes the fear that the other person knows so much more and you knows, maybe going to be trying to take over for them and what they’re doing, like some intimidation it it could be, yeah, it could be intimidated and, you know, and it may be that that there’s absolutely no reason for that it doesn’t mean that the older person really feels that way, right? But the younger person lives might might feel based on these generalizations and stereotypes, right mean, isn’t well, not only stereotypes, but, you know, if you haven’t been doing something for a long time and somebody else has ah, may feel well, you know, they they think they know so much more so why should they listen to me? Am i going to be looked? At enough as an authority figure so that that kind of thing can happen. And i think that what we need to remember is that people have to have respect for each other and to respect experience and not think, oh, well, you’ve always done it this way, but i have a better way or i have done it, you know, and it’s been proven to work for twenty years. So why you trying to get me to do something in in a different way just to say ok? You know it’s not about you, it’s, about whether our common goals here, you know, we have some objective we’re trying to read which we’re trying to do something for a client or for the organisation or trying to serve, solve world problems and it’s not about, you know my way or your way or the highway it’s how can we best work together? How can we take what i know and do really well and what you know and you do really well and figure out what the role should be based on our skills, our knowledge, our interpersonal relationships with people, the contacts we have, whatever it is, what? We need here. And how are we going to make this work? Right? And how can we start to how can we start this conversation across these two people if there is a little tension, a little intimidation, little fear, how do you how does your work work with a team like that? Well, you know, i think facilitating dialogues within work teams, people who have to work together, um, is really something that’s so important and not being done enough, and it should be encouraged by the employers and, you know, sometimes you have to bring in coaches, and it could be i’m not just saying from somebody from the outside, but it could be somebody within the organization. I i think that sometimes with mentors and mentoring circles you can have or this employee resource groups that are that set up around some kind of affinity s o that you see a lot of those for for gender, and you see them for lbgt now you see it for racial, ethnic and, you know, that kind of thing, and we’re starting to see some of them around generational issues, too. And so if you, you know, you have these discussions, you know, whether they’re internally were, you know, coming from the outside, getting people in a non threatening way to start surfacing, how they, how they feel, what you know, what they see is their obstacles. What i’ve read about the millennials is that they like to be like to have their voices heard absolutely, i don’t know so much that they need to see that what they’re recommending, you know, he’s always carried out i mean, i don’t read that there that’s selfish, but they would liketo have input they liketo be know that they’re being heard absolutely, you know, and i think from the older and two when they’re no longer running things, they also want have have a voice, but this opportunity for everybody to have a voice is really important and for the younger ones and one of the one of my favorite names for a generation wireframe millennials, it’s generation, why? W h y for all the questions that they’re always asking and you know when when managers have come to me with, you know, what do i do about this? I mean, sometimes you know either sometimes it’s annoying, but even when it is a nice child. Five year olds kinds of why? Why is the sky blue? Why are we doing it this way? Yeah, and and we taught our kids to ask questions it’s a good thing, but sometimes it’s inconvenient, you know, you’re running off to a meeting to the bathroom, whatever, whatever it is, and there are people who actually managers sometimes feel guilty about it because they can’t on the spot. It’s fun to feel like a prop that question, i can’t answer all the questions that are being thrown at them, right? Okay, so so what one thing that i’ve suggested? Because especially the younger people like working in groups is, you know, why don’t you schedule every couple of weeks a session where anybody can come and ask their questions and get answers to them? And then people can hear what other people are asking that can learn from that they all have their opportunity for for their voice, their self expression, whatever, whatever it is, and again, they don’t expect to get everything that they’re asking for, but also they want to know what’s going on that has an impact on me and i think anybody in or place really wants to know that the more they’re more vociferous about asking exactly not keeping it inside, right? But the more transparency there is, i believe it’s so usually better for everybody. Okay, let me send some live listener love. Tio medford, new york. Middleboro, massachusetts. Bangor, maine live listener love bangor. I love bangor. Yeah. That’s. When? When? When i was an urban planner. And my first incarnation. And that was a client that remained was in urban. That was an urban durban downtown bangor. Okay, i hope it’s benefited from your work. Can you remember something? You wantto somebody’s listening from bangor? What do you what did you do? You put it. Build a park oversea a parka monument. What? What? What can you point to where we were doing? We were doing studies on downtown commercial revitalisation. And what kind of businesses should come in and and attract them? And it really was a while ago. It was like i have no idea what bangor is like. Not sure, but it was a nice being shoretz a thriving small town. Lovely. Because because of your work there, taiwan taipei tai pei has checked in ni hao. Also none. Ching china was not with us before, but none. Ching is now with us. Ni hao out to you also. We have, ah, few more way have several minutes before break, so we’re talking about openness, transparency you want these feelings to be shared in the workplace, but typically we’re not especially, i’d say boomers in traditionalists. We’re not really accustomed to sharing feelings in the workplace. So much is that is that difficult toe overcome their? They’re traditional feelings about about sharing feelings in the workplace? Yeah, i think that you probably have a better chance with the boomers and, you know, especially some of them you don’t remember when boomers came into the workplace, they were going to change the world. No, especially the older hand. I’m on the young side of rumors, so well, i was on the young side, but i’m still a little on the younger younger, so i don’t remember that so and they’re still in trouble and they were going they were going to change things. Yeah, okay, you know, and and were kissed of all kinds of things. And you know what? What are they growing? Long hair? And what is this about woodstock and and the beatles and civil rights, you know, against the vietnam war, all of those kinds of things very politically involved. Ah, so and i think that what we’re seeing also with some of them who were thinking, what am i going to do? And i either voluntarily or involuntarily leave what i’m what i’m doing now, our thinking back to the three kinds of things that they wish they had gotten an opportunity to do when they were younger, but they were encouraged by their parents who came from a much more insecure, you know, depression area, a year era. Ah, to do something that was very respectable, that they thought was a secure job, like, you know, be a doctor, a lawyer, an engineer or something like that nothing is secure anymore, and so that, you know, thinking that there’s still, you know, deep down somewhere, things that they would like to do that that would be helpful to the problems we have in the world, they could join the occupy movement on dh, some of it but but actually occupies similar really start analogous toe the the counter culture and political ah, not really revolution but turmoil and and that we saw in the sixties when the boomers were were of that a war. Of the you know, now what’s now the millennial age, so because i’m trying to compare the with the boomers were for in opposite were opposing politically and socially with what occupy that’s true accepted it and and yeah, it’s very similar, but the younger generations now have a different way of going about most of them would not be involved in protests out on the streets. Ah, they they would go about it in a different way. They tend to their political involvement tends to be different, but but they’re still very, you know, interested in doing something about cleaning up the environment. That’s a big one there, you know, some other issues just took a different form of unoccupied was more of a one of a cohesive group in a lot of different cities than than my at least my sense of what was happening in the sixties, which was much more scattered, and there wasn’t really there wasn’t really even a name to it. Now we have occupy and the and you know, you know, the tagline, the other ninety nine percent, so they even branded themselves sort of all right, we could take take another break. When we come back, tony’s take two. And then we’ll continue the conversation about cross generational conversations with phyllis weiss haserot stay with us. Co-branding think dick tooting getting ding, ding, ding ding. You’re listening to the talking alternate network duitz waiting to get in. E-giving good. Are you suffering from aches and pains? Has traditional medicine let you down? Are you tired of taking toxic medication? Then come to the double diamond wellness center and learn how our natural methods can help you to hell? Call us now at to one to seven to one eight, one eight three that’s to one to seven to one eight, one eight three or find us on the web at www dot double diamond wellness dot com. We look forward to serving you. Hi, i’m ostomel role, and i’m sloan wainwright, where the host of the new thursday morning show the music power hour. Eleven a m. We’re gonna have fun. Shine the light on all aspects of music and its limitless healing possibilities. We’re gonna invite artists to share their songs and play live will be listening and talking about great music from yesterday to today, so you’re invited to share in our musical conversation. Your ears will be delighted with the sound of music and our voices. Join austin and sloan live thursdays at eleven a. M on talking alternative dot com. You’re listening to the talking alternative network. Duitz dahna i’m leslie goldman with the us fund for unicef, and i’m casey rotter with us fun for unison. You’re listening to tony martignetti non-profit radio big non-profit ideas for the other ninety five percent. Durney what a lovely chorus that was love that time for tony’s take to roughly thirty two minutes into the hour late last month, maria simple and i hosted a live chat for the foundation center on prospect research, and that was called what’s in your donordigital see, eh? The transcript of that chat is on my block. So if you are interested in that, the block is that tony martignetti dot com and also wantto just take a moment to remind you of the importance of charity registration. It’s ah it’s, part of the practice that i do aside from the plant e-giving fund-raising consulting because not complying with the state laws in every state where you solicit donations can be a little embarrassing. I remember that chris christie was embarrassed because he created a sandy relief fund, and unfortunately, the fund was not in compliance with state laws. They’re in new jersey that sell embarrassing. Um, mary j blige was embarrassed. Sometimes i call him mary j bilge, but but i do like like most of her music, so i don’t usually call her build, but mary j blige, she has a charity and was not it was not. In compliance with st charity registration laws and that she was a little embarrassed. But lest you think that it’s only for the famous and the notable, a small connecticut police charity was embarrassed when the leader was actually find twenty two thousand dollars for failure to comply with these these laws, and it was a personal fine that was not for the charity that was for the executive director on and i’ve got a little more motivation around charity registration on my block at tony martignetti dot com. If you go there and just search the phrase charity registration, you’ll find one of the posts called charity registration matters and that one details a couple of other episodes of charity registration embarrassment that you want to avoid. And that is tony’s take two for friday, the fifth of april, the fourteenth show of this year. Let me send some more live listener love absecon, new jersey see ya, but i know everybody pronounces it abso khan, but i know that it’s absecon because i have a deep love for belmar, new jersey, which is not too far away. They’re not in the same exact vicinity, but there generally related. And, ah, i still go to belmar every summer, and i hope that bill maher and absecon have well will have recovered from the devastation of sandy. Bye bye the summertime so absecon good good wishes to you and new bern, north carolina live listener love also seoul, korea well, i love the asian thie asian listeners it just incredible. So far, it’s been taiwan, china now seoul, seoul, south korea got to send you an io haserot and we’re also thinking of you soul for some for attention very tense time we’ve seen these episodes before. I certainly don’t know anything about no very little. Well, let’s say nothing about the politics of the peninsula, but i don’t know anything more than i’m reading on our thoughts are definitely with you in in seoul and all of south korea continuing our conversation with phyllis weiss haserot she’s, the president of practice development council, which you will find at p d council dot com that’s ah, if you were going to do that fanatically, radically, that would be papa delta candy counsel. And, of course, counsel is c e o u n c l e dot com oh, and that’s where she’s the president and you can learn more about phyllis is practice there on if you want to google her her last name spelled h e a s e r o t haserot on dh thank you for pronouncing it right. You’re doesn’t just well, i suffered. What do you think i suffer with the name martignetti martin? Ellie. I find that the tease get transformed to elza latto. I get a lot of martinelli’s or martinelli martignetti martignetti they transposed the g in the end, i get o r martin getty there’s the transposition martin getti. So i have ah, have a deep and abiding respect for proper name pronunciation. Was it again? Has a rot? No, no, i know that’s not, uh, okay, so childish, so puerile, like, like i’m you know, i’m a gen y minus minus ten years. It’s terrible let’s talk about some of the some of the other advice that you might have. You know, if you’re consulting around opening up these conversations, you know, certainly talked about facilitating dialogue and having meetings where people, younger people can ask the questions what the strategies have you got for non-profits? It may be struggling. Around these issues. Well, i think that if you have, if you have something that i have met mentioned to you and we’ve talked before, who is about setting up mentoring circles, okay, i want you to describe what mentoring circles are, i think that the first phase of mentoring that we’ve seen is older people mentoring younger word that’s the typical right and done the reciprocal well, let’s say reverse mentoring on which, you know, got some attention because thie younger people tend to be better about technology than the older ones, suggesting that someone is twenty four years old has something to teach me. Is that your is that what you’re suggesting? I think less than would have been true ten years ago? I think that most of the boomers are techno tech dahna logically competent enough to do for most of the things that they need to dio, whereas, you know, you used to have people who had their secretaries assistants doing their email for them. You know which an email it’s really easy, i never understood well, why that was a difficult thing, but, buddy, i think we’re we’re coming together much more, even though you were not born with the computer and all of those things, and, you know, you can imagine a world without them. Yes, i remember, but it was yeah, i think the first thing people thought about was the tech, the gap in technology from one generation to another. And so but but there were other things as well, that the different generations could learn from each other, and the younger generations can teach older generations. I i very often ask i have ah linked in group called cross generational conversation and that’s, we want to do the things i’ve asked, and i ask when i’m doing workshops, what can you personally it’s a younger person? Ah, what do you have to offer as a mentor to an older person? And i think, you know, they need to it’s important, that they think about this for their own confidence as well, because a lot of times, people are reluctant to ask someone that they would like to mentor them because they don’t know, you know, what can they give in exchange? I want to be a taker, right? And, you know, maybe maybe that person wouldn’t particularly be interested, they’re probably pretty busy, but if they have something to gain from mentoring you, then they’re going to be much more apt to say, oh, yeah, you know, i’d love to help you. Well, let me ask you what kinds of things did you see? What kind of response did you see that young people felt they could contribute to an older mentor? You know, sometimes it could be the contacts they have, it could be the way you know, what they observe in the world. Ah, you know, even what? What’s, you know, what’s new and coming up in the market place, you know, what kind of products do you think? What kind of needs air people going tohave that that we weren’t noticing before? So they have, ah, you know, a different sense of that. They talk to different people, they might watch and and, you know, use different media, they’re getting different messages, they’re interacting with people in a different way. And so, you know, anybody who has a business or is trying to interact or rays, or whatever it might be, can get a lot of out of their perspective out of a younger person’s perspective. So you would suggest if someone seeking if someone younger is seeking a mentor, that they explain what value they could bring to the absence. So okay, let’s say, i think the first thing you want to do is whether you’re networking or you’re looking for a mentor or you’re trying to get a client. The first thing you want to do is try to offer something before you’re asking for something. You know, reciprocity is a very big thing about, you know, as as an influence principle, and if somebody gained something from you, they’re usually going toe want to as soon as they can give back, i think most people wanted yeah, i mean, we don’t want to be owing people something for one thing, and you know it and just to be nice still don’t want to do that too, but getting getting back to the mentoring. So so so? So first you have it going one way from older, younger, then you have going the opposite direction as well. Um, reciprocally, your mutually mentoring, but people are so busy now, and a lot of mentoring relationships really fail or wither away because that one person who’s supposed to be mentoring can’t find the time and has other things that might be high priority, and if you put together a circle of people of different generations, different skills experiences and all of that who can draw on each other and people can still pair off went one. But you have a whole lot of people to draw on a whole lot of people to give to, because even if you do ah, you’re lucky enough to get the time of one particular person, no one person can give all the advice that any other one person may need. I mean, everyone does not have exactly the same needs the same life that’s always been my reluctance when people ask if all mentor them. Ah it’s, i’m not sure that i can provide everything that they they’re in need of. Saand i can’t i’m certain i can so that’s always been my reluctant, so you know, sort of qualifying sale, do as much as i can for you, but with a circle you have the expertise of lots of obviously lots of people to drop and their time and so would the circle so you could set up a mentoring. Circle in a workplace you certainly can meets what? Once once a month. The way? Well, i think i went a week it’s probably more time than anyone’s going to devote to it. But if you could do it once a month that that would be very good, or even if it was every couple of months. But other people got together in the interim. A cz they needed or wanted smaller groups. Yeah. Okay. And you’ve seen these mentoring circles work? I have i think again, people have to be very committed to doing doing, you know, you have to show up. You can’t just say the first time, okay? I’m going to be there and and you don’t on a regular basis because not only what should be giving, but you won’t be getting either. Yeah. Okay. Cool mentoring circles. Um, you talked about the, uh, life cycle of ah of a person. Um, what is there? Is there? What are we have defined stages of of our lives? Is that what you meant? Um, well, yes, there are that, but a person can be ah, undergoing or experiencing the same sorts of things at a somebody very different age on the easiest example is, you know, medicamentos years, i’ll get right, okay, dumb it down. Yeah, is men can have children and a much older age than women can. So if you have, ah, father with young children in their sixties that may be experiencing and having the same concerns is somebody who’s in their thirties or twenty or twenty or twenty? If yeah, if people in their twenties air getting around to having children not as much as it used to be, but yeah, right, okay, we’re going to take another little break, and when we come back, we’ll continue. We’re going talk about veterans to you, have some special advice, can be very, very important subject, because, of course, we don’t we don’t deal with trivia here on tony martignetti non-profit rated that goes without saying, phyllis, come on, okay, and let’s, take this break in. Phyllis stays with us, and you should do. You’re listening to the talking alternative network. Schnoll are you stuck in your business or career trying to take your business to the next level, and it keeps hitting a wall? This is sam liebowitz, the conscious consultant. I will help you get to the root cause of your abundance issues and help move you forward in your life. Call me now and let’s. Create the future you dream of. Two, one, two, seven, two, one, eight, one, eight, three, that’s to one to seven to one, eight one eight three. The conscious consultant helping conscious people. Be better business people. Have you ever considered consulting a road map when you feel you need help getting to your destination when the normal path seems blocked? A little help can come in handy when choosing an alternate route. Your natal chart is a map of your potentials. It addresses relationships, finance, business, health and, above all, creativity. Current planetary cycles can either support or challenge your objectives. I’m montgomery taylor. If you would like to explore the help of a private astrological reading, please contact me at monte at monty taylor dot. Com let’s monte m o nt y at monty taylor dot com. Talking alternative radio twenty four hours a day. Durney welcome back, big non-profit ideas for the other ninety five percent, continuing with the live listener love leave massachusetts, minneapolis, minnesota and columbus, ohio. Columbus, ohio. That’s, the appreciate the capital of ohio. I think i believe that’s, capital city live with her love to all those massachusetts, minnesota and ohio. Thailand. I’ve been to thailand. I was in bangkok and i was in pata also thailand, tokyo, japan also japan, konnichi wa. And why are you? You know, we have all these asian listeners taiwan, china, japan, thailand. Now, why are you listening at att one? Almost two o’clock in the morning. It’s oh, it’s. Remarkable. I don’t know why you’re you’re night owls or but consistently, you guys are up late on. Ah, well, this is friday night. Maybe that’s. The reason, but love to have you have you? Have you all, um, veterans? Phyllis, you have some special advice around generational cross generational conversations for for vets. What the special issues first to prevent. Well, first of all, we have ah, we’ve been at war for so long. We have a whole lot of people in their twenties and thirties who are coming back and either wanting to go to school, be educated um, her to teach or to get jobs. And if you think about it, the experience of somebody in their twenties who has been in iraq or afghanistan, or something like that has to be very, very different from the people that you see on the college campuses or, you know, at at at work, if they might have been on the thirty eighth parallel in the korean peninsula, they could have twenty eight, thirty, thirty thousand troops there, right? Right? Well, many, many places, but especially when you, you know, in danger of being fired out every day and their training is they s so much more leadership training, then younger people get now and that thie stress the and, you know, and i’m talking about now, even for people who don’t have post traumatic stress and all of those kinds of things, but that that they’re they’re pretty healthy physically and mentally, even so that you know, that that would put other layers i know on all of this, but they they’re also used to so much more structure if you think about it now, young people tend to and especially you. Know if you’re in school, you go to class when you want you dress the way you want, you don’t have very strict ways of behaving and those expectations, and so i think that the veterans arm or, you know, really more like the older generations because they’ve come, they have more structured workplaces and have been, you know, enough experience, so the lot of them have been leaders and think in that way, whereas the, you know, generalized seems to need a lot of guidance and wants to know what air their expectations, where have you been, the military there very quickly, there’s the court clear, very clear? So is so they’re really not like piers in in many ways. And so is there a problem of perception that people who are older tendo lump them as being the same as people that are in their same age group? And so that those of us who are older or not fully appreciating the differences that that air across vets and non vets, i think that’s very possible, i think that’s very possible on dh way just, you know, these people have been serving our country we need to get some jobs we have dealt with, um, you know, get educated, and so often they will look to people who have had similar experiences. So if there are older veterans in your in your work place, they can be good mentors or help them get up to see speed to how things are ah, loosen up. I mean, because if you’re used to a very rigid structure and suddenly you’re in a different environment, you have to loosen up more, uh, forming these affinity groups so that they are, you know, the veterans feel like they’re not, you know, standing out on different from everybody else around them who is their age can be very helpful. They just really have to think through what it is they’re looking for, what, what their needs are. A lot of them have families more than some of the younger people, particularly in school, and so they may have totally different needs. I want i want to close with what it is that you love about the work that you’re doing. Why do you love this? What moves you about this? I i just find differences fascinating. For one thing, i get a lot. Of energy from the younger people as well as people who are older as well. I saw something just yeah, totally, totally, i mean, i think that’s, why it’s hard to you know, we’re thinking about whether the boomer is going to do they’re not going to retire for most of them and, you know, not thinking even if money was not an issue of, you know, spending their days playing golf and lying on the beach and doing the traditional things that people thought about wanting to dio so what can i do next? I i appreciate the differences, and the other thing is that i just think that it is so important that we get all the generations talking together, working together for what they do in the workplace and solving the world’s problems that we have instead of pointing fingers at each other and say, we look at the world that you’re, you know, leaving to us. Duitz phyllis weiss haserot is president of practice development council at p d council dot com. Phyllis, thanks so much for sharing your wisdom around my absolute pleasure. I’ve had a lot of fun. I’m glad most guests do some are tortured, but not not many, and i’m glad that you’re not among the tortured, and there was no jargon jail there was all such a simple conversation, no jargon, jail love that absolutely, i don’t jarden next week followship not fellowship follow-up ship alison fine is co author with beth cantor of the networked non-profit and alison has been thinking lately about opening organizational culture to allow non-profits to be more reactive to the interests and motivations of their followers while still keeping goals in sight, and alison is going to share her thoughts next week. Also, jean takagi are regular legal contributor returns. We’re all over the web. You can’t make a click without dahna testes piela still trying to say, smacking your head hard into tony martignetti non-profit radio. What i what i actually need to learn is how to say put me on your do not call list in spanish. I’ve been getting telemarketing calls in spanish and i say, put me on your do not call list and they say, no, no, no, auntie ende they don’t understand, so they’re doing an end run around the federal do not call list, so if someone could explain to me how to say put me on your do not call list in spanish. I would be grateful. Any case we’re all over social media and youtube is but one example. My channel, their israel tony martignetti is over ninety videos i’ve got craig newmark, the found of craigslist is on there with me. Seth godin is there. Rachel sklar are from huffington post is there charles rich, the founder of donors, choose dot org’s where teachers post there, their needs and donors give to those needs he’s i’ve interviewed him so that all those people and lots of other videos at riel tony martignetti dot com also some stand up comedy is there. Our creative producer is claire meyerhoff. Sam liebowitz was not our line producer today. Janice taylor was the line producer today. And this shows social media is by regina walton of organic social media. The remote producer of tony martignetti non-profit radio is john federico of the new rules will be going remote next time we’ll be in june at fund-raising day here in new york city. I hope you’ll be with me next friday one to two p m eastern at talking alternative broadcasting at talking alternative dot com no dahna. Hyre i don’t think they’re too good ending. You’re listening to the talking, alternate network, waiting to get me to thinking. Hi, i’m donna and i’m done were certified mediators, and i am a family and couples licensed therapists and author of please don’t buy me ice cream are show new beginnings is about helping you and your family recover financially and emotionally and start the beginning of your life. We’ll answer your questions on divorce, family court, co parenting, personal development, new relationships, blending families and more. Dahna and i will bring you to a place of empowerment and belief that even though marriages may end, families are forever join us every monday, starting september tenth at ten am on talking alternative dot com. Are you suffering from aches and pains? Has traditional medicine let you down? Are you tired of taking toxic medications, then come to the double diamond wellness center and learn how our natural methods can help you to hell? Call us now at to one to seven to one eight one eight three that’s two one two seven to one eight one eight three or find us on the web at www dot double diamond wellness dot com. We look forward to serving you. You’re listening to talking alternative network at www dot talking alternative dot com, now broadcasting twenty four hours a day. This is tony martignetti aptly named host of tony martignetti non-profit radio big non-profit ideas for the other ninety five percent technology fund-raising compliance, social media, small and medium non-profits have needs in all these areas. My guests are expert in all these areas and mohr tony martignetti non-profit radio friday’s one to two eastern on talking alternative broadcast are you fed up with talking points, rhetoric everywhere you turn left or right? Spin ideology no reality, in fact, its ideology over intellect, no more it’s time. Join me, larry shop a neo-sage tuesday nights nine to eleven easter for the ivory tower radio in the ivory tower will discuss what’s important to you society, politics, business and family. It’s provocative talk for the realist and the skeptic who want to know what’s. Really going on? What does it mean? What can be done about it? So gain special access to the ivory tower. Listen to me. Very sharp. Your neo-sage tuesday nights nine to eleven new york time go to ivory tower radio dot com for details. That’s ivory tower radio dot com everytime was a great place to visit for both entertainment and education. Listening. Tuesday nights nine to eleven. It will make you smarter. Dot com. Hyre

Cause Marketing Guidance From NY Attorney General

The cover of Cause Marketing for Dummies courtesy of John Haydon on Flickr.

Cause marketing: when your charity teams up with a company so that you raise money and they sell stuff and/or look good.

Questions have been asked, most recently in the The New York Times. There are no rules and the amount of money raised can be questionable.

The New York Attorney General wants to help. The office has issued a five-point guidance document. It’s on the web and as a pdf. Here are the recommendations:

1. Clearly describe the promotion
Prominent disclosures should include: charity name and mission; benefit the charity receives; minimum guaranteed or maximum imposed on donation to charity; consumer action required; and, dates of the campaign.

2. Allow consumers to easily determine donation amount
Do you wonder what “net proceeds” means? Net of what?

3. Be transparent about what is not apparent
Protect your brand so it’s not injured by an unclear campaign. For instance, if the company is making a fixed donation, don’t let promotional materials suggest that buying product makes a difference in how much your charity gets.

Likewise, if there’s a cap to the donation you’re getting, don’t flood stores with more goods than reasonably expected to reach that maximum. (I like that one. How ethical are you when it’s hard for the public to know how ethical you are?)

4. Ensure transparency in social media
If it’s a campaign to get the company likes, followers or +1’s, follow the other recommendations here. Social media campaigns aren’t exceptions to transparency and accuracy.

5. Tell the public how much was raised
Cause marketing is no exception to the public’s demand for impact measures. Tell us how you did.

Care to share your experience with cause marketing? Was the company fair? Did you get what was promised? What feedback did you get from donors? Would you do it again?

Dear Housing Works Thrift Shops

On Thursday, Oct. 11 at about 5:15pm I intended to donate a bookcase clock to your Gramercy Thrift Shop. I had been carrying it around all day with Housing Works in mind.

While in the bag the clock unscrewed from its pedestal and I screwed it back in. The young woman accepting donations saw that and when I put it on the counter she laughed. The clock swivels in its pedestal and I surmise she decided it was broken and a worthless item.

When I asked her for an explanation she insisted, “Nothing is wrong” and chuckled when I accepted her offer of a donation form. Her unsuppressed snickering turned me off and moved me to withdraw my donation. She offered no apology or explanation.

She’s [description omitted]. The clock is 2 years old from Bombay Company.

Your thrift operations need to be more attentive to hiring and training.

I have donated to the Gramercy store previously and bought from there. My most meaningful purchases were a $250 chair with ottoman and a $100 file cabinet. I have bought smaller items as well.

Your inconsiderate employee cost you a donor and buyer.

I blog on philanthropy and fundraising. I may well blog this as an example of what not to do.

Sincerely,
Tony Martignetti

I emailed that to Housing Works’ vice president for development on a Sunday. He emailed me back on Monday:

So sorry to learn about your experience at the Thrift Shops. I’ve forwarded your email to our director of stores. I expect that you’ll hear back from her shortly.

Please know that we appreciate your generous support over the years and we hope that this experience doesn’t completely end our relationship with you. Staff training is very much important to us; however, we sometimes fall short of our customer service goals.

Feel free to call me at any time; my contact info is below.

Housing Works’ director of stores left me two messages on Tuesday. She was very apologetic. I called her back but we haven’t spoken.

Rather than an example of what not to do, which I anticipated, it’s representative of the right way to handle a customer complaint.

Well done, Housing Works.

Nonprofit Radio for August 24, 2012: Campaign Volunteers & Fiscal Sponsorships

Big Nonprofit Ideas for the Other 95%

Listen live or archive:

Tony’s Guests:

Rich Foss
Rich Foss: Campaign Volunteers

Rich Foss, author of Greenlight Fundraising, on the importance of volunteer leadership in your campaign. How to recruit your chair and lead donor; the other volunteers you need in place; and what their jobs are. He has job descriptions and other resources that will go up on LinkedIn and Facebook.

 

Gene Takagi & Emily Chan
Gene Takagi & Emily Chan: Fiscal Sponsorships

Our regular legal contributors, Gene Takagi and Emily Chan of the Nonprofit & Exempt Organizations Law Group (NEO), make sense of this complicated relationship. What it is; why your office might become a sponsor and what that looks like; how to get started.

 


Top Trends. Sound Advice. Lively Conversation.

You’re on the air and on target as I delve into the big issues facing your nonprofit—and your career.

If you have big dreams but an average budget, tune in to Tony Martignetti Nonprofit Radio.

I interview the best in the business on every topic from board relations, fundraising, social media and compliance, to technology, accounting, volunteer management, finance, marketing and beyond. Always with you in mind.

When and where: Talking Alternative Radio, Fridays, 1-2PM Eastern

Sign-up for show alerts!

Here is a link to the audio podcast: 106: Campaign Volunteers & Fiscal Sponsorship. You can also subscribe on iTunes to get it automatically.
View Full Transcript

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Hello and welcome to the show, it’s tony martignetti non-profit radio big non-profit ideas for the other ninety five percent. I’m your aptly named host. Oh, how i hope you were that you were with me last week. That’s all i just hope you were here. We had grow grassroots michael o’brien, founder and principal of mob advocacy. He knows how to bring people to your cause with grassroots advocacy. How do you activate people? What are grass tops? We talked about that and how do you engage those people? Where do you go to meet potential coalition partners and what’s the added value for your work around grassroots advocacy and divine devices, desktops, laptops, tablets and handhelds? Scott koegler had tips for picking the right device to fit your budget, your work style and personality. You know him? He’s, the editor of non-profit technology news and our monthly tech contributor. Of course, this week, campaign volunteers rich foss he’s, the author of green light fund-raising we, he and i are going to talk about the importance of volunteer leadership in your campaign, how to recruit your chair and lead donor and the other volunteers you need in place and what their jobs are and has lots of descriptions and other resources that will go up on linkedin and facebook after the show today and fiscal sponsorships. Our legal team jean takagi and emily chan from the non-profit and exempt organizations law group make sense of this complicated relationship. What it is, why your office might become a sponsor or sponsoring and what that looks like and how to get started between the guests on tony’s take two big non-profit ideas for the other ninety five percent you’ve heard that already. Today my block this week is to encourage you to listen to the show and since that’s a paradox, i’ll have some other things to talk about other ways to connect on tony’s take two here’s the first one, of course hashtag non-profit radio to join the conversation with us on twitter right now, we take a break, and when we return it’s campaign volunteers on rich fost will join me. I hope you stay here co-branding think dick tooting getting dink dink, dink dink, you’re listening to the talking alternative network waiting to get in. Thank you. You could join the metaphysical center of new jersey and the association for hyre. Awareness for two exciting events this fall live just minutes from new york city in pompton plains, new jersey, dr judith orloff will address her bestseller, emotional freedom, and greg brady will discuss his latest book, deep truth living on the edge. Are you ready for twelve twenty one twelve, save the dates. Judith orloff, october eighteenth and greg brady in november ninth and tenth. For early bird tickets, visit metaphysical center of newjersey dot or or a nj dot net. Hi, i’m donna, and i’m done were certified mediators, and i am a family and couples licensed therapists and author of please don’t buy me ice cream are show new beginnings is about helping you and your family recover financially and emotionally and start the beginning of your life. We’ll answer your questions on divorce, family, court, co, parenting, personal development, new relationships, blending families and more. Dahna and i will bring you to a place of empowerment and belief that even though marriages may end, families are forever. Join us every monday, starting september tenth at ten a m on talking alternative dot com. You’re listening to the talking alternative network. Dahna welcome back, live listener love going out new bern, north carolina? Oh, how i miss north carolina haven’t been there for a few months, but i will be there soon september welcome new bern and we’ve got more live listener love as the show goes on right now, my guest is rich fuss he’s, the author of green light fund-raising your sustainable fund-raising guide to raising fifty thousand to five hundred thousand dollars a year to light up the eyes of people you serve and your donor’s hope the book is shorter than its title. Rich he’s been in fund-raising over twenty nine years as both staff and a consultant he’s with me from rural illinois, where he’s, the leader of a mennonite community rich fast welcome to the show. Thank you, tony. I’m really glad to be here today. It’s my pleasure to have you, uh, we’re talking about campaign volunteers. What what’s the role of volunteers in a campaign about in my career, i worked with community non-profits and usually there’s only one or two development staff, and so i really wanted to develop a system that could be a multiplier for for staff and also that could really use the gold standard of fund-raising, which is, is. You raise a lot more money when you sit down face to face with somebody and describe the organization and ask them for a gift. Face-to-face and so, basically, i developed this system where you recruit volunteers and have them sit down with face-to-face with people and ask forgiveness for your non-profit and, uh, uh, not promise that have developed our have a doubt that it it’s been very special for them. Now we have a drug in jail on tony martignetti non-profit radio, and i hate to do it to you in this very first segment. But you said volunteers are our multipliers for for the charity? What? Why do you what does that mean? Basically, what it means is that that a development director, even if they go out and ask forgiveness, face-to-face, uh, can only meet with so many people each week or each year, and if you have aa group of passionate volunteers, uh, bacon meet with her a lot more people in a much shorter period of time and, uh, that’s why i call it a multiplier, okay, so early parole from jog in jail, but what your step you don’t you don’t want a second offense while you’re on parole. The let’s see, i’ve heard that it’s really? I mean, volunteers and i’ve had guests say this volunteers are the leaders of the campaign. Is that do you? Do you believe that over rather than the staff of the charity? Uh, definitely definitely. And that’s why? In setting up the system, the very first step is to recruit the campaign chair person who you want to have a very influential person in your community be the campaign chair person because their leadership will influence a lot of other people to, uh, to join your campaign. And so that that leadership role is extremely important. Okay? And we’re gonna have some time to talk about how to recruit that campaign chair is as well as some other volunteers, but what’s the role of the charity’s staff in all this. Then if the if the campaign is being led by volunteers, well, basically, i describe it. The role of the the, uh, campaign staff is particularly development staff. He used to run the system. Sometimes i like in these campaigns like an ipad. The ipad spring is very simple. And yet behind it, there’s a whole lot of details. Well, what you want to do in these campaigns is to create the systems and the details in such a way that it’s very easy for the the er staff are executing the volunteers to do their work, and so that requires a lot of work, a lot of organizational detail, a lot of of of work on the part of the development. Okay, now you’ve been doing this for nearly thirty years, so you can’t always have been like getting this toe ipad. What you used to look like in tow the old pong game or what? What did you used to liking it, too? Twenty nine years ago. Oh, okay, well, i didn’t have any metaphors until i was the brother typewriter. When you push the half space key. What i love just love about those type, you know? You know there’s? No, they didn’t used to be an exclamation mark on typewriters. I’m sure you remember that, right? Right. Had you had to do a period and then a back space and then a apostrophe to get an exclamation mark and that’s my theories. Why they’re overused now because there is an exclamation keith but that’s a little bit of a digression. I suppose. We have just a couple minutes before we take a break let’s from so so the so the staff is doing the systems. I mean, they’re they’re basically they’re supporting the volunteer leadership then is that is that? I have that right. Okay, okay. Now, before we could do the campaign chair, your advice is that there be a pre campaign committee. I don’t want to spend too much time on that, but just like a minute and a half before a break, tell us about the pre campaign committee, okay? Basically, you know, a lot of community non-profits their boards don’t get formed based on fund-raising. And so when i developed the system, i decided that we needed to have a group that was focused right on fund-raising and so generally what you do in the pre campaign committee, you get together, the executive director, maybe past boardmember the current board members, people who are influential, the most influential people in your community that are connected to your organization form that that, uh, campaign committee, because basically it takes influential people to recruit influential people, and so that prepaid campaign campaign committee gets together and identifies, okay, who are? The the top five people that could serve that in our community, that could serve in that role of campaign chairperson. Of course, if you put it, if you put dick cheney on your pre campaign committee, then he’s going to want to be campaign chair. Well, if you’re lucky, there might be somebody on your on your your pre campaign committee who could serve his chair. But especially in the first year, you want to go after the absolutely best person in your community, because that’s going to make your campaign sustainable because you want to do this every year, okay, which way a person. First, it works much better the next year. Okay, we’re going to take a break. We’ll come back and talk more about the campaign pre-tax paint committee leading into the campaign chair. Stay with us, talking alternative radio, twenty four hours a day. Are you stuck in your business or career trying to take your business to the next level, and it keeps hitting a wall? This is sam liebowitz, the conscious consultant. I will help you get to the root cause of your abundance issues and help move you forward in your life. Call me now and let’s. Create the future you dream of. Two, one, two, seven, two, one, eight, one, eight, three, that’s to one to seven to one, eight one eight three. The conscious consultant helping conscious people. Be better business people. 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Why not advertise on talking alternative with very reasonable rates? Interested simply email at info at talking alternative dot com welcome back. We’ve got more live listener love going out to massachusetts, spencer, massachusetts and no handup massachusetts, welcome to the broadcast with rich foster. We’re talking about fiscal sorry we’re talking about campaign volunteers, which fast, you probably want to talk about fiscal sponsorship, do you? I don’t care. You have expertise. Yeah, i don’t even particularly. I’m not looking forward to it, but we are going to want to talk about campaign volunteers on dh were in our pre campaign committee. So the this group of community leaders is assembled to to choose the people who would be good prospects for the campaign chair. Correct. Okay. And you did say if the pre campaign committee should include the the executive director of the charity? Correct. All right. Is that really the only should that be the only staff person employee of the charity? You’re often the development director will also be a part of it. Okay? And then other people who are prominent in the campaign co-branded community in there, in the community. Okay, so what’s their what’s, their process this as they as they narrowed down the prospects that they move toward asking somebody, uh, basically what? They do is the first thing they do is identify probably five people, possible people and then rank them. And basically, i suggest this because, uh, i learned from my mistakes the very first campaign that i was involved with. We we identified the next best person asked that person and they said no, and that happened four times. Yeah, so that’s. A lot of disappointment for a committee of mostly volunteers. That’s, right, that’s, right. Very disconcerting and out. The fifth person said yes and ended up to be a very a very good campaign chair person. So what was the lesson lesson from that? Yes, i learned from that identified five people right away. Rank them and that way, if you if somebody says no, you don’t have to push the panic button. Okay, your committee of volunteers is not disillusioned. That’s, right? They got others to go to. Ok, it’s right on. You have some pretty specific advice about about this process and even the meeting with with the candidates. Yeah, yeah. The the recruiting of volunteers is really, really serious business tonight i have a son who played division one basketball in fact, colgate university and so i got to see first hand the basketball recruiting process, and one of those guys are highly organized, and the same charities have to do the same thing. I have to plan things out very carefully and basically, you have to identify, okay, who’s going to on this pre campaigning committee, who’s the best person to invite the person to a breakfast or lunch where they can be approach who’s the best person to ask them to be the campaign chairperson and in the there’s, a lot of details that you and i have planned out, and you’re doing this for each of your five candidates. Yes, well, you do it for the first one and and then, you know, if you have to go to the second one, you do it, but all planned. I mean, do you even recommend people sort of role, role playing or any kind of mock mock meetings? Teo, talk about you’re going to say this and she’s going to say that, etcetera, i don’t know if you need to do the role playing, but you need to identify who was going to say what you know, so that that, uh, like the reason you involve the executive director is you need to have someone who could describe the non-profit and also who can tell a powerful story about the work of a non-profit and, uh, so you basically need to figure out the roles before you before you set up the meeting, okay? Okay. And at what point should you share the the sort of job description of the campaign chair with the with the prospect? Well, i, uh i would do it verbally during during the meeting and then, uh, attended the meeting just give them the job description, ok? You don’t want to read it during them during the meeting, but you want them to have something to refer to when they’re when they’re considering it. Rich has a model job description for the campaign chair and lots of other helpful resource is we’re going to mention a couple of them, but you’ll find, ah, whole list of them around this topic of campaign volunteers on my on linked in group for the show and also on the show’s facebook page after after the show, those will be posted and rich, who lets see who i should be the person to actually make the ask at the meeting is that should not be the person who’s the the closest to them. Or should it be the executive director? Or how do you decide who actually says we invite you to be our campaign chair? You basically need to ask who is the most influential person in terms of who’s who provoc perspective, campaign chair, person who’s? Who are they most likely say yes to ok. And that’s also the campaign pre campaign committee simply asked that question and hash is without among them and that’s, the person you asked, okay? And around a giving a gift expectation for the campaign chair. Certainly the person’s going to need a campaign they have to give. Correct. What do you like to see in terms of asking what? Telling them what they’re what the charities expectation is around that in an ideal world, they would give the elite gift. Uh, but way lived in an ideal world. You’d be on a much better. Show them this way. So we know that that’s out. Okay, i would be much more fluid. Uh, so you more support thing is influence not with e-giving ability of course you want them to give you want. You prefer to get them to give a major gift they clearly have to give, but they may not be able to give at the league gift level. Okay, uh, but their primary role is to be the chief influence in the campaign. So if they’re involved, you want everyone to say, wow, this is this is an important bilich event or important campaign in our community because this person i see ok, and also they become the person that it’s hard for other people to say no to write that’s, right? Because right, because they’re going to be responsible for recruiting other volunteers and asking people for gift. So say little about that, okay, the, um the campaign chair person will be responsible for recruiting the division chairs and that’s going to vary from community community, uh, in a larger city, you might do it by, you know, geography or, you know, a suburb or by industry that’s sort of part of the planning process. But whatever divisions you come up with, there needs to be a chairperson for that debate division. And, uh, you want your campaign chair person to recruit, recruit them. Okay, right. And you want to make that somebody that it’s hard to say no to that, right? Okay, so let’s spend a little time. By the way, just listeners were talking to rich boss he’s, the author of green light fund-raising we’re talking about the use of volunteers in your campaign rich why don’t you tell people where they can find your book? Green light fund-raising that or okay, green light fund-raising dot org’s let’s talk now, since you’re starting to lead us there. But you’re not taking over the show, which for some some guests get a little presumptuous. Take over the show. You’re not taking over the show. Appreciate it. I’ll follow your lead. You’re in trouble going off a cliff. Thie let’s talk you started brought into a bigger staff of volunteers. What should that? What? It’s? A little more. Besides the division heads. What should this broader volunteer kadre look like? Okay? One of one of the things that the development director needs to do is to develop a gift charges and the gift chart basically says what level of gifts need to be asked for and received in order to achieve. The goal, and then there are are once you have that, you can identify the number of volunteers you do, and i won’t go into all the process. But basically for every gift you need, you need three prospects. Right? Okay. And you want your volunteers to, uh, ask five people for gift. So this is hyre mathematics now. Okay, it’s. Just a matter of each volunteer. No, it’s hyre math for me anyway, so every volunteer as to ask five people that’s, right? Ok. That’s, right. And so well, you can figure based on your gift chart, you can figure out what you need to talk to so many prospects. And are you okay? Tio, meet your goal and you divide that by five. And then, you know, you’re a number of volunteers, okay? And that’s another one of the resource is that we have is that is not in the list of raving. Okay, there’s there’s a, uh an excel spreadsheet that has, ah, gift shark in it. And it also includes the breakdown of volunteers. Okay, excellent. And again, you’ll find those on the linked in group for the show and also the facebook page and then those air links back to teo richie site um, now we like to see volunteers recruiting their own teams isn’t isn’t that right? Yes, rather than having them posed by the staff that’s, right? It’s basically, because, you know, this is all volunteers doing it. They’re going to have to the leaders of the team leaders we’re gonna have to yeah, you know, do some gentle pushing to get things done, and they’re going to be able to do that much better with people that they know their friends. And so you want them, you want to strongly encourage them to recruit people that they know it, and, like and trust that the charity is putting a lot of faith and trust and like into it’s volunteers? I mean, there really are e-giving a lot of responsibility to this to this volunteer. Kadre yeah, yeah, and so, you know, one of the one of the the important roles, but particularly the development director does is is built strong relationships with the campaign leaders so that the campaign league leaders know that they’re going to have the support of the staff, and it really gives them confidence in their work and that kind of flows through the whole campaign. Okay, just the important point that this really is a ah delegation to the volunteers it is it is, yeah, yeah, and part of what happens is that, you know, i emphasized over and over again is you have to tell the stories of your non-profit because these dramatic stories of either wives transformed or also of, uh, the needs of non-profits mitnick is meeting really energizes the volunteers and gives them really meaning and purpose and what they’re doing way have a segment on the next show. My guest is rochelle shoretz and she’s going to talk a lot about storytelling in rain in the second half of next week’s show. Great, because i would really encourage people will listen to that or has, uh, stories are just absolutely essential when working with volunteers, which what is it that you love about? Fund-raising it seems, lives transformed, you know, the i’ve had so many people, you know, talk to me over the years and say things like, man, i can’t do that, you know, that’s begging for me, it’s not begging, you know, i tell people, you know, a panhandler bag. A fundraiser transforms lives. Yes. Give us a story. Give tell a little story about some some life that you’ve seen transformed our lives. Yeah, i was actually influenced in developing this model by doing a capital campaign. And, uh, when i did this capital campaign, i was working for an organization that provides services to people of developmental disabilities. And, um, there were about seventy people that we had living in a nursing home, and we wanted to shut that nursing home down and make it possible for them to live in a small group, homes. And there was one guy, particularly, uh, and, uh, i want to give his name, but i would talk to him. And any time this topic came about pizza, you know me. I like peace and quiet. And he was living in an extremely noisy nursing home, you know? And, uh, i remember we did this campaign. You know, it was a tremendous dahna taking for the organization never dahna campaign before raising one point, two million dollars dahna, uh, community of, you know, seven thousand people. And i went and visited him in his new home. And that was so moving you. Know to see him, you know, getting the peace and quiet and he’s long he probably living this nursing home for twenty years or so, you know, and see his life. How has changed? It was just amazing just by having a quiet environment very touching. Yeah, rich, we have just a minute left. I’m going to hold you to that. But can you tell us what? What lesson? What a lesson that we might all take from the mennonite community around fund-raising of the mineral rights. Uh, not only do fund-raising but they’re also very action oriented. One of their one of our services called mennonite disaster surface and so many knights from all over the u s will go to places where tornadoes go through hurricanes and they’ll clean up. No, they were down in in er not bad. Duitz of louisiana, new orleans, new orleans yeah, you know, helping clean green. And i remember hearing the stories of, you know, incredible work that they did buy the good friend who is on their way. I have to stop their rich shirt rich boss is joining us from rural illinois where he’s, the leader of a mennonite community. He’s, the author of green light, fund-raising, which you’ll find at green light fund-raising dot org’s rich. Thank you so much for being on. Yeah, thankyou. Tony, i really appreciate being here. It’s been my pleasure. Thank you. Now we take a break, and when we return it’s tony’s, take two little more live listener love and then gene and emily on fiscal sponsorships. Talking alternative radio twenty four hours a day. Joined the metaphysical center of new jersey and the association for hyre. Awareness for two exciting events this fall live just minutes from new york city. In pompton plains, new jersey, dr judith orloff will address her bestseller, emotional freedom, and greg brady will discuss his latest book, deep truth living on the edge. Are you ready for twelve twenty one twelve? Save the dates. Judith orloff, october eighteenth and greg brady in november ninth and tenth. For early bird tickets, visit metaphysical center of newjersey dot order or a nj dot net. Are you suffering from aches and pains? Has traditional medicine let you down? Are you tired of taking toxic medications, then come to the double diamond wellness center and learn how our natural methods can help you, too? He’ll call us now at to one to seven to one eight, one eight, three that’s to one to seven to one eight, one eight, three or find us on the web at www dot double diamond wellness dot com. We look forward to serving you. Dafs you’re listening to the talking alternative network. I’m ken berger of charity navigator. And you’re listening to tony martignetti non-profit radio. Big non-profit ideas for the other ninety five percent. Welcome back, we got live listener love going out to laurel, maryland and also malaysia. I don’t know which city in malaysia, but laurel, maryland, malaysia welcome tony’s take to my block this week encourages people to listen to the show you are obviously already past that, so i have the advanced course for you. I want you to know that i continue the conversation from the show in the linked in group last week, i had a follow up question for michael o’brien about civil disobedience, which we didn’t get a chance to talk to talk about in his conversation around grassroots organizing, and this week, as i mentioned, the templates and other resource is from rich foss will be in that linked in group. They’ll also be on the facebook page, so next time you’re on linked in, please check out our group and join also twitter no there’s me and the hashtag, and you can follow me on twitter the hashtag of courses non-profit radio if you want to know who the guests are going to be each week, i send email alerts every thursday on the facebook page. My voice just broke thursday like i’m twelve again, um and you can sign up for those email alerts. I just said that on the facebook page and then you’ll know in advance for the guests are maybe you don’t care. I understand you may just be subscribing and you don’t really care who’s going to be on because you know that the guests are all going to be smart and that the host is in question, but you can always count on good guest. Um, i also won four square. If you want to connect with me on four square, i’ll see where you are in the world and you can see where i hang out. Check me out on foursquare and that is the end of tony’s take two for friday, august twenty fourth, the thirty sixth show of the year we have jean takagi and emily chan gene is the principle of neo, the non-profit exempt organizations law group in san francisco, he edits the popular non-profit law blogged dot com and he’s g tak g ta k on twitter. Emily chan is an attorney at neo-sage she’s, principal contributor to the non-profit law blogged, and she is the american bar association’s two thousand twelve outstanding young non-profit lawyer i don’t know why she’s still on the show. I’m sure she can have certain you could do better than this. Now that you have that appellation, you can follow emily chan on twitter she’s at emily chan, jean and emily welcome back. Hi, tony. Tony. Hello, emily. You’re still on that. You’re still coming on the show. Thank you for that. Everything about you for having me even if you got the prestigious award. Um, let’s. See, we’re talking about fiscal sponsorships. If there was ever if you ever needed evidence that the contributors choose the topics, this would be it fiscal sponsorships. A little little technical, but i’m willing to go into it. What is jean a fiscal sponsorship? Well, i’m gonna try to get a dog in jail. Yeah. Good luck. Were already there. Fiscal sponsorship let’s define this before out and its most common form. It’s. Really a way to start a non-profit project without creating a whole new nonprofit organizations. So basically, what happens? You’ve got a charitable project or an idea that you want to implement. You bring it to a charity willing to serve as the fiscal sponsor on who’s willing to operate that program within the organization so it becomes a negro part of that organization. And you reserve the right by contact. Be able to move the project to another physical sponsor if things don’t work out or you could even move it into your own nonprofit organization that you form once you know that the project is viable. That’s great. Thank you. Okay, you cut out a little bit. There is great incubator, i believe, is what you said, right? That’s okay, so we have the sponsor. Is it the sponsor? And the sponsoring? Is that how we should be referring to these two? Mostly referred to them as a sponsor and the proud sponsor and project. Okay, all right. We’ll keep our terms straight. Okay? And could gene could the could the project be another charity or that that’s? Not that’s, not how it works. Well, the like a smaller charity could be a smaller another charity don’t have to apply for tax exemption. Just actually running a program that you’ve introduced to another charity. And so you’re kind of head of that program. But the program is owned by the other to charity with the caveat that you, khun, take that program and bring it to another charity if the relationship sours in some way. Okay, okay, now, emily, i’m going to guess we would we would only want as a sponsor of our project. Oh, and established charity. Yes, picking the right physical sponsor is a huge part of getting the advantages of a physical sponsorship relationship, as jeanne mentioned. You know, they have a lot of control over the project. They take on a lot of responsibility generally with, like the admin and all the back office things, and they’re also managing the funds that would help fund your project that you definitely want to pick someone or excuse me of charity that has a good reputation in the community has some experience, possibly with physical sponsorship already. So they have the process is in place and one that aligned well with the mission. Otherwise you’re going to run into a certain problems. Sure. Well, and i would imagine a charity wouldn’t wouldn’t take you as a project if there wasn’t mission alignment, hopefully not. And that is a big part for the physical sponsor to be sure that they understand why. They’re taking on certain projects. Sometimes, you know, you’re so eager to want to help a charitable project that you do start to go outside of your own mission without, you know, taking care of your organization. Emerge. That’s risky. Mission creep. Mission creep. Okay, now what? Um what should a charity be looking? Oh, no, wait. I want to want to ask you, emily, you mentioned that the sponsor manages the money, so the money doesn’t belong to the project. It belongs to the sponsor. That’s correct. So entertainment in the typically a project that doesn’t already have tax exempt status, would it really make sense in that situation? So essentially, the physical sponsor is taking in money for the charitable purposes of the project, but that sinful sponsor, in order to not essentially acted like a conduit or to collapse and basically give money teo, non exempt entity. They have to have discretion and control over the funds. So there’s a certain level of oversight that the physical sponsors should be exercising with the project to make sure that it’s no operating properly, that the money being used the right way and that at every juncture, essentially when it does. You use the money to fund a project that is making that decision as opposed to just letting it pass through. Okay. And when you refer to the non exempt entity that’s, the that’s, the project. Right. Okay. Okay, let’s, stay with you, emily. So what’s the advantage for an existing charity cause our clients. Sorry. Our listeners are our charities mostly. And when you guys were first on the very first show that you two were on, we talked about alternatives to creating a new five. Oh, one c three charity. And we just barely touched on this subject. S o we have we have talked about altum other alternatives to creating a charity, but what’s the advantage to an established charity. Emily tbe a fiscal sponsor of projects for the fiscal sponsor it’s really about furthering that sponsored mission. So again, we talked about mission alignment. If you find projects that further, you know, the charitable purpose of your organization, not a huge benefit for the physical sponsor. Additionally, they do take generally a cut of the funds to take care of that back office stuff. I mean, they’re taken care of let’s. Say, you know payroll, you know, their insurance, maybe covering the project. All of these things take some money as well. It’s not really a money maker again. It really should be about furthering the mission. The charitable mission of the existing sponsor. But they do take some money generally in order to cover their cost. Ok. So now, gene, i assume we can just look to the internal revenue code and that will lay out these fiscal sponsorship responsibilities and relationships. Actually, no tony physical sponsor ship is not defined in any laws. I don’t think any state laws and definitely not in the internal revenue code so it’s all about the contract. So we want to make sure that you’re working with an established sponsor who can establish the right contacts to comply under the regular five a onesie, three rules. Holy cow. All right. So eyes. So there must be things that are supposed to be in these contracts. And again, were you know, our listeners are are the charities. So if somebody’s going to take this on this fiscal sponsorship because they do see mission alignment and the things that emily described? What what’s your advice around creating this? Contract if there’s there’s no statutes governing this relationship well, this may sound a little funny, but you’ve got to talk to the lawyers think this arrangement for the does that lawyer have to be the outstanding young lawyer of twenty twelve from the american bar association? You can’t go wrong with that, right? That’s what you absolutely cannot just outstanding and it’s in the title, so we know, but in case you don’t happen to have access to emily, although through the internet there’s no reason anybody shouldn’t be hiring emily, but you’re right, so you definitely this is definitely a legal relationship, and you need a lawyer drafting this contract, right? And to understand your responsibilities as a sponsor, there’s a great book out there from a no attorney colleague of ours, greg colvin called physical sponsorship six ways to do it right. And there’s, a organization called the national network of fiscal sponsors that publishes guidelines for fiscal sponsors and their best practices, including what they put into a physical sponsorship, agreements and policies. Those are definitely things that wanted checked out. Okay, and how does your friend, your colleague, spell his last name? Greg coben, ceo b i n okay. The guru of fiscal okay. Six ways to do it right. But there’s probably dozens of scores of ways to do it wrong. I’m sure in fact we actually put out a block both staying six days to do it wrong. So they definitely are. Did you? Okay, let sze not a copyright infringement. Wait, you do intellectual property work over there in the non-profit exempt organizations law group, not it out you don’t that’s. Very convenient. Okay, so it could very well be a copyright infringement. No, i’m sure it’s not a lawyer now. It’s fair. You some sure or something? I don’t know who does. Okay, so, emily let’s go into a little detail about structures around this sponsor project relationship and just we have about two minutes before first break. So what? What does it look like? Yeah, the structures, there’s models? Yes, there are. There are a handful model that actually comes out of that book that great colden. I wrote that gene mentioned the most popular one is the one that we we’ve been discussing. Model a also called the comprehensive or excuse me. Comprehensive physicals, sponsorship or direct project and it’s, when the charity basically houses the project, okay, in terms of all the management and the insurance and all that, all those things that you laid out, right, so it would be just like any other program it’s operating. Except for that caveat that is a relationship to find my contract. And there is a contemplation that the project may leave at some point. Ok, i don’t model a not a very clever name. I mean, i thought great could come up with something better than model a, but we’ll work with it. He’s the he’s, the guru. So we’ll work within his his, uh, sort of lacklustre. Um, his his, uh what i want to call this this is the, uh uh, i can’t think of the word i’ll think of it later. Okay, um and so all these things that you talked about before these all have to be in the contract, right? In terms of management responsibilities and insurance and oversight and all this it should be. And again, it just helps to lay out exactly what this relationship is going to look like because of the fact that it’s defined by the contract, i mean any pickles sponsorship could look a little different from another one. That is important to contemplate as much as possible at the outset as opposed to finding those problems. When you start trying to do this, ok. And the one that interested me, that gene mentioned a couple times is the right to leave the, uh, leave the, uh the the sponsor. Yeah. So that’s, very important for both the project on the sponsor to understand what terms and conditions might apply for that. So in some cases, maybe this sponsor is going to require that the project finds another five oh, one c three entity to house it. Maybe they’re willing, teo, do some other kind of due diligence to grant those funds that they held for those charitable purposes to the project. These are all things that you really want to think about beforehand. Ok, ok. Rubric. That was the word i was looking for. Model a is a rubric. This all falls under the rubric of model a i do. It was the board would come to me rubric. Of course, we’re going to take a break. And when we return, gene and emily stay with me. And we continue talking about fiscal sponsorships. That’s, another rubric. Com. Hi, this is nancy taito from speaks been radio speaks been radio is an exploration of the world of communication, how it happens in how to make it better, because the quality of your communication has a direct impact on the quality of your life. Tune in monday’s at two pm on talking alternative dot com, where i’ll be interviewing experts from business, academia, the arts and new thought join me mondays at two p m and get all your communications questions answered on speaks been radio. Have you ever considered consulting a road map when you feel you need help getting to your destination when the normal path seems blocked? A little help can come in handy when choosing an alternate route. Your natal chart is a map of your potentials. It addresses relationships, finance, business, health and, above all, creativity. Current planetary cycles can either support or challenge your objectives. I’m montgomery taylor. If you would like to explore the help of a private astrological reading, please contact me at monte at monty taylor dot com let’s monte m o nt y at monty taylor dot com how’s your game want to improve your performance, focus and motivation? Then you need a spire athletic consulting stop, second guessing yourself. Move your game to the next level, bring back the fun of the sport, help your child build confidence and self esteem through sports. Contact dale it, aspire, athletic, insulting for a free fifteen minute power session to get unstuck. Today, your greatest athletic performance is just a phone call away at eight a one six zero four zero two nine four or visit aspire consulting. Dot vp web motivational coaching for athletic excellence aspire to greatness. Hey, all you crazy listeners looking to boost your business, why not advertise on talking alternative with very reasonable rates? Interested simply email at info at talking alternative dot com. Welcome back. We’re talking. Toa jean takagi and emily chan are regular legal contributors about fiscal sponsorship. I want to send live listener love out to little wet british columbia, canada, and i apologize if from mispronouncing it, if it’s in the way or something different than i just said it, i apologize. We got last week, we had ontario in ottawa, where’s, where’s, saskatchewan. Why is saskatchewan in manitoba? Never checked in alberta? Never checked in. We need to get these provinces listening live gene let’s, turn to you and see what else we might flush out about other models around fiscal sponsorship. So since we have the very rich model, eh, there must be a model b. There are the model ate a model at the rubric. Okay, rubrics, the lackluster rubrics. I’m sorry. I’m sorry for your colleague. I’ll stop calling them lackluster. So okay, what does model be matter or or his model? See better than be? Or how does this work? Well, model is by far the most common form. Okay? I was believed to be that in, like, eighty to ninety percent of the cases. The next biggest is model b, which is called a preapproved brandt relationship models this is you cut out a little bit there. This is model season charlie model using bravo baizman bravo is not as popular as sees charlie that’s. Right? So shouldn’t see bebe. It kind of flows from the structure of the i don’t know if we can recommend this book anymore. No obstacle. Ok, tell us about model charlie model charlie is the way that an existing non-profit that still doesn’t have tax exempt status, perhaps it’s a fight to the irs but hasn’t received determination yet. Khun starts to get fun now. The sponsor can act as an intermediary if you will receiving grants intended for the project, but foundations aren’t willing to. That project until it has its own five. Oh, one team status. So it gives it to the fiscal sponsor. The fiscal sponsor re granted to the project. But it has to use its own expression and control in order to make that re grant. The foundation’s put the onus on the fiscal sponsor to do all the due diligence. Okay, emily, how does this differ from model a alfa? I’m in a lot of ways, actually. So going back to model a it’s, the project is not its own entity. It’s really? Just a program, essentially that’s being operated by the fiscal sponsors. So all the employees, all the volunteers, all the liability, it’ll sit with the physical sponsor model. See, you have more separation. So he mentioned that its own entity now the project. Maybe. You know, it’s, just the taxable corporation. It might be in its period right now. Where? It’s, waiting for its five twenty three determination. So a lot of more of the liability from that program that it’s running a charitable project with the entity. The other entity, not the physical sponsor. Okay, so this is it. Shifting the responsibility is different. That’s how? It’s different than a okay, emily, what are some examples of fiscal sponsors like could could’ve come? It is a community foundation of fiscal sponsor or could it be? It could be they’re really as there is no riel limitation on who could be or what type of entity could be a physical sponsor. Generally speaking, you see it more calmly and just five a onesie three entities, because they’re able to get those contributions that can offer a tax deduction to individuals as well as bring in some private foundation grant. So you see it a lot with five eleven three entities, but as far as the mission of those entities or what it is that they’re doing this there’s no limitation on that, okay? And just we have just a minute left. Emily, where do we usually see this conversation begin? Does it does it start with the ceo of the of the sponsor thinking about bringing in projects or just started the board level where i think it actually starts with the project approaching on today’s out there that either have already decided to do it? But i think most commonly, it might start with the project. That is looking for a physical sponsor. Gene could shed somewhere like him and he actually sits on the board of community initiative, which is a physical. Okay, jean, we have just thirty seconds. Do you want to shed some light as emily cast it upon you? Sure, there’s a website called fiscal sponsored directory dot org’s, which is a good place to find a physical sponsor in your area or in your eyes. Area service. So that’s a good face to go to community foundations often engage in sponsorships and sometimes there sponsoring a project that our collaboration amongst many existing non-profit organization okay, we have to leave. I’m sorry, we have to leave it there. But that website again was fiscal sponsored directory dot org’s jean takagi. Principle of neo non-profit exempt organizations law group emily chan and attorney at neo-sage even emily, thank you very much. It’s. Always a pleasure will talk to you next month. And also, of course, want to thank rich fast for being on the show next week. We’re pre recorded because i’ll be on vacation in beautiful block island, rhode island next week. We’ll have. I had a great interview, but i didn’t get the job suzanne felder was with me at fund-raising day this past june. She’s, a consultant in outplacement for lee hecht harrison and she has advice around job search. Then, as i mentioned earlier storytelling with rochelle shoretz, founder and executive director of shark charette, they have built a culture of compassionate storytelling to help their members through their cancer diagnoses and treatments. Rochelle will have really valuable ideas on helping your charity create stories and who’s best to tell them, and she has her own touching story as a two time breast cancer survivor. Come, i want to shut out one more live listener love right here in the studio, indianapolis, indiana in the studio actually, carmel, indiana, to be exact live listener love in the studio, you know that i host a podcast for the chronicle of philanthropy? Did you know that? Did you know i do it’s fund-raising fundamentals? That one is a ten minute monthly podcast and it’s on ly devoted to fund-raising topics i have a summer siri’s going on on grantspace eking the latest is building relationship with foundation program officers, and the first two were researching foundations and writing winning proposals. It’s called fund-raising fundamentals you’ll find on the chronicle of philanthropy website. You’ll also find it on itunes, continuing to wish you good luck. The way performers do around the world last week was chalk us, which means chicken in australia, in slang australian do you remember why they say chicken? You’re gonna have to go back and listen, i don’t have time to tell you today from spain monisha merida, a lot of ship, it comes from the success of a play. People would arrive at shows by carriage and what pulls a carriage, horses and what their horses leave behind shit. So the more of that you have, the better your show is. So i wish you much mierda for the week. Our creative producers claire meyerhoff, with this kind of content it’s hard to believe we have a creative producer, actually. But there is actually is one but she’s not responsible for these language lessons and this performing that comes from janice taylor. So i want to thank janice taylor. Sam liebowitz is today’s line producer shows social media is by regina walton of organic social media and the remote producer of tony martignetti non-profit radio is john federico of the new rules. Oh, how i hope you will be with me next week. One, two, two p, m eastern on talking alternative broadcasting at talking alternative dot com. Durney dahna. I think a good ending. You’re listening to the talking, alternate network, waiting to get anything. Cubine hi, this is nancy taito from speaks been radio speaks been radio is an exploration of the world of communication, how it happens in how to make it better, because the quality of your communication has a direct impact on the quality of your life. Tune in monday’s at two pm on talking alternative dot com, where i’ll be interviewing experts from business, academia, the arts and new thought. Join me mondays at two p m and get all your communications questions answered on speaks. Been radio. Are you stuck in your business or career trying to take your business to the next level and it keeps hitting a wall? This is sam liebowitz, the conscious consultant. I will help you get to the root cause of your abundance issues and help move you forward in your life. Call me now and let’s create the future you dream of. Two, one, two, seven, two, one, eight, one, eight, three that’s two one two seven to one eight one eight three the conscious consultant helping conscious people be better business people. Buy-in you’re listening to talking alternative network at www dot talking alternative dot com, now broadcasting twenty four hours a day. This is tony martignetti athlete named host of tony martignetti non-profit radio big non-profit ideas for the other ninety five percent technology fund-raising compliance, social media, small and medium non-profits have needs in all these areas. My guests are expert in all these areas and mohr. Tony martignetti non-profit radio fridays one to two eastern on talking alternative broadcasting are you concerned about the future of your business for career? Would you like it all to just be better? Well, the way to do that is to better communication. And the best way to do that is training from the team at improving communications. This is larry sharp, host of the ivory tower radio program and director at improving communications. Does your office need better leadership? Customer service sales or maybe better writing are speaking skills? Could they be better at dealing with confrontation conflicts, touchy subjects all are covered here at improving communications. If you’re in the new york city area, stop by one of our public classes or get your human resource is in touch with us. The website is improving communications, dot com that’s improving communications, dot com improve your professional environment. Be more effective, be happier. And make more money. Improving communications. That’s. The answer. Dahna

IRS Filing Prompts Charity Registration Compliance

Last week I used Mary J. Blige’s foundation as an example of a noncompliant charity and opened an explanation of why it’s important to register your charity in each state where it solicits donations.

Here’s a motivation I didn’t mention last week: IRS Form 990.

If you’re required to file Form 990 annually, rather than one of the shorter annual forms like 990-EZ or 990-N (the postcard), then you’re answering questions about whether your charity is complying with state registration laws.

The alternate forms for smaller charities (based on gross receipts and/or total assets) don’t inquire about that.

For 990 filers, take a look at Part VI, question 17. (Use the link above to view the form.) It asks you to, “List the states with which a copy of this Form 990 is required to be filed.” Submitting the form is a basic request in every state registration regimen.

If you’re required to register in a state, you are required to submit the 990. (I speculated last week that not having its 990 ready may be why Ms. Blige’s charity hadn’t kept up with its New York registration.)

Charities required to file Schedule G of the 990 (who’s required?) will have their interest piqued by Part I, question 3: “List all states in which the organization is registered or licensed to solicit contributions or has been notified it is exempt from registration or licensing.”

That’s straightforward reporting of your compliance with state laws.

To blatantly nitpick, there is another possibility beyond registration and notification of exemption. Many states allow you to decide for yourself that you’re exempt. You won’t get notified by those states.

This is all quite interesting. A federal agency’s form asking about your compliance with state laws. Might that information be shared with states? I don’t see evidence that it is now, but I have heard rumblings about greater cooperation between IRS and state charities bureaus.

To round out your 990 thrills, the form is signed under penalty of perjury by an officer. It best be filled out honestly.