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Nonprofit Radio for April 19, 2019: Grit: Succeeding As A Woman In Tech & Great Ideas

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Marisa Lopez, Sara Chieco, Tami Lau & Aparna Kothary: Grit: Succeeding As A Woman In Tech
Our panel takes on the common challenges facing women in tech as they share their own stories and reveal lots of strategies for succeeding in this overwhelmingly male-dominated career. They’re Marisa Lopez, Sara Chieco, Tami Lau & Aparna Kothary. (Recorded at the 2019 Nonprofit Technology Conference.)





Graziella Jackson & Marcy Rye: Great Ideas
Also from 19NTC, we get methods for generating strong—even breakthrough—ideas, everyday, with help on how to choose and implement the best ones. Our panel is Graziella Jackson & Marcy Rye.





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Hello and welcome to Tony martignetti non-profit Radio. Big non-profit ideas for the other ninety five percent. I’m your aptly named host. Oh, I’m glad you’re with me. I’d get slapped with a diagnosis of silicosis if you mentioned the bird brained idea that you missed today’s show grip succeeding as a woman in tech, Our panel takes on the common challenges facing women in tech as they share their own stories and reveal lots of strategies for succeeding in this overwhelmingly male dominated career. They’re Marissa Lopez, Sarah Chico, Tammy Lau and Aparna Kothari that’s recorded at the twenty nineteen non-profit Technology Conference and Great Ideas, also from nineteen ninety Sea. We get methods for generating strong, even breakthrough ideas every day with help on how to choose and implement the best ones. Our panel is God’s piela Jackson and Morsi ry. I’m Tony Steak to thank you. We’re sponsored by pursuing full service fund-raising, data driven and technology enabled Tony dahna slash pursuing by where you see Oppa is guiding you beyond the numbers regular cps dot com by tell us turning credit card processing into your passive revenue stream. Tony dahna slash tony tell us, and by text to give mobile donations made easy Text. NPR to four four four nine nine nine Here is grit succeeding as a woman in Tech. Welcome to Tony martignetti non-profit Radio coverage of nineteen ninety Sea. That’s the non-profit technology Conference coming to you from Portland, Oregon, at the Convention Center. This interview, like all our nineteen ninety si interviews, is brought to you by our partners at Act Blue Free fund-raising Tools to help non-profits make an impact. This topic is grit. Succeeding as a woman in tech panel is all tech leadership. Women beginning with Closer to me is Marissa Lopez. She’s director of account management, presents product group, then. Sarah Chico is director of technology. Social Impact of Presidents Prat Presence Product Group. Tommy Lau is senior self sales force. Energy engineer Tommy Lau is a senior sales force engineer. Social Impact Presents product group and Aparna Qatari is director of technology operations, a global citizen year. Technology. Women Welcome. Thank you. Thank you. Thank you. Technology leadership with women. Welcome. That’s what way women in Texas. They’re succeeding as a woman in tech. This’s not. This is not a panel of lackluster professionals. A panel of successful professionals Important to make the difference makes a distinction. All right, um, let’s talk down the end there. A partner. Thank you for sharing Tammy in a partner. Thank you for sharing Mike’s. The panel is so big, but I didn’t want to exclude anybody, So let’s start with a partner, you know, Give us Give us the headline. Give us the headline in the lead. What is it? What does it take to be, uh, to remain as a successful woman in tech not to get there We’ll get we’LL get to the get there But what does it take to remain st Stay, Stay as successful as you have been I think because you know where you are, right? I think we’Ll probably have slightly different answers with this, but probably with an underlying theme of community and finding a community that you resonate with that you could be comfortable with. One of those communities for us is amplifying. We are working with people with underrepresented voices in tech and so we have in person groups, online groups. But the fact of having a group of people who you can be yourself within share yer challenges with I think something about being an underrepresented voice and tigers when you’re in the workplace. You sometimes don’t want to show that you don’t understand something. Don’t know something are are kind of not faltering but are struggling a little bit. And so it’s been really nice to have a community of people where you can show those struggles, get support, get riel. Resource is without judgment, without judgment, with pretense. So that has to me that has been kind of a game changer. Tammy, would you want to add anything to the community? Sense of the importance of community? Yeah, absolutely. I think I wholeheartedly agree with what partner said. Just finding this community specifically amplified. But other women in tech communities as well has really made my life as a woman in tech so much easier, so much more fulfilling and has really helped me to get to where I am today. Andi organization is amplify. Is that right? Yes, amplify were amplified out, or ge amplified dot org’s okay there. Pointing to Marissa was where assuring the amplify shirt. But everybody doesn’t have the advantage of the video. Yeah, most of our audience is podcast, right? So So what’s that make sure? Amplify. It says amplifying. Yeah, that’s right. We are amplified out. Organs are website in the name of the group. Example. Five. Okay. Okay. Um so, Sara, let’s let’s get you in on the headline. Anything more than community? Uh, probably. I think perseverance and hard work and diligence are are kind of traits that I feel I’ve had to exhibit and had to be strong at in order to succeed and continue succeeding more, though more so than male counterparts, do you feel on the persevere inside, Absolutely absent, really persevering over what persevering over the challenges that come as being a woman in technology, in having managers that don’t understand necessarily how to relate to you or how to speak to you properly, or how to kind of bring out the best in you being having to do that on your own essentially and kind of overlooking, you know, various slights and or obstacles that are put in your way because you’re a woman and not similar to your male counterparts. What are some of those obstacles? Pay disparity, promotion disparity? You know, I was once told, yes, it’s true that you’re better than your male counterparts. And yes, it’s true that they all are making more than you. But it would just be too hard to re calculate the pay scale at this point in time. So we’re just going to leave it as is when this is done. That’s your trouble line. Herbal example. Yeah, too much trouble. It’s just one minor example, but it’s been like that. I have a master’s degree in computer science. I’ve been in Tech since the nineties, and it’s gotten better, but it’s still definitely not all the way better. Okay, because there is a stereotype that people are guys. Yes, guys become computer scientists. Yes, I was a graduate teaching fellow and out of a class of one hundred twenty six students, one was a woman. Reza. Yes. What do you want to say to introduce this? What do you want with the headliner? So what comes to mind for me is the title of the session, and so it’s it’s really what Sarah said around perseverance like to be the word grit, little shorter little fun, more fun and a little more edgy, but really is about the same thing, right? So to be gritty. I mean, if you think about Grigg, you’re thinking about, like, a piece of sand in your eye you’re thinking about, like, you know, biting your tongue. You’re thinking about surviving something they, you know you’d rather just bail out on. I think all of that, really. You know, they’re analogies for the experience of being a woman in technology. Um, some of the common challenges other. Certainly. Sarah listed a couple of poignant and illegal leased. The pain started challenges, Uh, other challenges. Are you willing to open up to any personal I mean, get personal, But what’s happened to you personally as a professional, uh, that I don’t feel comfortable talking about on this radio cast, but I will say that toe piggyback on what they all were saying about community, I think one of the big challenges is also just around being vulnerable and not being able to be vulnerable in the workplace. And that is one of the reasons we need our community. The vulnerability aspect. Yeah. All right. All right. Okay. Anybody wantto respond to what I you know? Like what? What you faced Shuriken in general. So as you mentioned Yes, the stereotype of programmers and developers. Being men is a constant challenge. I’m fighting whenever I’m in a space with other developers. I always have to to feel like I have to prove that I am also a programmer. And over that, yes, I do belong there. Yes, I don’t look like you. Yes, I do indeed. Write code, you know, so that constant mental energy of having to prove myself and altum to convince others I belong, you know? So there’s that that costs to my tio, my energy and my time that there’s that men don’t have to do, don’t have to expend Yeah, partner, I think for me I think a lot about the role of assumptions, both assumptions that are placed on us. But once that we have placed on ourselves just based on how way have been raised in a society as such. And so I think about how we were talking about how your first job out of college, that salary really sets you on a path of, you know, Sal er, promotions and salary raises and how you start off when I think about the wage gap. We’re starting off at a disadvantage for no reason other than our gender perceived gender. And I just get the assumptions role of has really made it made it more challenging, but also made it harder. Tio Excavate what the challenges for? Because it’s so ingrained in my own. Have you, uh have you done your session yet tonight? Coming up. Okay, so now I know a lot of what you’re gonna do is spend time listening to with stories are coming from the audience. Okay. Are you not? Yeah, I thought you were some but we’re also going to talk about our stories. OK? Yeah. We’ll be telling stories. Okay. Uh I guess in more detail. Alright, Thin. You want thirteen thousand strangers to here? Ok, I understand. It’s not a perfectly safe space. It’s time for a break. Pursuant. The art of first impressions. How to combine strategy analytics and creative to captivate new donors and keep them coming back That is there a book on dahna acquisition and how to make a smashing first impression. You’LL find it at the listener landing page which, as always, is that Tony dahna may slash pursuant with the capital P for please let’s do the live love live love goes out. I don’t know where you are because we’re pre recorded, But you’re listening live. And I love that you are. It seems like strips that I love you. I love that year. I hardly know you. I don’t know you at all. So I love that you are listening and the live love goes out. Let’s just Let’s just keep it at that. Let’s not get carried away. And the podcast Pleasantries. Of course. The pleasantries have to come on the heels of the love first love. Then the pleasantries tow our podcast audience. Thank you for listening via podcast pleasantries. So from here we go back to Marissa Lopez, Sarah Chico, Tammy Lau and a partner Kothari. You think I could say all those names? Here they are. We’re not quite halfway, but let’s move to the positive. Okay, Okay. I’m gonna put you on the spot. Although you did say you’re willing, but yeah, I think we’ve We’ve covered the challenge is sufficiently. I think I think the guys there’s a lot more to talk about. Guys, we’re listening, Tio. All right, Go ahead. Teresa. You wanted Teo won’t do one more. Well, I just think. I think the pay in salary is actually really huge and really a big deal and really a really problem. And it it goes deeper than the workplace. I mean, when you’re getting played last year, disadvantage of the world, your children at our disadvantage. Some people are a disadvantage to their partner. I mean, that’s like a huge, huge power issue that women have to deal with. I say I would say myself specifically I was. I kayman attack about a quarter way through my career and I was severely underpaid. I didn’t know that I should be getting paid more. There wasn’t a lot of salary studies out of the time, and I didn’t come from a tech background. I wasn’t part of the network. The good old Boys network for folks know how much people are getting paid so again without that community, that network in that background, I got underpaid for many, many years and I will never be able to make that up, you know, like Aparna said, like you can’t make up for being underpaid early in your career affects your the rest of your life. Yeah, home holds you back and that’s it’s all based on the beginning. All right. You want to Sara? Sure. I can give you an example. So I worked at a start up in San Francisco down your South Park maybe almost twenty years ago. And though it was, you know who’d strap warehouse, whatever. And it was just it was one person who kind of ran the office and the company at operations. And then there were five software engineers and I was the only woman in the company, and I didn’t often open. We didn’t have, You know, anybody who opened the door had kind of an office role. Occasionally I did. Mostly, I didn’t. But whenever I would get up to answer the door, sure enough, the guy who was standing at the door would ask me to get him coffee. Never once did any of my male counterparts get asked to bring coffee too, you know, I mean, it’s just little things like that that happened throughout your career. Kind of perpetually. But I don’t even drink coffee, nor do I know how to make it. So you know, I know I do know how to make it, but I don’t like you drinking? That’s irrelevant to the boy. Almost. Why were you hired in that company? Uh, because I was a good software engineer. So they so they were open. They recognized your your professional talent. But then it was the visitors who ask this now. I don’t know. I’m sorry. These air. Oh, that’s right. You were opening the door of the visitor’s presuming that you’re the office secretary. I’m the secretary, makes the coffee. Women and minorities will deal with micro questions like that every single day. I will tell you every single day in the workplace, and it is very exhausting. And I I think that that is part of the reason that folks with underrepresented voices do not get promoted to leadership is they don’t have the additional band, wants to do all the networking and all the snoozing and all the extra work. Sometimes and all the things. All the things you have to do to move up the ladder because they’re already being overburdened with all these little aggressions. And it is every day still Okay, I see. Let’s let’s let’s talk about let’s talk about overcoming, okay? Overcoming these obstacles and challenges. Um, Tammy Tammy, you have Ah, kick us off the first first tip. I mean, the whole community’s been said so check out, amplify if you’re if you’re among the oppressed. Well, I guess all female. So if you are, if you are the oppressed that we’re talking about, check out, amplify amplify dot or ge is that we are amplified dot org’s okay for under represented folks. Okay. Underrepresented in any in any respect. Okay. In tech. Okay. Exactly. So strategies. Tammy Teacher. So I think I’m going back to the issue I talked about which was the mental energy of explaining yourself. Is that yes. Take the opportunity to explain you know the issues and to explain your story and to try to educate people using the venues that you have, but sometimes just say no. Just walk away and save that energy for another fight. So you don’t have to fight every battle, make it fight. It were accounts, so that’s that’s made him okay. Um go ahead apartment. Have a real simple find a mentor and be a mentor. Yeah, I hear that commonly, for women especially needing to support each other Umm, how about when you’re you’re getting started in your career, is there? Is there anything unique too? To suppose u s o Unlike Sarah, Suppose you are aware that you’re being grossly underpaid. You know who was who was underwear? Who was away? That Morris Resa unaware that you were grossly underpaid. Suppose you are aware. Uh, you go to your boss. Let’s assume that that’s Ah, guy. Worst case scenario. Uh, all the women can be difficult to eye, right? It’s not. It’s not only men, although I’m not gonna let me off the hook. But women can be difficult to women also, let’s assume, let’s assume it’s a male supervisor. You know, you’re being terribly underpaid, but you’re new in your career. Maybe you’re just a year or two out of school, and this has come become aware to you. You become aware of it. Uh, who wants to? What do you What do you think? What? You said you can stay a couple of things so that we could move on. So so once someone else’s dancer. But I would say one thing. First of all, don’t be afraid to go look at a different top if they’re not going to give you a raise at your job. You do not have to stay. If there was a lot of opportunity for smart people up and hardworking people and that is a really thing. And I feel like maybe my generation or maybe who am or maybe who I was raised always like. You have to stick with this and you have to make it work or whatever, but you actually don’t. So that’s one thing. Don’t be afraid to go somewhere else, that sort of do it all the time. Two. I really believe in accomplices and acts in accomplices, meaning like allies that could be male allies that could be other co workers. I could be your friends, but I think it is important to find people that you can trust that can help toe advocate for you. Yeah, and sometimes it’s like Tammy. Wising sometimes is not the fight pick. It’s not the battle Tau Tau battle against, but sometimes someone else can do it for you. And you could either call them in and you could establish that relationship so they could do it. Okay, help from others. Anybody else for the early first couple of years of work, uh, strategies for that For that phase of career. I am pretty far removed from that phase of my career at this point. So why would you remember? Because you were mentoring somebody who right who is in that? Well, I was underpaid when I was in that phase, and I wound up having to have other job offers in hand twice to get raises, because both times they claimed there was not any additional money, which was not true. And then when I, as Marissa said, you have to be willing to look elsewhere. One thing I would recommend not doing is don’t threaten to quit somewhere if you’re not actually really ready to leave and have another good opportunity. That’s possible because I think idle threats are probably not together, completely counterproductive. But so I did actually have other job offers in hand and got matching raises twice and then left when I felt like what I wanted to do. There was done because I was never going to stay in a place that didn’t value my worth. So as a as a you know, I was a director of technology. I managed about ten people now and I always bring people in at what I feel is a is a higher than you. No base salary, because I want people starting off on the right foot. And I want people happy with what they’re making and not feeling like they’re already behind the eight ball to start. You know, a lot of times people kind of like negotiate down with you when you’re doing your initial salary negotiations. And I just don’t believe in doing that. Tammy three of you are with Presidents Product Group, so we may as well disclosed. What? What’s the work of President’s presence? Product group? Sure. So, actually, I was with a non-profit until about six weeks ago. And you’re the only one. You have No one there. Yeah, masking the newest employee. All right, Will you still know? You still know what they do. So what do they do? S o? We build digital products, whether that’s mobile APS o our products on sales force. And specifically our team works with social impact ordered. So non-profits be corporation. Is anybody making a difference in the world building self source products for them? Because you have seen your sales force engineer Yes, you’re correct. Okay. Okay. Uh, all right. Let’s Let’s progress in our career were beyond the first two to three years. Um, for any for any phase of any phase of career. What are apart? You haven’t spoken for a while. What? What is some strategy would give us another strategy for coping overcoming these obstacles. I mean, I think I go back to what I said about being a mentor. I think having a mentor outside of your organisation, but in your industry, because I think often what we do is we tie our salary to ourselves. To our sense, our self worth. Really, this is what we are worth in the work place. This is what we should be paid and that I guess it’s fine. And without having someone to see toe like, understand the industry and understand the work that you’re doing and understand what comparison’s across the industry, I think oftentimes we’re just way are not aware. We’ve convinced ourselves like Oh, yeah, way always justified, right? I’m only fears into my career. This seems like an appropriate salary, because this is what they’ve given me. So I just I think that like building you’re what? I’ve heard someone call like your own board of advisors. We’re kind of your own council of advisers. Teo, give you advice. I think I need to work on that. But I keep keeps coming back to me as a strategy. Okay. And as you said earlier, also, when you are more senior, be willing to be a mentor, seek a mentor and be a mentor. Yeah, All right. We still have lots of time together, right? Go ahead. What else we’re doing? Well, I have something that was really hard for me. That I have learned to do is shamelessly is to toot my own horn. Publicized things on social media linked in I mean linked in this huge, you should be putting updates on lengthen. You should be putting like articles. You should be putting events. You’re going, Tio, that is actually really important. And I always thought that it was more like the work that I am doing for this company and if I am doing my job really well, but actually, publicizing that, especially in this day and age, is actually really important in whatever your networks are. So I think that is a piece of advice that applies to any stage of the A career, but particularly mid career and think it’s easy to get lost in the actual have your head down and focus on what you’re doing. But you need to talk about it and you need to get up in person and you need to write block post and nobody really has time for that. But it actually makes a huge difference. The quality, not just what you’re making or the opportunities, but actually the quality of your career experience used on DH. Your point about Lincoln well taken before that, you said tooting your own horn. Well, how do you do that? You go into your How do you do that with your with your boss with like like, Quarterly? Is that you? You, uh, do you rely on the annual or the semi annual performance review to do that? Or there are other times you’re doing it? Yes, so that proactively, that’s a fair question, I think for me personally, the closer I am with someone, the harder it is. Tio toot, my own horn, so to speak. It’s easier to do it more publicly in generically, but I think that I need to do that a lot more, and it just comes down to communication. You win a big deal. You have a great conversation with a client. You call him, you text them, you slack them. You sent him an email, whatever kind of way you mentioned it during a sales meeting, you mentioned it. Turn whatever meeting you’re having being vocal and meetings again. An area that I need to work on and sayings what’s going on. Hey, I had this great day or even I met this great connection that would be really beneficial to our company. Whatever it is, that’s positive talking about it, you know, not holding it in latto things. Nobody knows unless you say it. This is the This is the great panel. And a couple of you have already said I need to be better at this, you know? But it’s hard. It’s hard to actually take the take the steps on. And it’s you know, it’s probably exhausting, too, starting at a disadvantage, but But you’re the great panel and and you’re even saying you know, I need to be I need to be better at this for myself. But consciousnesses know that women are very self critical of themselves. Yeah, that’s true. Wasting no more time. I’m, uh Are there other subjects you’re going to cover that weren’t Maybe we’re not in your session description, which is what I got my notes from. I saw the common challenges. I know we did that personal challenges from the audiences and talk about your own and then strategies for overcoming obstacles. Is there more that you’re doing? Don’t hold back on non-profit radio listeners. Well, like we’re saying, I think we’re going to dive a little bit deeper into our story. So I think everybody here has a really interesting story of how they got to this point. Three of the four of us started off in the nonprofit sector. Part is still in the nonprofit sector. Tammy just crossed over to the dark side. Um, Tammy also comes from an environmental background. I come from a background in conservation. So Sarah’s actually the only one on this panel that came from a real computer science background. Yet we’re all in technology, so I think there’s some interesting points within that. Okay. Yeah. You want to flush some of them out there. Go ahead. Yeah. So I will say, coming from a non-profit background. And we’ve talked about this amongst ourselves again. Sort of the culture of tech. Just so you have glitter eye shadow. That’s right. Just your glasses. Where I didn’t notice it. Even though you’re sitting there like it, it’s Ah, striking. Yeah, Thank you. I just I only because I was lifting up until now. Your eyeglasses covering here? Well, they just write out the eye shadow. Yeah, you could show it off your for those who don’t have the benefit of video, they’re not going to see that. So Marissa has Yes, literally. I’ve been dreamforce twelve or thirteen times. I actually don’t know. In Dream Force is the global sales worth extravaganza, right? And so, you know, like maybe eleven, twelve years into it. You kind of have to like, you really, really have to have fun with it or else you are not happy. So I was going to just bring the glitter for the evenings out, but I figured I could just wear it anywhere. And then I just realized I could wear it to other conferences to nobody here knows me and knows whether I worked litter all the time aren’t hot. All right, So you were flushing something out? Yeah, the difference backgrounds that you bring to today. So I brought you to non-profit, Released lives or culminating this moment Don’t radio. That’s right. And so I would say that like for younger generations So it might not be applicable if you’re a millennial or if your generation z but for my generation sales lorts and exist. When I went to college, the Internet barely existed. I definitely didn’t use a window in high school. You know, a lot of this stuff is new, and so there’s this term of accidental techie that folks like to take on, but I actually think that that term should not be used right. And folks like myself that come from the non-profit backgrounds are usedto lower pays and usedto working for the mission rather than for the money. I also have this. This might applied to folks that are listening to non-profit radio like inclination that once you go into the tech space, you still have to stay at the non-profit salaries. You’re still working for a mission. And so I think that and the culture is frankly grittier. Once you get into the space and I would say it sze rougher. It’s more fast paced. It’s more masculine. And from my experience, then the non-profit fate space, which is often more feminine and so that cultural change for me was really challenging. And I think it can be for a lot of people. And I think it’s also very normal to cross over from one sector into tech because so many people are working attacked. There’s so much need for that. And there’s need for folks intact and people getting poached in to check all of the time. So there is this transitional, a thing that can happen that some of us have experience that can be fairly challenging. Yeah, and Tio Tio, I think, as someone without a tech background who’s now a tech, and this happens to some extent to everybody. But that feeling imposter syndrome can be much stronger when you don’t have a tech background and you’re surrounded by other people who you feel like, Oh my God, Everyone knows what they’re doing. I don’t know what I’m doing. I’m a fraud. I shouldn’t be here that could just make it really hard coming from a different background into the space and then being underrepresented person on top of that. So I got to imagine that in any phase of our life we imitate and sort of we look at other people where social people are social, right by nature. And so when you look up and you see that only three percent of the CEOs in the tech space or Latino you assume that you don’t belong in leadership. It’s just a natural human assumption. So there’s a very big disparity and leadership that we’re also dealing with here. OK, we’ve got about a minute or so left. Uh, Sarah, a partner. You haven’t spoken most recently. Uh, somebody want toe, give us sort of a wrap up and optimism. Uh, either one of you. I tell you what. A partner. You I let you open. I should session say, like you opened. I asked youto open. I did ask you, uh, Sarah, do you feel comfortable with Cem Porting words, Some parting words? Yeah, I think that, you know, it’s I mean, it may sound cheesy, but, you know, you should do what you are drawn to do and what makes you feel good doing it. And if that’s being in technology, whether you’re under represented or not, you know, go forth and be strong and doing it. Look to your mentors. Look to your community. Don’t be afraid. Women. A lot of times they’re really afraid to ask for help because they feel like it makes them seem weak. Do not be afraid to ask for help. You know, ask for help along the way. It’s actually it’s a really great trait to be able to do that, and I think it’s also well respected. So I would say, You know, go forth. Don’t be put off by the fact that it is more difficult. This is the great panel. We gotta leave it. There they are. Marissa Lopez, director of account management at Presence Product Group. Sarah Chico, director of technology Social Impact Presents Product group. Tommy Lau, Senior Sales Force Engineers, Social Impact Presents Product Group and Aparna Kothari, director of technology operations at Global Citizen year. Thank you very much of each of you. Thanks for telling so much. This is Tony martignetti non-profit radio coverage of the nineteen twenty nineteen non non-profit technology conference, and this is brought to you by our partners and act blue Free fund-raising Tools to help non-profits Macon Impact Thanks so much for being with us. We need to take a break. Wagner, CPS. They’ve got a free webinar It was on April sixteenth. That was a few days ago, but you watch the archive. Of course, it’s tips and tricks for your nine ninety. The best part. You’ve heard me say it. Using your nine ninety as a PR tool is a marketing promotion tool. So many people are reading it because it’s so widely available. Ubiquitous. You might say that you may as well not just satisfy the I. R. S because they don’t care what your right and how you used these sections. As long as the numbers all add up, uh, use it as a marketing tool because it’s so widely read by potential donors. Watch the archive of the Webinar Goto wagner cps dot com click seminars. I wish you could click webinars, but you can’t quick seminars. Then go to April. Now, Time for Tony. Take two. Thank you. Um, thanks. Thanks for listening. Thanks for supporting non-profit Radio however you do if you are subscribed on YouTube. Thank you very much. Twitter. Following their joining there, I’d like to say I don’t really like to turn followers some messiah. Uh, no. You’re joined me. You joined me on Twitter. Thank you for doing that. You’re an insider. You get the insider alerts. You got the access to the insider videos. Thank you for doing that. Whatever you do. Uh, what else? Facebook. Oh, yeah. Facebook were still there? A cz disenchanted as I often am with Facebook. Yes. Were there along with four billion other people. So, uh, thank you. Your your fan on Facebook. Thanks for doing that. You shared non-profit radio you shared with your colleagues to share it with your board. Thanks for doing that. Whatever you do. Thank you. Thank you for being with non-profit radio. Now let’s go to our panel for great ideas. Welcome to Tony martignetti non-profit radio coverage of nineteen. Auntie Si. You know what that is? It’s the twenty nineteen non-profit technology Conference. We’re kicking off our coverage right now. This is our first interview of many, many thirty seven to be exact on DH this interview, like all of ours. At nineteen. NTC is brought to you by our partners at Act Blue Free fund-raising Tools to help non-profits make an impact. Kicking off with me, our gods piela Jackson seated next to me. She’s CEO of Echo and Company and Marcy Ride. Marcy is founder and principal of wire media Ladies. Welcome. Thank you. Pleasure. What chorus? Eleven. And your topic is staying sharp. How to create an implement. Great ideas. Yes. Okay, uh, let’s start at the end. More. See? What? What do you feel like? Non-profits could do better around, I guess. Problem solving and idea eating. I think one thing that’s important is getting everyone involved in the whole process on DH have it not necessarily coming top down, but getting all kinds of input coming in. Okay, Stay close to you. Might remember. Stay close to me. Okay? Andi, I’m sure you know, subsumed in that is getting the right people involved. Yes. Identify who they are. Okay, uh, got piela anything. You want to kick us off? Yeah. I think when we’ve been working on projects where innovation is the core of the project, a lot of times, what we encounter is that culture is a barrier to being able to drive innovation forward. And a part of that is because non-profits in particular, have cultures where there’s scarce. Resource is, there’s not a lot of time. A lot of the staff is very overworked. And so the idea of getting together and creating space actually create and innovate is very scary. Because if you don’t get the right answer first, then you might actually exhaust all your resource is you might actually not be able to go on to the next idea. Everybody’s tired of the process And okay, so we’re gonna talk about culture now. This was originally presented at the Harvard University Digital Innovation Academy. Wass by the two of you Just bite me first. Are you okay? In the true spirit of ideas, this is a pilot. Yes, awesome. And also, in the true spirit of Tony martignetti non-profit radio, which is big non-profit ideas for the other ninety five percent. So if you want the ideas that emanated from Harvard metoo listening to non-profit radio and here’s the proof. All right, um, you, uh let’s take what you’ve got you what you want to encourage strong, strong ideas like every day. This is not just for your strategic plan or something like that. This is every day, pre idea creation. So how do we start to make this culture shift? Thinking about breakthrough ideas every single day? Yeah, yeah, I think the most important thing is that ideas don’t come from a predetermined spaces or predetermined settings. So a lot of times, what you need first in order to come up with new ideas, is a spirit of play in a spirit of spontaneity and often times when we’re in meetings, we have laptops were sitting around a table. Everybody’s in a setting where they’re afraid of being the one, not saying the right thing. And there isn’t a spirit of embracing mistakes. And it’s embracing attempts as much as you have embraced successes. But we really need to shift your setting, whether that’s being up on your feet, it’s changing. The environment is going outside, and you really need to bring in a spirit of play and equal contribution to the table in order to just even start. Okay, this all sounds sounds very good, but how do we convinced our CEO that playtime is eyes really question that playtime is appropriate for our idea. Generation? Yeah, it has to be structured and has to be intentionally set to a goal. So normally, when you’re creating this environment, what you’re trying to do is separate the creation of ideas from the refinement of ideas and picking the one that actually can go forward with limited resource is budget and people. And when you actually see ideas constrained and started inside of organizations that they haven’t done enough prep work, enough research to actually ground the session, you’re going to be having an ideation. And then you’ve also tried to create ideas and edit ideas at the same time, which ends up with too much dress. So, Marcie, I mean, when I was in college, I learned this as brainstorming right on DH the first, the first step in brainstorming was nothing was disallowed. Everything ridiculous. Wild but insane was was not labeled as such. It was written on the board. Is that is that an outdated, uh, brainstorming dead? Now, Marcie, you were just calling it a breakthrough idea generation or what? I think the idea of brainstorming in a group is may be dead and time to move past it. I know that we’ve had some success where people are are individually coming up with ideas. And then they worked together as a group to organize and come to consensus on them. And that works pretty effectively. Okay, okay, yeah, yeah. One thing, too, is a brainstorming in the method a lot of people use. It really don’t doesn’t allow people of different types of thinking and different learning styles actually contribute equally. Why’s that? Oftentimes it’s a group of people, and there are questions put out to the room. And then there’s a sort of ad hoc responses to questions. But a lot of people don’t answer well. They need to take time to reflect. They need to have structured activities, to think, to frame their thoughts and then be able to contribute it back to the group. So what end of happening is people who are really good at responding quickly, who are more extroverted and who are better at thinking out loud, dominate the setting and the people who are actually more cautious and they’re thinking and reasoned. And maybe it’s quieter. Researchers don’t have space, but often times have the best ideas, okay, and so you really have to structure your setting. So how do we do? Martin? Marcie, can you start? Give us some tips. How do we structure this to empower everyone equally? I mean, there’s there’s different ways to do it The way loud on non-profit radio when I was what I was thinking of earlier and sort of referring to earlier is something that we do with branding. Exercise is where it’s pretty simple, but everyone has time to write down their ideas on sticky notes. For example, if they’re trying to figure out, you know, how do they come to consensus on what the personality of the brand should be like? And so they have time on their own to come up with ideas in their own way, and then they and the next phase is they get together as a group, and they work together to figure out how to organize these ideas into categories and which categories are the most important and in the process of doing it, they have conversations about why they’re making those decisions, and it’s really effective in getting to consensus with the whole group that includes often like the CEOs down to the the marketing assistant. Some of the audience. Sometimes it works really well. Okay, um, stick with you, Marcy. Had you mentioned the CEO? How do we get our CEO onboard with this is culture change. What would you say? Way? Tell listeners to say what one of my favorite sort of go twos is. There’s a psychologist called me. Holly Chick sent me. I and don’t ask me to spell it, but he way, having asked you to say it a second time, he came up with the concept that’s called Flow. And it’s the idea of being so fully engaged in something that time passes freely. You don’t notice the passage of time on DH, you do it very. You do your activity very well because you’re completely engaged in in the moment on DH. Then there’s information. There’s data somewhere that shows that you could be more effective. When you’re in a state of float, you get more done. You do better work. All right. What if our CEO says sounds very metaphysical, but how are we going? Toe You wanted me to give you want You want me to get our team into a flow. What do I need to do? What we need to do? Well, I think that’s what God Cielo was recovering Teo earlier about having a structured format that gets them there, and that puts them in the moment. Okay, if you can also drive if you can drive that conversation towards operational efficiencies. So what actually happens when you make this culture shift is teams are happier. They feel more productive. They’ve created space to come up with better ideas. They also embed research into the process that we didn’t really talk about. How you prime yourself for the session before you start. But the idea is to go out to your audience, understand the mission, understand the people you’re serving, actually get input from them so staff can be representative representatives of the end constituent in the room. What actually happens is staff tends to get way more re engaged in the purpose of the organization and the mission, and, uh, and then they start putting in more qualitative hours during the workday. So it’s not showing up in just doing the usual work, which is very important. It’s creating space to do work better and being really connected to how you actually scale the mission a little bit more and you can actually map it. Tio outcomes that looked like revenue looks like costs. It looks like decreased costs and recruiting staff and keeping staff. It looks like decreasing the amount of time that is spent to get better ideas. And then it’s actually having a spirit of trying a lot of things. Picking the best ones, replicating them, maturing them and turning them into programs so the organization itself can grow in a non haphazard way can grow very intentionally around the efforts. All right, I got to take a break. Tell us the passive revenue stream. You want fifty percent of the fee. When cos you refer process their credit and debit card transactions with Tell us and all that fifty percent of those tiny fees it adds up. That’s the long tail of passive revenue. You don’t work for it. That’s passive. Get passive right passivity. The passivity of the revenue. The Explainer video is that Tony dahna slash Tony Tell us, watch it, then have the company’s watch it, then make your ask. Would they switch to tell us and then tell us we’LL we’LL work with them, right? You go to Tony dahna slash Tony Tell us now Back to Gutsy Ella Jackson and Marcy Ry Way. If we’ve made the case on DH, we’ve we’ve had our first. This’s not just like a single session. It doesn’t sound like you know, you said some people function very well in one hour setting. They think rapidly, and other people need Teo. Be more considerate. So we’re talking about something that’s not just a one, a one off ideation session, and then we moved to the next step or something. You know, we start going down. It’s a longer term. Yeah, Usually the cycle is a research and prepare. Then idee eight. Then concept test concepts figure out which ones are the best. Replicate those and then a couple times, and then the ones that prove themselves than mature them and continuously start that cycle over again. That can be a sprint in a matter of two weeks. Or it could be a longer term programme in a matter of months or a year just depends on the complexity of the problem that you’re trying to solve. Okay, and then eventually the goal is that this becomes very natural. And so that that then you are doing this in every day, decision making. But it’s happening obviously more, more rapidly. We can spend two weeks on every decision. Yeah, and then the other thing that is very beneficial for a leader is a part of the process. Is teaching staff to learn how to pitch their best ideas to leadership in a way that leadership can then go pitch that to board members and thunders and things like that. And so you actually want at the end of it, you want to go knothole process so you can prove your pilot. You can pitch it to the executives, they could go pitch it to the board, and it’s founded in research. So when the board is arguing about the marriage of that or questioning the merits of that, they’re arguing with numbers and evidence and not with people and ideas. So you do want to push out of the ideas phase into evidence, but the process allows you to do that better. Okay? What brought you to this work? Initially? A good question. It only took me twenty twelve minutes e-giving dancing question out. I’LL try harder next time. It’s marrieds are getting So I started in journalism when newspapers were falling apart. Somebody said, Who wants to learn? HTML and I did, and I ended up in technology. But I ended up in technology doing big Web strategy for organizations that had thousands of people, lots of micro sites. They kind of had homegrown technologies. Everybody had their own budget. All of the technologies were decentralized, and people were had an appetite to consolidate all of that. And I started in organizations trying to do it from a Strat from a consulting perspective. And it didn’t work because you have so much change embedded in the process that if you don’t do the work to get people excited about process and excited about the ideas, they’re not going to be able to understand or commit to the amount of change that you’re asking them to go through. And so I just got really excited in that I studied design thinking, which, uh, it’s a It’s a way of solving unknown problems, using a lot of co design with people who are going to be the end beneficiaries of the solution and it’s actually built on improv. So the the for the, um, the art form of improv has a central concept. And yes, and exactly why do I have done in problem taking improv classes? And I use it in my stand up comedy? Yes. And you surrender or fishes? Yeah. Alright. And so it was just and I’m involved. I’m on the board of Washington Improv Theater in D. C. I’m very close to that work. And I could mind at UCB Upright Citizens. Yeah, And in these working Alan Alda actually created a organization. I think it’s called the Center for Compassionate Communication. We goes into mostly scientific organizations, teaches them improv and completely sort of read, helps them re imagine the way they communicate with each other and the way they communicate externally. Kruckel mostly. What drew you to this work? What drew me to it? Yeah, it’s kind of the opposite track. I guess I started working more with smaller organizations that had few numbers of people that needed to do a lot with a little on DH. So it was starting to think about how can we get there pretty quickly and then, you know, my background is more designed, technology oriented. So I kayman things from that perspective and started seeing that some. You know, some of the problems pretzel is talking about where change management issues on the on their staffing side and how their processes were creating problems for the project we were doing. And that got me interested in trying to fix it. Yeah. Okay. And so you apply this for your clients? A wider media, Okay? No, the ones that are willing, the ones that are willing. Okay. Okay, um see, choosing implement. So let’s talk about choice now choosing, choosing the options that we’re goingto way. Just choose one. First of all, we’re really choosing one of the many or we’re choosing half a dozen. How do you know who knows best this? I mean, that’s where I think pitching, pitching it is important and making a case for who is going to serve, what the outcome is going to be and why the commitment of resource is worth the eyes worth the investment. And so I can I think it just depends on the problem you’re solving and whether or not you want to try different things in different context to be able to compare them. There’s a lot of different types of research that you can do in our field. We kind of break it down before the first one is explorations. If you’re just trying to explore a concept, you do kind of many things that you, Khun, see how people would solve problems in their own world in their own words. And then the second one is, once you’re kind of headed in a direction, you do assessment testing, and that’s kind of figure out. You come up with a concept, and how close did you get it actually solving things the way that they that someone might want it to be solved, and then it just gets more formal from there. Once you have a finished design, you test that once it’s live and in production, you test that. So it really depends when you’re in this exploration phase. You wantto do the right amount of exploration to hit the appropriate audiences. We always do and use their definition first. It’s like there’s no point in doing anything unless we design for the people who are going to be using it, and that could be fifty different types of audience groups that could be too. And so that kind of dictates the how much work you do in that, um, who can give me Marcie, Can you give me some examples of problems that were that you’ve seen your client’s solve using this method? What types of decisions are we talking about? Well, I mentioned earlier, like coming up with branding characteristics for a new brand or something. Another one might be So something we’re working on now actually is women organization has lots of different kinds of information that they want to share with the world. And they want to put that on a website or some kind of application. How do you structure that? So that the people that need that information can quickly and easily find what they need, you know, and you couldn’t think of a million different ways to organize data or content like that. But doing the right kinds of testing at the right time really helps you with the audience focus, right? Really helps you make sure that you know the person who needs the particular piece of information gets it quickly and easily. Yeah. Um, you said in your session description that the best ideas are often undiscovered. Why why is that? Is that because, Well, you explain me. What? Why why do you say that? Um, well, we see it in different ways in different organizations. But my my general sends is that the people who carry some of the best ideas because they were the closest to the people that are being served aren’t in the room. When ideas are being created on and you don’t you don’t necessarily know by instinct. Who in your organization has the best ideas? I think the best thing you can do is an executive is go ask around for who kind of is the most pioneering who’s willing to drive things forward, who’s really good at people and marshaling resources towards a common end who’s really good at just guarding that. The innovation aligns to the mission. You have to have all the four types of those people to be able to get to a good idea, and oftentimes you’re just leaning on leaders to come up with a Biggins up inspiring idea or your leading on on leaning on staff or overworked a busy and they don’t have time. We use a formula where we kind of look at the amount of time that staff members are spending on different types of ideas. There’s bread and butter ideas that’s like your daily to do list. I always say that that’s like a goldfish. It’Ll grow to the size of the pond, so if you have a million hours, your to do list will grow to a million hours. The second type is building boost ideas, and so it’s creating a little bit of space to do something that requires a little more coordination, a little more effort. And from that, you often times can get what the third category is, which is breakthrough ideas. And that’s like big ideas. You spend a lot of time developing and nurturing, and most organizations are just stuck in bread and butter. And so there’s not enough intentional time carved out for the other two types. Time for our last break text to give Diversify your revenue by adding mobile giving. It’s not on ly for disasters. It’s not only for small dollar. Donations is not only through the phone company lots of misconceptions. You can allay those you can. That’s the Lei is more for fears. You can slay those misconceptions you can. Ah, eliminate. Seems kind of easy, but you can’t eliminate the misconceptions. You do that by texting NPR November Papa Romeo to four, four, four, nine, nine, nine Just do it and the misconceptions will die. We’ve got several more minutes for great ideas with Nazi Ella Jackson and Marcie Ross marchenese doing doing a lot of nada. Anything you want to add. What? I mean she’s right. Yeah, yeah, yeah. Okay, Information. Affirmation is a part of the process where it fits in rewarding people for being courageous and putting an idea out there that they’re hesitant about because the bad ones are as good as the good ones. The bad ones prime you for a better one. So it’s funny. I spoke on a panel two high school girls in stem on Monday before I came here, and they asked us a question. What will we go back and tell ourselves in high school? And mine was Don’t measure your don’t measure yourself to the success. Measure yourself to the attempts because we’re hardwired to learn from mistakes and failure, and sometimes we just get obsessed with what success looks like. But it’s better for us to try a lot of things and write things. And eventually we’LL we’LL hit a couple that are really good. I should have asked you, Is there a client story or two you want to share? Yeah, I’LL try to share one short red quickly So way work with organization in Washington, D. C. Called the Newseum. They’re pretty well know. Yeah, so they focus on their mission is to advance media literacy and education about our First Amendment freedoms. And years ago in twenty fifteen, they indigenous to just kind of redesign. A very simple website had about ten lesson plans and some PDS and some videos and way got in there with them. We did some ideas, ideas, princessa sessions, and we asked them why what teachers were looking for. And teachers were really preoccupied with not being able to teach current events in the classroom with curriculum that helped him deal with sensitive subjects and then with the materials to help them teach it. And so we started doing a ton of exploration, and we realize that the museum was sitting on this goldmine of thousands of artifacts that had to do with historical references to politics and media and also contemporary references. And when we went to talk to teachers, we realized that we needed to not redesign the thing that we were hired to redesign. We needed to create a completely new platform that was one hundred percent dedicated. Teo serving media literacy curriculum teachers in the classroom. So they making all these resources available to them for free indexing. Okay, Yeah. Driving. Yeah. So we pause that project way. We created a platform and a brand. So before they were just a department and then they were the Newseum. Ed, Uh, they ended up getting a major funder commitment for five years to be able to build this platform that’s still growing. And they went from eight hundred users to one hundred thousand users in about three years. How did the breakthrough process contribute to that exponential growth in usually So there was like a very cinematic moment where I walked down a hallway with something on a sticky note. It was like we need to do this, and honestly, they have. They had a vice president of education, and I think she was a director at the time. She is exceptional at pitching ideas and leading her team. And she took that idea on the sticky note. I think, to the CEO of the Newseum and said, We need to do this This is central to our mission. If we don’t do this, somebody else will do it. We’re going to miss the opportunity. I will lead it protects her effort into it. I will find my own funding for it. I just need your support. I need to be at the executive table to have conversations about this. I need to be ableto talk to the board and understand their support in this. And they did. That kind of shifted the department. She ended up sitting thie executive on the executive team and she really did. She was a visionary and she drove it forward, including this decision making process. Yeah, including this decision making process. So we launched a like what we kind of call the beta of that platform and twenty fifteen didn’t have enough resource is and we knew that we were to achieve what we needed to We needed a road map. We wrote that so she could go get funding. And then we actually relaunched it this year, a major version release again with a lot more committed funding. And so it’s it’s growing from there. I hope it around for a very long time. Um, Marcy, how can we be sure that the idea that is going to be implemented remains intact through this through this? I don’t wanna call a tortuous process, but through this through this process, like, how do you ensure that you stay true to the idea that with the solution that was chosen through implementation, I think that comes down, Teo, the idea of having a structure and a specific process that you go through and you stick to it and you don’t let you know random outside ideas come in and derail that you stick to the formula that you’ve decided to use from the start. Um, we still have another, like, two minutes or so together. What, uh, what more can you say about you? Have a ninety minute. How long of the sessions on our or ninety minutes? Fifteen. Okay. Somewhere in the middle. So you got You got seventy five minutes on this topic. What? What can we say for another couple minutes? Yes. Oh, I am going to be fun. Yeah, so? So majority of the session is going to be a game, and I feel like that’s really important because you have to be able to bring a spirit of play and fun into it. Okay? And it’s going to be a man activity that helps you figure out you have a listener’s listeners can’t be on the game. Okay, so what else can we talk about this topic that listeners can benefit from? So it’s based on a model where there are four types of ideas and you can think of it as a ladder and you have to run your idea of the ladder. And the first question is, Is it useful? Is your idea useful is something that you can move forward If it if it’s yes, then you go to the second question. And that is, uh, is it rare? Is it valuable or is it rare? And then, if you get it, if it’s no, you’re you’re filtering out your ideas. If you get a yes on the next is is it difficult or costly to replicate? Can you only do it because there’s something about you and your resource is where you can achieve it. And if you get yes, you go to the last one. Which is is it designed for lasting value? And those air Four questions you can ask about every single idea. And what you’re trying to do is weed out the ones that don’t hit all four questions. Yeah, would you say Yeah. Yeah. And then the ideas, Teo, the idea is to present your idea to Piers or to other people involved and get their input on whether or not you’re asking them those questions. You’re not asking it of yourself. You’re asking the other people you’re working with. You’re asking this team right in each of these four questions. Okay? Yeah. And then what? Do you have a minute or so That what happens if multiple ideas? Well, then do. Then you start to co implement, right? Yeah. Move them all through the process. Yeah. Here, you pick one that seems to have the most merit. You’re going forward with that one? Yeah. It is kind of like the U size, the decision to the organization, But I think just going through that exercise will get you either a stack of all those really lasting value ideas or not. Okay, well, don’t leave it there. Thank you very much for naming my pleasure. They are gods piela Jackson, CEO of echoing company on Marcy RAI, founder and principal of Wire Media. You’re listening to Tony martignetti non-profit radio coverage of nineteen ninety seethe uh twenty nineteen non-profit Technology conference in Portland, Oregon, on this interview Like all our nineteen ninety seon reviews brought to you by our partners at Act Blue Free fund-raising tools to help non-profits make an impact. Thanks so much for being with us next week. Maria Semple returns. If you missed any part of today’s show, I beseech you find it on tony. Martignetti dot com were sponsored by pursuing online tools for small and midsize non-profits, Data driven and technology enabled Tony dahna slash pursuant capital P by Wagner’s Deepa is guiding you beyond the numbers. Gregor cps dot com by tell us credit card in payment processing your passive revenue stream tourney dahna slash tony tell us and by text to give mobile donations made easy text NPR to four four four nine nine nine our creative producers. Claire Meyerhoff. Sam Liebowitz is the line producer. Shows Social Media is by Susan Chavez. Mark Silverman is our Web guy, and this music is by Scots. Dine with me next week for non-profit radio. Big non-profit Ideas for the other ninety five percent Go out and be great lorts You’re listening to the Talking Alternate network e-giving Wait, you’re listening to the Talking Alternative Network? Are you stuck in a rut? Negative thoughts, feelings and conversations got you down. Hi, I’m nor in Sumpter potentially ater. Tune in every Tuesday at nine to ten p. M. Eastern time and listen for new ideas on my show yawned potential Live life your way on talk radio dot N Y c Hey, all you crazy listeners looking to boost your business. 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Nonprofit Radio for January 4, 2019: Stay Secure In 2019

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Oppcoll. Hello and welcome to Tony Martignetti Non-profit Radio Big Non-profit ideas for the other ninety five percent. I’m your aptly named host. Happy New Year. Welcome. Welcome to Non-profit radio two point zero one nine. Whatever the hell that means. Welcome to the new Year. Oh, I’m glad you’re with me. I’d suffer the embarrassment of Pem Fergus Arithmetic. Assis, If you made me face the idea that you missed today’s show, stay secure in twenty nineteen. Let’s resolve to keep our technology and data safe in the new year. Jordan McCarthy will help. He’s with tech impact. And he’s got simple, proactive measures for the short term as well as bigger long term initiatives. For your consideration, stay safe on Tony’s Take two Time to be an insider. We’re sponsored by pursuant full service fund-raising data driven and technology enabled. Tony Dahna may slash pursuant by Wagner CPAs guiding you beyond the numbers regular cps dot com. Bye. Tell us Attorney credit card processing into your passive revenue stream. Tony dahna slash Tony Tell us and by text to give mobile donations made easy text. NPR to four four, four nine nine nine How police to welcome Jordan McCarthy to the show. He is infrastructure and security lead at tech impact. He works with organizations of every shape and size from three person grassroots advocacy groups to three hundred plus Persson social service providers to help them figure out what kinds of technical tools, analyses and strategies will maximize their social impact. Yes. A decade of experience and systems and network administration, technical writing and education and technology policy analysis. Tech impact is at tech impact dot org’s and at tech underscore impact. Welcome to the show, Jordan. Thank you so much. It’s a real pleasure to be here. Thank you. And happy New Year. Oh, you as well, Thank you very much. Thanks. Um, Tech impact is Ah, non-profit itself. What? What are you doing there? So quite a lot. We are an interesting organization because we have the heart and soul of a non-profit, um and to some extent, you know, the constant, you know, running from one thing to the next. But we provide services in the style of a more traditional tea shop to other non-profit. That’s not the only thing we do. We actually have several arms, one of which I’m really, really fundez works arm, and they’re sort of a more traditionally non-profit ah division that does workforce development in Philadelphia, Wilmington in Las Vegas. I bring in underserved young people and giving them a solid foundation of skills in its various kinds of support and allows them to go back in their communities and give back and start off on really solid careers. But, um, I was out of the house. We provided all sorts of technical services advising, consulting, implementations and an ongoing support. Two non-profits of every shape and size. And what we do for each non-profit really depends on who they are and what they need. So we try to meet folks where they’re at and, you know, get a sense of who they are and then sculpt a package of services, whether ongoing or short term. There really helps them be more effective at whatever it is that they do using technology related. Yes, exactly. Right. So you know, we aren’t necessarily going to help for supply cars, but anything related to information technology. It pretty much falls under arm broke Now I saw that in training you partner with Idealware Idealware Sze CEO Karen Graham is bound to show a couple of times. I’m a big fan of Idealware. Did I see that right? You You do some partnering with them? Actually, yes. And we’ve partnered more closely than ever because we have actually merged with Idealware second back and idealware. Yeah are now basically part in parcel of the same organization. So we are tremendously excited about that, Looking forward to working with Karen and her team to really redouble our efforts in the area of education and training and really trying to get people empowered to do some more of that stuff on their own. So they don’t have to, you know, exclusively, Rely on, you know, chops like that Come back. We will be here still that people need us. But we want to give people a much much of the tooling and resources that they I can stomach so that they can be as effective as they can on their own looking Look at Non-profit radio outside the loop. I did not know that you had merged. Is there going to be a common name? But between you and idealware. So they are, I believe now, but we’re keeping the name check impact it’s sort of, you know, it’s It’s a nice broad umbrella Idealware is keeping their name is well, but I think there now, you know, one of our major flagship. Yeah, Not not. I don’t know what we’re calling it the subdivision because they are, you know, really powerhouse in their own right. But they’re a member of the family. Let’s say OK, how recent is that merger that I that I didn’t know? Only in the past couple months. Oh, good. Okay. I don’t feel so bad. All right. No, more like two or three months behind. Oh, that’s not so bad. I’m still reading the newspapers from October then. Okay, Trump. Um, So you want to see, um, social progress? You say that you want to see social progress shaped technology usage, not the other way around. What do you feel like? Non-profits are not doing as well as they as well as they could in this. That’s very interesting and complex questions. All right. What we have in our you know, I mean, we go. Don’t take. Don’t take a full hour on it, you know? But now I don’t know if we have time. You don’t want the one you don’t want to tail wag the dog? Yes, exactly like that. One of my personal driving philosophies, that sort of really, um they put me where I am today through various stint in higher education and the D. C think tank world. And what I know what that means to me. I think, is that I see, you know, technology is everywhere in today’s world, and we’re doing a lot with it. But a lot of what’s being done is not all that socially oriented, right? You know, I several years ago was already sort of concerned about what Facebook was doing to all of us. And now, you know, come two thousand eighteen and we get a really big download of exactly what’s been going on there and how they have not really been all that interested in doing good by the world on. You know, Facebook is obviously the bookie man of the day. But you could look at any big tech company, really and and ask. Okay, well, how much of this is socially relevant? And to be fair, many of these cos I do have a lot of really powerful, um, philanthropy arms, and they do a lot of really good work. But at a zoo community, I feel like the technology space isn’t as focused as it should be on solving the really big problems that we face as a society as a world, you know, matters of civil rights and environmental destruction so forth, Um, and I think that the non-profit community really does tackle those problems day in and day out. You know, that is their core focus. They’re kind of safety net providers in the whole bunch of different spaces where you know other sectors just aren’t quite stepping up. And so what I would really like to see is a fusion of the spirit and the really innovative thinking in terms of social development and progress on the non-profit side and be able to fuse that with the you know, really, under a nouriel creativity of the technology space so that we can see maur tools, Mohr types of work that leverage this tremendously powerful tool kit that we’ve developed over the past twenty years or so to really maximize the number of people who can be reached by a particular social intervention, you know, the number people who are aware of various pressing problems really raise the level of engagement. OK, tidy as a whole. Uh, Jordan, I want Our people are not only more aware of what’s going on, what’s really important, but that they also empowered to do something about it. That’s meaningful. Unhelpful. Okay, we got to take our first break, but I want to continue this thread of the conversation talking about Cem Cem. You know, idealware non-profit technology network and I feel like there’s we’re making inroads to this, but time for a break right now pursuing two New resource is on the listener landing page. The field guide to data driven fund-raising is practical steps to achieve your fund-raising goals using data and they’ve integrated case studies included and demystifying the donor experience guide you through creating a donor journey. That donor journey map plus savvy stewardship strategies. You find those two resource is on the listener landing page at Tony Dahna may slash pursuant capital P for please. All right, now, back to stay secure in twenty. Nineteen. Right. Jordan sometimes might take these brakes. I forget where we were, but I did not forget where we are. This time. But future breaks, I may ask you, Teo, be my crutch. Remind me what? That we were just talking about. OK, so where you want to see this fusion between social progress and the technology tools that can enable it support it? We’re making inroads, though. I mean, there’s there’s tech impact. There’s a non-profit technology network there’s idealware. Let’s see, I just had a guest on and Mae Chang a few weeks ago talking about instead of lean, startup lean impact, you know, howto iterated and learn fast from buy-in in your in your non-profits. I mean, that’s sort of ah, that is broader than just technology. But she was taking that technology that that tech startup theory of lean impact from Eric Reese and applying it here to non-profits. I feel like we’re making inroads, right? Oh, yeah. Okay. Which is not where you want it or not, where you want to be yet, right? I think you know the corporate world is really good about innovating rapidly and figuring out new things, Teo. New products to bring to market and new ways to capture the public attention and so forth. I mean, there was really good at it. That’s what they do. And I feel like the non-profit and civil society space. You know, it’s so focused on its core work, which is some of the most important work being done out there, right? You know, it is life saving work. It is world saving work that they don’t necessarily have much time to throw at considerations that might seem, in some ways, like overhead. You know, obviously fund-raising that one is a given, right? Everyone needs to do that. Yeah, but way. I’ll know that mandate all too well, but there are other things that are perhaps equally important, like keeping abreast of what opportunities are out there in the way of technical tools that could really help, you know again, reach more people or make your operations more efficient or save money or saved. The’s are all important investments and unfortunately, overhead. Gotta bad label several years ago. But, you know, Ah, non-profit radio were always bristling at that. That that thought that, Oh, you know, if it’s not direct service related, it’s wasted money and people won’t. Our donors won’t understand it on DH. They’ll think that we’re not good stewards of the money that they give us. That’s that that thinking has got to go out because we’re talking about investment in your organization and your people and in the services that you’re providing. That’s exactly right. Yeah, I mean and invested time and money to end up with a better, more efficient, leaner you gnome or impactful and state like that’s just there’s no way around it, right? I mean, you can’t deny that the most Well, I was gonna say most admired companies, Let’s just say the wealthiest cos whether they’re most admired. That’s ah, value judgment, but that you can’t deny that they’re constantly investing in in themselves in their people. Amazon, Google, Facebook. Was that Fang Netflix? You know, the company’s heir, constantly investing in technology, and there’s a lot of lessons to be learned in those types of investments. Oh, most definitely. And I think you know, I I also share your frustration with the whole idea that overhead is a bad thing because you know, it doesn’t matter and you know not to stare at their do it, Lee. But information security is often seen his overhead right. It’s something that you have to deal with on a regular basis. You know, you do it right. It’s always in the back of your mind and always take some resource is an attention, and you don’t really see immediate, tangible benefits because by definition, good security is not getting broken into right. And it’s hard to measure the value of a negative. I know, until, of course, you do get broken into and you see just how bad it can be. So I completely agree. I think overhead is a sort of A I wish it were not a bad term, but since it is, let’s get rid of it and call it something like, you know, core structural support, investment. That’s what investment you’re investing. Exactly. Yeah, that’s even better. And people understand that. And you’re asking people to invent me? If you’re talking to donors, you’re asking them to invest and you’re investing in the work that they’re investing in. You just give it to you, and you invest duitz. Okay? All right, Let’s school. Good. Uh, love that opening. So let’s let’s get to some some details. Tech impact has this excellent resource which we’re goingto sort of talk through. So if you could just goto tech impact dot or GE, is that the way to get it? I got it. But I forget, how did what did I do? You go to Tech Impact or GE. And then where, then Eleanor website. There’s a whole bunch of menus, and there’s a menu item for things that we do on underneath that there is a security section and I’ll go there. You’ll get brought Teo Page that ask you for just basic information. And then you get a quick security checklist of the top things that you can do is a non-profit or honestly, for that matter, as any kind of organisation or even a person to be safer in a world that is getting less safe. Okay, Yes. And I I want to thank Thank you that I appreciated that it was very minimal information that you asked for sometimes to get the resource, you know? Yes, it’s free. But you have to give up your your physical address. Ah, phone number. You know, I bristle it that for this resource, it was this name and email. That was it, that’s all. And that’s all I asked for When people join our list. Name and email. So thank you for that. Thank you for not going overboard with data collection. You know, I mean privacy, because then you have to preserve lead right to you. If you take my address, then you will have to preserve it and secure it. All right, So we’re gonna get to that. OK? Eso what kinds of risks are you concerned about your welcome to share client stories. I know you. You know, you do direct work with clients non-profits clients. So what types of risk air you seeing? So I think I unfortunately have gotten pretty Harry particularly. I would say over the past year, twenty eighteen was not a good year in so many ways. So what we’ve seen is that, ah, the tax that previously were targeted, let’s say, mostly at bigger fish especially, you know, corporate fish are now coming downstream to smaller organizations. And that is ah, indicative of AA few things. One important thing to understand about the space of ideas, security or insecurity, if you like, is that it is and has been for a while. It is dominated by big, actually corporate actors. I mean, These are international crime syndicates who exist in their their core business model is to break into other organizations and steal their intellectual property. Used there are rather abuse their infrastructure. For other, you know, malicious reasons just generally do as much damage as possible. Like steal half a billion addresses and credit card numbers from it was, Well, Marriott, Whatever the weight of a company emerged with Marriott last year. Spring him not Spring Hill, but Starwood Starwood, right. Half a billion addresses, credit card, a data passport information for some people compromise. And that’s just one example of yeah, well, you go back, you know, even a couple of years. And, you know, many, many big names just, you know, fly off the pages of a Home Depot. There was target argast, you know, the Office of Management and budget in the federal government like you be. These attackers have targeted very successfully the some of the largest institutions out there that have truly massive databases of personal information. But Betsy’s coming down, proceed. You Ah, go and steal people’s identities or you know what? They generative process, right? They take the information that they’ve stolen, and they use it to try to extract as much value from that data set and then build dated today to set further. So they might use those emails to send more spam, encouraging people to log into a fake. You know, Google, Sinan Page or something and thereby build their database even further on. And they really refined this. It’s not a technique, it’s a hole. World of techniques, really. It’s a business model over several years. Two at the point where it’s really a precision engineered process, and they have a specialization. They’re different parts of this black market ecosystem that specialize in breaking into accounts. They’re different ones that specialize in spamming. They’re different ones of specialized in setting up and distributing attack tool kits that make it even make it easy for people to start performing these attacks. So there’s a lot of specialization, a lot of a lot of different firms engaged in this process, and there’s a CZ. You pointed out this billions of dollars to be made in compromising organizations. Now rhetorically again. And even now, of course, the Holy Grail, if you will, is to break into a target or a Home Depot or something because they have millions upon millions of records, latto payment information and so on. But of course, you know, this is an arms race, and so the big companies have gotten somewhat better at securing themselves. Many of them have been hacked and therefore have been paying a lot of attention to their borders and making sure that you know they’re relatively safe and At the same time, the attacks have gotten cheaper to run because they’ve been systematized and really reached a sort of industrial level of scale, which means that it is easy and cheap to run attacks against smaller and smaller organizations profitably. And so that’s exactly what’s been happening is that, um, these very sophisticated attack tool kits and procedures have been used to go after smaller and smaller organizations. Ah, and another important thing to understand is that most of this work is not at all targeted. It’s very opportunistic. So you know, a. A big crime syndicate will get a big list of E mail addresses by way of breaking into a company’s database. And you know, there’ll be all sorts people on that on that email list. You know, private individuals, partners of the company and so on. And the attackers will just use that database and send out fairly generic phishing emails to everyone on the list on the assumption that sure most people will recognise this email that’s coming in is not actually asking to reset their Gmail password. But even one percent of the people on that you know, many million person list do actually take the bait that represents thousands and thousands of more accounts they’ve just broken into and a hand that can now use to execute even more attacks. And so there’s a lot of daisy chaining that’s going on here a lot of building on prior work or prior attacks to create even Mohr devastating attacks that target even more people. And so the non-profit space is sort of squarely in the sights of this black market ecosystem now. And so, you know, at any given day I c e mails coming in both to Tech impact itself and to our partners, who then forward them on to me. You know, maybe somewhere between five and ten fairly well crafted emails. Ah, on all sorts of subjects. You know, some of them say your Gmail account has been compromised. Please click here to reset your password. I saw a brilliant one just yesterday purportedly from American Express saying something is wrong with your card. You need to click here to review some another as transactions. This email wass spectacular. He had all the right branding. It was formatted exactly right. All of the links in the email even went to valid American Express Web pages except the big click Here button, which set you to the attack Paige that tried to get you to divulge your log in information for your American Express account. You’re saying that was very high level of sophistication mary-jo right now, very hot again, basically targeting everyone at this point. Okay. And that was very high quality, so very equality. And I mean, I think the big theme is I have seen a steady progression of the quality. So it started out, you know, in let’s say, Well, that’s a year ago, January of last year, Most of the stuff I was seeing was pretty shoddy, right? It had lots of spelling errors, very little in the way of visual branding. Um, you know, the formatting was terribly off. The email address didn’t look even remotely convincing. But you know the email I got yesterday again, everything about it was perfect. Except that one button and even the button. I mean, it was, well formatted. You would have to actually hover over it and noticed that the link point somewhere other than an American Express. But Paige Teo be able to tell that anything was wrong. Okay? S so natural. You know, next question is, what the hell are we going to do about this? So you’re you’re resource papers, got ideas, and you really want to start not with the technology, but with your people. Exactly. There’s a misconception in the general, you know, world at large that because this is a high tech problem, it must have Ah, hi tech solution. And more to the point that you know that high tech solution probably going to cost a lot of money. And it is true that there are some high tech solutions out there or I wouldn’t call them high tech. I would just call them, you know? Yes. Technical solutions. None of them are that involved. And, you know, you shouldn’t have to pay that much, if anything, for most of them. On the most effective solution to this kind of problem, um, is getting your team, your staff on board with the project of keeping the organization’s safe and helping them to understand just how pervasive and sophisticated the threats really are. You know, it’s hard to get a bunch of dedicated, hardworking, you know, non-profit staffers into a room for an hour and get them to listen to a lecture on you know how they need to care about security. You know, for all the reasons we talked about you so much rather be getting their work done. But if you can get your team to understand that this is the risk Israel, the threats are, you know they’re significant and growing. I get people to just adopt a stance of reasonable vigilance, you know, not full blown paranoia, but just being a little bit, you know, thoughtful about everything they click on, whether it be an E mail that comes in from that they weren’t expecting, even if it comes from someone they know. Because part of this whole like iterative process in the attack space is that attackers will break into an email account and then send emails to every single person in that now hijacked account’s address book so that the emails do, in fact, come from someone that that person know you can’t even now just say, Oh, as long as I know the person, it’s fine may very well not be fine because you maybe not. But when you open an email and you’re not expecting it. And I’d ask you to go. You know, you this special report that, you know, if for your eyes only and what not especially if the person that you, uh, get this email from would never write that way. That should be a red flag. And similarly, whenever you’re browsing online, you need to be vigilant about what you click on you. No, don’t click obviously, on anything that says you’ve won a thousand dollars, because that is never true either. It’s certainly not true in real space, and it’s doubly not true online. And, you know, you always just have to be a little bit, you know, a little bit suspicious in back of your head. Think, Okay. Could there be another you No ulterior motive here? Like what? What’s the agenda of the person who sent me this thing or, you know, showing me this web page? Um, you know, is that someone I trust on? Do I have some context for why I’m being asked to enter my password here or provide this information Or click on this button? Um, is this going to do what I wanted to do? And if you can adopt that kind of a mind set and get your entire team to adopt that kind of a mind set. You become exponentially safer than most other folks around. Because this is a new mindset. It’s hard to shift your thinking, particularly the non-profit space, where we operate largely on the basis of trust. Right? You know, we have a lot of partners. Uh, you know, we have to trust that our partners are also interested in doing the same good work that we are. You know, we don’t want to wander around being endlessly suspicious of everyone, but unfortunately, the state of security online. Yeah. Yeah, You really have to be all the more vigilant. We just We just have about two minutes before break, tell us what’s been going on at Tech. Impact yourself. You’re you’re you’re CEO. You’re some sort Your CFO has been getting emails that purportedly come from your executive director. Oh, yeah. And we’re not alone. So the more sophisticated version of we’ve only really talked about one type of attack. And there are others that we might want to talk about. But, you know, let’s go quickly. There’s a different variant that isn’t quite fishing. So fishing is trying to get you to divulge your own personal information over email. But there’s a variant of that attack where someone writes into an organization pretending to be someone high up in the leadership team, the executive director or the CFO or someone like that and ask various members of the staff, Oh, I’m out of the office right now, but I really need you to conduct a transaction for me. I need you to buy some gift cards. Some of them get really creative, and they say, and they and they do their background research. And they say, Uh, we just had this annual conference, and I need to send gift cards to all of our speakers. Could you go out and buy those for me and then send me the codes from the back of those gift cards so I can, you know, send them along to peep folks by email. Those e mails, when they’re well done, can look exactly like they come from the executive director of the C. F O or whoever. And of course they don’t. And if you reply to them and do what they ask, you will be sending all sorts of things potentially financial information out to someone you’re never gonna be able to find again. Because they set up a fake e mail account for the purpose of trying to infiltrate your organization. And once they’ve done that, they’re going to get rid of it, and it’s going to be on Treyz schnoll. All right, we’re going where we’re going to take a take a break. And when we come back, I want youto continue this because I’m going to ask Ah, Jordan, how could this possibly happened? Attack impact. Okay, so ah, stand by for that weather. CPAs nufer the New Year. They’re kicking off a remote non-profit roundtable. Siri’s. They used to just be on location. Now they’re doing it remotely. Livestreaming each quarter a wagner’s C P a C P a will cover a topic that they’re intimately expert in. So they’re the experts, but you need to have a basic understanding of it. All right. I mean, you want to know what you want to have a rough idea of what you’re seeing is doing and what to do in the non-profit realm. That’s what they’re talking about. The first one is on January fifteenth about revenue recognition for your grants and contracts, you goto wagner cps dot com Click Resource is than seminars Now Time for Tony. Take two. It’s time for you to be an insider. A non-profit radio insider also nufer the New Year. I’m kicking off something expanded guest interviews that are going to be exclusively for non-profit radio insiders. Each week, I’m going to dive a little deeper into a topic with a guest or cover something we didn’t talk about on the show in these three to five minute videos. All right, the video is going to be on a private playlist entirely for insiders. Have you become an insider? Sounds like something that you would have to pay for. And you’re right. It does sound that way, but you don’t have to pay. Other people might charge for something like this, but I will not. Ah, all I do. All you do is go to twenty martignetti dot com. Click the insider alerts, button name and email Like George and I were just talking about that’s all you got to give and you become an insider. Tony martignetti dot com. Now let’s go back to Jordan on DH Stay secure in twenty nineteen Jordan How could this happen to tech impact? No. The unfortunate thing is this is really easy to do, and it’s easy to do for someone with not that much technical skill. And just because you get one of these emails that looks really carefully crafted and whatnot doesn’t mean anything has actually been weak or that you’ve been broken into every one of us as an organization has tons of information about us online, right? Certainly the names of our executive directors are incredibly easy to find. If nothing else, you can get them from our tax returns, right? And attackers again have built out this elaborate process that involves doing some basic background research on any organization that they want to attack. I’m sure that they go to the organization’s websites and maybe even look at their tax forms and find out other things about the organization’s. Actually, I read recently that many of these militias actors air now doing extensive Lincoln research on a particular people within an organization is they’re trying to go after, so you don’t know what they’re doing. They built the whole process around this on. They use the publicly available information to construct, you know, eh uh, intact. It is as plausible as they can make it. So, you know, if they see a mention on the Web site that there was a annual conference recently, they might throw that into the E mail again to try to make it that much more authentic. They might mention someone else on the team and say, Oh, you know, like, you know, pretend that the message was coming from your executive director. Oh, I tried to contact, You know, Jim our c F. O. And he was out of the office, but I really need this done. Can you help? It is very common behavior. Now, I will say each second a background research. That hacker does represent one less second of profit. Right. They don’t want to put in that much time. So you know, you shouldn’t worry generally unless you are really, really big and really, really interesting about, you know, hypothetical attackers scouring your web page and every other thing you’ve done publicly for information about you. They’re not going to do that, but it probably will spend, you know, a minute looking at the stuff they confined most easily. And then they’re gonna construct attacks based on what they found, uh, and make it seem like you know the emails. They’re sending our legitimate as possible. They also will do that, actually, not only even just pretending to be part of the organization, they will also try to extort you and say, you know, I found out all of this fallacious information about, you know, your executive director, or you know what your organisation’s doing on. They’ll drop some publicly available details that aren’t even remotely interesting and say, But I have so much Mohr and, you know, if you don’t want us to go out, then you have to pay me a lot of money. I actually saw entire wave of the attacks last month, and they they weren’t particularly well done. But they bothered to do a little bit of background research. So the bottom line is you’re going to get these emails on. They will contain information about you and that should not be as big of a red flag You as you might think. You shouldn’t respond to them. You shouldn’t do anything except, you know, look at them carefully make sure that there isn’t anything in there that really is private and that someone has figured out, because if that’s the case, you need to do a lot more work to get things locked down. Um, and again, just be suspicious. Don’t believe someone when they ask you to do something, you know, unless you have actually had a conversation about that request before. Better yet, I encourage every organization to have a basic policy that says no one in the organization is going to ask anyone else to authorize a financial transaction or a password reset or anything sensitive over email alone. That’s just never gonna happen, and it’s never going to be allowed. You always have to actually talk to the person who’s making the request to confirm that they, in fact, made it before anybody acts on anything. Sounds like a sound policy. Okay, Labbate. Let’s let’s bring it back to what we can do to protect our organizations. So after staff training, what what would you say is next? So after staff training and then again, building a sort of culture of vigilance and everyone being it together on everyone having each other’s back, I would say there are some basic technicals. Defense is you can put in place. Um, because the most dominant type of attacks that we’re seeing right now are definitely email based and identity based. That is, they’re trying to convince you that you know, the attacker is someone they’re not, or and most often there, trying to steal your own account credentials and then use them for exactly the same purpose. One of the best things you can do to protect identity online is too not used, just a password alone. Wherever possible, passwords are kind of outdated security mechanism. They were only added back, you know, twenty thirty years ago, when the original researchers who were building Internet realized Oh, really? You know, not everybody should have the ability to read everybody else’s email without a password. That’s how open everything wass until they tacked on the password, kind of as an afterthought to fix the security hole and a force. As the Internet has evolved to do all sorts of incredibly sensitive things. The password as a security mechanism really hasn’t kept up to speed. It’s not good enough for the level of security. We really need of our bank websites and our social services websites and our, you know, electronic health record websites. So there’s a new standard which itself is not perfect. Nothing ever will be, but it’s a whole lot better than just a user name and password. And this technique or technology is called a couple of different things depending on who you talk to. But they all mean the same thing. You can hear the phrase, multifactorial indication or dual factor authentication or two step verification and all of those terms mean you can. You still have a user name and password, but you also need to supply something else whenever you log in to prove that you are who you claim to be, so that someone who managed to steal someone’s password can’t get in with John. That stuff this is this is Well, I think it’s we’re starting to see this. I see it on a lot of options, you know? Do you want to enable? I usually see there’s, like, two factor authentication, and this is where it’s a code will be sent to your to your phone number to your to your cell, and then you have to enter that number into the site that you’re tryingto log into is that yes, we’re talking about. That’s exactly right in the core idea There is. It’s actually just terrifyingly easy to steal someone’s username and password, particularly if you build a Web page. It looked exactly like the Gmail log in Paige, but it’s going very, very difficult for someone to simultaneously steal someone else’s phone. It is possible are, but it’s just so much so non-profits can implement this a CZ. When people come in in the morning latto log onto the system, they have to provide two factor authentication. You can do that. I would say it’s less important to do that on, you know, your PCs, you know, so that when you grow up coming in the morning, you have to go to this process. Certainly, hospitals do do that. Everyone has, you know, their little cars, that they swipe against some sort of scanner and that that council there’s there in a second factor. But most of us, I think, are now using something like Google Sweet or Office three sixty five, which is accessible from anywhere. And that’s where the attacker’s really have a have a party right they can get because you could get into the system from anywhere. The attackers can get in from Russia, Thailand, South Africa, lots of various places where they tend to work out on. And so those kinds of cloud based systems, as convenient as they are, also present a pretty big security risk that literally anyone on Earth put attack. And so those are the platforms where you really want to make sure you have multi factor authentication turned on. And the good news is, in most of these platforms, turning on multifactorial education is free and pretty easy. It’s, you know, there’s a few steps to it, but you basically just go to someone’s account. You say this person should now be required to use this second, you know, step verification or multi factor authentication. You have to have your your team signed up. You know, basically, just put in their phone number that they want to receive those authorisation codes at and then you’re done. That’s it. You know, they’re they’re logging process is going to be a little bit harder in some cases, but the whole it’s pretty painless and it’s so affected by locking these kind of so much worth the extra minute that it takes just to enable this, okay? Let’s say we got We got a couple minutes before another break, so give us No, we have to go to a break. Sorry. My mistake. So hang on there, Jordan. Think. Think of the next thing we’re going to talk about Xero tell us. Can use more money. Do you need a new revenue source? This is your long stream of passive revenue that you get when companies that you refer process credit card transactions through. Tell us watch the video. Send potential companies to watch the video. After you do, you go when you want to see it first. And then if they use, tell us for processing you. Your NON-PROFIT gets fifty percent of the fee for each transaction. This adds up small dollars. Adding up the video is that tony dot m a slash Tony. Tell us time for live listener love. We’ve got to do it. There’s so much of it. I get it. I get three sheets of paper, but do not. Eight and a half by eleven sheets. Uh, Northvale, New Jersey. The live love to Northvale, New Jersey. Wow, Northvale. Hello. That’s like that’s two minutes from where I grew up in uh, old Japan. Ah, New Bern, North Carolina. Live Love to you, Carmel, California Paddocks. Kala Patasse, Piela, Ohio Pascal or Patasse Piela Live Love goes out. However you pronounce it even if you pronounce it differently than either of those two ways. Live loves going to Ohio. Jacksonville Beach, Florida Atalanta. Oh, California Tampa, Florida All right, Awesome. Lots of live listener love today. And let’s go abroad. Uh, why wouldn’t we? No reason not to, um Tokyo and Cicada. Oh, Japan. Wonderful. Konnichi wa Hanoi, Vietnam. Ah, Social Korea, on your own. Haserot comes a ham Nida for our Korean listener. Beijing, Beijing, China. Of course we know d how everybody knows that Mexico City, Mexico I was always said, guten tag. No, that’s not right. Mexico City. Mexico would be good afternoon. What a star days when a star dies. Of course. Iran. That’s not guten tag either. But Iran is listening. Laos and Egypt. Well, look. Ah, Middle East. Checking in love it Lots of live love going out to all those people. And they maybe others that we can’t see. Sometimes there’s masked cities, et cetera. Um and ah, the podcast pleasantries. The podcast pleasantries have to go out to our over thirteen thousand podcast listeners right on the heels of the live list. Their love comes my gratitude to our the bulk of our audience, which is sitting podcast in the time shift. Whatever time device, however, you squeeze non-profit radio into your life, whether it’s Sunday nights or Saturday mornings. Pleasantries to you. Very glad that you’re with us. Thank you. Okay, we’ve got several more minutes left for we got lots of time left. Oh, yeah. We got latto two time left for Jordan McCarthy and stay secure in twenty nineteen. What’s next? Jordan? What? What should we attack after we take on too factor with simple enabling of two factor authentication? I don’t want to sound like I don’t make it sound is difficult. Once we once we checked out off, where should we go next? It is really not not hard at all again, just so valuable. So we talked about fishing. We talked about email based attacks on identity based attacks. Again, I would say they are the most frequent, Andi increasingly sophisticated type of attack we’re seeing so that definitely your number one priority, I would say. But then there’s a whole other universe of things that also are happening at the same time. So let’s talk about malware and others have more software based attack. So in addition to the attackers, just constantly, you know, trolling around, trying to find people who they can trick into divulging their passwords. There also constantly scanning every system connected to the Internet to see if those systems are susceptible to various kinds of software attack that can sort of worm their way onto PCs, possibly even then spread to other PCs on the network. Um, and again, all these attacks, very opportunistic, automated. It’s very rare that you’ll see someone actively targeting you because they care about you. They just want a, you know, hit the low hanging fruit. Um, but that means they’re going to put up a malicious file that looks like, I don’t know, maybe a pdf of, you know, um, various discount code for something that that’s that’s a common technique. Or or even better yet, a free version of Adobe Photo Job. Right, look, one one deal. What, one day deal, you know, download adobe photo job for nothing here, right? Of course, that’s ridiculous. That would never happen. And if you click on that link and download the software, you may get some variant of Adobe. But you’re also going to get a boat load of malicious software along with it. And once that software is on your machine, that could do anything it wants. Pretty much, you know, they can watch every keystroke that entered into the BC. It can even take video and audio recordings. It can hijack the computing a network power of the PC and use it to attack other targets. Um, until malware is Avery Big deal. And it’s producing a pretty big deal because the most rallies not even that recent anymore, but one of the more modern variants or evolutions of malware. Let’s say it’s called crypto ransomware, which is a mouthful. But what that basically means is this malware is very sophisticated and what it does. Once it gets onto a machine, it takes a look around. It finds every file. It looks like it might contain something useful to you. So every word document, every picture, every email, takes all of that data and steals it, put it into an encrypted archive, delete the original copies from your computer entirely, and then puts up a message on the screen saying, We have your files. If you ever want to see them again, you have to pay us about a thousand dollars. That was last year. The British medical system, right? And the entire city of Atlanta. All right, let’s get to what we can do. The help mitigate the likelihood minimized. I know we can’t prevent. What can we do to minimize the likelihood of this? So when you were talking about malware again, the number one thing going back even earlier discussion is, too promote that culture of vigilance and thoughtfulness. But technical safeguards there your most powerful defense of your software systems and your system security is to keep your systems up to date and that that sounds deceptively simple for anyone who’s actually tried to do it. You know, it’s next to impossible because everyone is very busy and no one wants to take the time to reboot their computer ten times a day to keep everything up to date. So it’s a challenge. But there are various tools that can help you do that shit. Um, e-giving mind when I say keeping up to date? I’m talking about not only your computer’s operating system so Windows or the Mac OS. I’m also talking about your phone operating system, whether it be Android or IOS. I’m also talking about various programs on your PCs, especially Web browsers on other boardmember that connect to the Internet quite a bit from all of that needs to be kept up to date because any one of those pieces could theoretically, if they get out of date, be broken into by one of these automated attack phones. Khun B phones could be turned. Phones could be turned around into microphones against you, right? Exactly. And you know, phones or general purpose computers, too. So if the phone gets compromised, theoretically, you could end up You know, using that phone is a launching point onto other devices are connected to it. OK, what are we going to do? What? You scared us enough. You scared me. And it was very good, too. Sorry. Didn’t get a little bit late for Halloween anyway, so there’s a few tools that can help you. There are tools that very simply watch all of the program’s installed on your PC and alert you. If any of them get out of date, some of them will automatically install patches for those tools for you on. Most of them are free. You know, if you just do a quick online search for, you know, keep my PC updated, that kind of thing. You’ll get some good options whenever you download anything online. As part of this, you know, theme of vigilance. You wantto look for reviews, make sure other people have used that tool and like it. But there are a lot of tools out there to do this work. That’s very ad hoc, right? Each piece he would have to have that installed, and, you know, someone could uninstall it. It would be kind of messy for organizations that are I would say above, let’s say ten people inside. It probably makes sense to aim for some degree of centralization. Uh, you can monitor and enforce the prompt application of software updates for both the operating system and other applications on there’s a variety of tool kits that can do this that there’s a too big name, um, types of rockets that are useful in this case. One of them is called a mobile device. Management took it. And again, if you do a quick Web search for mobile device management, you’ll find a bunch of different options. Um, some of the big players in the space there include things like Microsoft in Tune, Cisco Air Watch, um, IBM mas three sixty and there are a bunch of others. But those are just some that come to mind, and those are really, really good at managing the security of mobile. As their name suggests mobile devices. So many of them focusedbuyer merrily on the the mobile phone space. But many of them can also handle desktops and laptops as well for desktops and laptops. Then there’s another tool kit or a type of tool kit that really focuses in on that space and those air remote management and monitoring toolkit abbreviated are. Mm. On the first one was abbreviated mdm tonight. We love acronyms. I’m not really sure why, but but thankfully, you kept yourself out of jargon jail by actually using the full name before you even said that with him. So yeah, I get that way. That’s why we have debts when non-profit idea has jargon jail. Oh, thank you. I What? All right, finish your sentence, and then we gotta take our last break. Okay? So remote management and Mandarin monument and management and monitoring tools do exactly what I proposed. It needs to be done. They help you watch species for anything that might need to be updated and get those that they supplied promptly. They can also do more than that. They can watch and monitor and a virus programs which are not actually as useful as you might think. So that’s why I didn’t put them first on my list. Keeping yourself repeated is actually more important than having antivirus programs in place generally. But it is a good last line of defense. And these talk is gonna help make sure that those you’ll stay in place and are updated as well. All right. Jordan and Jordan, Wait. Take your last break. When we come back from this break, I want you to list list again. The resource is that you named so that people can have a place to ah t check out and you know, the ones that you believe are our sound. Do you think hoexter give can use more money again? I need a new revenue source. Here’s another way. Mobile e-giving. You could learn about it with text to gives five part email. Many course. Now, this is an E mail that is bona fide. So you don’t have to worry about is being a phishing e mail. You know, you’re just five e mails away through this many course. One each day from raising more money are raising money to get started through mobile giving. It’s cheap to get started. Its easy for your donors. The way to start the many course. You text NPR to four, four, four, nine, nine nine. All right. And we still got several more minutes. Force they secure in twenty. Nineteen with Jordan McCarthy. Alright, Jordan, what’s your What’s your list of resource is that users can trust. So first of all users listening listeners, listeners, contrast. Who’s you? Well, they are users, too, but listeners is what we’re talking about here. You want to look at whatever vendors you use and you want to see. You wanna have a look at what they say about their own security? So, you know, look at go to the web page of, you know, blackbaud sales force, Microsoft, Google and, you know, just say all right. Tell me about your security. What do you do? What do you offer? What can you help me to nail down? Okay, because many of these platforms will have a lot of security features built in that you may not be taking advantage of. So start simple. Start free. You use a totally ordinary included but may not know about you already included. Ok, then you want to start looking for other resource is to tell you you know, about what else you, Khun Dio? What else? What what? What are the sort of tools of record that really are effective and secure and we’ll increase your security So I mean not to be too self promoting, but idealware is a phenomenal resource for this kind of thing. That haserot hutchisson tons of resources and listeners know that idealware idealware knows dimension of, you know, I, including security brought up Yes. Objective, objective, objective. Other indexes as well. So if you look at sites like PC World, um, com p world ars technica Wired, they usually do reviews of various security tools I go to them routinely to see. All right, what is the latest on the mobile device management tool kit? There really top notch? What antivirus programs are recommended this year because they always cycle in and out. Okay, no. In terms of the tools that I use quite a bit and trust, I would call out for things like authentication. Obviously, Office three sixty five and the Google Sweet are phenomenal talk it They can both do a lot for you in terms of keeping things safe and helping you to monitor the security of your communications and your files and everything. So either this platform’s, I think are exemplary. And both have built in multi factor authentication. You just need to turn it on. Um, if you’re looking for something that can be, go beyond those core platforms and spanning multiple product, you might want to look at. Ah, couple of tool kits that focused squarely on authentication, safeguarding identity. Those tools are duo. Do you and octa O K E A. And these They’re both really big names in the space of again. Just making sure that people’s identities were kept saying that they cannot get attacked by simply divulging their passwords. Both of them provide multifaceted indication toe a wide range of other tools so you could end up just logging in with your duo or octa credentials and then be granted access to a bunch of other things. But but in a very secure way. Okay, excellent. We just have about a minute left. Jordan. So I feel like we did enough on why you should be paying attention to this. Let’s not. Let’s not wrap up with that. But I’ll leave it to you. How do you want to close? You got a minute? I think I would say that. You know, things are pretty scary right now, and I don’t want to sugarcoat that way. As you say. We said enough about it, but there is a lot that any given non-profit Khun do it doesn’t It’s not rocket science. You know, you might be told that you need to pay a butt load of money or hyre, you know, a really fancy consultant to tell you what to do. Ah, and if you find it helpful, sure, by all means, go and get some help. And you know, if you want a lightweight approach or even something more in depth, tech impact is here to help where we’re more than happy to meet you at whatever level the support you need. But having said that, a lot of this stuff is really not that difficult. It can be done by someone who just has the time. I mean, that’s sort of our all of our scarcest resource. I know. So that’s easier said than done. But if you have the time and you know, you can set aside some resources to dig in and turn on mold a factor authentication and figure out how to keep yourself up to date, you were going to be so much safer as a result. And for most non-profits, that’s exactly what they need to do as long as they are safer. Than the average. They are totally not interesting. Okay, hackers we got Okay, We got to leave it there. Don’t be interesting. Two attackers. Ah, he’s Jordan McCarthy. Infrastructure and security of the tech impact. You’ll find them at tech impact dot or GE, which is where you’ll find there the resource paper with even more ideas. And they are at tech. Underscore impact. Thank you so much, Jordan. It’s really a pleasure. Thank you. Thanks. My inside a video with Jordan. We’re going to talk about single sign on next week. The annual zombie loyalists replay with Peter Shankman. His customer service ideas are excellent, so it’s very worth Well, he worth replaying it. Do it every year. If you missed any part of today’s show, I beseech you, find it on tony martignetti dot com. We’re sponsored by pursuing online tools for small and midsize non-profits data driven and technology enabled Tony dahna slash pursuant Capital P. Well, you see, piela is guiding you beyond the numbers regular cps dot com by tell us credit card and payment processing your passive revenue stream. Tony dahna slash Tony Tell us and by text to give mobile donations made easy Text n p. R. To four four four nine nine nine. A creative producer was Claire Meyerhoff. Sam Liebowitz is the line producer shows Social Media is by Susan Chavez. Mark Silverman is our Web guy and his music is by Scott Stein. You with me next week for Non-profit radio Big non-profit ideas for the other ninety five percent Go out and be great. What duitz? You’re listening to the talking alternative network you get to thinking. Things xero. You’re listening to the talking alternative now, are you stuck in a rut? Negative thoughts, feelings and conversations got you down. 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Nonprofit Radio for June 15, 2018: Avoid Website Ageism & Grants For Newbies

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Jessica Meister, Matt Dragon & Justin Greeves: Avoid Website Ageism
How do you design your site to meet the needs of those 65 and over? What about testing with seniors, and accessibility requirements for federally-funded nonprofits? Our panel answers it all. They’re Jessica Meister with Oral Health America; Matt Dragon from Charity Navigator; and Justin Greeves at Porter Novelli. (Recorded at the Nonprofit Technology Conference)

 

 

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Janice Chan & Danielle Faulkner: Grants For Newbies
Janice Chan and Danielle Faulkner cover the basics of researching and submitting grants. They reveal free resources to find out what’s available, share tips on tracking deadlines, help you prepare for online submissions, and more. Janice is with Johns Hopkins Institutions and Danielle is from Baltimore Community Foundation. (Also recorded at the Nonprofit Technology Conference)

 


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Hello and welcome to tony martignetti non-profit radio big non-profit ideas for the other ninety five percent. I’m your aptly named host. Oh, i’m glad you’re with me. I’d be thrown into foley dupe aqua if you questioned why you shouldn’t miss today’s show, avoid website ageism how do you design your site to meet the needs of those sixty five and over? What about testing with seniors and accessibility requirements for federally funded non-profits our panel answers at all. They’re jessica meister with orel health america, matt dragon from charity navigator and justin grieves at porter novelli that was recorded at the non-profit technology conference also grants for newbies. Janice chan and daniel faulkner covered the basics of researching and submitting grants they reveal free resource is to find out what’s available. Share tips on tracking deadlines help you prepare for online submissions and mohr. Janice is with johns hopkins institutions, and danielle is from baltimore community foundation that’s also recorded at the non-profit technology conference. I’m tony steak, too thank you. Responsive by pursuant full service fund-raising data driven and technology enabled tony dahna slash pursuant radio and by wagner cpas guiding you beyond the numbers witness cps. Dot com and by tello’s turning credit card processing into your passive revenue stream. Tony dahna may slash tony tello’s here is a void website ageism welcome to tony martignetti non-profit radio coverage of eighteen ntc non-profit technology conference. We’re coming to you from new orleans at the convention center all our ntcdinosaur views are sponsored by network for good, easy to use dahna management and fund-raising software for non-profits this conversation is with jessica meister, matt dragon and justin grieves. Jessica is the web user experience specialist at orel help america. Matt is director of engineering at charity navigator and justin greaves is senior vice president of research. Porter novelli jessica justin welcome, thank you for having welcome to non-profit radio your workshop topic is i’m not the dinosaur. You’re the dinosaur. How your website should keep pace with america’s aging population okay, let’s, start down the end there. Justin, who thinks i look like john mcenroe? He he spilled performance that happen. But i remind you of john macro at least at least happy. Yeah, right now. Not the tennis racket slamming john macaron? Not yet. I haven’t gotten there yet. Yeah, yeah. Don’t give me cause, okay? What what’s the issue here, justin way, talking about websites that are built specifically for senior population, like sixty five it over or accessibility of all websites for the for the elder population? Yeah, yeah, i think i think one or the other, but we’re taking a step back from that and looking at everybody and really looking good. How in my part of the presentation, how people are accessing information generally in society and looking at that websites are a part of that news is a part of that social media is a part of that radio shows are a part of that, right? So seeing how those different audiences by age or by other characteristics are doing things online, are getting information. So we really took a broad view about toe understand that, and there are a couple of interesting trends that we found in our research. Porter novelli we do an ongoing program called styles, which is abroad be of americans lifestyle okay, we’ll get into the research. Remind me if i don’t get teo. I don’t know about research company. Okay, sametz what what’s your sense of this. How do you want to open up the topic sure. So charity navigator biggest user percentages is sixty five and over. And if you lump in fifty five and over it’s really a majority nineties, we in ninety percent, ninety percent, probably around eighty percent. Ok, seventy five percent. So we we have a lot of those users. As i covered in the presentation. Over seventy five percent of our donors to us are seventy five are fifty five and over. So that that’s something that we’re constantly considering in our website design communicating with our users and our donors. Okay, jessica, you’re our user experience specialist. And what what? How do you want to open this topic for the elder population? Eso my belief is that technology should be for everybody, and it shouldn’t be limited to just young people, um and that’s on all of us to create technology and websites and designs that air usable by every single person. I think. It’s a negative stereotype that older adults seniors above the age of sixty five don’t use technology and it’s absolutely not true. Both justin and i have found plenty of research. That is completely metoo contrary. Okay, thank you for that. All right, not. Now that i’m sixty five, i’m approaching now, but, uh, i’m not even in the face, you know? I am in the fifty five over. Yeah, i am in that one, okay, i did remember what i want to talk to you about the research, so i want i do want to start with in terms of how thie older population is using data differently using is using technology differently. Yeah, please, just beyond, i think justcause point it’s ah it’s a myth and it’s a long held belief that older people are behind in technology and don’t use things but what we found in our styles, research that i mentioned before is half of people in the silent generation that’s, age seventy two and above have a smartphone mobile device that they’re using and half half seventy two and over half of our subs on dh in boomers, which you’re you’re, you’re a boom here, boomer young, i’m young, you’re young boomer. Yeah, almost genetics are seventy five percent of boomers have smartphones and that’s the primary way that they’re accessing all sorts of things. News your radio show information about websites e-giving donations online so you got to think about the population, which the vast majority of givers of high givers are also older people. You’re not going to be as effective if you’re just still mailing them stuff, right? They need thio interact and access just the way we all do, and they want to do it on the whole device. Mostly. Okay, okay, you want to add more to the research summary? That’s ah, pretty fair summary. So justin’s work has been primarily in quantitative data and looking at it from, like a sky level view. Getting these good statistics on what usage rate looks like. My work has been more qualitative when you actually sit down and interact with have a senior interact with either a website or a tool or technology, you asked them to use it, completing a particular task, and, yeah, the vast majority of them are wanting to do it on mobile as well. And especially from a non-profit perspective, it’s important to keep in mind that sometimes the on ly access someone may have to the internet is, in fact, on a mobile device. They may not have the means or access to like a desktop computer, and so that was something that we found in our research when we redesign tooth wisdom dot org’s, which is a website designed to provide education and accessed older adults to dental clinics, affordable ones in their area. When we did this study, we found that they really wanted to be able to search and that they may be doing this from a mobile device. Yeah, okay, okay, and in the middle, matt at a charity navigator, what was your part in the presentation so way have this predominantly older user base, but we’re also seeing a lot of growth in the twenty five to thirty, twenty four to thirty five year old user community that we’re seeing, so we’re struggling, too make angels to the site that that appeal to a younger generation, but not turn off or lose our older users in the process. So we have a lot of a lot of sort of feedback and help type questions that we get from older users where they just aren’t used to interacting with with websites like younger generations are on dso we’re always trying to sort of factor that in as we make changes to the site or or consider how we present information on the site. It’s. Time for a break pursuant. Their new paper is the digital donation revolution. I always love all the pursuant free resource is very generous. How do you keep up in our one click to buy amazon world? Can you use more revenue? The paper has five proven to work online. Fund-raising tactics that will save you money. It’s on the listener landing page. Of course. Tony dahna slash pursuing radio now back to avoid website ageism. There’s another layer to this two, which is the federally funded organizations. Yes, by law that required, you have to have accessible, abide by and it’s called section five o eight and it was voted on and passed through congress last year, january twenty seventeen and it just went into effect january eighteen o and this is any organization that receives any federal funding whatsoever, regardless of if it’s one hundred percent or if it’s two percent they receive any federal dollars whatsoever, they’re obliged to adhere to accessibility guidelines there, primarily based on the w keg, which is the world wide web consortiums, accessibility, content and six ability guidelines. Okay, thank you for question that. Because we have george in jail on tony? Yes, i apologize. You just walk in front of the prison? No. Yes, i wanted teo put it out there because it’s it’s an important resource. So it’s w c a g and it’s finding online. You see a g? Yes. Okay. Okay. So, so any any federal money, you’re getting grants for service or whatever, but anything at all and the critically this law applies to not just your public facing website, but anything that you use internally as well. So even if it’s just in internal that on ly the other staff members see all the only your millennial staff is using correct yes, it’s pretty burdens. Yeah, so it’s it’s pretty it’s pretty massive. But this is especially critical to seniors and older adults because forty percent of people above the age of sixty five have some sort of disability compared to twenty percent of the general population. And so, if you’re did, if you’re designing for seniors, you’re designing with accessibility in mind. Okay, dahna let’s. See where should we go testing you? So you do the individual testing. So your roll. Justin is more than quantitative research. About bigger, bigger picture recent yeah, my role in the presentation was sort of the higher level trends and another another thing that we all talked about in all near and dear buses, the impact of social media on things you know, we hear a lot about facebook and twitter and linked in and other things nowadays. And so again, there’s another myth that, well, seniors aren’t on technology and they’re definitely not on social media, which is absolutely false also good. The majority of seniors are on some form of social media, most likely facebook, and so if you think about you need to think about how to meet them where they are just convention on our in our engagement earlier today and that’s going to be mostly on facebook, you know, if you’re trying to get people and get them to interact, they’re going to be in a special channel, they’re going to be in facebook, they’re probably not going to be on twitter very often. There’s another myth twitter’s everywhere only thirteen percent of americans used twitter on a regular basis and of course, we all know one of them right here two hundred, chief, so thirteen percent use it on a regular basis thirteen percent of americans use twitter, so? So if you have an older population, you probably shouldn’t spend too much time on your twitter strategy, which is something we worry about, p r all the time you should think about facebook and think about other channels and think about websites and e mail because that’s, where you’re going to find i like coming back to you not because you thought i looked like john mackerel, but, you know, so it provides the broader context. Yeah, i was okay. And then jessica, you’ve done the individual you use your studies? Yes, sitting with seniors watching them way have devices that watch their eyes on a cz they navigate website. No screen reading studies are available from larger group screen reading, so that technology exists you, khun tracking studies tracking studies labbate which yeah, and then those can develop heat maps that will indicate where someone looks on a site but generally speaking, in terms of how seniors look at a website, it’s not very different from how most of us do most of us like to scan websites, we don’t like to read them. The average amount of time you spend on a website is between around single web pages between thirty seconds and sixty seconds. There’s not a whole lot of time, people, people just try to get what they can and they leave on dh that’s true for seniors as well. They’re there for a purpose way know that they don’t come in through the home page. They came from somewhere else they were looking at or looking for something specific, they link to you, they found it, they leave, yes, so he might try to engage them somehow that gets into, you know, marketing and the web site design, but but leave that aside buy-in they came for something specific, and they’re leaving after they get it correct and it’s interesting, because as webb has evolved over time, the home page has become less and less important because, as you said, they’re coming in from google and they’re landing on the pages that they’re looking for. And so for example, on the homepage is right overrated, for example, on our website, tooth wisdom dot or only eleven percent of our users come in through the home page and so it’s interesting. When you’re doing time evaluation oh, how much time should we think about the home page? Maybe eleven percent of your time, matt, i’m guessing. Does that vary for you? Is home page more important for charity? Navigator it’s actually less so so ten percent of our told my intuition eyes a data driven discussion. Ten percent of our total web page views heir of the home page so not not even landing on it. Just visiting it any point during your visit? Ok? Eso there’s there’s ah it’s a similar thing and i think, really the we mentioned five oh, wait like five oh, wait doesn’t talk doesn’t speak it all to how people move through your sight how they locate information on your site it’s about the visibility, the readability, the color contrast so it’s it’s still very important to talk to your users do the kind of studies that jessica did because you’re not going to know you can be one hundred percent five oh, wait compliant and have xero users able tto do what they’re trying to do when they come to your site. That’s absolutely true there’s a difference between accessibility, compliance and accessibility and practice, you have a loss that’s a minimum standard, right? But this is not going as far as you’re describing now. So, matt, you you’re straddling an interesting position because you said, uh, the elder population is most of your users, but you’re the younger population is growing, so you’re constantly straddling. How do you how do you rationalize that? So part of it is we we addressed it to our channels, so so our website, our facebook tend to have an old, older audience. Our twitter followers, as justin noted, tend to be younger, so we can we can sort of target content that way. Another big part of what we have to look at is just we can’t way sort of can never make a really drastic change to something on our website, because that will throw our senior audience even though a younger audiences is almost surprised when you go when i go to a website and nothing’s changed since the last time i’m there that’s sort of the anomaly, but with supporting older users, we’ve made what we thought were very simple changes to our search results page, and it throws people off and they don’t. Understand that it’s not the final destination, it’s just you have to click through to get to the data, and people are people ask us, you know, where did all the data go? Why did you take away all this information when it’s just they’re looking at a searchers all not at the page that used to be looking at so we go, let me go to justin. This is this has implications around the it’s, the way seniors air using the technology. So you’ve demystified ho are not demystified debunk these myths that, as jessica did to seniors or not using technology, they’re not engaged with it, but how they’re using it and their understanding of it is different. I mean, it’s not as sophisticated as someone who grew up with it. Yeah, it has more exposure. Yeah, i think it’s probably not a sophisticated, but they bring their kind of wisdom and life experience to it. So another thing is, what do you really believe when when you see things on the internet? We did this siri’s that things based on the whole fake news and other stuff to look at, how many people actually get news from facebook believe the news and what do they do have someone post something that they don’t like? So what we found is only about one in ten people now believe what they see in social media is news good. Only about a third of those people click through to actually look at the original content about, like, three percent it’s a very small number on then. But the other interesting thing is seniors less likely to have this one bad behavior, which is diferente de follow people who have a different opinion than them? The younger generations are much more likely tio unfriend or unfollowed someone let’s say, tony of a different opinion than idea about politics or some social thing. Seniors are going to ignore it. Younger people are going basically opt out of you and what that means and you feeling about the implication is we all are just star in our own personal echo chamber, right? What we hear, what we want to hear, we’re only talking people have the same opinion and i think that’s a very dangerous point, you know, america’s based on diversity in the melting pot, and if you’re not hearing people from other cultures or believes our angles, whether you think they’re right or not, you should at least listen. Seniors do that younger people do not very interesting. Okay, so dahna matt, i’m interested in what was the little change you made to the search page, that through seniors that you thought was not a big deal, so we actually we service mohr information onto the search result and gave you mohr functionality via the searchers, always doing things like the result s o that the fact that all that functionality and information was showing up on the search page, people didn’t didn’t understand anymore that they had to click in to a charity’s page to see that high that maurin dept is more in depth. They thought they thought you had a cat in a diddle, the right all the all the information down to just what they’re seeing on this screen, right? The one after the after i click search. Exactly, okay, kapin ate it. Is that the right use of the word? Shorten? Keep it simple, alright, reduced, all right, got it. Some best practices. You ah, from your seminar from the workshop description, you promised them best practices for helping the over sixty five, population sharing you s oh, they’re posted on the handshake from our session, which is eighteen ntcdinosaur okay, very good. So we have them posted there, and you should also be ableto flip through materials and find access to those slides. So some of the overarching principles the first one, which is very important is be big, be bold and be obvious. And so this has to do with create things in large text. High contrast, is it good enough? Text tohave a texting, larger obstruction lodging button it’s not that it’s a it’s a good thing to add it’s a nice feature, but you also have to expect quite a lot of people won’t see that available on dh so fun side, but if you make the guy larger, big that’s not still not adequate, so that goes that’s. A lot of people just will ignore that part of the screen, usually because they don’t visually identify it as the thing they’re looking for, like you said, but making text minimum of a year, she educates. The host brings me along. I’m very gracious. I’m grateful for that. Okay? Minimum size, i think, is recommended at seventeen point font for website. Okay, what’s the way know what the average is? We know what typical website is. A lot of people have it smaller than that because standard booker print size is twelve point and so a lot of people rely on that print standard over fifty percent larger yeah, roughly almost fifty percent larger than the standard book. Okay, okay, big, bold and what was it obvious? And so matt and i talked about this senior sometimes having a difficult knowing which items air interact oppcoll and so we recommend, for example, of recognizing the highlight like they don’t know that, like a button is a button on dh, so you might need literal signifiers to make it look like it’s a three dimensional button with a shadow that you would push in three in real life that’s a literal signifier, but it gives a visual indication that something’s interactive ble and i think literal signifier that central ok previous conversation today i was talking with the woman and sheila warren about bitcoin blockchain that you’re talking about the wallet wallet in blockchain. Is that is that what it was? What was the literal signals? That a literal signifier? I would say so i would say so when we refer to something that’s traditional for something that’s new because blockchain is just yes, people just discovering what it even means or how people think of a floppy disk. Us the same little signified, right? Right. A literal signifier. Yeah. Okay, little signal. I always wondered what those were, but when you see a little bank for for your for your savings or something, okay, little signifier, thank you for that. Your host aggression, right? That phrase down okay. And having nothing to do with this conversation, but or very little to do with it. Okay, i used know that matt had talked about how some of the users on their site had also struggled with things that weren’t necessarily obviously buttons. But we’re click. Okay. You got some. You got some best practices for dealing with the sixty five over. Yes. So? So one of the things is is just to make a literal call out. So one of the things we did teo help with. Our search results problem was making sure that there was there was words that said mohr details or more info, something that even though it’s a link and it’s blue and it looks just like every other charity name link that’s in the search results, the fact that it was more of a call to action and clearly something that if you’re saying, oh, i wonder where the details went, you could click on that thing, and it would take you to the following paige so just things that that sort of are very clear next steps or calls to action. The other thing that we’ve done is pages that might be a dead end, like if you click into a history of donation and you’re looking at an individual donation you made and you want to get back to the list for a lot of younger users don’t know they have to hit the back button, but we have we’ll actually put a button that says, you know, return to my donations so that it’s very clear that there’s always a way out from from whatever page you’re on and sort of similar, just sort of having bread crumbs. Sort of at the top of a page that would list sort of the hierarchy within the sight of the page that you’re currently at. So any anything that that sort of keeps people when, when they might think, oh, now i’m stuck. I don’t know where to go next e-giving them sort of an escape valve or an obvious thing to click on has the next step what are the breadcrumbs? What breadcrumbs on pages so breadcrumbs would be like if if you’re if you’re at the top of the charity navigator page and you click into a category and then it cause it will show you the category you clicked on as we list the causes within that cattle. Are you okay? Trail that contrary? Yeah, apple does that. I think they pioneered a lot of websites. Will have that sort of at the top. You are in the nest, right? Baizman nesting. Okay. Okay, justine, i don’t want to leave you out of the best practices conversation, but you know that you’re part of the bone, and i cracked. I definitely have about okay. And all of us share this theory, which is do more research. I mean, i think that the number one stumbling block block that people have and mac gave great examples and just cut you have to know your audience and do research to understand how they’re using your product or your website or whatever and sit down talk of them. It doesn’t have to be expensive, it doesn’t have to be a long process that could be a small focus group of granny’s at home or it could be your friends and family, but do research and have a discipline way. One cautionary note that i’ll put out. I don’t want to get in the acronym jail, but be calm argast drug in jail don’t ruin my little signals are like in jail, the literacy that are the literary sent a liberation, but the idea is don’t collect more data than you need because the gdpr is coming general data protection requirements from europe and so everyone in the united states, if they deal with european counterparts, is going to be required. Tio give people who are citizens of europe and the uk, the ability tio, act like they never visited your sight. Are they you know they could be for gotten and it’s very hard, the finds are extremely expensive. They’re meant to be business shutting fines and so don’t collect the any personally identifiable information you don’t absolutely need and have a way for people opt out of that, let them know what you have and have a way to get rid of it because that’s the requirement and starts at the end of may know yeah, i’ve been doing a lot of reading about that. We covered it on non-profit radio a couple months ago. Yeah, yeah it’s a tough one. But again, you know, the my final answer is you do research, it could be informal can be formal, but gets a users and have a feedback channel because we live in a dynamic world and people expect change. Okay, although matt, when people see change, they don’t always know how to react to it. And sometimes they get panicky. Yeah, and that’s the kind of thing that having a group to test that with, you know i can help you sort of a void that that stumbling block so so even even just being ableto put it in front of a small group of people who are in a representative portion of your audience, you know, putting putting in front of my developers is not a way to know if if are our older audiences going tto find a problem, you have some seniors come out to new jersey, you’re you’re in a small town into joe’s we are alleged wort know what is not gonna rock gonna rock. So so we want we it’s something we want to do more of way. Haven’t we haven’t done it? Jessica’s been ableto really incorporated into her process much more than we have. Okay, we do it all the time. And the thing we always say is you get out of your own conference room. Talk to real people, i think that’s very good advice for a lot of it. Also rates back to what you were talking about. You know, night narrowing your circle of of influence that you allow in, you know, but let’s, get out a little that’s. Good for life. Okay? We have to have, like, a minute or so left. Who wants to wants to put the finishing touches on this subject? A little motivation. Jessica, i’m gonna give it to me, okay? Because i started down that end with with justin, so let’s go. All right, so i think, oh, my gosh, no, i’m on the way they were talking to a friend, you know? We said, you know what i’ve been doing this work? Why is this so important? I think it’s very important, especially in the non-profit community that we don’t just talk the talk, but we walk the walk, and so if we say we’re trying to serve a specific population, it’s very important that we do the work to actually do that. And i believe that building tools and resources and technology for seniors is a way that we can live our mission and serve that population. That’s it rubber. Okay, she’s, jessica meister webb and you ex specialists at oral health america. Well, she’s not also mad dragon, but seated next to her is matt dragon and he’s, a director of engineering at charity navigator, and justin greaves, senior vice president of research porter novelli, justin sorry, jessica and justin. Thank you very much. Thank you. Thank you. This interview has been sponsored by network for good, easy to use dahna management and fund-raising software for non-profits and this is tony martignetti non-profit radio coverage of eighteen ntc and i thank you for being with us. We need to take a break. Wagener, cpas they go beyond the numbers. They’re covering your essentials nine, ninety and audit before they go beyond the numbers. So first is the essentials. Then they go beyond the numbers. Check the matter whether cps dot com start your due diligence there. Then use the contact page or better go in real life. Pick up the phone and talk to you. Eat hooch doom the partner there. Wetness cpas dot com now time for tony’s take two. Thank you. However you’re listening live podcast am fm affiliate if you’re getting my insider alerts each week thank you. I am very glad i’m very grateful that you are with us. Thank you very much. Now let’s, go to grants for newbies. Welcome to tony martignetti non-profit radio coverage of the twenty eighteen non-profit technology conference coming to you from the convention center new orleans. This interview, like all our ntcdinosaur views, is sponsored by network for good, easy to use donor-centric software for non-profits i guess now are janice chan she’s, a tech training specialist. For development and alumni relations. Maybe the tech training special, the one of the only are you the guy? I am a team of one seam of one. She is the tech training specialist in development and alumni relations for johns hopkins institutions, and daniel faulkner is donor engagement coordinator for baltimore community foundation. Ladies welcome. Thank you for having a son like you. Your topic is grant proposals for newbies, bootstrapping research and preparations so that’s perfect, actually, for our audience of twelve thousand small and midsize non-profits some of whom may not be doing grants don’t don’t have to get started on grant’s research. You don’t know how to start putting. Well, there’s a paper depends hyre anymore, but doing out online forms, you know, and that probably should be in the fund-raising mix. You think, daniel, for most be a consideration. Definitely it’s, it’s, it’s. A robust process. But once you get it, handle it it’s really easy to follow year after year. So if you could work it into your schedule it’s definitely worth going active. Okay. Okay, janice, anything you want to add to the motivation step i think you get it gets easier. The first one is always tough to figure out, and it gets easier as time goes on, so don’t get discouraged by exactly first one. Exactly number five will be easier than number one. Exactly. Okay, okay, let’s, talk about some of the research, you know. How do you how do you, uh, find out about grants that might be appropriate for u s o for me, i look for free and easy sources. We love free on free it’s always great. I will plug one, which is foundation center. They have a great website to find funding opportunities they have. If you in baltimore, if you go to a public library, you can actually access their account free. They’re free full membership, most libraries or institutions, educational institutions have a membership through them. So that’s a great resource. If you’re looking for nine nineties, you want information about funders? I use them a lot. Their office in d c is great because they’re really if you call, they’re willing to help you and they’re all volunteered face or they have classes webinars that are free. So i use that a lot in my day today foundation research you khun i’m sorry foundation sent to research. You could do any any of their affiliated library in that country. Exactly. There are many there that you don’t have to be a subscriber. You there so we can be who you want to do for your desktop. You won’t get as many features, but the features that are offered through their free on account justice. Good there are okay. The other other janice free resource is that we could take advantage of besides foundations dahna sure grantspace go for any federal funding and that’s that’s up your alley and you’re usually a lot of states will have a local council of grantmaker zor of foundations, community foundations, humor sort of have a consortium and you can sort of go to one place and get some of them, even have a common common form. Okay, okay. Others other we love free resource is anything besides, maybe your community group. I know. In new york, there’s new york regional duitz association of grantmaker is nigh rag. So there’s that goes well, the foundation center. Any others were involved when we have a bag, which is another resource, like a bag thing. Well, i would say community foundations are a great way. Usually most their websites give a general opportunity list of what’s going on for their fund holders. So in baltimore, we have over eight hundred funds that come through our foundation. So that’s a great source. If you know your community foundation, get in contact with them to see what’s available and how they can help. Okay? Okay, anymore i’ll keep asking. You say there are no more also like your state or local organization of a non-profit associations. So, maryland, the suspicion non-profit organizations has some of those. Resource is that you can, you know, make an appointment schedule to use as well. Ok, for research there, there for research research. Resource is also okay. Okay. Anything else? I think that covers everything the free and easy. The user friendly ones that are a great start there won’t overwhelm people. Those are really good sources to use when you’re first starting out. Okay. These are also for not only finding well grants, doing your own research around foundations that may fundez your fundez or work. These are all resource. Is that exactly that? Well, okay. Okay. What’s, the next step. So now we now we know where we should be applying. We’re taking it step by step. Danielle, where should we where do we go next? Well, for me, after i’ve done all the research, i have a proponent of writing one grant and then from there outsourcing it and using it to write many multi purpose. Exactly. I call it my my thanksgiving dinner of granting if you go one grantspace irv’s, everyone. So that’s, where most of my work comes in, i would say gathering information that pertinent to your organizations, so that might be your mission statement all your financial papers on the irs, things working with your program team to make sure you have the right lingo in a language down to explain the project that you’re want funding for take some real time to gather that all in one location. So when you sit down and write, you don’t have to go and have to go back and forth. I’m a really big component of doing all the hard work first, so then you can focus on the writing if you that’s not your strong point there’s also a point that’s tangential to that which is make sure you follow all the instructions exactly. Hide everything just for doesn’t really matter how burdensome you think it is. Yes. And they say twelve twelve point fonts on double do it, it’s not a suggestion. Find tabs? Yeah, ever. What was jonas finder town that they need to be labeled? Just do it. Okay, it’s like, in that sense, it drives me of dealing with government bureaucracy. I’m just they may ask things that don’t make sense to you, but and it may not even make sense to the people who are asking for it. It may have been twenty years ago, but just do it okay, just comply. You know you’re asking for their their support. You gotta comply, right? And i’d like to add a point to that to write figuring out like one of things we talked about our session was having a go or no go less right there’s things that yeah, there’s some hoops that you’re going to jump through it’s going to be worth it. But you also wanna they’re going to be some things that maybe is a stretch too far for organizations. Kind of taking you off mission. You’re kind of drifting. From things. So you want to make sure that that’s really feasible, invisible as well? Okay, that’s a very good point, especially in terms of mission, you know, it’s only it’s only sort of related to what you do, you know, they’re going to read through that, right? And you’re probably gonna be unsuccessful in the grant anyway, you know. So why try toe conform your work, tio what they’re looking for? Better to stick with exactly what you do, find funders for that makes it ok. But look at the different angles of what it is that you do that might be appealing to that funder, but it’s, so good to be at the end of day. What you’re actually trying to find accomplice, you gotta be on the same page, okay? Oppcoll you talk about i’m just drawing from what was in your session description? Oh, interpreting instructions is that is that basically what we’re talking about? Or is there more spending one? Yeah, just read them. I would have after you’ve written the actual brand and this is way after have someone not associated with the organization or maybe a co worker who’s, not in the process. Read the instructions of unread your grants so they can look at it from a different eye. Make sure you hit all the targets because if you’re in it and your writing it, you might think you answered that question correctly, but in reality he didn’t, and someone outside of your space well under sand so i would definitely, if you have the time, try to get someone outside of your world to read it and the instructions fired-up anything that janice you want to add, i think also, i don’t like to start with what’s needed less when i go through the instructions like, okay, let’s, before we can gather everything’s, make that checklist that i don’t lose something or i can get somebody else rolling on whatever i need, i need their help with. Okay. Last november, i hosted a panel at the foundation center. I’ve done a fair amount of speaking there. It was not a great writer or professional, but it was a panel of grayce grant oars, funders and one non-profit and the subject matter was building a relationship with the institution, even including at the applications, you know, some some explicitly say no calls. So oppcoll but others are more open to communication or maybe it’s no calls and, you know, we take emails, but talk a little about that early stage where you’re still rating, having getting questions answered, you know, not being afraid, anybody? Well, i’ve never come across a call for a proposal that didn’t have instructions on if you have questions during the process, they always air usually upfront about that which they prefer follow that to a t and that that’s what i told my freelance clients the same way, you know, if you do have a question, let me go through that process for you, but don’t like magically run into that person for that thunder that’s not really appropriate, but follow their rules just like the instructions for the grant follow the rules. What do you mean that people see through that stuff? Yeah, you know, it becomes law fake and phony, and you don’t want that, i don’t know and if the end, if they don’t write, i mean funders know they’ve your non-profit what you’re looking for us funding, right? Like that’s already in the back, right? You want to you want to find out? What? What it is that that fundez hoping to achieve through their grantmaking so that you can line that up. But i think also, if they don’t have explosives constructions about, don’t call, don’t e mail anything like that, right? You know, it doesn’t mean i don’t feel like you can’t. You’re like, you know what? Like our boardmember knows somebody on their board, let’s, just see if that would be okay to have a meeting. Tto, learn more and meet with their program officer to see you. Is this a good fit? Doesn’t line up or, you know, it should be it go looking elsewhere. Good. How about tracking deadline? Make sure we go to a lot of details were like twenty five minutes, yeah, don’t hold back, don’t hold out on non-profit video sures deadline, so deadlines ah, and i’m one of those people would put, like, you know, two weeks ahead of the actual deadline on my calendar, but i think that there are a lot more, you know, when i did a lot of my grantwriting is before a lot of project management skills were easier to use and they are, so i just put a lot of things in a spreadsheet on dh kind of, like project manage things that way think they’re a lot more project management tools now, right where you can put in due date it’s gonna trigger reminder and send you an email or, you know, when you log into that system, et cetera, but i think that that is really key, because if you you know, if you don’t similar, like if you’re applying for a job, you don’t follow the instructions, you don’t meet their time frames, you don’t show that you’re respectful of their time, they’re going like, why am i exactly? We have a deadline it’s an easy right off that in the next way didn’t say postmark said, bye you know you’re gonna be disqualified our land and also building and buffer times using technology. First of all, that’s a technology help brovey times yeah, you’re not gonna be able to devote a solid week to this, so don’t leave five business days before the deadline to get started on that right? Be realistic about what you can do in the time for him, a lot of opportunities may pop up it’s a rare with grants cause cycles are pretty much the same, but be realistic if you are a team of one r office that small, i don’t think you can pull off the whole grant and a time frame of a month that’s a lot of work to do for one person if you’re a small office buy-in some opportunities you have to wait for just go after next year, but yeah, be realistic about those deadlines and don’t think you could just write a grant overnight. I thought clients asked me that, and i always turned them down right away. No, you won’t get my best work at that, so yeah. Just be realistic about what you can produce. What your staff can take on that’s also related to what we were just talking about it, asking questions of the the foundation of the thunder. You know, if the question is coming the day before the due date yeah, that looks back that you know, that even you can’t mask it. They know they’re down you again. You’re gonna be gonna be found out. So all right, plan ahead. Leave yourself enough time. So even a month is really not enough time for a small shop. I like to do at least four to six months and that’s if everything is weight, should be. But there are those rare occasions where something pops up. You can’t miss out, you need it. That’s where i would say if you’ve already written that one grant, you’re prepared already so you can dust it off for what you need from it. And you can apply to that one that pops up within a month. Otherwise, i probably wouldn’t go under a month just because of what you have to produce. If it’s a brand new grant and if they’re asking for a lot. Of extra things that you don’t have time to produce in a you know, good manner, i think the weather you’re starting from scratch like your writing a grand for a new program that you haven’t had to write one for me for right? Like a lot of stuff you can recycle, but some things you can’t or like, they’re taking a very different tack on whatever it is you’re doing. I think the other thing is that the attachments, right? If they want their like budget for mated, a format, a specific way, you you know, your finance person doesn’t have that time, right? So i think just being cognizant of that and being cognizant, what you’re asking of your coworkers will also make the process smoother because you’re always like, i always worked closely with the finance people with our program south and the better relationships i had with them, like, okay, let’s, be realistic about this and also is this realistic for me to ask for? Or is there are there some adjustments that we should make that’s so meet the put the funder is looking for, but that aren’t going to be just a pain for everybody to actually implement if you get the grand also good point too you’re going to be counting on other people? Or is that another reason to allow enough time? Exactly? I don’t want to make enemies in your you got enough opportunity. Do that elsewhere around. Same team here. Okay, i gotta take a break. You’ve heard the talis moughniyah lll from lee elementary school, where they’re getting a monthly donation from tell us for the credit card processing of a parent owned company that’s the secret to the monthly pass of revenue from tell us, ask the people close to your organization who owned businesses that would they switch to tell us that’s the key? Get those insiders started tony dahna em a slash tony tell us now back to grants for newbies anything else around this discussion about deadlines? More hold out on us now don’t wait to submit an online application so the last day like i always i actually block, would block off time on my calendar because i definitely like the day before submitted and like their website has gone down, you know, like will this count against us? We don’t know, maybe we should have submitted it earlier, and so then you end up panicking about it. You know why you schedule it, like at least three days in a fans for, like, an online submission, or, you know, maybe till i get it in the mail, get it, you know, tracks, you know, it’s worth getting a track for that piece of minds. I once drove across town and actually dropped it off. But that’s, an idea you got there twenty minutes before that funders office closed. Got there, just in the nick of time. It was a day off, but that was not ideal. Don’t do that. Don’t do that. Don’t let this happen to your exact a proud moment, okay, but thanks for sharing. Hyre. A prepper preparing for online submissions. We just talked about that clearly. Tips for online. We got more time to get now, when is your sessions? Have you had it? This morning. Okay. Now you spoke for an hour on this topic. And you? We did. Okay. What? I think it was just right. Join now. We’ve been together for seventeen minutes. So are like sixteen minutes. We have a minute of prep. You got more. Don’t hold out on us. Ah, fun fact about me. I love reading nine nineties that’s. If you know what those are, the virus form nine. Ninety. Exact wired by latto you like you’re not talking about the easy no, no, no, no. Thirty patients postcard postcard don’t no, no, actually, i started high school with a non-profit i was volunteering for that’s how we fund-raising to come back because we’re all volunteers so i was taught very of sixteen. Seventeen howto break them down and i enjoy it now for sure somebody tips on how to decipher how to get out of the good things to know you can find out who you need to contact as far as who to invite to her events, if you’re afraid that religion is the foundation, you’re looking at the wound, yes, so they have to list who was involved with our foundation. So i’m talking about their board, who their highest paid person is our persons, you don’t have to disclose your five thing exactly he’s on the nine, ninety okay would say if you are not inviting those people to her events, you should, because those are the people who have power clearly in that organization. If they don’t know who you are and you’re not on their radar, you should be, and that list it verifies, hey, they’re important to be on this form. I should probably know who they are, and they should know who i am so that i always tell people check that list out is web sites aren’t always updated quickly on dh that’s, a yearly thing that the irs form also their disclosure of where they give money. People can say a lot of things, but what they report to the arrests have to be legit, so looking at how much they give tio organizations that are like yours, so if you’re, you know, arts organization and you find a nine ninety where they’ve given in the past, but their highest gift has been two thousand dollars. I wouldn’t go for them for ten thousand dollars. I would stay in that range of okay under two thousand it’s the first time, maybe a thousand, but it gives you a good indication of what they’re capable of giving that’s also looking at their salaries if their executive director only makes fifty thousand and you need that probably shouldn’t ask for fifty thousand. But you should definitely okay, little things like that where you can break that down on nine nineties there free. You don’t have to. Everyone has tohave one. Some of them are located on people’s websites, so they’re really easy to find this buy-in store have foundation. They d’oh d’oh scores another one. I sir, has its foundation, of course, has attorney xero back-up probono also happens. We’re together database e-giving well, yeah, yeah, so little things like that. I kind of check on what i do take on a freelance client and they say, oh, i want to go after this grant, i check out that foundation first and say, is this worth your time? Because they might have grand ideas off. Oh, they’ll give me this when in reality no, they’re not so it’s. A good way to double check yourself and it’s a free source and they have to give it something else that can happen is referrals from board members, but not bona fide like just right. Oh, i heard i heard the rockefellers funded. Yeah, great. You know, let’s see, if that i dont happen, you know our work, you know, they have a lot of money, a rockefeller have a lot of money and gets to exactly everybody knows that. And if they’re not allied with what we’re doing now, what’s the point. Sometimes you have to press back, push back. Otherwise you’re going to be real. Or if you find in baltimore, we have certain family foundations where they give to similar organizations throughout the year if you’re new on the scene and saying, hey, is this a good opportunity or good contact? Tohave you can find similar people are doing your work and say, well, they’ve already got a contact with them. They might like me too. So it’s a good way to say like, are we on the same level, you know. Will they even, like, welcome, ian, if they’re already on that same mind. So i like to look at that. Zoho your peers are exactly know your peers are going after. So you khun get a piece of that pie. Okay. All right. Those were excellent. Thank you, danielle. Insider like pro tips for the nine. Ninety it’s. A weird thing i liked. I glad somebody likes to look at them. It’s mitch, what else? We got several minutes together. Somebody but somebody had brought up like they had this sort of weird program model. And anyhow, i think one of things that’s important to think about is as much as we harp on following the instructions and following, you know, everything that they asked for the tea. Like what? Their contact preferences are, et cetera. Also don’t feel like you should be boston by that. Right. So that’s that’s, i think where working your network has the potential. Teo, open up. You know, other ideas. So i get in terms of corporate funders. Right, corp corporations usually have both, like the they might have a corporate foundation, but there’s a marketing dollars that they give. Out of to write for a slightly different reasons, right? But if you have a conversation with whoever’s in charge of giving right, or even if it’s somebody in their corporate social responsibility department, right, you can have that conversation about, you know it does this make here’s what we’re doing here, some opportunities for your organization to get involved, you know, maybe if employees engagements important to them, whatever it is, right? You finding out what that angle is for, what they’re trying to achieve through there giving right, whether it’s on the marketing event sponsorship side or they really like that grants more formal grantmaking side for it or some bridge of the combination of the two right, and then also corporations, national corporations in this half like local community e-giving where that local store of, you know, say of a large chain store, they might have that store manager might have the ability to give out small grantspace right, it’s a good way to get your foot in the door and say like, hey, can we get we work across the state? Can we get? Is it possible to get funding at that state level? So i think don’t be afraid to sort of, like, figure out what is your foot in the door to start that conversation with them and that’s also where you can find out. Okay, you know what? Maybe this isn’t really good fit, but people move around to write and they remember you like you’ve had a really good relationship with them. You’ve, like, always kept him updated, invited them to your events, right? See what we’re doing, even if you’re not doing it right now, maybe you personally, like i would make, you know, like we’ve gotten i’ve seen people like, you know, like, okay, my company isn’t doing right now make a small personal gift because i think you guys are doing great work, right? And those people have moved, and i’ve also see them come back and say, like, you know what? I’m a different organization that now funds programs like yours, so you know, like, the more you can build those relationships and have those conversations just get on people’s radars, as danny mentioned, the more people you know, just like personal networking, the more people know what you’re doing and see that impact it has, then i think that’s more people can advocate for you. Someone who’s volunteered to re grants for review. Ah lot of the decisions come down to do i know who this person is. Do i know who this grant us for? Andi it’s very shallow thing to say like, well, i don’t know who that is, why i give money even though they’re doing great work, but it’s a reality. If you’re not on their radar, why would they take a chance on giving this x amount of money? So you really do have to think about how you’re engaging those people that you’re going after and don’t just approach them when you need money approached me around so they know who you are and they feel comfortable getting with that amount of money that isn’t that the same as what we do with individual? Yes, come to the clinic and engaged. We educate them just like them. And then, you know, the ultimately that there may very well be a solicitation for some, you know, for something and and janice, you’re point is very good to terms of corporate, you know, it’s not only about money, but employee engagement, your opportunities it’s often very important, right? Or if they’re start opening headquarters in a new community, and then i have a relationship with that community, and you, d’oh, right, that’s, a good place to position yourself as well. Okay, uh, we still have another couple of minutes left, like men and a half or so together. Daniel, i guess. My three takeaways for writing, because that’s, my background study, playwriting. But this is how i get to write as well. It’s all over it’s weird, but i would definitely say, win or lose, funded or not, i was under thank you letter i’m a big proponent of thank you letters that’s part of the follow-up you never know when friend funding will become available. So that little piece of thank you, you know, regardless, we’ll keep them engage. I always say simple equals fundez so you might have a beautiful paragraph about everything you’re doing, but when it gets down to it, it might be too much. So that goes back to the instructions. If they have a word limit, follow it. But also you’re getting too wording and just what you’re doing. Just take it out. They really want to look at the numbers and the outcomes and how they’re going to get that money back if there is opportunity for that looked like that. And then your last one kind of brief. Last one said you had three three takeaway? No, i don’t never mind. Okay. Thinking. Sorry, right to protest to yeah, those are the two big ones too big to take away. Okay. All right. We are going to leave it there. All right, so my pleasure they are. They are jenise chan, the technical training specialist in development and alumni relations for johns hopkins institutions on danielle faulkner dahna engagement coordinator at baltimore community foundation. It sounds like she’s also a freelancer. Yes. Okay. Okay. Girl right. That’s, the freelance for arts funding in baltimore city. We’re looking for that girl right where you are, right? Tio? Yep, like playwright. Okay. Danielle janis, thanks so much. So much. Tony martignetti non-profit radio coverage of eighteen, ninety si, thank you for being with us. This interview sponsored by network for good, easy to use donor-centric software for non-profits, thanks so much next week. Storytelling and free facebook fund-raising if you missed any part of today’s show, i beseech you, find it on tony martignetti dot com were supported by pursuing online tools for small and midsize non-profits data driven and technology enabled. Tony dahna slash pursuant radio by wagner, cps guiding you beyond the numbers wetness, cps dot com and by telus credit card and payment processing, your passive revenue stream durney dahna slash tony tello’s, a creative producers claire meyerhoff family boats in the line producer shows social media is by susan chavez and our music is by scott stein of brooklyn. You with me next week for non-profit radio. Big non-profit ideas for the other ninety five percent. Go out and be great. You’re listening to the talking, alternate network, waiting to get you thinking. Nothing. Good. Hello, this is bruce chamlong, host of the web design and technology coach. Join me and my guests every tuesday from eight to nine pm as we discussed the latest in web design, social media, marketing, search, engine optimization and technology way also discussed popular topics, including ward press, making money online, better koegler rankings and more every month way. 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Nonprofit Radio for May 4, 2018: 18NTC/NTEN & SMS Fundraising

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We kick-off our coverage of the Nonprofit Technology Conference with the host’s leader. Amy Sample Ward is CEO of Nonprofit Technology Network and our social media contributor. Learn why the conference is wildly popular and why you need to join NTEN. I’ve been a member for years. (Recorded at the Nonprofit Technology Conference)

 

 


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Hello and welcome to tony martignetti non-profit radio big non-profit ideas for the other ninety five percent on your aptly named host oh, i’m glad you’re with me. I’d suffer the effects of your atrocious if you made me sweat with the idea that you missed today’s show eighteen ntcdinosaur n ten we kick off our coverage of the non-profit technology conference with the hosts leader amy sample ward is ceo of non-profit technology network and our social media contributor. She explains why the conference is wildly popular and why you need to join in ten i have been a member for years that was recorded, of course at the non-profit technology conference and as sametz fund-raising can this help you? Lots of non-profits are successful with it. It’s more than text to give the details of setting goals list growing finding the tech you need andme or come to you from rachel kottler with mask and neil and company teyla dankmyer at up land mobile messaging and sandy fox principle of smart as a fox also recorded at the non-profit technology conference on tony’s take two, my number one eighteen and tc takeaway responsive by pursuing full service fund-raising data driven and technology enabled tony dahna slash pursuant radio by wagner cpas guiding you beyond the numbers witness cps dot com bye tell us turning credit card processing into your passive revenue stream durney dahna may slash tony tell us here is the kickoff of ntcdinosaur bridge with eighty ninety seay and antenna and amy sample ward welcome to tony martignetti non-profit radio coverage of eighteen ntc non-profit technology conference. This interview is sponsored by network for good, easy to use donor and fund-raising software for non-profits we’re in the convention center in new orleans, and this is our interview number two of our coverage, and i’m very pleased to have made me stop award with us. Hello, aimee semple work. Hello interview number two i’m sad i didn’t get number one. I think i should have hustled you. I should’ve hustled. You were booked or we were booked already. Yeah, these interviews go fast, it’s true, they do go fast on non-profit video. Amy, of course, is the ceo of intent, the non-profit technology network and the social media contributor for non-profit radio. Now, when we’re on, we’re on non-profit radio, but not here. We say your social. Media contributor and ceo of intent. Yes. You gotta flip it. Yeah, but here it in ten. Your ceo first. Yeah, i appreciate that. Okay. Yeah. That’s. What? That’s. Really? Thank you. Congratulations. Thank you. Yeah, you’ve been working. The staff is working very hard on this for months and months. It’s true. Hopefully it feels like we worked hard, but that we are not working hard now and that you do not see a lot of stress on us now, i know. I see a lot of fun. Good. Okay. Good. Haley was very fun. Way checked in. Everything. Oh, good. Nice. Um, nothing. He came by today giving us high. Yeah. Um, before we talk about in ten, let’s, talk about eighteen ntc. Yeah, i saw thirteen hundred and twenty first time. First time attendees. Congratulations. Yeah, thanks. Yeah, yeah. You like that? You like, like, the first time we like our first timers. Yeah. I mean, it’s not. I think there are some folks who are in a position both too, really, really want teo and really, really be able to come every single year, regardless of location. But we also hear from a lot of folks. That that’s not really the way their organization has budgeted what we actually hear a lot of is that people come one year and then they rotate through their team so that each person gets to go, for example, every three years and, you know, they rotate who gets to go, so even those they’re great fun? Yeah, totally. Food is excellent. Totally. So we’ve got, you know, about half of the attendees are first timers, but when we do, when we run the numbers on, if their organization is first it’s much lower because it’s that individuals first time that the organization has been here in some way or another in the past, right, more people being exposed, yeah, exactly which is kind of part of our goals that it isn’t just one person in an organization trying to do this work right now that we know that intent is not only for technologists exactly. We don’t only want the technologists if you have one, right? If you have an apple and if you have one exactly, listeners do not. But if you do, we don’t want that person be the sole person coming right? I’ve already met a couple of other ceo executive director’s exactly how many total attendance here? I haven’t seen the final number, but people were even registering still yesterday. So i think when i saw it yesterday, it was that twenty one twenty three. Something like that so well, over twenty, one hundred, we’ll just leave it at that and not have to get a specific number. Two plus. Yeah. Excellent. Ah, one hundred thirty sessions, one hundred thirty sessions over three hundred speakers. Over ninety percent of sessions have at least one non-profit staff member speaking. Yes. That’s important? Yes. You like to go beyond the consultants? Yeah. Yeah. Okay. What’s that’s gonna share about non-profit we’ve have ah, we’ll have twenty five or twenty six. Interview scheduled. Wow. The over the two and a half days. Yeah, very pleased with that. I didn’t. I didn’t count the number of most most are panels of at least two. Yeah, a bunch of threes, even even a sprinkling of force. Wow, i have to have some double up. Mike’s. Yeah. Um, so i don’t know. We’ve got twenty five to fifty, seventy five it’s got to be eighty, ninety speakers, i would think. Wow. That’s. Awesome, yeah, significant portion. Yeah, um, what else about what else? About eighteen, ntc. Well, well, one of the stats, i guess you could say that i shared this morning, was, you know, and ten has hosted the ntc, but also the community had been self organizing even before antin started. So, in a way, the ntc has lasted longer than intend, but for all intensive purposes will say as long as in ten. So, you know, nineteen years. But we’ve only been in new orleans one other time, and that was ten years ago, and there are sixty four, folks registered who were at that anti seat to, yeah, you love data way. Well, it tells such an interesting story, right? Sixty four different people, and of those sixty four, the vast majority of them. It was their first. So new orleans was there first, and they have stayed for ten years. So hopefully, you know, a lot of those thirteen hundred. All right, we’ll stay for ten years. Now. We know that they’ve stayed, yes, not like they came ten years ago, and then they skip nine years. No another back, that’s what i mean, they skipped a couple at different times, but pretty consistently stayed the whole time. Okay, yeah, just wantto. Durney any questions lingering about pressure, about, share, the validity of what we’re saying, yeah, don’t question the data, okay? Falik challenge, yeah, that’s fair, healthy challenge. Eighteen ntcdinosaur at. You know, i know something once but you, you are actively. Pursuing something that you and i have talked about, ok, on eighteen ntcdinosaur it is the the affiliated but non not official activities. Maybe i’m not calling them the right thing, but you know what i’m talking about? I’m just not going there, i think. Ntcdinosaur hyre okay. Yoga morning run explorer, the french quarter, but journaling buja e i thought i thought bull journaling was twitter, but i was mistaken. So these are things that are organically created. Bye bye community members coming here, but you give them a template and a format to follow, and then you have some disclaimers. You know, it’s not our event need to coordinate with people who are creating it, but it’s it’s an organic growth you’re empowering the community to take the conference and mold it the way they would like it to be in some small respect, yeah, totally it’s time for a break pursuant, they’re not just producing valuable digital content on the listener landing page. O goodness no, they’re professional fundraisers and campaign counsel. They can work with you on sight or remotely to get your campaign started or if it’s flagging to get it re energized assessment case. Development major gift prospecting, volunteer coaching, campaign management all of that stuff. They do it all start at tony dahna slash pursuing radio. Now, back to amy. Sample ward. Say more about that. Yeah, there are a lot of different aspects. So there are some things that we definitely take kind of use your language a little bit more effort and do create the template and some examples and get them going and that’s things like the diner rounds. So anton actually does basically nothing for that. We just say you should go to dinner with five other people. Here is a google doc where you can write down where you have you just call, make a dinner reservation anywhere for six people. Put it in this document, and then five people add their name. Total strangers that want to go to dinner with you. And then the next person just copies the same, you know, table puts in. I’ve made a reservation under my name at this restaurant. Do you want to go there? Five people add their names before the conference even started, every single dinner spot was fall. People were calling us and asking for help making. More reservations because restaurants were false, everybody wanted to be able to go, and i think it’s a great example both of what we do but what anybody can do the community is happy to self organize, but they often don’t know what’s allowed or what would work. They’ve never been there. They don’t know what the restaurants are, they see sametz samples and i think, okay, i too, can call a restaurant and make a reservation for six p m and that’s all i have to do, i don’t have to know those people. I don’t have to go recruiting, solicit yeah, i don’t have to recruit friends to come and ten will promote that the dying around is happening, and now i get to meet five other people. We all just pay for our own dinner like that, you know, there’s, no other logistics that i think people get intimidated by in trying to be a part of an event like i have to get six people who are going, we’re going to the conference and right? And how would i find them? And yeah, and i think that’s true, certainly in person events like this, but all the time in organization, so long as you give people the template, you know, you tell them what the lanes on the the bowling line are, they want to do it, you know, and they want to have a place, especially when it’s something like this that lets them connect with other community members, you know, and meet people, and we all have to eat dinner, right? So why not, you know, do it in this path for smart? Yeah, it’s and is consistent with what you and i have talked about on the show, right? Organic growth within the community? Yeah, exactly. Some boundaries ends a little assistance. Yeah, exactly. Yeah, and like you said, i think the disclaimers are important, not toe, you know, not what brings past that, you know, to make sure people know and then is not responsible for your dinner reservations if you didn’t make it, we don’t know any details about, you know, so just and i think that goes with creating the guidelines or whatever. So they know where the organization stops and you, as the community member, have to start with responsibility. But after that, i mean, you’ve seen people just totally take it and build it how they want it to be. I don’t see that a lot of other conferences that kind of allowing that spaces take it. Yes, tio, take it in a direction where you’d like to, you know, very simply and within reason. That’s got a lot. I know you don’t want to trash talk your your your conference competition, but yeah, bond, i’m not trash talking, but i don’t i don’t i don’t see it. It’s part of the special sauce event ten. How do you come up with these good ideas? That was that. Was that a staff driven idea? Yeah. I mean, a lot of these ideas are staff driven ideas that we see in other places, not even necessarily other conferences, but just another aspects of our life. For we read a book blogged about something, and it gave us an idea. But we have all staff and t c meetings, you know, all year round and staff just bring ideas to those and say, oh, i was at this event in town this weekend, you know, for my knitters group and somebody mentioned this. What if we turned that around and did it this way for the anti see, you know, and then staff either say that’s a horrible idea. No. Or yeah, let’s do it. And who wants to be on the project team and let’s build out a plan. And a lot of it comes kind of through staff. But from the community, you know, from from engaging with them, hearing their ideas and a lot of our online groups. The different kind of topical peer groups that we have, we’ll bring ideas to, like, they’ll be having a monthly call and discuss something and say, is there a way we could turn this into an open conversation at the ntc was such a interesting idea that we had. I bet more people have ideas to share, and then we work with them on, you know, creating a space for that conversation to happen. You know, let’s, talk a little about staff. Yeah. How many? How many staff? Fourteen. Okay. And not all in portland, oregon. No. Portland is our only actual office, but then we have three virtual staff. Three virtual. Okay? Uh, yeah. You know, i love intern you doing? Remember? You’re on the show every month. Yeah, and you have been since show number one hundred. Yeah, coming up on four hundred, oh, my god. S o that you would’ve joined in two thousand eleven. We started in july of two thousand ten. You would’ve started in july of two thousand eleven on and you’re coming up on seven years. July. Wow, really? I think i have that right because you were on the first time you around was shown number one. It was, and we’re coming up on show number four hundred. So, however you slice that that’s, another three hundred shows, six years, it’s, six or seven years. Wow, that’s. Awesome, you know. And when you were at the time when you first game, you were never membership director, yeah, before you became before you were promoted, moved up tio tio. Yeah, but also i love intent. I love it so much. Sometimes i over think it. But, you know, the staff is i mean, the staffers, like motivated, yeah, motivated and driven are synonyms. So there’s, no point staying motivated, driven, but like a bee. Ah, a little bee colony, and they call it a day, and they, you know, they really just care about interacting with people in helping the broader mission, which is smart and use of technology that you listeners people in small and midsize non-profits can focus more on your program in mission work and not stress so much over over tech, right? Did i did i phrase that, yeah, that’s all great, yeah, okay, so smart staff it’s, not even possible toe shout out the people who have worked on eighteen ntcdinosaur because it’s all it’s, all staff? Yep. Okay, all right, yeah, i believe that there. Then let’s talk about and ten as a membership organization as more than just his conference, as awesome as it is every year. And then in the end, we’ll ask about remind me if i forget about nineteen. Ninety? Okay, whatever we can say about nineteen ntcdinosaur forget great. Okay, um, intense it’s. A very affordable membership for for non-profits. Right? Correct. Yes, you are. You acquainted with thea? Well, levels of how just how affordable it is. Well, our membership dues if you you could join us. An individual just joins individual. But you could also join as an organization. And if you’re joining as either a non-profit aura for-profit, both organization types have dues levels based on your annual budget. So if you are a really small organization, you only be paying seventy five dollars a year for all of your staff. Have membership way. Don’t count. How many staff do you have that i want to remember? As many staff won’t participate? Yeah. The organization has a membership for them. Yes, exactly. On then. And then the tears go up from there. But you can see by the fact that small organizations are at seventy five it’s. Not a lot, regardless of how large your organization is. And what do you get for your seventy five dollars? Well, ah lot. Of folks at this, you know, here at the nbc now know that they get a massive discount on their ntcdinosaur ation. That is a big perk. For sure. On dh, you get discounts on all of our other educational programs, including fifty percent off the price. If you are trying to achieve your professional certificate so that’s a huge discount to get a professional certificate. You have a profession. You have a certification program now, right? Yes, we have. Ah, non-profit technology. Professional certificate. Okay, yet we’ll talk about that, too. Okay. Now try to remember a few things. Okay? Non-profit technology certificate. Okay. Yeah. Yeah. So what send off educational programs? But when we asked members what has the most value for them and what’s most important to them about being a member it’s less of the transactional discounts and much more about getting to be a member of this community come and getting to find those people that can answer their questions when they did them answered, but also find those people who could answer questions they didn’t know they had. And they just want some colleagues, you know, they just want people that they can connect. With regularly and you could do that virtually there also meet ups around there in person, tech clubs that are kind of monthly free events, lots of online groups, tons of online content, and we see a lot of that in ten community really engaged on social media to especially twitter, and you don’t need to follow-up necessarily the organization if you don’t want to. But if you follow the hashtag and p tech for non-profit technology there’s just so much they’re happening that’s really, this community using that hashtag let’s talk about some of the virtual communities that you do communities of practice, though i have that right way, just call them online groups, but they are essentially a community practice. You know they’re kind of peer groups, and many of them are formed on a topic like digital communications or using wordpress for your website so things that maybe are a part of your professional identity. You know what your job is or what you do at work. There are also a few groups that are a little blurry between professional and personal identities a women in technology, for example, but you can also create a group if you see that there is not a group for you, we are happy to support you creating that group and you could become an organizer and we’ll help you make sure people are in your group and they’re engaged and you have access to all of our tools. You can run a free monthly call or webinar, you know, whatever you want to do to engage your group, you don’t have to you put in the time and we cover the costs. And do you need to be a member of inten pretty joining those krauz groups, you know, that’s that’s, part of let’s talk about that part of your mission, which is goes beyond the membership, right? Yeah, i mean, ultimately and ten is a five oh, one c three non-profit like, basically everybody else in the community were not in association. We don’t. I believe in having a big pay wall that says you can only access our content are access the community because you paid to get that access because if we did that, we wouldn’t meet our mission and we wouldn’t be able to reach as many non-profits as we need. Teo, that need help. So it’s a pretty open community. And we hope that that helps people, whether they can pay or not still benefit and the tech meet ups around the country. Do we know how many? You know how many? Well, there’s a couple dozen that were brought also. Yeah, we do have some in canada and over in europe. Okay, yeah, a couple of dozen in the u s okay, but of course, you know, you always have the virtual groups exactly fall back to. Yeah, there is. And if you and if there is an attack club in your city, you can also start one of those. We’ll help you support that, too. Okay? Okay. Um, what else would you tell me? Uh, tell me what else you want to talk about. That professionals. And if we get well, we’re going to get way, way. Have a little enough time to talk. Ok. I know. I did write down. So now i can remember. Okay, nineteen, ninety sea and also the commercial traffic you’re off the hook. More about in ten. What? Oh, no. Anything any insider? Who? Anything. Insider group. You know it’s, a smart group. You know, we try. To not have any inside knowledge. Really? I mean, you know, we have quarterly town halls where we share what’s happening behind the scenes were working on what’s going on, folks ask us questions, we always answer them publicly, you know, we we really try to not have inside, i mean, other than like, you know, how the sausage is made kind of way we do still share that we actually get a lot of questions in the summertime about hey ntcdinosaur great, would you have a call with me? And, you know, teach me how you did dine around xero how you did birds of a feather or some aspect of the conference that other folks liked and staff always take those calls and tell other organizations how to do the same thing that we do, but we don’t necessarily write it all down publicly because it would be the most boring long you’ve ever way community be much more grateful for a twenty minute phone call. Yes, a twenty page document, right? Yeah, she sure is what we did and three sarah more i mean, you’re you’re chatty group yeah, people we like chat, they do they do. You do, you neo-sage okay, let’s, let’s, talk about the certificate, so taking pictures. Thank you for shooting picture. Thank you, where’s. It gonna be twitter, tweeting. Okay, thank you. Yes, we love well, his pocket and twitter. We’ll stick with the twitter. I won’t pursue the pocket check ben’s twitter right now, then let’s, give me showed up. Yeah, then bisbee. Yeah, yes, it is, ben. Welcome to the welcome you want to. You want to pull up what has been due. No, no, no, because we’ve already shared ben’s name and that’s enough for ben it’s. Good. Okay, osili. Ah, on saying not with just in case i don’t know, we’re picking this up on micro ben is saying not with not with the c e o all right, all right, well, thank you for thank for promoting. You hear what he said? Well, i don’t know if anybody i didn’t hear that part. So, listeners, i’m not cheating you out, okay? Thank you. Ben bisbee for that little fly by. Alright, the non-profit technology certificate? Yeah. Is only a couple years old. Yeah, yeah, yeah. What? What is it about? Well, we have heard from this community the you know, the broader and time community for many years at this point that there are a few different kind of career struggles. One is that most of the people here, even if their title is technology or they would identify themselves that technologist very fuel folks in the community have a technology degree, right? People didn’t go to college for a computer science degree and to advance in a career path that is focused on technology. Our institutions have not really embraced that that’s not how people come into these rolls, right and so there’s a lot of folks. Facing the reality that to get a promotion or to get that director job that, you know, they have twenty years experience working in non-profits managing technology, there’s no reason they can’t have that job, but the job description says they have to have aa degree in that field, right? So we’ve here we’ve heard a lot of that struggle and frustration and that, you know, institutions aren’t moving as fast as the community is, and we’ve also heard a lot of people say, i know that i have these skills, but as you will appreciate, i think all your listeners will appreciate our titles in non-profits are not often representative of all the wee d’oh and to apply for another job and say, oh, yeah, i managed our website, but my title was communications coordinator, no one really gets that. I do have those skills, i do have that experience, my organization was really bad a job titles that doesn’t mean, you know that that i didn’t do it, and so we created a professional certificate both to give people the knowledge and the kind of certification that they want and for those other folks who feel like they have a lot of knowledge teau help make sure it was rounded out and comprehensive across an organization so that both of those paths could say here is a way for me to demonstrate. I do have this knowledge, i do have this experience and i am qualified for whatever job i’m applying for, and we have been really thrilled that even in the first few people that that graduated with a certificate, they were writing back to us saying as soon as i had that certificate, i applied for this other job and i got a promotion and a different department, a different organization. I am able now to communicate that i do have these skills, so that was like exactly what we wanted to hear when we started. And now over fifty people have gotten a certificate and many more are in the process with a few more courses to go. So, yeah, it’s really it’s weird, we are trying to not be surprised because we didn’t design this ourselves. We didn’t come up with the idea of it ourselves. You know, this was many years of listening to what the community needed and just answering that call. And not designing something in private by ourselves, you know, when we were piloted this content in different forms and through other programs where we could kind of test it for a few years before we released it as the certificate. So we’re trying to not be surprised because we know we did the right work on we did you know, we did a good process to get here, but honestly, we are still surprised because even when you do it well and you do it right, you’re still nervous that, you know, no one will come or that it won’t be the thing that the community wants and it’s great, that it has gone so well, and now we’re working on developing just a lot more courses, so i guess i’ll backtrack and explain the way it works. Is that there’s a ten week kind of tomorrow? Some language from college is, like required content that everybody has to dio yeah, yeah, and then outside of that, in order to get the certificate, you have to do at least five other courses and those you can choose whatever topics you want and that’s our way of helping people kind. Of focus or say, my knowledge is really in this area, you know? Yeah, if you’re going kind of for a specific angle or have it all over the place and show that you’re more diverse with your experience, eso we’re really doing a lot to build out that kind of curriculum, essentially so that people could do a much more tailored focus like i have a major, you know, like like borrowing that college language, so we’re building that i think there’s over forty courses on the website right now, the people can choose from and continuing to add to that. Right now, we’ve done a lot toe add a number of courses specifically around digital equity because that’s something certainly in line with our mission but also a much more harder field for people to find content around. Even within and tens world, you could find a course on digital marketing or online fund-raising technology management or budgeting? Eso we weave also given ourselves the challenge of making sure we haven’t a lot of content around digital equity and what that means for designing your programs to reach communities who maybe not online. How you make your own organizational strategies that kind of thank you on dh. People will find information about the certificate at, of course, that in ten dollar yep. And tn dot org’s. Did you get initials after your name? Is that kind like? I mean, we could come up with some initials. Way could come up with somebody, you know. So in ten dot or gue, you know, join the organisation for pete’s sake. I’m a member. I’m not just not what we say. Tony can be about. So you can be one of technology, but i learned a little bit every month for maybe okay, we got to do a quick shout out for nineteen. Ninety let’s do what we know dates. We do know dates, okay? Yeah, we will like t c it’s, it’s, technically, public knowledge. But we haven’t directed anyone to the public knowledge, so we’ll we’ll announce it more formally on friday. But it’ll be in portland and tens hometown, portland, portland i’ll get to see really the food drive? Yeah, yeah. The food car starts the trucks in new york courts. Important? Yes, we’ll get to sleep in our own beds for once is the conference staff and it’ll be in march. The thirteen through the fifteenth. Okay, so that’s just like this. Where? It’s a wednesday. Thursday. Friday so everybody can stay the weekend in portland? Yeah, long time. They’re seeing you getting to get to know maximal. Better access. Ah, max. Max. Sample ward? No, just mac’s. Ward. Yes. Maxwell maxwell. Amy’s husband eyes he stage managing today he is he’s back there with a headset on. Okay, we got a rabbit there. Thank you. So oh, and very night. We got a rat with this it’s. So good to see you in person. Yeah. It’s. So great to get teo to share a microphone. A microphone table. Thank you. Yeah. Thank you. Thank you for having me and thank the staff. I will. I will. I love it. I will remember for join the organization in ten. Dot org’s. Thanks, everybody. Thank you. This interview sponsored by network for good. Easy to use donorsearch and fund-raising software for non-profits. This is tony martignetti non-profit radio coverage of eighteen ntcdinosaur non-profit technology conference. Thanks so much for being with us. We need to take a break. Wittner cps. And you eat lunch too. You need to talk to you. Um, first, check out the firm at wagner cps dot com naturally going to start you due diligence there. Then pick up the phone and talk to you. Eat. You know, he’s been on the show. So he’s bona fide he’s friendly, no pressure he’ll explain to you how wagner can help you from doing your nine, ninety up to the annual order that you need weather cps dot com now time for tony’s take two my number one takeaway from ntcdinosaur non-profit technology conference in new orleans a few weeks ago. I’m luv to reveal it because if i do, you’re not gonna watch the video it’s about your ceo and if you are ceo, then it’s about you. My video is at twenty martignetti dot com that’s all i can say goodling dot com i’m a safe too looked our founder of good link at goodland dot com non-profits connect with businesses that advanced their missions when i want the best connections i listen to non-profit radio good link. They are a new marketplace. Where non-profits meat vendors? No cost to you as a non-profit it’s your bridge to products and services and i’m helping them get started. See what you think. Check them out, please. Good link dot com and its link with a c now it’s time for our panel on sametz fund-raising welcome to tony martignetti non-profit radio coverage of twenty eighteen non-profit technology conference hashtag is eighteen ntcdinosaur in the convention center in new orleans and this interview like all at ntcdinosaur sponsored by network for good, easy to use dahna management and fund-raising software four non-profits i guess now are rachel kottler, taylor dankmyer and sandy fox. Rachel see the closest to me is digital account manager at lautman master neil and company taylor is mobile strategist at coupland mobile messaging. I said it right, it wasn’t troubled, but i did, and latto pat myself and sandy fox is founder and principal consultant for smart as a fox l l c rachel teller, sandy welcome, thank you, thank you. Have you thank you? I’m glad you’re here, too, and your workshop topic is raised. How much with sms mobile programmes let’s start down there with sandy fox? Give us some motivation why mobile should be part of our fund-raising plan moguls to be part of your full integrated digital strategy, it should be part of fund-raising it should be part of your advocacy. G part of your engagement with your supporters period and and that’s complex, i’m correctly you first what i said you said for fund-raising fund-raising oh, yes, ok, i’m saying it could be a part of your full digital strategy to be integrated into everything you do, and that is your makeup just took their better that’s a little bit ago, and and that is because everyone is on mobile. You want to meet people where they are and ninety five percent of americans have a mobile phone. Seventy seven percent of americans have a smartphone on, and so when you are texting them, they’re more likely to read your message and see it and respond and engage with you as an organization on and really feel like they are part of the organization. Okay, part of your total engagement strategy, okay? Okay. Thank you. Thank you. I’m the remedial student of we need to bring me along happy. Teo, just hold up there. Yeah. Don’t be so willing, hyre okay, uh, no. Okay. Let’s, let’s, jump right in. We know that open rates are very high. All right, open rates are they are yes, they are. But what i like to say is i don’t like using the term open rate because when you think of open right, you think of email, which is something that you can actually track, you can say this money people opened an email out of the people you sent it to you. Where is you can’t technically track how many people see your tax message, but we know from studies that the majority of folks who get a text message actually do read it, ok. And rachel, don’t they open them very, very quickly, too? Yeah, most people open their text messages within two minutes of receiving it, and if you think about it, most people like get an anxious feeling. If they see in their phone they have text messages that they haven’t read yet. So that’s why, when we talk about open rates, were talking about the fact people actually are opening the text messages and seeing it, whereas email like i’m asked actively at this point, i mean, there’s, just so many emails coming in every minute, emailed that still have some credibility. Oh, yeah, yeah, okay, okay, your heart rate actually goes up when you receive a text message that is a a real study behind the physiological change. Yes, in the body. Yes, when you receive a text message, she mentions, he kind of gets a little ankle. You have until you, you get excited until you have read it. There’s, a fizzy latto. Alright, thank you. I’m gonna okay. Tell her i’m gonna put you on the spot. Labbate i ask this of another group. We’re a couple of sessions ago sessions ago we were talking about sms and i said, surely there’s gonna be another technology sometime down the road. I don’t know if it’s under development now it may very well, maybe maybe not, but there’s good. There will be something that’ll be more urgent buy-in sms and we’ll end up trumping s enough. Doesn’t that seem inevitable? Maybe. I mean, i think people have been thinking that estimates was going to go away at some point. And that’s still hasn’t happened. Sort of radio. You know, the platform run right now. People think radio is going to die. Radio is not going anywhere. It’s just kind of adapted over time. Were also yeah, right. Exactly. This is the back to the point. So videos in the name? Yes. No, i took yet. Still still on audio medium, right? So audio focused you have exactly. No, i got you so that’s. Kind of. Yeah, s o i think of other i don’t know. I know i have to tell her i didn’t do it. Because you’re sitting close like you got. Okay, so but to go back to your question. No, i wasn’t i wasn’t trying to trash radio, actually usedto as an intern, it was an intern. I did some school stuff in high school on a pr. So it’s got yes your npr radio radio is a very personal yes, i don’t know. Yes mess i don’t think i am fm is going anywhere exactly. We’re finding ways to engage with even more in our in our exactly. And so i think that’s kind of what we’re seeing with messaging. We talked about different ways that people are using text messaging, um, different messaging tools. So now we’ve got, you know, facebook messenger and whatsapp and all these tools that are used what we consider quote unquote, over the top messaging. So over the top of what i guess that’s the mess, but those tools are continuing, developed, they’re not as ubiquitous as sms sms is a standard that is on everybody’s phones we don’t have exactly what’s that thie sms to point it will be rcs rich communication services. It hasn’t it’s still in development, it requires the carriers to basically improve it so it’s very slow, but once it comes around, it will sort of be a new age, just a mess. It’ll have a lot of new features to it. Seattle it’s difficult going anywhere. I don’t know if there’s anything like there’s, no thing that’s going to replace it. But if it is it’s, it’s, different messaging tools and, you know, rcs, if that actually because think what you will articulate, they’re always be early adapters, something new, but it’ll take a long time for folks to catch up to it. You know, for instance, like i said, we have ninety five percent of folks have a cell phone by. Only seventy seven percent of folks have a smartphone, so we know that there’s that gap right there, right between that ninety five. Sensitive to that two things are not always riding a link to clear exactly which is why we tell jokes. Sometimes a really great wayto engage your audiences, ask him to respond and take action within the text messaging platform. So tech sign or and then give us your zip codes. You consign this petition that’s why phone calls are so successful through mobile devices. And texting it’s because you’re always already on that platform, we ask you to text call and oversignt you’re calling your senator so yeah, and you’re rachel greene to bring it back into fund-raising if you think about it, i remember maybe five years ago, my father who’s, the target donorsearch age, he, like, refused to text with me. He just wanted teo email me and now he texts me every day we have a family chat, we’re on, we get pictures, see baby pictures, everything like that. And so, i mean your donor’s air now using text, getting more comfortable on their phones and poor and toe add a stat that every year over the last three years, it’s increased by forty percent, the number of people who have given beer their mobile devices. So with the last three years, forty percent forty four section order year after year after year, and my father is one of those folks to who now is on a text that i used to take a picture of an article and send it to me on dh he very, very cautious of identity theft, but i think he’s getting to a point where he would give on his mobile device. Okay, taylor let’s talk about some of the gold star talked around them a little bit, but what, aside from fund-raising what else can we do with that? Sametz yeah, going backto what sandy was saying, you know, actually it’s kind of knew that we started talking about fund-raising over s a masked people didn’t directly think of building enough sametz program five, ten years ago, just about fund-raising it didn’t seem to make sense, people were afraid they weren’t going to donate over text that’s starting to change for sure now, and we talk about people are comfortable that so most of our customers were just engaging like they are in all their other channels, so there they’re they’re educating them, they’re asking to make calls they’re, you know, sending the videos, they’re asking for them for their supporters to send in content or pictures of, you know, maybe them at an event, um and also crabbing lots of information, i mean, in some ways what we first started doing this, it was essentially ah, let’s have people text in when they’re in an event and let’s grab their emails and names. Because one collecting hundreds of people’s names at an event on paper is terrible and awful for everyone involved, but also this’s just much easier if organizations to handle and we know that they’re going once they text in its very likely, they’re goingto quickly respond. They’re used to having conversation overtaxed, you know, so the more we can make it conversational, like it is with their family and their friends, the better off we are, and because of those open rates and response rates now, you can collect a lot of information very quickly. So none of that answers your question, but a few things about it. Breaking, breaking news alerts. People are looking at their phones right away and their text messages. I mean, already today we all got, like three texts from different organizations about paul ryan announcing that he’s not running again. I’ve been doing interviews. I didn’t hear that, yeah, ryan is not your first. Okay, well, now, by the time this airs, it’ll be old ways, but i’m intrigued, okay? Mary-jo dahna part of your workshop was spent talking about human rights, human rights campaign. They did very, very successful. Who’s who’s, the nobody’s from hrc here who wants to talk about on why they’re a model to follow so i can’t talk about that. So i’ve been working with hrc for about three and a half years now on their e mail and mobile fund-raising and advocacy programs drew from hrc was on the panel with us when it wasn’t through here. He’s too cool, no that’s, not the reason true he’s, very cool, very busy provoc idea was important, man all right, well, i’m a shout out to drew he’s awesome hey is the person you get the text from for hrc. I would say part of the reason that they’re mobile program is so good is because they’ve actually been around a lot longer than other organizations. They were an early adopter of mobile and they’ve been able to really invest in it and try new things to testing segment their list, use it for calling congress use it to raise money use it, especially around some supreme court decisions as a wayto both engage and grow supporters and also to tell people breaking news and get them to donate and become members. You’re using it robustly, using it for a lot of different, not different purposes. What specifically can our listeners in small and midsize shops we’re all very cool? By the way, our listeners a cool on this show is cool? I’m not. I don’t know about this guy drew, i don’t know him, so i’m not going to say it’s his life. He chose not that it’s just like he’s the better answers he’s busy he’s a very important guy. You know what can? What can our listeners take away from hrc? Aside from the lots of white gold lots of different diverse goals with it, what else can we take away? I would say first, take away if you’re trying to start from scratch, start adding a mobile field collection, tow any petitions and forms you do online that’s how hrc first started to collect numbers and grow their list and at a spot for it on your website so you can get started and second if you’re doing male and you have people’s mobile numbers start integrating if you’re setting an email and you have mobile, send a text with the e mail, send a text with the mailing that way. It’s a quick little reminder for somebody and it’ll help with your multi-channel strategies. Okay, what are these he’s solicitation or not? That’s not station to try to grow the list, but, uh, where you put these field? What are these called? Actionsprout feels that you’re asking people to fill out in orderto teo, opt in it just just phone number a check that i’m willing to accept checks and, you know, tio include yeah, you don’t even need to put a check because everyone has a standard email. Often you just add the mobile. Opt in language with it to any of your forms for an action for just to get on your email lists. You just include the whole opt in number and if they give you their your mobile, their mobile number, they’re on your list. Longfield get the compliance language at the bottom of the form here. You’re pretty much good. Okay, now and then how do we grow that list? Over time, what are some different order? Some good growth strategy was to go tell ugo. Well, i’ll definitely latto how’s, sandy she’s run these programs at a higher level than i have, but with sms requires a lot of promotion off the bat like anything else, and if you’re starting from scratch or from a smallest, you really do need to do a lot of work too. Get that going? I guess my rule of thumb is you really need to promote it everywhere. Your best bet is adding them to web forms, so we just talked about that got all these existing forms just at a field to those, and hopefully people will provide their numbers and you can start texting them. The other place that it could work, though, is really everywhere else. So didn’t you have a huge list on emails? Most likely, you may have a very large audience on facebook, you know, building graphics, that’s a text, you know, hrc two, three, six, four, four or text marriage three, six, four, four you know, send us your reaction for your story or something like that. So really, you’ve gotta promoted everywhere because, unlike, say, maybe facebook or like your website, i can go find those on the web from looking for what your organization does tto find your text message, lest i really need to do some work, so adding it to that form, having graphics on your social media, promoting those maybe putting some money into it. But then also specifically, when you having people joined the list, you want to give them a reason why you’re joining, you might ask for emails just like and people understand. Oh yeah, i’m email because they want to reach out to make with mobile it’s great, if you can specifically say, hey, texting for this specific thing. So whether that’s a free items, some kind of gimmick, or if it’s, you know, text in to tell us how you’re feeling about this marriage equality decision or something like that, so making it really specific and people seeing the value right off the bat is really important otherwise, like, well, why do i want to get text from you? What’s the value so you want to provide value immediately? I gotta take a break. Tell us i have a tell us, moughniyah ll for you, quote. Tell us has opened up a whole new stream of donations for our non-profit it has allowed business owners to support us without any additional cost to the company and, quote that’s barry dodson, founder of accelerate ministries, a whole new stream of donations that’s the long tail of passive revenue have been talking about for you. No cost to the companies you refer. Watch the video get started at tony dahna slash tony tell us now, let’s, go back to sms fund-raising do you have more dead? Definitely. So so i am. I worked at planned parenthood for three years and built their mobile program from the ground up. They already had a decent number of mobile numbers has planned parenthood, and they’ve already had mobile on some of their form, so they had already had some options, but they didn’t have unengaged list, and within the first month of me being there was june and a supreme court decision came down. That was not a positive one for the reproductive rights movement on, and ruth bader ginsburg gave a scathing recession on part of our judge we had obviously planned for whatever result will come in, and if we lost we wanted people to sign on to ruth bader ginsburg’s descent, so we put on all of our graphics all of our banners on facebook, twitter, text descent to our short code. Um, and we got a ton of new, often just from that. So really, what? What teller was saying is, is true to speaking. Sure, you include a tech stopped in in a lot of your visual graphics on instagram and snapchat and facebook and twitter also utilizing your actions that you, er you’re doing so really just integrating that in on dh, then taking advantage of events. We’ve seen a lot of activists getting out there and going to these large scale marches and rallies, and someone from your organization is speaking at one of these rallies, make sure that in their speech at some point, they say, hey, everyone, pull out your cell phone. I want you to do this right now. I want you to text the word, um, join or marked tio six, nine, eight, six, six or whatever the short code is on and say i’ll wait for you to do it xero and have them do that it really the march the march that we had the women’s march back when trump first took office, the women’s march group got so many text, often tze from that one event, they had millions of numbers that they could reactivate for different actions throughout the year. So it really you need to take advantage of those moments, be it a supreme court decision, b a be a rally or an event on dh? Just utilize it about some some of hyre yeah, maybe we’ll come back to best practices. We still have some time, but i want to spend time on on the technology. The platform? Yeah. How do we do this? How do we do that? Rachel, we haven’t heard from you in a few minutes. How do we do this back end? Well, don’t currently have it. What are we looking for? What we’re searching for? What kind of technology we need. Yeah. There there’s a bunch of different cos or vendors. You could use that have these programs so okay. You just need a budget that you can put towards it and to choose the right vendor for whatever your situation is. What do you searching for? What search? Terms that i used to try to find the vendors mobile texting, that’s it okay, usually a decent number. There’s a really easy one if you just type in upland mobile messaging and the google that’ll come upside i just my shameless like i’m sorry you didn’t really need to call it out. And honestly, most of us have used mobile condit’s up messaging for all the work that we’ve done with other organisations. So there’s a reason folks use them? Okay, yeah, yeah, but of course there are other or there are other vendors out there. They’re different price points depending on your list size. The more numbers you have, the more people you wanna text, the more it’s gonna cost more calls to congress. You want todo that’s more expensive than texting? If you want to send a multimedia message mama’s that’s more expensive than just a text with words so it’s all a question of budget and figuring out what makes sense for your non-profit alright, so that so that all right, so the technology’s pretty easy to figure out. I mean, you have to have the budget saying it’s think of it as like any email. Platform it’s very similar to an email platform. Only you’re you’re doing one hundred sixty characters instead of putting together a full email and your segmenting your list and it’s a very similar. If you’re pretty good at learning an email platform, you’re going to be it’ll be easy for you to learn a mobile platform, okay? Yeah, okay, very good then let’s go back to some more best practices we still have we got like six or seven minutes together, so some things we haven’t talked about yet, yeah can give a fun example that hrc did this past summer. We knew there was a big march coming up in d c during pride month, so we knew a lot of people wouldn’t be able to physically got there. So we decided what if we do a virtual pride march? Teo, go with the physical march and pride month and have people have to text in tow have their name added to a school, so we promoted it on email. We promoted it on facebook on twitter, uh, pretty much all over the place, and then we ask people who did it to promote it more and if people like seeing their name. You had to text it to text in to get your name out of it so people could see their name in sync krauz love to be shouted out yeah, i send live listener love non-profit radio. I do like city and state people say, you know i love it wei have heck else do listeners of the week this week, people looked looked like their name or hear it it’s a feeling. Yeah, nature’s. He was actually able to grow their list by over ten thousand people from that one action. So i mean, be creative with it. Yes. Add it to your forms. You have an event. Ask people to do it. Even our session. We started off by asking people to text as the mass tio six six two to six. Six to rate how experience they were with it. And then we had a little bit of pull way have helped life. Okay. Yeah, well, your insiders so that no. Alright, i can i can give ah, couple examples. So to go off on rachel is saying planned parenthood, we when we had our first pink out day, which was a really rallying cry for around planned parenthood when they were being attacked in twenty fifteen what we did is we had a digital wall that was everyone who is tagging their tweets and instagram posts with pink out and on mobile what we did as we asked folks to send in their pink out pictures. So we got well over a thousand photos, including men wearing pink high heels way got it was also national coffee day, so we got photos of a woman with pink lipstick on her coffee cup. We got lots of family photos of everyone wearing paying s it was really wonderful, they engage them on the on that medium on mobile when they were out and about and then another good example of fund-raising example for you is that every year since i was at planned parenthood, we did this tactic, which actually hilary clinton during her campaign stole from us. What about that? Tell other hrc so what we did is around your end, it’s holiday time, so we would send a message tio r list, and we’d say cecile richards wants tio wish you a happy highs ing and has a special greeting for you text here on dh. Well, well, you’ll hear that greeting, um and so they would immediately get a phone call with an audio recording from cecile think of it is, ah, new age robo call right with her wishing them a happy holidays and then with an ask tied into it, i’m saying we would love your support on this holiday season and then once the message ended, they got a text message with a link to get andi saw really great results with that on dh, then with follow-up text over your end on dh so there’s lots of ways that you can utilize the platform for engagement. So who wouldn’t love to hear from your ceo, right? One organization that they love doesn’t have to be planned parenthood, no organization, you’re and a lot of folks, every town has done it with celebrities that are supporters, so they’ve done recordings from julianne moore on other folks who are some of their hyre up supporters so it works and it’s something that you khun dio on mobile on dh that folks really respond tio yeah, okay, just best practices. I mean, just a quick when you know communications should be regular varied in two way, so they should be you should be really very regular vary to a communications that’s that’s the name of the game regular is and then we need to be reaching out to them fairly regularly. We don’t want to leave them strange it for two months, someone another panels, otherwise they’ll forget that i did. And if i stop if i stop texting you after two months and i asked you for some money part of like, well, no, i’m not getting any money, so you know, you got to keep that relationship going maybe two to four times a month, maybe once a week it started to change varied we talked about different kinds of things to promote advocacy fund-raising really build it into your existing programs and don’t leave some stuff out really kind of make it, you know, diverse people are neo-sage fund-raising plan, yeah, exactly don’t just don’t continue to ask people for money overtaxed, that’s going to look really bad, and they’re not going to see the value that your organization’s bringing and then two way again it’s a text message let’s make it personal and let’s make it very human and have them respond to us and ask questions and all kinds of stuff like that. Okay, we’re gonna we’re gonna leave it there. Guys, go. Okay. All right. They are rachel kottler ditigal account manager leichtman mascot neil and company taylor dankmyer global strategist for upland mobile messaging and sandy fox. Sandi with an i founder and principal consultant at smart as a fox llc. Thank you so much for being with us. Thank you. Thank you. Thank you for being with our coverage of eighteen ntcdinosaur provoc technology conference. This interview is sponsored by network for good, easy to use donorsearch and fund-raising software for non-profits, thanks so much. Next week. Maur smart guests from the non-profit technology conference. If you missed any part of today’s show, i beseech you, find it on tony martignetti dot com were supported by pursuing online tools for small and midsize non-profits data driven and technology enabled. Tony dahna slash pursuant radio weinger cpas guiding you beyond the numbers. Wagner, cps, dot com and tell us credit card and payment processing your passive revenue stream durney dahna may slash tony tell us. Ah, creative producer is claire meyerhoff. Sam liebowitz is the line producer. Shows social media is by susan chavez. On our music is by scots dahna you with me next week for non-profit radio. Big non-profit ideas for the other ninety five percent. Go out and be great! Duitz you’re listening to the talking alternative network, waiting to get a drink. E-giving cubine hi, i am dr tranquility of dr tranquility pr, successfully meeting the media needs of the wellness community as an expert myself. For major mainstream media, radio, tv and print magazines, i now help you book interviews for broadcast radio, podcast television and i pay tv as well as many, many magazines reach me to one to nine to zero one six zero three. Are you feeling unhappy with your body, shape or size? Ever feel out of control with food? I’m elizabeth from nourish the soul, and on the show, you’ll uncover the route to these imbalances and discover a permanent solution toe having a healthy relationship to food and your body. Join us every thursday morning at eleven a, m eastern time on talk radio dot geever. Hey, all you crazy listeners looking to boost your business? Why not advertise on talking alternative with very reasonable rates? Interested simply email at info at talking alternative dot com. Are you into comics, movies and pop culture at large? What about music and tv? Then you’re in for a treat. This is michael dulled, your host on talking alternative dot com. I’ve been professionally writing comic books, screenplays and music articles from fifteen years. Catch my show secrets of the sire at its new prime time slot. Wednesdays, eight p m eastern time, and get the inside scoop on the pop culture universe you love to talk about. For more info, go to secrets of the sire dot com dahna. You’re listening to talking alt-right network at www. Dot talking alternative dot com, now broadcasting twenty four hours a day. Are you a conscious co creator? Are you on a quest to raise your vibration and your consciousness? Um, sam liebowitz, your conscious consultant, and on my show, that conscious consultant, our awakening humanity, we will touch upon all these topics and more. Listen, live at our new time on thursdays at twelve noon eastern time. That’s, the conscious consultant, our awakening humanity, thursday’s twelve, noon on talk radio dot. You’re listening to the talking alternative network.

Nonprofit Radio for January 12, 2018: Free Coaching In 2018 & Maria’s 2018 Plan

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Curtis Springstead: Free Coaching In 2018

SCORE coaches small nonprofits nationwide through its network of volunteer specialists in marketing, HR, technology, management, finance and more. Curtis Springstead is from the northeast New Jersey region and he reveals how to get free, ongoing support for your organization.

 

 

Maria Semple: Maria’s 2018 Plan

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Welcome to twenty martignetti non-profit radio big non-profit ideas to be either ninety five percent on your actor named oh, i’m glad you’re with me, i’d suffer the effects of organ neo-sage if you got taste saying you missed today’s show free coaching in twenty eighteen, four coaches small non-profits nationwide through its network of volunteer specialist in marketing, hr technology management finance and mohr kurt kurt springstead is from the northeast region, and he revealed how to get free, ongoing support for your organization and maria’s twenty eighteen plans. Maria semple has strategies for your fund-raising digital marketing and trusted research prospect, research contributor and prospect finder. I thought he’d take you twenty eighteen plans all this month responded by pursuing full service fund-raising data driven and technology enables, tony got a last person and by wejust piela guiding you beyond the numbers. Western piela dot com hello durney credit card processing into your press of revenue stream. Tony dahna made black teller i’m pleased to welcome kurt springstead to the show. He is a certified mentor and chairman for the score northeast new jersey chapter his near forty year career was in information technology and ranged from programmer trainer and adjunct professor. Tow it, director, consultant and non-profit boardmember score is at score. Mentors and score dot org’s. Kurt springstead. Welcome to the show. Thank you. It’s. A pleasure to have you, um, score. Now, i i grew up with score being the service corps of retired executives, but that’s ah, that’s. Old news, right? Yes. We’ve dropped that. That acronym? Because it turns out that nearly half of us are working to some degree, many full time in some part time. Okay, so so i was like, like, aarp is no longer the american association of retired persons. It’s just aarp like that, right? Like that. Okay, um, and score is nationwide and supported by the small business administration. Technically, we have our own funding from the directly from the government, and we’re a partner of this administration. They just kind of helped me or the money out. Okay, okay. But of course, score is itself a non-profit so people can give to score and support the work. Well, the way we have our own non profit foundation called the score foundation. Okay, in order to to accept funds donated from the public or from corporations that want to sponsor is because as a government agency, which is what we are, we obviously can’t take donations. Oh, you’re still you like you’re a part of small business administration? Not just i thought, supported by the website says, supported by i thought that meant like you get grant, you get a grant from score. I mean, from s b a. But what exactly happened? Wear actually empowered by an act of congress and they give us a small grant that they they ask our big brother, the spd administer. Okay then, when someone tried to donate a large sum of money a few years ago, we had to figure out how to make advantage take advantage of that. So i created the square foundation, which then sponsors various programs that were involved in whether it be training or outreach. They allow us to be more effective than what we get from the government. Okay, so the yes. So the score mentors are acquainted with non-profits not wanting to turn down gift if they don’t have to. Absolutely. Well, we we end up in our particular chapter having to raise nearly half of the money we need to operate. So we understand all the all the issues that not-for-profits okay, excellent. Eso s o score is i think i feel i feel like my voice just crafting a score score score score is mentoring that is on coaching that is available nationwide, including for non-profits let give us a sense of the breath of this. What? What? What non-profits could learn? Sure. So, yeah, one of the key services we do offer is confidential and free mentoring for as long as you’ll have us. And, you know, there’s about thirteen thousand of my friends in three hundred thirty chapters across the country with people who have done everything you can imagine serial entrepreneurs, uh, people with industry specializations, i spent a lot of time as you mentioned it, but we have people who are retard lawyers piela people have come from not-for-profits organizations and so on, and then what we offer you is whatever services you might need it’s really, in terms of a coaching, a relationship. So if you were people come to us with simply a gleam of an idea, i’d like to create an organization or like to create an entity that does the following and i need to know where the steps are. What are my resource is? How do i make it happen? And since most of us and our careers have been down that road already, either in for-profit or not-for-profits we can i tried to tell you where the where the dangers are and what kind of decisions you might have to make. Okay. And that’s, that’s, that’s pre startup. But our listeners are are already in non-profits, you know, vast majority is already in non-profits so i first of all, i just love the idea that this is available to us as us taxpayers and non-profits ah, you know, in part supported by our small business administration. I love that guy like that, right? So actually, you should be really important. Happy the taxpayer because for every dollar the government gives us, we return fifty dollars. I don’t think there’s any other group in the government that actually gives money back. Is that right? Yeah. Okay. So the yes. I mean, well, you know, we tend to see a lot of people who are looking to start a business, but probably nearly half our business. People who already in business. Ok. For a significant period of time, and so the services are the same. The questions they’re sometimes different not trying to find out necessarily where to go, but we have some trying to grow or i’m thinking of adding a new line of service, or i’m struggling with managing the people that i have a client come to me has been a business for twenty five years, and suddenly the numbers went went rid. She had no idea why that happened or what was going on had, uh, any number of people who come to us with, uh, you know, i just we feel we need to grow. We need to serve more of our clients. We’re not getting out to the the community we were designed to serve. How do we make people aware of us? How do we get volunteers? All those kinds of questions that we run into excellent. Okay, so so even though it’s small business administration, you know that there’s a reason that you’re on non-profit radio i want listens to b b certain that they can avail themselves of this inn non-profit so so whether it’s marketing or law or human resource is a righty or accounting? What? I mean, like any any business functionality is available for the is available as coaching and mentoring that i haven’t run into anything yet that i can’t find, you know, the reality is that for, you know, a cz you’ve mentioned, i’ve been on board and, you know, i’m i’m running a fifty person ah, small non-profit myself locally with the team that i have, so i’m struggling to find more money trying to struggling to find volunteers, i’m tryingto struggle to keep them engaged, too. Figure out how i can reach more clients, which is one of the reasons is wrong with you today. What can i do to make sure that everybody knows our service is out there? So we have the same kinds of problems, the same issues. So, you know, sometimes you need legal advice, and i appreciate the nuance that there are some regulations and some decisions that are different for those of us who are in a not for profit status and the have you got a charitable registration you need to set up? How do you? Some of the legalities of when we hyre people on how we treat them are a bit different howto do with the tax situation. I mean, one of the most interesting questions i get it someone has come to us, has had a for-profit business i have working with a woman who’s been teaching art for a number of years, but now she wants to turn it over and offer some of her courses for free on the internet. And she was going to look for grants. Well, unfortunately, she’s a commercial operation and the number of grants for a commercial operation are quite small. So we started to talk about how she might look at establishing an aw for-profit and attract people to make donations to that business. So i, you know, i’ve only been with score about three years, but i’ve been all over the map. So in terms of those kinds of questions, i can’t help but notice the similarities between my four business work in my not-for-profits although, as every business has its own unique nuance, um where where we do our best to help with that? Yeah, we have to take our first break so you just hang out for a moment and it’s time for a break. Data driven fund-raising field guide that is their newest resource on the listener landing page. There was more data generated in twenty, sixteen and twenty, seventeen, and in all of previous history made that is amazing and it’s too much for you to deal with a field guide to help you translate the data. You have the fever got into actionable inside, drive your fund-raising so you can act on your data, not be stuck in its muddled through it. You know that, ah, fancy report that you get out of your fund-raising starita basis is not worth anything. If you can’t act on it and have it helped you in your fund-raising what is taking what they’ve learned in working raise large organisation, and they have boiled down to basic principles for you in data analysis. The data driven fund-raising field guys it’s at tony got a flash for students capital p now, back to springstead and free coaching in twenty eight i’m with kurt springstead on, we’re talking about score, which is consulting, coaching, mentoring, that’s available to you in all these different areas that that kurt has been touching on anywhere in the country. Him he happens to be in the northeast new jersey chapter, but how many three hundred chapters you said throughout the country, country hundred thirty welcomed the beauty of it is we have a significant number of clients that we service, uh, who who are comfortable with an exchange of e mails, and we’ve also started in the last year or two significant amount of mentoring the video conference, so if the particular expertise you need isn’t in the small team, in your neighborhood or in your your area, then with some help your you, khun, search and find a person anywhere in the united states, and you can make the arrangements to work with it. I was working with the young man who originally met with him in kentucky or talk with him while he was in kentucky and one day we were chatting while he happened to be in china working on this project, so we’re no longer bound by the code we working. Okay, excellent. All right. Very good to know. All right, so if someone wants to work with score, we want to take advantage of this vast consultancy basically that that’s free to us way get started with the the website it scored out. Or gore or how oh, that is the most efficient way to do it. Okay, you go to score dot organ, you’re going to find one of several buttons that it’s going to or hidden around the screen or on the screen that will tell you, you know, meet with a mentor. And at that point, you’ll be asked to you know what? How do you want to do that? Face-to-face email whatever you type in very minimal information that your name and address phone number email a little bit about what you want to talk about and hit entering within two business days. Somebody is probably going to be back in touch with you trying to establish the appointment to move ahead and you make a distinction between mentoring and consulting? How do i know which of those is better for me? Okay, well, actually, there you’re going to be with one person. We find that we have to wear a couple of hats were primarily mentors and had been a consultant most my life. I could make a hope, a simple distinction. A mentor, a guide you through the process asks you questions, ask you to probe things, operas you advice and counsel and points it out, but allows you to come to your own conclusions. We make no judgments about what it is you’re proposing to do or how you propose to do it, because ultimately it is your business. But there are times when what you need is information and instructions specifically how to do something and when we can do that, you know, we can’t practice law, and we can’t do the work of people do, but we can we can help you review a business plan, our build, you know, proposal to a bank. We’re going to coach you on that when i was a consultant, i i also would charge you to do that work or i do it for you. We are not. Equipped to fill out your business plan, but to help you go through that. So most of the time were mentors were were advising coaching, encouraging, sometimes supporting when times get tough. But every once in a while you need someone with the main expertise. Oh, and that’s, when we put on our consulting hat for a bit of time. Now, how do you get familiar with the work of the non-profit before this before this initial meeting? So so the initial meeting is for the purpose of, of understanding. What is it you want to accomplish? Where are you? What have you done so far? And then establishing a game plan? And one of the key things is do we need other players in the meat in the mix? That’s the advantage i have i i i’m probably meet with you with someone else anyway, just because more people that are listening, the better hyre information will gather anyway. But then if i know that there’s a particular expertise or challenge at the moment, then i can go out and make sure that i have the right person with me at that time, or i might need to do. Some more research to find out through my other channels, other partners that we work with to make sure that we have the information that you’re going to need or the access so the resources that you want. So that first hour, so it is really sort of like the doctor taking your vital signs, we need to kind of know what we’re dealing with first, before we start begin to do any kind of diagnosis. I mean, many people come to us, i think they have just a quick question. They want to get answered, and and that may be true, but oftentimes during the dialogue, they come to the conclusion that they there’s more than they had asked for the problem’s bigger or the questions are broader than they had thought and that’s that’s why we look at that first meeting is simply this sort of the diagnosis, okay? And you’ll stay with them. You said it’s a cz long as they’ll have you. Right, so the ad varies a bit by by chapter, but in our our chapter, the basic model is if i were to work with you, for example, i would intend to work with you for as long as you have me and as time would go on, i would expect you would need to have many different resource is, and you’d need things well beyond whatever my expertise might be. So i’m going to just make sure that i’m going to be your single point of contact with score throughout that entire relationship and get you the resource is that you need within score and without way our research, your partner, the fda, there might be a time when we need to reach out to there were two other governmental agencies, for example, to help you with something you’re trying to do and that’s the ideas we have that you can you can build that relationship with deaf. You not constantly telling your story to new people who might show up the answer a question, i suppose it’s something general, i’ve had guests on talking about, you know, planning on dh here we are in january talking about planning for the new year, i suppose it’s like, you know, i don’t feel like my will keep it in your in your ballpark, you know, i don’t feel like my eye is is adequate. You know, but i’m not really i mean, i don’t feel like the programs we have or the methods we have, like we’re two spreadsheet dependent, but, you know, i’m not really sure what direction to go or what, and i don’t know how much you know, money i need to spend, i suppose it’s something you know as general is that, uh, you know, sort of nebula nevertheless, is that well, that’s actualy pretty specific. Thank you, really? For that i was trying to give you a hard i was trying to give you a hard hypothetical. Yeah, so the whole idea’s, because i happen to have that the main expense, i’d start asking in little more in depth questions and understand and why you have these feelings with the challenges are what, what your current situation is preventing you from doing what things you think you’d like to be able to do, and we could talk about whether or not your system would do that. And then because i’ve had thirty or forty years, i can start to help you figure out how to shop for a new solution. If that’s the right case i could give you. Some ideas of what the orders of magnitude of expense might be the time to get these accomplished some thoughts about the steps of going forward, you know, recently have been advising a couple of people who are creating app in their particular space, and it’s it’s been a lot about strategy? You know what kind of a platform that we put it on when i have no money to start with? And then what do i do if i open up my app and i suddenly become, you know, huge, i’ve got, you know, one hundred thousand users where am i thought i might have a thousand on the first day, so all those kinds of things, you know, we’re equipped to do it, and, you know, it doesn’t it’s not always going to happen in a one hour session, and we understand that, yeah, of course, yeah, now i assume this is all confidential, absolutely pr every year we’re we’re required to re certify on our code of ethics and the number one tenant is confidentiality we that’s built into the when you actually agreed to be a client, you’re you’re covered by that, and i could just tell you from my own experience, unless we engage of one of my colleagues into a into a particular client, i’m not likely to be speaking about your personal situation with other members of the team. Frankly, just no, no need to do that. So you could be you can be absolutely certain that whatever we talk about it it’s just between us. Can we bring in other people from the organization? If i want, maybe it’d be helpful for you to talk. Tio my c f o r a boardmember can we can we engage multiple people on our on our side? Absolutely. We recently had a team of from my office to meet with the entire board, a new organization to provide some residents living facilities for people with special needs. And they were struggling with there being pressured but costs. And so it was important to get the full perspective from from their, uh, their leadership to what they thought their challenges and issues were. And that was so we had a nice big meeting, so we’re oftentimes it’s scaled up. And that sounds like a good story. Good non-profit story. How were you able to help? Those folks they st louis where they, you know, they gave us a rundown on what they saw, their challenges and what the in terms of the quality of people they needed toe hyre because of the concern for the people that the population they were serving, the challenge is about how they were funding the business. There were some options available to them, given the structure of some of the reimbursement that’s available through healthcare plans and such on dh ahs well as the diversity of their program, and we were able to share with them from our differing expertise. I had someone who had financial background, and there was another one with people back, personnel background, and i looked at some of the systems approaches, we were able to provide them with some frankly, in their case, so a way of sort of prioritizing the many challenges that that they had, and that seemed to be a recurring theme by the way that we run into many of the existing businesses there are there are so many things we could work on that sometimes we can’t make up her mind, which is the one that, uh, it’s going to be the most productive well and that’s, that and that’s a big challenge, of course, in the non-profit community, especially now, as you know, if if if we see government funding reduced to the point, where are our state can no longer offer services, you know, i think a lot is going to fall to non-profits and prioritization is going to be the challenge. I mean, this is gonna be so much more that needs to be done. Can we do it? Should should we be doing it on def? So you know how right? And, you know, i think the other thing is that for many clients of in both the non-profit world as well, the for-profit world, sometimes the best be that outside force or that outside opinion, um, your board is a good team, your volunteers were good team, but you you are not already looking through a filter based on your day to day knowledge of what, what you do and how you’ve done it. We come in with with none of those constraints, we don’t we don’t know everything about the business, so we’re not afraid to ask stupid questions or two proposed the idea from another industry or another space that perhaps could be adapted to your space. One of the interesting things we teach some business start up ideas, and one of the concepts in there for one of the leading thinkers is that there are no new business models. There are simply people who were innovatively applying business models into a world where they have not traditionally been used thinking of things like amazon into the book market, for example. So sometimes it just creates it’s just good to hear somebody who doesn’t already have the corporate think, if you will say, agree with your idea or think that your priorities are correct. What about around social media? If i if i feel i’m struggling, i’m not sure which which channels to be in? Um, i’m not you know, i don’t feel like i’m thoroughly engaged with people you know is help with social media within within the score of expertise to a degree, yes, i would be we find that more often than not just because of this, the fact that it moved so quickly, even with some of the the younger subject matter experts that we have on our team it’s just hard to keep up, so we understand i mean, frankly, is an organization we were struggling every day and constantly checking to make sure that what we’re investing in, what we’re doing is social meat is working, but so we can give that some overviewing could put that in the context of other efforts that you might be doing to get your workout, but we also can help you identify a partner if that turns out to be the right thing, because there are two aspects to it through the strategic aspect, which we can offer probably more help with, and we have we have, you know, hundreds and thousands of resource is on our national website on a variety of topics, several of which are around that we also produce a webinar every week on a different topic and oftentimes social media’s his way one part of that so we can provide that overall information, but sometimes it’s uh, i will just tell you that score we’ve hired a contractor who actually implements a lot of our strategy and making sure that we’re getting post out, helping us figure out howto measure and find out if it’s actually working if we’re if we should be boosting post if we should be buying at how are we using our google place that nature so we can get you two started in that the right direction? Sometimes all we can do is help you be a good customer when you have to go out and buy a resource. Because you what? You really someone who could come and spend time, day after day doing the work for you, which were just not structured, right? Right. That’s, not yours. Ok, but but you can’t help identify the questions we should be talking. We should be asking potential vendors and identify the for us, you know, a process for for hiring, whether it’s frankly, whether it’s, a social media manager or ah or an outsource cfo or right. I mean, you can help with that, you know, acquiring the expertise? Absolutely. And so it will be better than just sort of, you know, hitting up google and looking for the one in neighborhood. Yeah, we’ll give you some some measurements of some things you can ask during the interview. What should you look for in their in their background or in their proposal, if that’s the right thing and some sort of sense of perhaps with the fees and costs on toby, i’m thinking about this, too. In terms of finances, you know, a lot of people, lots of people get into non-profits started non-profit because they have enormous passion for some cause and let’s put aside the question whether forming a non-profit was the right business decision to make or not because they already passed, that they’re already incorporated, but they often are lacking the business savvy that it takes two to scale and sustain. And i think i think financial issues particularly stand out what you know suppose suppose that’s me, i mean, i got a lot of passion and i’ve already incorporated is a non-profit but i’m not sure i’m accounting correctly, you know, people talk to me about ah, accounting software, you know, how do i start? Right? And you have the reality also is this significant potential legal and issues if you don’t do that sort of thing, right? So yeah, that is that’s a very common peace. I would just tell you that very few people who go into business a cz well, who might have a passion for a not for profit uh, area really ever intend to be the business person they wanted. They want to serve the population, they wantto feed the cause they want to, you know, sell the best pizza, whatever it might be. So and then they say, oh, not so now. I’ve got to run this business thing and double these forms, and the government wants something, and i got to write a check to this guy and i just, you know, what’s all this about and that’s where we can provide a couple of layers of support sometimes it’s simply where those of us who are from score who have the financial chops of the management chop could just be that that mentor we meet with you on a fairly regular basis, help you realize, you know, figure out howto watch the pulse in your company and make some of the long term, bigger decisions if you’re comfortable doing the day to day checkbook and that sort of thing, okay, for other people, it’s it and, you know, maybe you’re lucky and you you’ve blossomed you in your really big skill, you know, i was on the board of a couple of not-for-profits that are, you know, had million, multi million dollar budget. So we we had professional accounting firms to do it eso again helping to find the right people. But also, you know, people will tell you, make sure you do the right accounting and so on. But you need to go with them and help them explain to them well, what your strategy, which your long term plan for the organ ization? Where am i going to go next? Because that might affect what they do today. So we can help you crystallize and formulate those plans on growth situations. And then you have someone who could do the day to day blocking and tackling. If you do need sources of funds, where do i find that? You know, if i’m not for-profit i have some opportunities. Perhaps go for grants. How do i write a grant? Where would i find a grant writer? Do i need a grant writer? That kind of thing all come up as we go forward. And then also how do our their limitations on the money that i have? I can tell you that in my organization. There are certain things that i can’t pay for with the money the government gives me to operate, but i can pay for with the money i get through donations off. All right, so these are all factors that we many of us have expertise we have their knowledge of and worst cases again, we will help you become the better informed consumer of services for by a professor. All right, we have to leave it there. I just wantto make sure that people understand, too, that there are a lot of do-it-yourself resource is at score dot org’s articles outlines templates. Kurt mentioned one hour webinar every week, so i’m encouraging you for twenty eighteen to check out, score, score, dot or ge and at score mentors. Kurt springstead thank you so much, my pleasure. We need to take a break. Redner’s here’s a testimonial, i was on my new position when i began working with regular piela my confidence, i can have grown knowing that i can rely on the professionals to answer any questions and make recommendations that will ensure the success of our non-profit you were given sound advice enabling us to increase investment income while at the same time, protecting you. Ask that. I trust and respect our audit team on the forward to their annual visit and vote. That is, from a midsize religious organization in the big graft. Dahna look at this. I mean the people of more than piela e-giving investment income on that’s. Good advice. And the person looked forward to their orders. I don’t think you have no properties are looking forward to order. I think they’re more feared, maybe dreaded, but it’s not a fortune from the midtown religious organization in the mid west and diversity of expertise reminds me of all the guys that they have all the guys, guys, guys, all these forms in ten places and white papers on diver subject oppcoll way beyond accounting. No, lecter goes way beyond the numbers for their clients. You know that you’re supposed to change audit firms every three years to get a fresh perspective on your practices on the first set of eyes looking over your books and your management management processes. You want the advice of a firm that goes broads help you? I think you know beyond the balance. So that is what i’m always saying. They go beyond the numbers talking on one of the people you could talk to. Is you too, who’s? Been a guest on the show martignetti piela dot com that’s not tony. Take two. Well, it’s almost for your twenty eighteen planning there’s. More coming after this one next week. Takagi what is the new tax law metoo for your twenty eighteen? Hundred. And on january twenty sixth, it’s gonna be me and amy, i’m gonna be talking about starting your plan e-giving programs in twenty eighteen, and then amy sample ward is gonna have her twenty, eighteen plants, just like maria has plans coming up very shortly. We’re supposed to have joe garrett. Unfortunately, he had a family emergency, couldn’t make the day that we were gonna be recording, so we’ll get joe garrett back fund-raising plan. But instead of joe playbook, that i get that, but i’m always got, so we have got you covered for the whole year, all month of january, that is all you got to do. My pleasure. Welcome. Maria semple, prospect finder, trainer and speaker on prospect research. Latest book is magnifying your business. Six tools and strategies that growing your business or your non-profits our joy and if they’re free, get the prospects finding dot com and at maria semple welcome back, maria semple. Happy new year. Happy new year county. How are you today? Thank you. Doing great. Thank you very much. It’s. Good to talk to you. And and you’ve been thinking through what i’m calling maria’s twenty eighteen plans. What are you going to start with? So, you know, i thought i would give a little bit of a mixed some tips that i might be, you know, might have offered through my focus. Well, it’s, um, it’s really focused in on prospect research in particular. And just, you know, trying to make sure that non-profits are a cz short up, as they possibly can be for the upcoming year. Okay, so that book might like that magnifies your business school gravity’s growing your business or your non-profit looking talking about? Yep. That’s the one that’s, the books magnifying. Okay, i wanna make sure that was it. All right. So what? Do you want something? Well, you know, i was thinking about thie importance of really solidifying your relationship with individuals. Andi, this is where i think non-profits really have the greatest strengths on dh, their greatest opportunities as well, for growing. So, you know, when you think about, you know, launching a major gift effort or maybe upgrading your major gift effort, this is really the year to do what if you haven’t done so already? So, you know, sort of a first step that you might consider doing is to do a database screening. There are a number of companies out there that will screen your entire donordigital base, um, so that you’re really able to kind of elevate those those prospects that might be hidden in your database and give you an opportunity that you know where to focus your efforts. All right? So you’re encouraging diversifying into an individual e-giving program if you don’t already have one that’s, right? That’s, right? But you need to know where we’re to focus so very often if you’ve got a board that’s been changing out a lot or you’ve got, you know, a lot of staff changes and so forth. And you really don’t have that longevity and people really standing who’s in that donor database, so you’re able to sort of look at it on your own, obviously that’s seen cheapest way to do it right? Because now you’re not, you know, outsourcing anything, they’re not paying anybody to screen the database, but i really find that when when organizations take an opportunity to do that, it gives them the chance elevator to the top, the names of the people they should really be focusing in on. So, you know, you might even do it. Has a lot of the companies will allow you to send in a batch and test your database to see, you know, if it’s going to be worthwhile. Thio do the whole thing. Okay, um, something else you want to have in place before you do a major gift on individual individual giving program, major gifts or welchlin yeah, you’re gonna end up with maybe get program if you take this important step starting individual e-giving program’s going to end up with major donors, some are goingto give more brothers, but either way, you want to have ah, constituent relationship matters in a database. You crn database in place on dh. There are very affordable ways of doing that there’s so many different cloud services and there’s some that you just played by the records. So when you’re starting small, you know, you don’t have to have the major’s your commitment, maybe database, that, uh, that is only going to have a couple dozen names in the beginning, but you want to have a way of capturing all those relationships all those different data points with people because of something that you just mentioned area staff turnover, when when one person leaves, they’ve had all the conversations with, you know, half your donors, uh, you don’t want to lose weight, and i talked about that. You don’t want to lose all that precious information, right is right, and, you know, it’s a problem as as i’m sure you’ve seen in your own consulting that happens time and time again, where you get in there and you talk to an organization and they say, you know, well, you know, i’m new here, i’m only on the job three months i’m really not sure what those relationships were like on dh then you find out that you know, a lot of conversations and so forth, which simply not recorded anywhere. Elearning yeah, i mean, the last thing that you want to do is call the donor and say, hi, you know, my name’s, maria semple, on our new year of the organization, and i’d like to get to know, you know, for your interest, why do you give to us, you know, i mean, you should know that you should know all of that information. Yeah, i just had that conversation with your your predecessor two months ago, so so database screening find find people on, of course don’t only pay attention to the wealthiest in your in your in your database on that also have your e r n, right? Okay, you’re you’re also encouraging, looking into recurring yeah, you know, this is a place that you have an opportunity to garner, and i’m going to say those smaller gifts, those people that will commit ten dollars in most twenty dollars a month, whatever it is that’s hating their credit card, everybody so, you know, many of us are already used to paying whatever netflix, whatever this monthly charges that’s hitting our credit card accounts. On dh so it’s already sort of been absorbed into our monthly budgeting and so forth. And so if you can convince people to start setting up a recurring, uh, payments to your organization that’s going to go a long way to helping booth and of course, you’re not talking to the major gets here. You are talking about getting people in, perhaps at a much lower entry point and keeping them engage. I think it’s pretty standard practice, but i was going to make this explicit no on that donation page that you’ve got. You want to have a button for making monthly or something like that so that the person who is giving at a level that could conceivably be the monthly recurring donation could easily do it, you know, you know, ryan and i have to go in someplace special to make a set of recurring giving, i think that’s pretty standard, but i want to make it quick, make sure hyre no, that could be it could be very valuable. And you know what we get on saying that people just forget about it and fills, usually until their credit card expires, and then they’re reminded oh, yeah, no, i got this thing, and then and then sometimes that’s an opportunity for you asking for upgrades when a person is reevaluating. I mean, yeah, there’s always a chance that they’re goingto stop those donations at a point like that. But there’s also a chance that they’ll they’ll increase it. So you use a of failed transaction as an opportunity to essentially increase. Yeah, yeah, and, you know, it’s an opportunity for you to really start using the language that you would use, maybe with a major gift donor-centric tuo invest on a monthly basis in our organization, you know, you might have a monthly investments that you have set up for, you know, for yourself, for your for one kings or, you know, whatever we’d like you to take just ten dollars and twenty dollars a month and invest with our organization in the future viability of the organization. So, you know, give that compelling story, give that compelling reason why they should be engaging and investing with you on one thing faces, okay? And that’s, uh, you wanted to be telling them stories about about your outcomes, basically, what a big part of the story. Selling that’s, right? That’s right night. I saw that you actually had done them a video recently, you know, kind of on this topic as well. You know, you’ve got to be able to thankfully tell your story and, you know, there’s a lot of information out there on the web, all you need to do is really do a google search for non-profits storytelling, um, there are a lot of experts in that arena i’ve seen some of them speak even at the american marketing association conference on dh you know, the thing that you have to get across to people is, yeah, you’ve got your stats on, you know, those important metrics that you’ve got to be able to communicate, but that’s usually not what’s going to sell somebody right on on wanting to invest with your organization. So you’ve got to be able to humanize it and tell stories about the impact that your organization has on the community and, you know, making sure that you’re kind of a hearing too, really good storytelling, a beginning, a middle and an end and really understand all the different types of stories that there are out there. There’s a reason why we can’t remember, you know stories about whatever little red riding hood and the three little pigs, right? There’s a certain set up to those stories, you can learn tons of information about that on the web, and i really encourage you, teo teo, focus focus in on getting the story straight not only for your major gift donors, but also across the board at all we know right now definitely cross for this matter from e-giving five dollars a month with five dollars, more than they need to know what you’re infected and we’ve had listen, we have a guest here too. You go, teo durney martignetti dot com and search storytelling, the the guests we’ve had on that subject will obviously come up. Yeah, you got to share your impact? Um, you’ve also been thinking about trying to capitalize on sigil ambassadors? Yeah, yeah. So talented people. Yeah. So, you know, i’m sure that this is something that amy sample ward talks a lot about when when she’s on your show, tony as well. But, you know, you want to think about engaging people to be able to help amplify your message. Right? So, you know i think we’re all asses point sort of accustomed to seeing campaigns were online where your friends or maybe joni there their birthday, you know, raising money for an organization on behalf of their birthday, that type of thing. So those types of sort of crowd funding these people are digital ambassadors for an organisation when they do that, all the people that were involved in that bucket challenge, they were digital ambassadors, right? And there were some that were really, really strong, obviously that the first family, the first guy that kicked it off, they must have had a pretty good following to get to get kissed off as well as he did, but you wanted to try and figure out who those digital ambassadors are if you don’t have any really it’s time to start recruiting some on broadening your outreach, even if you have to think about some paid opportunities, you know, on facebook such as, you know, i don’t know ads are boosted post, yeah, big book and also twitter yeah, yeah, you know, as you find the people who are most network most deeply connected and you start a campaign you wantto be working with them. And this is something that any and i have talked about to work them back channels. You get them enthusiastic and you get them talking before you start your public campaign, right? Get there. And you get that they’re connected to help you in the public. And so that i know that people who follow you, uh, people who were with you and you have the most followers fanned. Whatever. You know, those were the most connected are going. Teo, be active participants in your campaign. Maria, we gotta take a break. We’re going toe. We’re gonna come back and talk more about yeah, ambassadors. And i know you have some resources share finding them right now. I gotta take a break. Elearning credit card payment processing brovey check out the video at tony dot m a flash tony, tell us explained the process of businesses joining tell us on having their credit cards, other payments process by tello’s and reminds you that you are going to get fifty percent of the revenue that hello elearning that’s a long revenue stream because they have one hundred percent satisfaction rate. So you can be assured that the business is going to be pleased, and you’re going to be earning revenue from this four, a good long time every single month. Also, the video for their, uh, one hundred percent satisfaction and the price match guarantee. You go beyond that. Tell us, can’t save the money that you started to tell us, and you’re getting two hundred fifty dollars. So it’s worth starting. Think about businesses. That next-gen tio, you know, as the rest of you watch the video. Think about like, a local body shop where, by the way, out there, all wearing masks and your protection jewelry store the area where they make a pie with the crust recognize from a bakery where hope that we don’t have very good. Um, think about that think about the businesses that you’re you’re boardmember zoho family members only any of these potential referrals to tell us for credit card processing, you just have to generate some interest to check out the video. That’s brightstep teo, your long tail of revenue. Tony got a last tony tellers. Now, look, rebecca miree simple and her twenty eighteen plan. You have some resources for finding who the deepest, most networked ambassadors are among your constituents. Yeah. Yeah. I have some resources that you might want to consider looking into. First of all, i came across a great white paper download that blackbaud put together. They put together a nice free guide. And it’s actually called super has the kids program how to create a super advocate program. So there i read through it, and it looked like there were a lot of really good chips in there. So that might kind of give you the first time ideas about how the framework and what it is that you might want to do and, you know, it really is going to be able to create opportunities foreign organizations most committed supporters really did take more action hyre value actions than than a typical supporter. This’s why you’re our joy and of your cubine free, right? So that the guide is free, but the guide three guys? Yeah, another one, right, yet so a couple of other things actually one that you brought to my attention called attentively, which is one of the blackbaud solutions actually wait give you the opportunity to identify whose influential so they say that a mass email files with social data and so that you can better understand the social side of yours supporters. So if you do have an email list, it is an opportunity to see who amongst that list might be really great social ambassadors reorganization, that’s attentive dot leaves they’ve got a y yeah, they they also make the point that home email i just better don’t. Usually the one people used to sign up with social network, so if you have a file of of home addresses, home email addresses attentively that’s not that’s not well, my treat so that’s not a free one, but no that’s correct zsystems blackbaud but value there and finding the most connected people and you got zaptitude what is zaptitude about? Yes. Zaptitude right. Kind of an interesting name. They have one of their service offerings is called good influence. And i learned about this company a few years ago. And i actually met some of the folks behind the company at one point and met people at the american marketing association conference who use this tool. Two years ago, you been holding out on us. You got a couple of years. You’re feeling it now in january twenty eighteen, you know, i’ve got i’ve got to keep some gems for you. I don’t think w hole not on non-profit idealware way. Never talked about you and waited. All right, maybe you alright? I get it out? Yes. So anyway, they have they have a tool called good influence and basically it it’s an opportunity to is your existing customers because this is used side both, you know, businesses and non-profit so in this case, your existing donors to dr support through new donors. So it’s a platform that really again helps to amplify not so much doing the search like thehe tentative job l y product would do, but really, this could be a platform for you. Teo, try and scale off your digital ambassador efforts. And when i was going back and reviewing some information about the current leadership team i’m looking at the bio of the founder and ceo is kind of interesting in marinette, we talk about the good influence product with the bat phone for the social activation engine for the famous i spoke a challenge current, so i’d be interested in having another conversation with him, actually myself. Teo, figure out more about how exactly the good influence taught. It played into that. I stuck a challenge. Okay, cool. And that’s that information about that is that zaptitude yeah. Dot com. Right. Okay. That’s that that to write? Well, you would be our most likely contributors. So let’s, get some prospect. Researcher idea. That is okay. So i was also thinking about a new arena we haven’t talked about before, which is maybe trying to research some of the companies in your community that are set up as the corporations and so i know, you know, you know why i don’t want to get thrown in the jargon jail so let’s, talk a little bit of what? You know well, listeners know that’s okay, well, that’s all right, gene cog and i’ve talked about the corpse on there now, and they’re they’re social, social good missions, not sickly, profit driven, but they certainly can be profit making, so you’re okay. You’re okay, cool. Cool. Ok, good. So there’s, actually a website called b corporation dot net. Uh, where you can go and search by state and see, you know what? All the big corporations are right in your state on dh. Then, you know, you’re kind of using, you know, good old fashioned prospect research looking at that company, trying to figure out who’s behind the company and so on and so forth and trying to learn a little bit more about him. You know, these people already have a social mission built into their companies. Perhaps the work that you’re doing can align some way with a particular social mission. So, you know, i think it’s an opportunity for you two. Maybe developed, um, uh, some relationship with him. Yeah, most of the time. It’s, private companies, so relationship supply. The companies that are set on our course. I love it. It’s, like it’s, like doing the same kind of research assay. Would foundation wear where they would be court they’re aligned with, and whether you might fit in. Yes, in-kind. What do you got for us? You mentioned a family you mentioned foundation so it’s touch upon that for a moment. If you have not made your annual trust to your local cooperating collections of the foundation center in your in your next the woods it’s time that you do that no, we’re going ahead and get a subscriptions directly to the foundation directory online. So if you have the funds to do it and you do a lot of foundation’s research definitely worth while having that tool in house, but it is available fourth grade if you go to the foundation center or one of their cooperating collections in your community. So what i recommend is to try and focus in instead of the really big foundations in your state, which everybody seems to kind of know today everybody goes, everybody goes, yeah, focus more in on the foundations that are the family foundation’s, even if they do not seem to have a lot of assets and some you will even notice some will come up xero and assets and don’t let that turn you off because if they had gone through the effort of setting up the framework for a sound of private foundation, but there may be, you know, a plan in the future that that family is may be planning to sell business and funding the foundation, and you don’t know what the thinking is behind it and it’s going to get to know them a little bit. So don’t discount the ones that you even see with xero asset, okay? And you trying to find connections between your non-profit and foundations not only terms of mission, but you know, if you’re looking in your state, you’re looking for a board connections two are some kind of some kind of relationship, right board connections, mission over laugh, it could be that they are literally in your county or in your town. So these air opportunity three to try and develop relationships with some of these people don’t forget, i mean, if it’s a family foundation, people behind the whole thing on dh there’s, you know, it’s just happens to be the vehicle by which they are, um, you know, putting all of their philantech through so it’s worthwhile, taking an opportunity to research it there if you don’t have any access, any way of accessing the foundation centers products you could do a similar type search on guide star okay, another case, and as you do your research, don’t be afraid to bring lips of foundation board members and foundation names to your board meeting try to have a board members or, if not at your meeting, circulated some other way, but have your boardmember scrutinizing the foundations that you’ve found that align with your work and start getting people you’re boardmember you know where the where the connections might be, but we gotta leave maria, thank you very much. Happy new year, thank you are joining of thirties and free, you’ll find her at the prospects finding dot com and at maria sinful next-gen takagi what’s the new tax balm for your twenty eighteen fund-raising plan if you missed any part of today’s show, i didn’t think you’d find it on tony martignetti dot com were supported by pursuing online tools to small and mid sized non-profits data driven and technology enables twenty dollars, by pursuing your guiding you beyond the numbers regular piela dot com and tell us credit card payment processing your passive revenue streams. Tony got a last tony killers our creative producers try my family, which is the line producer shoretz social media site. Shadow and its wonderful music. In-kind you give me that? We’re not from the radio. Big non-profit ideas for the odd third, ninety five percent go out and records. 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