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Nonprofit Radio for July 13, 2018: IT/C-Suite Crosstalk & Capacity Call Out

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Joshua Peskay & Robin Jenkins: IT/C-Suite Crosstalk
How do we improve the relationship between IT and management? Our panel from the Nonprofit Technology Conference is Joshua Peskay at RoundTable Technology and Robin Jenkins with The Hope Program.

 

 

Steve Heye: Capacity Call Out
“Capacity” means nothing until we unlock what kind. Technical? Managerial? Fundraising? Board? Steve Heye with NetSuite encourages introspection and shares assessment tools and models. (Also recorded at the Nonprofit Technology Conference)

 

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Hello and welcome to tony martignetti non-profit radio big non-profit ideas for the other ninety five percent on your aptly named host oh, i’m glad you’re with me. I’d suffer the effects of fei bro dysplasia, pacific cans progressive. If you exhibited the tendency to miss today’s show i t c suite cross talk how do we improve the relationship between it and management? Our panel from the non-profit technology conference is joshua peskay, eh? At round table technology and robin jenkins with the hope program and capacity call out capacity means nothing until we unlock what kind technical managerial fund-raising board steve, hi with nets sweet encourages introspection and shares assessment tools and models that’s also recorded at the non-profit technology conference on tony steak, too. A big lump of thanks, responsive by pursuant full service fund-raising data driven and technology enabled tony dahna slash pursuant radio by wagner, cps guiding you beyond the numbers wagner, cps dot com and by tell us turning credit card processing into your passive revenue stream. Tony dahna slash tony tello’s here are joshua peskay, eh and robin jenkins. Welcome to tony martignetti non-profit radio coverage of eighteen ninety sea it’s a non-profit. Technology conference in new orleans were at the convention center, and this kicks off day three of our coverage coverage, cracking like a fourteen year old. This interview is sponsored by network for good, not by the penguins. It’s actually sponsored by network for good, easy to use dorner management and fund-raising software for non-profits i’m joined by penguin one joshua peskay eh? And robin jenkins and robin also robin’s show your penguin for those who are not do not have the privilege of the video. Robin and joshua both have blow up penguins, probably three feet tall. Blackfeet black beak andi joshua, who were these courtesy is a courtesy of soap box engaged. They have a booth entirely filled with these giant inflatable penguins and have been doing that for the last ten years started when there was a lennox day preceding the conference that they brought the penguins for. Okay, so the penguins are not gonna be able to join us. We do have enough head sametz easy, joshua put it, had you on his? Yeah, we’re goingto neo-sage you’re putting the heck out of my head, said it’s, all stretched out now i think i have a fat head amy could take that for you. Thank you, amy. I don’t know. Wait. I would just leave this here. Okay. Uh, penguin madness on the third day of the and thank you to woobox who’s it’s a fox and gabe woobox neo-sage thank you very much for that. Nice folks. Joshua peskay a is vice president of round table technology. And robin jenkins is chief financial and operating officer at the hope program. And your seminar topic is unmet. Expectations and intervention between tea and non-profit leadership. Is that correct? That’s, correct way. Yesterday waited another session yesterday. All right, strategic tech planning. Yeah. Now you’re complicating my problems are today. We’re talking about bringing penguins i t and management together. Absolutely. Okay. Yeah. Can d’oh? Well, we did mostly multi task. You can’t wait to be single. Single focus. All right. Like direct mail. The best direct mail, you know, single single purpose. Yes. That’s. What non-profit radio? Okay, so, let’s, start with you, robin. What what’s the problem between management and why? Why? Why do we need this session? Well, sometimes they can’t talk past each other with different languages on dso, making sure that we can converse and a common language helps us to get to our end goals? Yeah, and joshua what’s the implication if we’re talking across each other well, i think that technology people in particular are guilty of not thinking of communications as a really critical part of their job and one main component sessions to be here. It is, yeah, it is an absolutely critical part of their job. And when they fail to communicate effectively, two executives about technology than the organization’s needs are ultimately unmet. That’s the unmet expectation in the title. Okay, so, robin, i understand. So, robin, you’re the you’re the leader in the leadership, a strata of this organisation, correct. And joshua was the vice president of technology. And what technology and technology strategy. Okay, tech guy robbins, the leadership. So he’s, actually, our vendor. So we actually a chance to practice in real time. Okay? Workflows kayman okay. You work together? Yeah. Let’s. See, you mentioned something. Well, now we’ll get to that about offers of children and skills. We’ll get to that. How do we how do we start? All right. Everybody needs to come to the center, you know, in a common language, right? I mean, he’s got their technical language. They tend to be very graphical. Maybe leadership, maybe not so much interested in the graphics. Is that? Is that a part of it? Okay, well, i was gonna say in the session were actually encouraging people there’s, there’s something in marketing that’s called a buyer persona where a market are actually develops an overall picture of the person that they’re attempting to sell. Tio what are they looking, what they read, what they listen exactly, you’re familiar with that, so we’re persona donorsearch dona we’re we’re giving them a template to develop an executive persona and encouraging people to actually create one. And then look at that when they’re thinking about communicating with executives around important strategic technology initiatives right now. But is it only the tech people who have toe come to leadership? Shouldn’t leadership be coming coming now? I was coming down. That’s not right, but coming, yeah. Reaching across the aisle wuebben their circle toward the circle that common space is that a common elliptical between the two circles? Yes, it’s. Not all on it. So, that’s, how i take my role is being able to straddle. Both groups and making sure that leadership is held accountable for how they communicate and what they need. Okay, so they are accountable as well. So should we start with our leadership persona? Is that is that a good place to can we develop together? Way could yeah. E-giving visual on someone you get included in the thing. Okay. Could be a link to it or were shooting video. We can. You don’t have. We don’t have a visual with you. I have it on my phone. But abila small. Okay? Yeah. If you had something penguin size, i do not have anything coincides and for just a small persona, but it’s a big personality. Okay, so how do we start now? The persona is different for every organization i write. I mean, for every person in every way. But we’re trying to reach to the c suite. Exactly. Or for the people who spend the money, you could okay. Who could be sponsors? Could be champions. Okay. Yeah. In a small organ might only be the executive director. Correct. We’re talking a lot of mean were there are twelve thousand listeners are small and midsize. Shop some of the marrow, you know, two or three people, right? So it may be a fundraiser. Executive director on dh, you know, maybe a marketing person. Morning communications. All right. I think these skills, though, in this workshop are are incredibly useful for anyone’s who’s communicating with someone who has a different perspective from themselves, which is essentially everybody all right. Because that’s really not more complicated, the fact that their executives is just part of the session title ultimately it’s about how do i who has one perspective communicate effectively with someone else who has a different perspective about a common need that we have but don’t think we have. Okay. Okay. Fair enough. So, it’s not only i t and management let’s. See? Amy, you have those, okay? The penguins are local. We’re going to call on them. Right? I told you this is this’s improvised penguins, by the way. Incredibly effective communicators. I mean, it zoho their way. They have to find each other right in a sea of penguins. Where are they? All look the same. What? Find each other? Oh, yeah. Find individual penguin you’ve never seen like march of the penguins. That thing with the guy? You know that the female penguin comes back with the fish he’s gotta find like her killed turner in, like, a million penguins. That all look the same. Like, how do you do that? We’re gonna call doing through communication. They have a unique calls that are very, you know, very effective. Why don’t we just create a penguin persona? Oh, yeah. It’s got the alliteration like a really big fan of fish cold weather extremes lighting on belly bilich magazine reader subscriber like water parks love the slides in water polo yeah, okay, all right. Let’s, let’s stick with our likes, polar bears. You know, you know, sharks are just starting with joshua peskay non-profit radio, so watch it or i’m shutting our eyes. They put the penguin in your seat and you’re out. Penguin talks a lot less than you do on robin and i will continue all right. It’s time for a break pursuant. Their newest paper is the digital donation revolution. You’re online donors have high expectations of you because of the swift transactions that they could do it amazon, zappos and other fine retailers that have easy user experiences the digital giving bar has been raised how do you get over it? Get the digital donation revolution the latest it’s on the listener landing page. Tony dahna em a slash pursuing to radio now back to it. See sweet cross talk. Okay, let’s, build our see sweet persona. How do we how do we start with this? So if i think of actual examples in my own organization, so i have a staff member who was very open and eager for change change but doesn’t always understand how that can impact their lives. So i have to make the tool that we’re thinking about implementing real to this person. How will it change? So i asked them questions. What do you do? And what would this have with this tool? Improve your work efficiency, your understanding, communicating with others, getting things done quickly worked quickly. So that’s how i begin to approach it. Okay on dh who is it? That’s asking these questions? Eso i’m asking the questions of the staff person of the person no more of this just not even someone who has either. Is aversa rights he or someone who doesn’t have much experience with it? Ok, ok, so we’re going a little broader than just okay. Okay, good. By the way, the penguin is also better dressed in you. The color blue is not becoming skin like pencil radio. Howard stern was nicer way sometime. Okay? And then what do we do with the answers to these questions? Right? So then i translate them to round table or two. Joshua i say this is the thieves or the people that i have. Then how can we make sure that we can communicate our pitch the proposal properly in the way that they can understand it and approve it? I mean, in the end goal, my goal is to get it approved. So how do i get to that place? Okay, joshua. And then what are you doing with this information that robin’s giving you? I’m really helping to make sure that we’re understanding not on ly what problems the organization has, but what challenges the executives have that we need to understand and communicate about how we’re going to overcome a lot of executives may be pressed by either they are intimidated by the technology that that might be changing, and they might not want to talk about that with other staff, but that could be a block for them or they have other pressing priorities that aren’t technology related and don’t think this is really worth their time, so if if we need their time and we need their buy-in what? Usually we d’oh understanding their challenger, okay, is critical something? I heard it in an interview i did yesterday duitz seems related come to me with a solution, not a problem. So you’re you’re suggesting not not just coming to the leadership in the decision makers with what the issue is, but with technology solution, but that also includes recognizing their needs and what their challenges are not just the challenge that you’ve identified, i’ll put it really succinctly, i shouldn’t come, teo, if you’re the executive, tony, i shouldn’t go, and i’m the me and robin like that like that i should like asking you for the problem. You’re the one who tells me the problems we say, oh, great here’s a way that we think we can solve that, then you say here’s some challenges that i have with that, like, oh, if i have to learn a new piece of software, i’m not sure that i’m ready to do that? We say, oh, here’s, that we can help you overcome that challenge so that we can solve this problem for you. Okay, if i don’t know those things and i don’t ask, you’re not you’re not querying the leadership. You don’t know what the troubles are, so i can build on that a little bit with a specific example. So my executive director, she has a really special quality of asking a lot of questions. That’s what i’ve learned is, if i can think through what she’s going to ask and what she’s going to need it, i can get it down to two questions based on our conversations, and i know i have i’ve solved a lot of her problems if i come out she’s still asking questions, and i haven’t predicted and i don’t know very well what her what her issues. Okay, so you’re you’re you’re you’re putting a thought into your that’s, right? You’re whatever weekly meetings are your proposal, executive directors were proposal. Okay? Yeah. Okay. How do we move this persona along? I feel like i feel like we haven’t developed this person yet. Yeah, well, i could get you. More specifics of the persona when you’re breaking it out, your whoever your person is right, you’re kind of saying here’s a little bit about them. So this is the one we have in this in that session is erin the is the first one, right? Just air in the diner, erin e r i n her and and she’s she’s got an avatar of a unicorn, right? Our unicorn executive director and, you know, she’s, super smart, but super busy. She probably has personal demands on her life as well as professional demands. And she really wants her organization to thrive and be successful and her staff to be, you know, well equipped with all the things they need. We should hope so. But she also she also has a lot of pressures around budget around the board asking to do things so so that’s kind of like a snapshot of her right. Then you have in the middle section, like here’s, the things that are most important to her that she’s working on right now, like these air, the air forms are top priority rights fund-raising i’m trying to fundraise for, you know, two thousand nineteen, you know? The next one is i’m dealing with hr issues right in the next one like these air, so from my perspective, like the it guy, like i need to understand that, like, it is not in her top four things, this is just not, you know, so unless i can appeal to these problems and say that the work that robin and i are doing is going to help with these things or help you focus on them even more, i’m fighting a losing battle, right? Okay, yeah, okay. Okay. And then was there another component to the they’re going to the three point is yes, so the third probono hand is then is so if you think of these, like, three columns, right? So we’ve got like, this is about erin. These are the problems and challenges she faces than the last one is here. In order to successfully communicate with aaron, here are the things i’m going to dio, right? I’m going to ask her about the problems that she’s facing in the organization. Okay? And this is what robin, this is what you try to anticipate, and i’m going to communicate the why, what and how if everything were doing very clearly. I’m going to prepare fully from conversations with her, so i don’t not ever waste her time, right? I’m going to anticipate questions she’s goingto ask about things we want to do. This is where robbins. Incredible, right? So, robin, when we had a big meeting with her executive director, she reached out to me and said, we need teo spend probably four hours making a slide deck and here’s all the questions i think she’s gonna have, right? So you you take the time to do that and it’s, in my opinion, it’s stuff we all i think i know, but i think doing it, we’re not regularly. We’re not being fundez being intentional about it. Yeah. Okay, so and so that’s and so it’s. Like a little one sheet thing, you can stick on your office. And and now it’s a reminder to you like, okay, these are all the things i need to do before i go talk to aaron or send her an email or ask her for something, right? I need to understand these is her problems. And these are the things i need to do to communicate successfully, okay? Okay? And is that what about in terms of actual words like, i mean, your your your session to talk about language? Does it get down to that granular level or words? Natural words? How does that how do we find the commonality in the words like avoiding jar? I mean, avoiding technical jargon. All right, you help me? Yeah shouldn’t be trying, you know, i guess if you tell me no, i think you’re you’re right, it’s that sometimes even the number of words someone may not have enough time, do you have to really keep its distinct? In short, i’d say there’s a even bigger gap between fund-raising and where we need to translate it into fund-raising funders will understand too healthy development team to communicate their proposals. So a couple of times we’ve had to go back multiple times to understand how to phrase something, even to the point where we have a specific budget of twenty five thousand that means i may only be ableto order for laptops and not five, because i really am above twenty five thousand with five so it really there are, you know, boundaries that we have to follow on dh. Communicate. Get down, tio. Okay, okay. Joshua language. Anything you want to add about this is a language really specific example that we give in the session. We’ll give it here, too. And hold out on video. Listen, i’m not going. Teo, cut your mike again. We’ll get the penguin’s. I have offstage talent breeding. I would never i would never claim to be more effective than the penguin at a change management executive communication. One of the questions is if you’re, you know, expressing like, hey, i think we should go to sales forthis is another problem that comes up the executive, maybe read something in the times or maybe here’s something from a boardmember and says, you know, we should use slack everybody else using slacks, we should you slack and a lot of people or folks like robin, your operations are kind of like, is that really what we need to be doing right now? And the pushback on that with an executive? Give me challenging. So a question, a specific phrases. What? Help me understand what problems we have at this organization that slack is going to solve for it. Right? And then then follow-up question. Is how does solving that problem help our organization and it’s a softer way of kind of, you know, walking them back from an idea that might be a bit something came from a boardmember has a wild hair, right? Exactly right? And so that that question i always push people to come back to the question of please tell me what problem we’re trying to solve here, that’s what i have to understand and then on lee then cannot communicate. You know, whether slack is the right resource, right tool to do that exact or, you know, maybe there isn’t really a problem or maybe there’s a better way to solve it. Okay, yeah. That’s related. Teo. Something you mentioned in your description, which is, uh, the boardmember child and nephew. Uh, i have a nephew took a coding course. Yep. And, uh, i think he could help the organization with his computer science skill. Right? Rare. You’re found course certificate, right way do with joshua. Well, i mean, i’m not going to sound really redundant, but it’s the same. So help me understand what problem we have in this organization that a recently graduated she’s going programmer could could be effectively applied to solving right if we can identify that, that, in fact, there may be an opportunity for that person to help us, but if we’re hammer looking for a nail and we’re not a nail it’s going to hurt? Yeah, you know? And so okay, andi, rock god, robert doesn’t add to that we actually had an example where we wanted to show a boardmember how much something costs and what we folded into that was the cost of me spending time with that person who was volunteering, so they sold them, they see true cost. So there’s a real life example, this is a real life example, and we show them the true class, and they were shocked, so i would say, don’t be afraid to show them under the hood so they truly understand the impact of what they’re asking for you in your your role as cfo. You get a lot of that, you know, coming down from boardmember zor, maybe your executive director sort of these ad hoc, you know, i read this article type or i heard about slack type, you know, we should be looking at this there’s a lot. Of that that come to you. So i want to get compliments through our board before i sit, go any fire there until they’re an amazing forward. I really mean that, so no, we don’t get too much. But when we do that’s where this example came in, where we really showed the true cost of personnel time training, if this person doesn’t stay, you know, this person doesn’t last long enough to actually get the work done. What does that cost? So so we have a good bounce with our board, but we do want them to understand sometimes what their suggestions metoo institutional costs and including time, right, right, and what that’s resulted? That is, of course, because they fundez us. Then they understand they’re going to raise that much more. But this other person, the way they responded was actually very helpful. They said, look, you know what, let’s, let me join the committee with you so i can dig in and understand how this works. And so now he’s working with us, you threw an opportunity. That’s, right? Yes. Excellent. And pick you up on that? Yes, you may be okay, but i appreciate you asking. For you, teo, turn around to the other side of that close to your mind. Sorry, so i’m picking up on what robin said i’m go and going back to his redundant any of the problems, if if executive director came to me with that and said the boardmember want that if i’m i have a good, strong relationship, i’m okay having candid conversations, we actually have some in our workshop on howto, like develop resilience toe having difficult conversations, i might ask the exact director is the real problem here that we need to find something for this person to do, to engage with the organization to satisfy this boardmember if that’s actually the problem we have to solve, then i will solve it right? But that’s not the problem, then maybe this isn’t the right opportunity, right? But let’s, be honest about what the problem is exactly i can find something if that’s if that’s what you’re asking me to dio, you know, and we’re guard listen, whether benefits organization, because it may be on a macro level benefits because this this boardmember or yours and you will be happy donor, exactly important insider to the organization and and that’s, the perfect example of, like, i may not be able to see that as a mighty person, so i’m not open to seeing it and don’t know how to ask the questions. I’m hopeless. Okay, okay, now you teach something maybe that’s because it was in your other session which i which i forbid you from bringing you said, push back and difficult conversations no that’s in this session that’s it it’s going to be a way we don’t have a hard time keeping my boundary. I’m enforcing that and let’s let’s talk about that, some having having that difficult conversation, who wants to start? So actually, the topic is now pushing back. When when you’re getting resistance, is that it? Yes, doing it appropriately and right. Eso joshua could speak really well to this because we talked about this thing other evening, but in my case, i think i’m very clear on where we need to end up, but open to changes in the path and because i’m very clear on where we need to end up it’s not problematic when people push back. Okay, so you know, if you’re not confident, what? Where you think you need to go, then you question in yourself if people you know push back on you but a cz long as i’m clear on where i think we need to go, then it’s much easier to have those cards. Conversation you’re advocating for something that you really believe in. That’s. Good for the organization. That’s. Right. Ok. All right. So how do we do it? Well, essentially, there’s there’s. I think people think there are other good or not good at having difficult conversations with people and it’s a skill that you can build like any other skill. And were we give a couple examples. This will sound kind of out there, but the example, the first example, we give us something called the ten percent challenge. Where for a week you go. And this was not something i came up with this they got him. Noah kegan who came up with this and you go. Any retail transaction you have? I go to starbucks to buy coffee. I asked for ten percent off. And if the city of a coupon, you have a discount code, i said no, i’ve just i would like you to give me a ten. Percent discount because i just, um, asking and i’m hoping that you’ll give it to me and you’re not pushy about it or anything you just you just and you do that every time you bison, you force yourself to do that every time for a week, and what you’re doing is essentially, like the equivalent of a push up for having difficult conversations. You’re building the muscle? Yeah, you’re building the muscle for, you know, dealing with that discomfort around having may be a difficult conversation, what that there’s other things you can do, and it allows you to maybe talk to your executive about something that you think they’re not going to be very happy about and say, you know what? This thing that we set up isn’t going very well, here’s, why it’s not going well, here’s what i think we need to do to fix it and have that, you know, very candidly because our tendency is due over promise and under deliver constantly because it’s easier on an interpersonal level for me to promise you the world and then once i’m not in the room with you and doing stuff, just get it good enough. And then hope that you don’t notice that. It’s. Not really what i promised. And you want to do exactly the opposite. When i’m with you. I want to really calibrate expectations conservatively, even though you’re you may not like it, right? And if i, if i can get over that difficulty, that discomfort and get really used to it, and i’m going to be much more effective with that, okay? And where do you go? Out? Ten percent. Ten percent challenge? No kegan k a g a n you did it, it’s it’s. Kind of it’ll seem kind of cheesy because it’s kind of been like what i refer to is the opto bro community, you know, like all that, you know, like the, uh, you know, the tim. I mean, with all due respect to this group who i’m a huge fan of. And i suppose i should be dead, but you know what? They’re like the kind of young dot com guys who are, like here’s, how you optimize everything in your life. So it’s, like the young white venture capitalist crowd, got almost exclusively male who were like yours, that you optimize your fitness, your diet, your productivity or everything to be like a super you know, dotcom entrepreneur. So i refer to them. I shorthand them is opto bro’s? Isn’t that what we all aspire? Yes. Okay, let’s. See, we’re going to aa. We’re gonna bring the penguins back. Amy! Hey, could we get the penguins? Oh, and i was so dull. What did i say? Penguin wanted penguin. You know, this is aaron here’s, the arrows! Aaron the yeah, this is air in the air in the back, headset back honor because they’re stretching out, but, well, they’re in the on dh er wait, you need robbins to caress way brought in the frame garrett to bring robin another one. Okay, we need teo or we got everybody now. I guess that’ll do it right. Okay, now that you’re showing that penguin, don’t do that. Okay, there we go again. But it’s, aaron and yu want t this is the other one said, oh, that’s our other next hour, both very dapper in both eyes. All right, all right. This is the panel, aaron and cedric. Oh, and also joshua peskay a vice president, roundtable technology and also robin jenkins, cfo, chief financial on operating officer at the hope of program. Thank you so much. Thank you. Last thiss interview sponsored exclusively by network for good, easy to use donordigital and fund-raising software for non-profits thank you so much for being with non-profit radio coverage of eighteen ntc we need to take a break. Wagner, cps. We recently had segments on storytelling, but you don’t want your excellent storytelling to be so excellent, so compelling. That it leads to too many restricted gif ts based on the stories that’s where wagner comes in their block post is avoiding restrictions from donations inspired by storytelling. Regular cps dot com quick resource is then belong in a moment its capacity call out right now. Time for tony’s take two. A big lump of listener. Thank you. No discrimination, no hierarchical. Thank you’s. If you are supporting listening to this show, supporting this show, gaining knowledge and help from this show for your organization, for your work. I’m glad. Thank you. Thank you for being with us. You’re getting something out of it. But we are on this end too. And i certainly am so glad that the show helps you. It helps you do the good work that you need to do. Thank you for being with us, it’s that simple. My video of gratitude if you wanna get a little more complex at tony martignetti dot com now time for steve. Hi and capacity. Call out. Welcome to tony martignetti non-profit radio coverage of eighteen ntc non-profit technology conference in new orleans. This interview is sponsored by network for good, easy to use donorsearch and fund-raising. Self aware for non-profits and my guest is steve. Hi, he’s. Solution consultant at net sweet. Welcome, steve. I thank you. Welcome pleasure. You want to welcome you to my own show? Well, i feel welcome. You are. You are genuinely welcome. Your seminar topic is capacity is more than a buzzword. Yep. Alright, that’s short. But i feel like there’s a lot in there. Iss what are we talking about? When we say capacity? What do you mean? And that was the whole point in the session. The whole point of the session was varies depending on where you’re sitting and yet there’s so many definitions of capacity. Everybody talks about it differently. So the idea of this session was too, really walk through all the different ways that people talk about capacity, how you can measure it, how you act on it when you know what it is. And so one of the key things was providing context to the word capacity. So the only way you can really talk about capacities by putting something in front of it. Like if you think about a car, it has seating capacity. Where if you think about, you know, a truck. It has towing capacity. All right, so that was a lot of our framework. So what are some things that might go? A friend of, uh, acquisition capacity fund-raising capacity. So fund-raising bassett is a good example. Organizational capacity program capacity, you know, financial capacity, technical. So we did it’s been quite a bit of time on technology, cassidy. So we’re around, you know, duvette right systems, right operations, the right technology, the right tech staff skills also. So there’s, you know, layers to how you can talk about capacity within an organization to meet their mission. All right, what with it being the non-profit technology conference? I feel like we should start with technology capacity. Absolute, which is a phrase i’ve never heard. Yes, i’ve heard those two words never put together. Yeah, what now, make sure you know that our listeners are large over twelve thousand there in small and midsize non-profits so they may very well not have any devoted technology staff correct. They probably sure they still have some some technology capacity right on, and we’re gonna help them try to measure it right? And we’ll flush it out more because i can’t even think about other things, too, say about it right now, but i’ll know more in about twenty minutes. Exactly. Um okay, but so, you know, a very good chance they don’t have dedicated technology staff, right? They’re outsourcing everything that they need or they’re piecing it together through. Ah, they’re executive director. And maybe you don’t an office manager or something. Okay? Technology capacity. Okay. What is that? So one thing to think about is the technical capacity. So what do you have enough? Do you have someone on staff that knows enough to able to talk to the vendors you work with and to be able to do the right sort of planning so that you at least understand the systems you have and the need you have so it’s a simple term of technical questioning. Meaning you know the right questions to ask. You know, you have a person driving the strategy. You have somebody making the decisions around your technique technology. And so one of the things that we do at my work is we donate software. Yes. Through social impact. Yes. And so what? My role is before we donate to software what we want to do. Is ask a simple set of questions to see if they have enough technical capacity to be able to implement the software. Oh, i know how you fit into this. Because i had peggy duvette on the show. Yes, just maybe two months ago. Or so you could. You could. If you miss that one, you go to twenty martignetti dot com and you could search her last name. Do you, e t and you can listen to how oracle net sweet social impact has all kinds of free not only product, but also consulting to go along with that to help you build your capacity for use the product that you will get from social impact from from oracle, that sweet social done. You could go back and listen to that. Okay. So now, steve, hi. You fit in determining whether an organisation has the capacity in a technical side. Correct. Tio tio, use what? Your company don’t generously donate. Correct. Okay, so how do you measure it? So we e so one of the challenges we had way had all kinds of grand ideas of how to measure. So he had all these thoughts around, you know, really? Deep interviews and but all of those things take time. So what we ended up doing as we came up with a very simple set of, like, twelve questions, and they’re all kind of very high level questions, but give us a set of information. For example, we asked, do you have a tech plan? These are these questions answered online? Yes. It’s a form that they fill out a hell of a lie you’re building your capacity for for intake to the donation program through social impact. Correct. You are. Congratulations. We had our own constraints and your talk. You’re walking your walk? Yes, it was one questions in your do you have a tech plan? One is. Do you have an i t staff and most people say no, but the second the answer is no, we don’t. But we have a volunteer that has a lot of tech skills that helps all of us allow it a lot. Another question was around. How much time are you willing to commit to a project? How much do you have? A financial understanding accounting in those kind of questions. Right? So the software is khun khun take on financial financial management, right. And i just use this is the one example of measuring technical capacity. And so then the idea is ok. Now we understand our capacity. Where do we where do we have gaps? And then what are some creative ways to fill that so for our non-profit to think about their technique capacity, that’s simple to just sit down and look at it. And then if you decide good. Okay, i got to stop for a minute. Yeah. What if what if an organization is not planning to apply? Tio oracle, that sweet social impact for donation? Can they still use these question? I mean, how would they manage our measure, their technical capacity? So our questions are pretty specific to our program. If they have an organization i think is looking to measure their own, i would look at the end ten and ten just lost the new launched a new technical capacity survey as well. That one is much more broad and open. Okay, so i would look to somebody, something like that for a more generic won. The example i use is just a little straight. Why? You would measure it in what you would do with a one way of measuring the inten a technical capacity survey. You could find it. And ten and tn dot org’s. Yes, kruckel second capacity and that’s a new one that they’ve just launched. And it kind of helps you give, get a clear picture of the technical capacity of your full organization as a whole and then gives you when you take the survey, it will spit out results afterwards of oh, you were a little short here. Go read this book here. Oh, you’re short here. Here’s a website. You should go visit. So it gives us set of recommendations as well. So that once you understand you capacity now you have a set of actions to follow-up right as well. So there is that much more public. Ours is for a very specific purpose. Yeah. So that was a key part of our whole presentation. My presentation of capacity was the there before you even talk about capacity. The key is to understand what? What? What capacity? Trying to understand what gold you have once you understand your capacity. And that would help you determine what type of assessment to do so, for example. Yeah, help. If your goal was to increase your outcomes, your program outcomes so you want to be more effective in the work you do to meet your mission. That would probably mean you would need to do like two different assessments. One is organizational effectiveness. How well do your staff work and how clear our their goals and isn’t tied to the outcomes versus a resource falik assessment to figure out ofyour right funding? Do you have the right revenue streams to support the right staff and then to do a staff have the right skills? So tying those two things together then allows you determine what needs to change in order to have more outcomes from your organization? Ok, boy, that’s a mouthful. It’s a lot. A lot. I’m gonna take a little aggression. So what is your work now, if you’re you strictly devoted to measuring the capacity of potential grantees for the social impact program, so no, i do two things. One is i designed this. The assessments that we use to figure out their capacity design that survey. Okay? And then i designed the interventions that go with it. So once we have their assessment, then we figure out what path they need to go down and what they need to get ready to be able to implement the software. And then once they’re implemented, i figure out, well, there there’s this capacity, we create interventions along the way to help them grow in their capacity so that they’re more successful in what they’re trying to do. Okay, like, but i know a standard part of a program is there’s a monthly monthly webinar for grantees drive that right? So there’s quarterly probono and then there’s regular opportunities to get help and assistance? Yes, we don’t know that there was something webinar maybe i’m wrong, okay? Yeah, i know i’m not sure, but i do a lot of interviews. Yeah, you’re being kind because it doesn’t exist. Not only you’re not sure about it does exist. I just realized you’re you’re good. He has branded oh yeah, you’re branded with nets sweet it’s, the old it’s our old logo on the old alright doesn’t say work along. All right? Yeah. Okay. All right. We got a good amount of time together. Yeah. How do we know what i’d love to talk about it? Unless you were going to take it out. Please go ahead. Thistle. Abstruse for me? Yes, absolutely. Zoho that was the whole purpose of the session was because when people talk about capacity, they it’s such a buzz word that it means nothing like this whole session, if we’re not careful, belongs in george in jail. It’s. And it is the whole thing was jargon joe and that’s. What? Really? So so what? The way i’ve structured the session was i first talked about. There are standard models of doing organizational capacity assessment. Mckinsey has one there’s, an organization called lisk that has one that’s called cap map. And then there’s an organization called the unit. I think it’s a unity foundation. And they have a model so it’s, a very purposeful, driven model. And they measure it in different ways. So you can do a capacity assessment as a self assessment where you just every staff person kind of takes a survey. You look at avery quantitative way to figure out what your what your capacity looks like that way, then you khun benchmark yourself against others that have taken the same survey or what they do is usually give you a report that says here’s your capacity here’s the actions need take here’s your strengths, here’s your weaknesses that’s quite an algorithm. How did they figure all that out? Yeah, and that’s that? Yeah. Then that’s. Why? You should leave something like that to the professionals? Because i don’t know. Okay, you are a professional. You designed a twelve question survey. Yeah, yeah. It’s a week really scaled ours. Now you’re touching at the perimeters of this, but gosh, i mean all right. What? What are the factors that go into it? Depends what kind of capacity you’re measuring me. We gotta break it down so i can break it down. So we had a list of six things. So is it really hold your list? Hold you. Listen, it sounds like something interesting, but is it really worthless to say the phrase organizational capacity? It is useless. It doesn’t mean anything. Yes, it factors in all these different capacities, right? That that is so it’s a broad. It really is unhelpful. Right? And organizational capacity. For what? For what? That’s? My follow up question. Capacity for what? Okay, okay. So that was one of my biggest struggles was as i walk around, you know, the vendor booths, and i will go to sessions and i could hear people and, you know, all of these vendors and several of, like, capacity building initiative. So what? What does that what does that mean? And what does that? How does their non-profit actually act on that? It just becomes, you know, like other words that people throw around there, just buzzwords, and it doesn’t have enough of a meeting. So that was my goal. Was that really actually give it a meaningful contact? Okay, now i see how worthless that is. Georgia. Organizational capacity really is all right. You had your your your clickbait and i’m clicking six list of six. Yeah. So though, so when the when the those three surveys, when they would do their type of assessment, they can’t keyed in a on key areas. One was leadership in governance. So that’s the top level? Do you have the right leadership? You have the right board structure because that really drives a lot of things. The second level then was around do have the right strategy and plan. And then the third was like program delivery. The fourth was around the right staff and structure to do that part. And then the last was resource is in the last was the final, final one with zsystems. Okay, so the penultimate was resource is, yes, the ultimate was back-up saying last night wasn’t the last one that was my sixth and ultimate. Yes, uh, okay, s so all right, so we have these six areas that okay, so these are the two categories that the tools that you mentioned, like the mackenzie said, this is what they’re surveying, yet they’re breaking down into differently. Yeah, okay, different layers of capacity, okay. And then that that broad. All right, go ahead. Yeah. So when you take those six, then it becomes much more meaningful to talk about capacity. Because if you break those down, you take the first two for example, leadership in governance and strategy and planning. If you if you do an assessment on that to see how effective you are, the gore, the and creating a strategy driving towards your mission and then does the board actually have the right governance structure and the leadership have the right tools in place to actually make changes that build your ability to meet those things. So that becomes more meaningful, rather entire organization capacity, which is such a fluffy where that means nothing. When you get into the details of does your leadership do the right things to move you closer to meeting your mission? Okay. So now you’re talking about tying capacity goals yet to the to your plan. Yeah, well, see your organization? Yes, exactly. Organization as it exists. And then you need a plan for filling the gap between what you need and what you have yet to reach the capacity that you’re striving for. Right? Okay. Okay. That makes sense. Those sentences makes sense. What i just said they make sense. Okay, all right. Got to take a break. Tell us this new tellis moughniyah liz from a company tell us, has been has allowed my business to support my favorite charity without even feeling the pinch of writing a check. I am donating money every month that i would have spent on credit card processing anyway. Also, their customer service is far better than we’ve ever had. End quote, one hundred percent business satisfaction with tell us the businesses you refer are going to love it. You will get the money. Watch the video at tony dahna slash tony. Tell us now. Back to capacity. Call out with steve. Hi. All right. So if you don’t have the means, you need one of these tools. You need some kind of professional. You said that earlier? Yeah. That’s. Where? Bringing bringing the professional. You really need some help measuring your capacity in whatever it was through. Whatever chadband whatever channel you want to talk about correct way that you’re concerned about you. And if you’re concerned about your whole organization, then it’s the six sound like the place to start, but you need help, right? And so on, but i think it’s, in a large organization, you really, really help if you’re small and you only have six staff, right? There’s really boils down to is simple questions, because then you don’t need the complex question because you don’t have eight departments to interview, you don’t have one hundred staff, you don’t have this big, unknown kind of presents from my wife’s organization that is no full time staff, you know, they just have a couple, you know, like, eat part time staff, they’re never going to need an organizational capacity assessment. They know they know what they can and can’t do, but so at that level, what they need to acknowledge, though, is do they have a strategic plan? Do they have a mission statement? Do they have a vision statement? Is their board engage, you know, and asking some simple questions like that and then doing it on a quarterly basis and then actually investing in that and finding someone that could maybe come in on a pro bono basis and just provide an outside opinion of whether things were going well or not on that organizational top level leadership? Because i think with small organizations what tends to happen is obviously they don’t need this, you know, one hundred question assessment, but what they do need is to have somebody tell them if they’re spending enough time strategically thinking versus just meeting today’s needs. So that’s, where we really spent the rest, that second half of our session was we were focused in on well, i gave an analogy, so the analogy i used was beer. So my whole session was your themed. My slides had beer on it. I gave away beer during my session was wonderful. It was a nice ice breaker. So the idea was, i gave somebody a beer. I said here, hold this beer. And then i threw a ball to them and told him to catch the ball. They were able to catch the ball, and then i did it again, and then somebody in the audience says, well, why don’t they set down their beer so they can catch the ball use here? And so i was like, oh, that’s, a great question. I was hoping somebody would ask that that was the whole idea for the exercise and i said, the reason you don’t want to sit down your beer is what we want to do is pretend to beers your mission and what often happens at a small non-profit is we put all of our capacity into catching the everyday balls we set down our beer, which is our mission, and nobody ever takes enough time to really think about how do we meet the one year goal, the three year goal in the five year goal? What changes do we need to make today? So for example, was going go back back to my wife’s small non-profit they wanted in five years from now, they wanted to be able to have my wife retire as the founder, but as an unpaid executive director, you can’t hire another executive director and tell him that it’s a freak job. Yeah, so she’s like, well, if i could want to retire, i need to be able to pay an executive tractor, so but in order to do that, i need to have more students in our program and in order to have more students in our program, i need to have a second studio, but in order have a second studio, i need to have a better staff set of of skills so that i can handle capacity, so i don’t have enough people in my organization to handle more students, so she worked backwards from there and figure out which capacity she needed to start with fixing, and what she needed to start with was management. So she took her executive director roll started breaking into an admin role, a program role and an executive director role, which usually doesn’t happen it tiny non-profits usually it has one leader, and they control all the power and it’s that founder syndrome of a lyman charge, and then what happens over time those that when that founder leaves, you have that? Oh, my gosh, is that huge hole? So she saw the capacity need of ok at the leadership level on strategy level can’t be me. We’re going to spread the beer around everybody’s, going to have a cup full of beer, and we’re all going to hold the mission and hold onto it together, and we’re going to share a part of it. So i think that’s the difference between what’s needed at a tiny organization versus a large one if you’re complicated, if you’ve a lot of politics, a lot of messiness, you need someone from the outside to come in with a very rigid tested nice framework. Toby, evaluate your capacity at the leadership level at a small one. It’s usually it’s just having coffee with a friend that understands is coming to a conference like this and having somebody just sit down. You share what you d’oh give you a beer and throw balls at yes, exactly. So what? The way my wife did it was she went to a dance studio owner conference she’s a non-profit dance studio. She had other studio owners tell her and do an evaluation of how she was working. So she benchmarked against them. She told him how she was doing and they’re like all you’re doing this wrong. You’re doing this wrong and the leadership level. So it was a peer evaluation rather than a formal evaluation. All right, first of all, shout out the name of the organization. Oh, my wife’s organisations called leap of faith arts ministries. So it’s a very small non-profit in the chicago land area. Okay, okay. All right, so this is very helpful because we’re breaking it down now for smaller organizations. Yeah, there’s also there’s a good degree of self assessment. I mean, inspection going, yes, there are a lot of founders who would not be willing to divide their job. Yeah, the way your wife did in tow three parts and that’s a that’s, a real struggle because you’re putting all the burden on one person, which is great because that that one person is there for a reason they’re really good at their job and they do it well, so it makes sense tow have them keep all of that stuff. But at the same time, you’re not building a long term capacity for that organization cause when the founder leaves, then the whole order dies. And it’s also not healthy for all these different functions to be in right, ready in one place, because even if the founder doesn’t leave or doesn’t die, eventually they go on vacation. Yeah, they do on dh if if if if getting to the next level which i hear a lot right, you know, how do i do? It is important to you? Yes. Then having a founder. Or maybe two people, maybe not literally just one. But write one or two people holding all the keys and the power that’s all the potential for the organization is is unhealthy. Limited instrument, of course. So yeah. So that was a start assessing start looking in for introspection. Yeah. Figuring out where the you know where the consolidation of power is, so that you can spread it out so that more people are involved. So then we then we continue the conversation to a much more tactical level. So we ended with all right. So if we want to be able to spend more time thinking, capacity, thinking, strategy, thinking, leadership, the on ly way we can do that is to stop doing other things. So you you need to be able to sit down and okay, where am i spending my time? That isn’t helping the mission. What tasks am i doing? What tax my staff doing mohr introspection. Right? So then you look down and you go, okay, well, wow. We’re spending a lot of time on our finances were spending a lot of time tracking our donors that we’re spending a lot of time. Tracking manual pieces of paper for our students doing registration, doing so you talked to start to take those things that there are systems in ways to automate those things. So it’s almost taking a laundry list of, you know, work for three weeks, right down where you spend your hour every hour to write down. Oh, i spent this on adam and i spent this some finance. I spent this and just doing like, a catalogue of your time and then looking back and going so well, i spent a lot of time doing stuff that really doesn’t change our outcomes. It makes us run, and it has to be done. But i could probably give that decided piela won doing it. Yeah. So so then that’s where you start to break down and build capacity because it allows you to focus on the mission in the vision and strategy, and you start to offload those things. And almost everybody went to get a capacity. Says that the first two things they think it’s all i need to raise more money. I need to hire more staff. That’s the only way that we’re going to build capacity and really to me, it’s not that you, khun. If you get your staff trained, they may be able to work better if you get the right systems. It may take away some of the work that you spent all your time doing. If you start to bring in probono staff to do some of this look for a probono accountant look for probono lawyer look for, you know, ways to supplement your staff because of you, in my experience every non-profit that i’ve been at when we ask for more money, or we ask for more staff, the answer is always no. So when i talk about capacity, i say let’s, just stop talking about the illusion that there’s more money and more staff so let’s take and go in two directions. The only way you can do it is supplement your staff, increase the skills of your staff, or look for ways to automate things that your staff shouldn’t be doing that a system can do for you that’s where we ended and that was a really fun cover, that that was the fun part of the conversation to me once we get past the gobbledygook of the word capacity. And the words organizational capacity because really what all what it’s all about is what do you choose to spend your time on? What tasks do you choose as your priorities and what? Where do you invest? The resource is thatyou’re non-profit has been given to meet your mission. What kind of questions did you get? The questions i got from the audience were really about one a lot about the tools. Which tools should i use? Of course, that’s where we started the other one, though, was what do you do? One leadership stands in the way and doesn’t want to change. Or what do you do when thie organization is so small that you know, these tools get away don’t know. Sorry latto clothe first one leadership leadership is resistant. Yeah, so i think when leadership is resistant to this, i think the best way to do it is to celebrate small winds, so arguing with the leadership and trying to prove your point usually doesn’t work. So i think what the way i’ve approached this in the past was do small experiments with just the other staff around you find ways to involve a volunteer or automata. Task and then celebrate it and show hey, you know, we did this little thing over here, and it saved me three hours a week, and now i’m able to do this other work. So i think a way to convince leadership is to prove success when you change capacity on your own, and then eventually you can show them dahna that it is worthwhile for them to spend time, maybe bite it off in small bit and do a test and show show the improvement. Yeah, exactly. Small level. Okay, we got time for one more question that you were asked and but because you can provide the answer. So the last one that since this is a technology conference is doesn’t make sense to do a technology specific assessment and i think that’s another way to answer the first question. So one of the ways that you can get around if somebody doesn’t want to do a full organization assessment, there are some great ways to have somebody just come in. Look at your technology set up, you know, hyre of endor or ask money report members. If they have a solid person, have them come into an inventory of your look at your tax strategy, i think that’s a simple way to start to prove the worth wildness of spending time looking at capacity is just to start with a technology capacity assessment and just have a vendor committed. Do it for you. That it’s. Not all that expensive. If you can find it probono it it’s. Very effective, too. Okay, we’re gonna leave it there. Yeah, steve. Hi. Thank you very much. Thank you. I hope i didn’t confuse you too much of a good overview. I mean, it’s a it’s, a dense topic. But it is a really done you broke it down. Well, for the small order. Good. Steve. Hi, he’s. The solution consultant at net sweet. Thank you again. Thank you. Appreciate it. My pleasure. This interview sponsored by network for good, easy to use dahna management and fund-raising software for non-profits. And you are with tony martignetti non-profit radio coverage of eighteen ntc wrapping up our coverage right now. This interview. Thanks so much for being with us. Thank you. Next week. Attentive and productive with steve rio at bright webb. If you missed any part of today’s show, i beseech you find it on tony martignetti dot com were supported by pursuing toe online tools for small and midsize non-profit it’s, data driven and technology enabled. Tony dahna slash pursuant radio by wagner, cps, guiding you beyond the numbers. 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Nonprofit Radio for January 12, 2018: Free Coaching In 2018 & Maria’s 2018 Plan

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Welcome to twenty martignetti non-profit radio big non-profit ideas to be either ninety five percent on your actor named oh, i’m glad you’re with me, i’d suffer the effects of organ neo-sage if you got taste saying you missed today’s show free coaching in twenty eighteen, four coaches small non-profits nationwide through its network of volunteer specialist in marketing, hr technology management finance and mohr kurt kurt springstead is from the northeast region, and he revealed how to get free, ongoing support for your organization and maria’s twenty eighteen plans. Maria semple has strategies for your fund-raising digital marketing and trusted research prospect, research contributor and prospect finder. I thought he’d take you twenty eighteen plans all this month responded by pursuing full service fund-raising data driven and technology enables, tony got a last person and by wejust piela guiding you beyond the numbers. Western piela dot com hello durney credit card processing into your press of revenue stream. Tony dahna made black teller i’m pleased to welcome kurt springstead to the show. He is a certified mentor and chairman for the score northeast new jersey chapter his near forty year career was in information technology and ranged from programmer trainer and adjunct professor. Tow it, director, consultant and non-profit boardmember score is at score. Mentors and score dot org’s. Kurt springstead. Welcome to the show. Thank you. It’s. A pleasure to have you, um, score. Now, i i grew up with score being the service corps of retired executives, but that’s ah, that’s. Old news, right? Yes. We’ve dropped that. That acronym? Because it turns out that nearly half of us are working to some degree, many full time in some part time. Okay, so so i was like, like, aarp is no longer the american association of retired persons. It’s just aarp like that, right? Like that. Okay, um, and score is nationwide and supported by the small business administration. Technically, we have our own funding from the directly from the government, and we’re a partner of this administration. They just kind of helped me or the money out. Okay, okay. But of course, score is itself a non-profit so people can give to score and support the work. Well, the way we have our own non profit foundation called the score foundation. Okay, in order to to accept funds donated from the public or from corporations that want to sponsor is because as a government agency, which is what we are, we obviously can’t take donations. Oh, you’re still you like you’re a part of small business administration? Not just i thought, supported by the website says, supported by i thought that meant like you get grant, you get a grant from score. I mean, from s b a. But what exactly happened? Wear actually empowered by an act of congress and they give us a small grant that they they ask our big brother, the spd administer. Okay then, when someone tried to donate a large sum of money a few years ago, we had to figure out how to make advantage take advantage of that. So i created the square foundation, which then sponsors various programs that were involved in whether it be training or outreach. They allow us to be more effective than what we get from the government. Okay, so the yes. So the score mentors are acquainted with non-profits not wanting to turn down gift if they don’t have to. Absolutely. Well, we we end up in our particular chapter having to raise nearly half of the money we need to operate. So we understand all the all the issues that not-for-profits okay, excellent. Eso s o score is i think i feel i feel like my voice just crafting a score score score score is mentoring that is on coaching that is available nationwide, including for non-profits let give us a sense of the breath of this. What? What? What non-profits could learn? Sure. So, yeah, one of the key services we do offer is confidential and free mentoring for as long as you’ll have us. And, you know, there’s about thirteen thousand of my friends in three hundred thirty chapters across the country with people who have done everything you can imagine serial entrepreneurs, uh, people with industry specializations, i spent a lot of time as you mentioned it, but we have people who are retard lawyers piela people have come from not-for-profits organizations and so on, and then what we offer you is whatever services you might need it’s really, in terms of a coaching, a relationship. So if you were people come to us with simply a gleam of an idea, i’d like to create an organization or like to create an entity that does the following and i need to know where the steps are. What are my resource is? How do i make it happen? And since most of us and our careers have been down that road already, either in for-profit or not-for-profits we can i tried to tell you where the where the dangers are and what kind of decisions you might have to make. Okay. And that’s, that’s, that’s pre startup. But our listeners are are already in non-profits, you know, vast majority is already in non-profits so i first of all, i just love the idea that this is available to us as us taxpayers and non-profits ah, you know, in part supported by our small business administration. I love that guy like that, right? So actually, you should be really important. Happy the taxpayer because for every dollar the government gives us, we return fifty dollars. I don’t think there’s any other group in the government that actually gives money back. Is that right? Yeah. Okay. So the yes. I mean, well, you know, we tend to see a lot of people who are looking to start a business, but probably nearly half our business. People who already in business. Ok. For a significant period of time, and so the services are the same. The questions they’re sometimes different not trying to find out necessarily where to go, but we have some trying to grow or i’m thinking of adding a new line of service, or i’m struggling with managing the people that i have a client come to me has been a business for twenty five years, and suddenly the numbers went went rid. She had no idea why that happened or what was going on had, uh, any number of people who come to us with, uh, you know, i just we feel we need to grow. We need to serve more of our clients. We’re not getting out to the the community we were designed to serve. How do we make people aware of us? How do we get volunteers? All those kinds of questions that we run into excellent. Okay, so so even though it’s small business administration, you know that there’s a reason that you’re on non-profit radio i want listens to b b certain that they can avail themselves of this inn non-profit so so whether it’s marketing or law or human resource is a righty or accounting? What? I mean, like any any business functionality is available for the is available as coaching and mentoring that i haven’t run into anything yet that i can’t find, you know, the reality is that for, you know, a cz you’ve mentioned, i’ve been on board and, you know, i’m i’m running a fifty person ah, small non-profit myself locally with the team that i have, so i’m struggling to find more money trying to struggling to find volunteers, i’m tryingto struggle to keep them engaged, too. Figure out how i can reach more clients, which is one of the reasons is wrong with you today. What can i do to make sure that everybody knows our service is out there? So we have the same kinds of problems, the same issues. So, you know, sometimes you need legal advice, and i appreciate the nuance that there are some regulations and some decisions that are different for those of us who are in a not for profit status and the have you got a charitable registration you need to set up? How do you? Some of the legalities of when we hyre people on how we treat them are a bit different howto do with the tax situation. I mean, one of the most interesting questions i get it someone has come to us, has had a for-profit business i have working with a woman who’s been teaching art for a number of years, but now she wants to turn it over and offer some of her courses for free on the internet. And she was going to look for grants. Well, unfortunately, she’s a commercial operation and the number of grants for a commercial operation are quite small. So we started to talk about how she might look at establishing an aw for-profit and attract people to make donations to that business. So i, you know, i’ve only been with score about three years, but i’ve been all over the map. So in terms of those kinds of questions, i can’t help but notice the similarities between my four business work in my not-for-profits although, as every business has its own unique nuance, um where where we do our best to help with that? Yeah, we have to take our first break so you just hang out for a moment and it’s time for a break. Data driven fund-raising field guide that is their newest resource on the listener landing page. There was more data generated in twenty, sixteen and twenty, seventeen, and in all of previous history made that is amazing and it’s too much for you to deal with a field guide to help you translate the data. You have the fever got into actionable inside, drive your fund-raising so you can act on your data, not be stuck in its muddled through it. You know that, ah, fancy report that you get out of your fund-raising starita basis is not worth anything. If you can’t act on it and have it helped you in your fund-raising what is taking what they’ve learned in working raise large organisation, and they have boiled down to basic principles for you in data analysis. The data driven fund-raising field guys it’s at tony got a flash for students capital p now, back to springstead and free coaching in twenty eight i’m with kurt springstead on, we’re talking about score, which is consulting, coaching, mentoring, that’s available to you in all these different areas that that kurt has been touching on anywhere in the country. Him he happens to be in the northeast new jersey chapter, but how many three hundred chapters you said throughout the country, country hundred thirty welcomed the beauty of it is we have a significant number of clients that we service, uh, who who are comfortable with an exchange of e mails, and we’ve also started in the last year or two significant amount of mentoring the video conference, so if the particular expertise you need isn’t in the small team, in your neighborhood or in your your area, then with some help your you, khun, search and find a person anywhere in the united states, and you can make the arrangements to work with it. I was working with the young man who originally met with him in kentucky or talk with him while he was in kentucky and one day we were chatting while he happened to be in china working on this project, so we’re no longer bound by the code we working. Okay, excellent. All right. Very good to know. All right, so if someone wants to work with score, we want to take advantage of this vast consultancy basically that that’s free to us way get started with the the website it scored out. Or gore or how oh, that is the most efficient way to do it. Okay, you go to score dot organ, you’re going to find one of several buttons that it’s going to or hidden around the screen or on the screen that will tell you, you know, meet with a mentor. And at that point, you’ll be asked to you know what? How do you want to do that? Face-to-face email whatever you type in very minimal information that your name and address phone number email a little bit about what you want to talk about and hit entering within two business days. Somebody is probably going to be back in touch with you trying to establish the appointment to move ahead and you make a distinction between mentoring and consulting? How do i know which of those is better for me? Okay, well, actually, there you’re going to be with one person. We find that we have to wear a couple of hats were primarily mentors and had been a consultant most my life. I could make a hope, a simple distinction. A mentor, a guide you through the process asks you questions, ask you to probe things, operas you advice and counsel and points it out, but allows you to come to your own conclusions. We make no judgments about what it is you’re proposing to do or how you propose to do it, because ultimately it is your business. But there are times when what you need is information and instructions specifically how to do something and when we can do that, you know, we can’t practice law, and we can’t do the work of people do, but we can we can help you review a business plan, our build, you know, proposal to a bank. We’re going to coach you on that when i was a consultant, i i also would charge you to do that work or i do it for you. We are not. Equipped to fill out your business plan, but to help you go through that. So most of the time were mentors were were advising coaching, encouraging, sometimes supporting when times get tough. But every once in a while you need someone with the main expertise. Oh, and that’s, when we put on our consulting hat for a bit of time. Now, how do you get familiar with the work of the non-profit before this before this initial meeting? So so the initial meeting is for the purpose of, of understanding. What is it you want to accomplish? Where are you? What have you done so far? And then establishing a game plan? And one of the key things is do we need other players in the meat in the mix? That’s the advantage i have i i i’m probably meet with you with someone else anyway, just because more people that are listening, the better hyre information will gather anyway. But then if i know that there’s a particular expertise or challenge at the moment, then i can go out and make sure that i have the right person with me at that time, or i might need to do. Some more research to find out through my other channels, other partners that we work with to make sure that we have the information that you’re going to need or the access so the resources that you want. So that first hour, so it is really sort of like the doctor taking your vital signs, we need to kind of know what we’re dealing with first, before we start begin to do any kind of diagnosis. I mean, many people come to us, i think they have just a quick question. They want to get answered, and and that may be true, but oftentimes during the dialogue, they come to the conclusion that they there’s more than they had asked for the problem’s bigger or the questions are broader than they had thought and that’s that’s why we look at that first meeting is simply this sort of the diagnosis, okay? And you’ll stay with them. You said it’s a cz long as they’ll have you. Right, so the ad varies a bit by by chapter, but in our our chapter, the basic model is if i were to work with you, for example, i would intend to work with you for as long as you have me and as time would go on, i would expect you would need to have many different resource is, and you’d need things well beyond whatever my expertise might be. So i’m going to just make sure that i’m going to be your single point of contact with score throughout that entire relationship and get you the resource is that you need within score and without way our research, your partner, the fda, there might be a time when we need to reach out to there were two other governmental agencies, for example, to help you with something you’re trying to do and that’s the ideas we have that you can you can build that relationship with deaf. You not constantly telling your story to new people who might show up the answer a question, i suppose it’s something general, i’ve had guests on talking about, you know, planning on dh here we are in january talking about planning for the new year, i suppose it’s like, you know, i don’t feel like my will keep it in your in your ballpark, you know, i don’t feel like my eye is is adequate. You know, but i’m not really i mean, i don’t feel like the programs we have or the methods we have, like we’re two spreadsheet dependent, but, you know, i’m not really sure what direction to go or what, and i don’t know how much you know, money i need to spend, i suppose it’s something you know as general is that, uh, you know, sort of nebula nevertheless, is that well, that’s actualy pretty specific. Thank you, really? For that i was trying to give you a hard i was trying to give you a hard hypothetical. Yeah, so the whole idea’s, because i happen to have that the main expense, i’d start asking in little more in depth questions and understand and why you have these feelings with the challenges are what, what your current situation is preventing you from doing what things you think you’d like to be able to do, and we could talk about whether or not your system would do that. And then because i’ve had thirty or forty years, i can start to help you figure out how to shop for a new solution. If that’s the right case i could give you. Some ideas of what the orders of magnitude of expense might be the time to get these accomplished some thoughts about the steps of going forward, you know, recently have been advising a couple of people who are creating app in their particular space, and it’s it’s been a lot about strategy? You know what kind of a platform that we put it on when i have no money to start with? And then what do i do if i open up my app and i suddenly become, you know, huge, i’ve got, you know, one hundred thousand users where am i thought i might have a thousand on the first day, so all those kinds of things, you know, we’re equipped to do it, and, you know, it doesn’t it’s not always going to happen in a one hour session, and we understand that, yeah, of course, yeah, now i assume this is all confidential, absolutely pr every year we’re we’re required to re certify on our code of ethics and the number one tenant is confidentiality we that’s built into the when you actually agreed to be a client, you’re you’re covered by that, and i could just tell you from my own experience, unless we engage of one of my colleagues into a into a particular client, i’m not likely to be speaking about your personal situation with other members of the team. Frankly, just no, no need to do that. So you could be you can be absolutely certain that whatever we talk about it it’s just between us. Can we bring in other people from the organization? If i want, maybe it’d be helpful for you to talk. Tio my c f o r a boardmember can we can we engage multiple people on our on our side? Absolutely. We recently had a team of from my office to meet with the entire board, a new organization to provide some residents living facilities for people with special needs. And they were struggling with there being pressured but costs. And so it was important to get the full perspective from from their, uh, their leadership to what they thought their challenges and issues were. And that was so we had a nice big meeting, so we’re oftentimes it’s scaled up. And that sounds like a good story. Good non-profit story. How were you able to help? Those folks they st louis where they, you know, they gave us a rundown on what they saw, their challenges and what the in terms of the quality of people they needed toe hyre because of the concern for the people that the population they were serving, the challenge is about how they were funding the business. There were some options available to them, given the structure of some of the reimbursement that’s available through healthcare plans and such on dh ahs well as the diversity of their program, and we were able to share with them from our differing expertise. I had someone who had financial background, and there was another one with people back, personnel background, and i looked at some of the systems approaches, we were able to provide them with some frankly, in their case, so a way of sort of prioritizing the many challenges that that they had, and that seemed to be a recurring theme by the way that we run into many of the existing businesses there are there are so many things we could work on that sometimes we can’t make up her mind, which is the one that, uh, it’s going to be the most productive well and that’s, that and that’s a big challenge, of course, in the non-profit community, especially now, as you know, if if if we see government funding reduced to the point, where are our state can no longer offer services, you know, i think a lot is going to fall to non-profits and prioritization is going to be the challenge. I mean, this is gonna be so much more that needs to be done. Can we do it? Should should we be doing it on def? So you know how right? And, you know, i think the other thing is that for many clients of in both the non-profit world as well, the for-profit world, sometimes the best be that outside force or that outside opinion, um, your board is a good team, your volunteers were good team, but you you are not already looking through a filter based on your day to day knowledge of what, what you do and how you’ve done it. We come in with with none of those constraints, we don’t we don’t know everything about the business, so we’re not afraid to ask stupid questions or two proposed the idea from another industry or another space that perhaps could be adapted to your space. One of the interesting things we teach some business start up ideas, and one of the concepts in there for one of the leading thinkers is that there are no new business models. There are simply people who were innovatively applying business models into a world where they have not traditionally been used thinking of things like amazon into the book market, for example. So sometimes it just creates it’s just good to hear somebody who doesn’t already have the corporate think, if you will say, agree with your idea or think that your priorities are correct. What about around social media? If i if i feel i’m struggling, i’m not sure which which channels to be in? Um, i’m not you know, i don’t feel like i’m thoroughly engaged with people you know is help with social media within within the score of expertise to a degree, yes, i would be we find that more often than not just because of this, the fact that it moved so quickly, even with some of the the younger subject matter experts that we have on our team it’s just hard to keep up, so we understand i mean, frankly, is an organization we were struggling every day and constantly checking to make sure that what we’re investing in, what we’re doing is social meat is working, but so we can give that some overviewing could put that in the context of other efforts that you might be doing to get your workout, but we also can help you identify a partner if that turns out to be the right thing, because there are two aspects to it through the strategic aspect, which we can offer probably more help with, and we have we have, you know, hundreds and thousands of resource is on our national website on a variety of topics, several of which are around that we also produce a webinar every week on a different topic and oftentimes social media’s his way one part of that so we can provide that overall information, but sometimes it’s uh, i will just tell you that score we’ve hired a contractor who actually implements a lot of our strategy and making sure that we’re getting post out, helping us figure out howto measure and find out if it’s actually working if we’re if we should be boosting post if we should be buying at how are we using our google place that nature so we can get you two started in that the right direction? Sometimes all we can do is help you be a good customer when you have to go out and buy a resource. Because you what? You really someone who could come and spend time, day after day doing the work for you, which were just not structured, right? Right. That’s, not yours. Ok, but but you can’t help identify the questions we should be talking. We should be asking potential vendors and identify the for us, you know, a process for for hiring, whether it’s frankly, whether it’s, a social media manager or ah or an outsource cfo or right. I mean, you can help with that, you know, acquiring the expertise? Absolutely. And so it will be better than just sort of, you know, hitting up google and looking for the one in neighborhood. Yeah, we’ll give you some some measurements of some things you can ask during the interview. What should you look for in their in their background or in their proposal, if that’s the right thing and some sort of sense of perhaps with the fees and costs on toby, i’m thinking about this, too. In terms of finances, you know, a lot of people, lots of people get into non-profits started non-profit because they have enormous passion for some cause and let’s put aside the question whether forming a non-profit was the right business decision to make or not because they already passed, that they’re already incorporated, but they often are lacking the business savvy that it takes two to scale and sustain. And i think i think financial issues particularly stand out what you know suppose suppose that’s me, i mean, i got a lot of passion and i’ve already incorporated is a non-profit but i’m not sure i’m accounting correctly, you know, people talk to me about ah, accounting software, you know, how do i start? Right? And you have the reality also is this significant potential legal and issues if you don’t do that sort of thing, right? So yeah, that is that’s a very common peace. I would just tell you that very few people who go into business a cz well, who might have a passion for a not for profit uh, area really ever intend to be the business person they wanted. They want to serve the population, they wantto feed the cause they want to, you know, sell the best pizza, whatever it might be. So and then they say, oh, not so now. I’ve got to run this business thing and double these forms, and the government wants something, and i got to write a check to this guy and i just, you know, what’s all this about and that’s where we can provide a couple of layers of support sometimes it’s simply where those of us who are from score who have the financial chops of the management chop could just be that that mentor we meet with you on a fairly regular basis, help you realize, you know, figure out howto watch the pulse in your company and make some of the long term, bigger decisions if you’re comfortable doing the day to day checkbook and that sort of thing, okay, for other people, it’s it and, you know, maybe you’re lucky and you you’ve blossomed you in your really big skill, you know, i was on the board of a couple of not-for-profits that are, you know, had million, multi million dollar budget. So we we had professional accounting firms to do it eso again helping to find the right people. But also, you know, people will tell you, make sure you do the right accounting and so on. But you need to go with them and help them explain to them well, what your strategy, which your long term plan for the organ ization? Where am i going to go next? Because that might affect what they do today. So we can help you crystallize and formulate those plans on growth situations. And then you have someone who could do the day to day blocking and tackling. If you do need sources of funds, where do i find that? You know, if i’m not for-profit i have some opportunities. Perhaps go for grants. How do i write a grant? Where would i find a grant writer? Do i need a grant writer? That kind of thing all come up as we go forward. And then also how do our their limitations on the money that i have? I can tell you that in my organization. There are certain things that i can’t pay for with the money the government gives me to operate, but i can pay for with the money i get through donations off. All right, so these are all factors that we many of us have expertise we have their knowledge of and worst cases again, we will help you become the better informed consumer of services for by a professor. All right, we have to leave it there. I just wantto make sure that people understand, too, that there are a lot of do-it-yourself resource is at score dot org’s articles outlines templates. Kurt mentioned one hour webinar every week, so i’m encouraging you for twenty eighteen to check out, score, score, dot or ge and at score mentors. Kurt springstead thank you so much, my pleasure. We need to take a break. Redner’s here’s a testimonial, i was on my new position when i began working with regular piela my confidence, i can have grown knowing that i can rely on the professionals to answer any questions and make recommendations that will ensure the success of our non-profit you were given sound advice enabling us to increase investment income while at the same time, protecting you. Ask that. I trust and respect our audit team on the forward to their annual visit and vote. That is, from a midsize religious organization in the big graft. Dahna look at this. I mean the people of more than piela e-giving investment income on that’s. Good advice. And the person looked forward to their orders. I don’t think you have no properties are looking forward to order. I think they’re more feared, maybe dreaded, but it’s not a fortune from the midtown religious organization in the mid west and diversity of expertise reminds me of all the guys that they have all the guys, guys, guys, all these forms in ten places and white papers on diver subject oppcoll way beyond accounting. No, lecter goes way beyond the numbers for their clients. You know that you’re supposed to change audit firms every three years to get a fresh perspective on your practices on the first set of eyes looking over your books and your management management processes. You want the advice of a firm that goes broads help you? I think you know beyond the balance. So that is what i’m always saying. They go beyond the numbers talking on one of the people you could talk to. Is you too, who’s? Been a guest on the show martignetti piela dot com that’s not tony. Take two. Well, it’s almost for your twenty eighteen planning there’s. More coming after this one next week. Takagi what is the new tax law metoo for your twenty eighteen? Hundred. And on january twenty sixth, it’s gonna be me and amy, i’m gonna be talking about starting your plan e-giving programs in twenty eighteen, and then amy sample ward is gonna have her twenty, eighteen plants, just like maria has plans coming up very shortly. We’re supposed to have joe garrett. Unfortunately, he had a family emergency, couldn’t make the day that we were gonna be recording, so we’ll get joe garrett back fund-raising plan. But instead of joe playbook, that i get that, but i’m always got, so we have got you covered for the whole year, all month of january, that is all you got to do. My pleasure. Welcome. Maria semple, prospect finder, trainer and speaker on prospect research. Latest book is magnifying your business. Six tools and strategies that growing your business or your non-profits our joy and if they’re free, get the prospects finding dot com and at maria semple welcome back, maria semple. Happy new year. Happy new year county. How are you today? Thank you. Doing great. Thank you very much. It’s. Good to talk to you. And and you’ve been thinking through what i’m calling maria’s twenty eighteen plans. What are you going to start with? So, you know, i thought i would give a little bit of a mixed some tips that i might be, you know, might have offered through my focus. Well, it’s, um, it’s really focused in on prospect research in particular. And just, you know, trying to make sure that non-profits are a cz short up, as they possibly can be for the upcoming year. Okay, so that book might like that magnifies your business school gravity’s growing your business or your non-profit looking talking about? Yep. That’s the one that’s, the books magnifying. Okay, i wanna make sure that was it. All right. So what? Do you want something? Well, you know, i was thinking about thie importance of really solidifying your relationship with individuals. Andi, this is where i think non-profits really have the greatest strengths on dh, their greatest opportunities as well, for growing. So, you know, when you think about, you know, launching a major gift effort or maybe upgrading your major gift effort, this is really the year to do what if you haven’t done so already? So, you know, sort of a first step that you might consider doing is to do a database screening. There are a number of companies out there that will screen your entire donordigital base, um, so that you’re really able to kind of elevate those those prospects that might be hidden in your database and give you an opportunity that you know where to focus your efforts. All right? So you’re encouraging diversifying into an individual e-giving program if you don’t already have one that’s, right? That’s, right? But you need to know where we’re to focus so very often if you’ve got a board that’s been changing out a lot or you’ve got, you know, a lot of staff changes and so forth. And you really don’t have that longevity and people really standing who’s in that donor database, so you’re able to sort of look at it on your own, obviously that’s seen cheapest way to do it right? Because now you’re not, you know, outsourcing anything, they’re not paying anybody to screen the database, but i really find that when when organizations take an opportunity to do that, it gives them the chance elevator to the top, the names of the people they should really be focusing in on. So, you know, you might even do it. Has a lot of the companies will allow you to send in a batch and test your database to see, you know, if it’s going to be worthwhile. Thio do the whole thing. Okay, um, something else you want to have in place before you do a major gift on individual individual giving program, major gifts or welchlin yeah, you’re gonna end up with maybe get program if you take this important step starting individual e-giving program’s going to end up with major donors, some are goingto give more brothers, but either way, you want to have ah, constituent relationship matters in a database. You crn database in place on dh. There are very affordable ways of doing that there’s so many different cloud services and there’s some that you just played by the records. So when you’re starting small, you know, you don’t have to have the major’s your commitment, maybe database, that, uh, that is only going to have a couple dozen names in the beginning, but you want to have a way of capturing all those relationships all those different data points with people because of something that you just mentioned area staff turnover, when when one person leaves, they’ve had all the conversations with, you know, half your donors, uh, you don’t want to lose weight, and i talked about that. You don’t want to lose all that precious information, right is right, and, you know, it’s a problem as as i’m sure you’ve seen in your own consulting that happens time and time again, where you get in there and you talk to an organization and they say, you know, well, you know, i’m new here, i’m only on the job three months i’m really not sure what those relationships were like on dh then you find out that you know, a lot of conversations and so forth, which simply not recorded anywhere. Elearning yeah, i mean, the last thing that you want to do is call the donor and say, hi, you know, my name’s, maria semple, on our new year of the organization, and i’d like to get to know, you know, for your interest, why do you give to us, you know, i mean, you should know that you should know all of that information. Yeah, i just had that conversation with your your predecessor two months ago, so so database screening find find people on, of course don’t only pay attention to the wealthiest in your in your in your database on that also have your e r n, right? Okay, you’re you’re also encouraging, looking into recurring yeah, you know, this is a place that you have an opportunity to garner, and i’m going to say those smaller gifts, those people that will commit ten dollars in most twenty dollars a month, whatever it is that’s hating their credit card, everybody so, you know, many of us are already used to paying whatever netflix, whatever this monthly charges that’s hitting our credit card accounts. On dh so it’s already sort of been absorbed into our monthly budgeting and so forth. And so if you can convince people to start setting up a recurring, uh, payments to your organization that’s going to go a long way to helping booth and of course, you’re not talking to the major gets here. You are talking about getting people in, perhaps at a much lower entry point and keeping them engage. I think it’s pretty standard practice, but i was going to make this explicit no on that donation page that you’ve got. You want to have a button for making monthly or something like that so that the person who is giving at a level that could conceivably be the monthly recurring donation could easily do it, you know, you know, ryan and i have to go in someplace special to make a set of recurring giving, i think that’s pretty standard, but i want to make it quick, make sure hyre no, that could be it could be very valuable. And you know what we get on saying that people just forget about it and fills, usually until their credit card expires, and then they’re reminded oh, yeah, no, i got this thing, and then and then sometimes that’s an opportunity for you asking for upgrades when a person is reevaluating. I mean, yeah, there’s always a chance that they’re goingto stop those donations at a point like that. But there’s also a chance that they’ll they’ll increase it. So you use a of failed transaction as an opportunity to essentially increase. Yeah, yeah, and, you know, it’s an opportunity for you to really start using the language that you would use, maybe with a major gift donor-centric tuo invest on a monthly basis in our organization, you know, you might have a monthly investments that you have set up for, you know, for yourself, for your for one kings or, you know, whatever we’d like you to take just ten dollars and twenty dollars a month and invest with our organization in the future viability of the organization. So, you know, give that compelling story, give that compelling reason why they should be engaging and investing with you on one thing faces, okay? And that’s, uh, you wanted to be telling them stories about about your outcomes, basically, what a big part of the story. Selling that’s, right? That’s right night. I saw that you actually had done them a video recently, you know, kind of on this topic as well. You know, you’ve got to be able to thankfully tell your story and, you know, there’s a lot of information out there on the web, all you need to do is really do a google search for non-profits storytelling, um, there are a lot of experts in that arena i’ve seen some of them speak even at the american marketing association conference on dh you know, the thing that you have to get across to people is, yeah, you’ve got your stats on, you know, those important metrics that you’ve got to be able to communicate, but that’s usually not what’s going to sell somebody right on on wanting to invest with your organization. So you’ve got to be able to humanize it and tell stories about the impact that your organization has on the community and, you know, making sure that you’re kind of a hearing too, really good storytelling, a beginning, a middle and an end and really understand all the different types of stories that there are out there. There’s a reason why we can’t remember, you know stories about whatever little red riding hood and the three little pigs, right? There’s a certain set up to those stories, you can learn tons of information about that on the web, and i really encourage you, teo teo, focus focus in on getting the story straight not only for your major gift donors, but also across the board at all we know right now definitely cross for this matter from e-giving five dollars a month with five dollars, more than they need to know what you’re infected and we’ve had listen, we have a guest here too. You go, teo durney martignetti dot com and search storytelling, the the guests we’ve had on that subject will obviously come up. Yeah, you got to share your impact? Um, you’ve also been thinking about trying to capitalize on sigil ambassadors? Yeah, yeah. So talented people. Yeah. So, you know, i’m sure that this is something that amy sample ward talks a lot about when when she’s on your show, tony as well. But, you know, you want to think about engaging people to be able to help amplify your message. Right? So, you know i think we’re all asses point sort of accustomed to seeing campaigns were online where your friends or maybe joni there their birthday, you know, raising money for an organization on behalf of their birthday, that type of thing. So those types of sort of crowd funding these people are digital ambassadors for an organisation when they do that, all the people that were involved in that bucket challenge, they were digital ambassadors, right? And there were some that were really, really strong, obviously that the first family, the first guy that kicked it off, they must have had a pretty good following to get to get kissed off as well as he did, but you wanted to try and figure out who those digital ambassadors are if you don’t have any really it’s time to start recruiting some on broadening your outreach, even if you have to think about some paid opportunities, you know, on facebook such as, you know, i don’t know ads are boosted post, yeah, big book and also twitter yeah, yeah, you know, as you find the people who are most network most deeply connected and you start a campaign you wantto be working with them. And this is something that any and i have talked about to work them back channels. You get them enthusiastic and you get them talking before you start your public campaign, right? Get there. And you get that they’re connected to help you in the public. And so that i know that people who follow you, uh, people who were with you and you have the most followers fanned. Whatever. You know, those were the most connected are going. Teo, be active participants in your campaign. Maria, we gotta take a break. We’re going toe. We’re gonna come back and talk more about yeah, ambassadors. And i know you have some resources share finding them right now. I gotta take a break. Elearning credit card payment processing brovey check out the video at tony dot m a flash tony, tell us explained the process of businesses joining tell us on having their credit cards, other payments process by tello’s and reminds you that you are going to get fifty percent of the revenue that hello elearning that’s a long revenue stream because they have one hundred percent satisfaction rate. So you can be assured that the business is going to be pleased, and you’re going to be earning revenue from this four, a good long time every single month. Also, the video for their, uh, one hundred percent satisfaction and the price match guarantee. You go beyond that. Tell us, can’t save the money that you started to tell us, and you’re getting two hundred fifty dollars. So it’s worth starting. Think about businesses. That next-gen tio, you know, as the rest of you watch the video. Think about like, a local body shop where, by the way, out there, all wearing masks and your protection jewelry store the area where they make a pie with the crust recognize from a bakery where hope that we don’t have very good. Um, think about that think about the businesses that you’re you’re boardmember zoho family members only any of these potential referrals to tell us for credit card processing, you just have to generate some interest to check out the video. That’s brightstep teo, your long tail of revenue. Tony got a last tony tellers. Now, look, rebecca miree simple and her twenty eighteen plan. You have some resources for finding who the deepest, most networked ambassadors are among your constituents. Yeah. Yeah. I have some resources that you might want to consider looking into. First of all, i came across a great white paper download that blackbaud put together. They put together a nice free guide. And it’s actually called super has the kids program how to create a super advocate program. So there i read through it, and it looked like there were a lot of really good chips in there. So that might kind of give you the first time ideas about how the framework and what it is that you might want to do and, you know, it really is going to be able to create opportunities foreign organizations most committed supporters really did take more action hyre value actions than than a typical supporter. This’s why you’re our joy and of your cubine free, right? So that the guide is free, but the guide three guys? Yeah, another one, right, yet so a couple of other things actually one that you brought to my attention called attentively, which is one of the blackbaud solutions actually wait give you the opportunity to identify whose influential so they say that a mass email files with social data and so that you can better understand the social side of yours supporters. So if you do have an email list, it is an opportunity to see who amongst that list might be really great social ambassadors reorganization, that’s attentive dot leaves they’ve got a y yeah, they they also make the point that home email i just better don’t. Usually the one people used to sign up with social network, so if you have a file of of home addresses, home email addresses attentively that’s not that’s not well, my treat so that’s not a free one, but no that’s correct zsystems blackbaud but value there and finding the most connected people and you got zaptitude what is zaptitude about? Yes. Zaptitude right. Kind of an interesting name. They have one of their service offerings is called good influence. And i learned about this company a few years ago. And i actually met some of the folks behind the company at one point and met people at the american marketing association conference who use this tool. Two years ago, you been holding out on us. You got a couple of years. You’re feeling it now in january twenty eighteen, you know, i’ve got i’ve got to keep some gems for you. I don’t think w hole not on non-profit idealware way. Never talked about you and waited. All right, maybe you alright? I get it out? Yes. So anyway, they have they have a tool called good influence and basically it it’s an opportunity to is your existing customers because this is used side both, you know, businesses and non-profit so in this case, your existing donors to dr support through new donors. So it’s a platform that really again helps to amplify not so much doing the search like thehe tentative job l y product would do, but really, this could be a platform for you. Teo, try and scale off your digital ambassador efforts. And when i was going back and reviewing some information about the current leadership team i’m looking at the bio of the founder and ceo is kind of interesting in marinette, we talk about the good influence product with the bat phone for the social activation engine for the famous i spoke a challenge current, so i’d be interested in having another conversation with him, actually myself. Teo, figure out more about how exactly the good influence taught. It played into that. I stuck a challenge. Okay, cool. And that’s that information about that is that zaptitude yeah. Dot com. Right. Okay. That’s that that to write? Well, you would be our most likely contributors. So let’s, get some prospect. Researcher idea. That is okay. So i was also thinking about a new arena we haven’t talked about before, which is maybe trying to research some of the companies in your community that are set up as the corporations and so i know, you know, you know why i don’t want to get thrown in the jargon jail so let’s, talk a little bit of what? You know well, listeners know that’s okay, well, that’s all right, gene cog and i’ve talked about the corpse on there now, and they’re they’re social, social good missions, not sickly, profit driven, but they certainly can be profit making, so you’re okay. You’re okay, cool. Cool. Ok, good. So there’s, actually a website called b corporation dot net. Uh, where you can go and search by state and see, you know what? All the big corporations are right in your state on dh. Then, you know, you’re kind of using, you know, good old fashioned prospect research looking at that company, trying to figure out who’s behind the company and so on and so forth and trying to learn a little bit more about him. You know, these people already have a social mission built into their companies. Perhaps the work that you’re doing can align some way with a particular social mission. So, you know, i think it’s an opportunity for you two. Maybe developed, um, uh, some relationship with him. Yeah, most of the time. It’s, private companies, so relationship supply. The companies that are set on our course. I love it. It’s, like it’s, like doing the same kind of research assay. Would foundation wear where they would be court they’re aligned with, and whether you might fit in. Yes, in-kind. What do you got for us? You mentioned a family you mentioned foundation so it’s touch upon that for a moment. If you have not made your annual trust to your local cooperating collections of the foundation center in your in your next the woods it’s time that you do that no, we’re going ahead and get a subscriptions directly to the foundation directory online. So if you have the funds to do it and you do a lot of foundation’s research definitely worth while having that tool in house, but it is available fourth grade if you go to the foundation center or one of their cooperating collections in your community. So what i recommend is to try and focus in instead of the really big foundations in your state, which everybody seems to kind of know today everybody goes, everybody goes, yeah, focus more in on the foundations that are the family foundation’s, even if they do not seem to have a lot of assets and some you will even notice some will come up xero and assets and don’t let that turn you off because if they had gone through the effort of setting up the framework for a sound of private foundation, but there may be, you know, a plan in the future that that family is may be planning to sell business and funding the foundation, and you don’t know what the thinking is behind it and it’s going to get to know them a little bit. So don’t discount the ones that you even see with xero asset, okay? And you trying to find connections between your non-profit and foundations not only terms of mission, but you know, if you’re looking in your state, you’re looking for a board connections two are some kind of some kind of relationship, right board connections, mission over laugh, it could be that they are literally in your county or in your town. So these air opportunity three to try and develop relationships with some of these people don’t forget, i mean, if it’s a family foundation, people behind the whole thing on dh there’s, you know, it’s just happens to be the vehicle by which they are, um, you know, putting all of their philantech through so it’s worthwhile, taking an opportunity to research it there if you don’t have any access, any way of accessing the foundation centers products you could do a similar type search on guide star okay, another case, and as you do your research, don’t be afraid to bring lips of foundation board members and foundation names to your board meeting try to have a board members or, if not at your meeting, circulated some other way, but have your boardmember scrutinizing the foundations that you’ve found that align with your work and start getting people you’re boardmember you know where the where the connections might be, but we gotta leave maria, thank you very much. Happy new year, thank you are joining of thirties and free, you’ll find her at the prospects finding dot com and at maria sinful next-gen takagi what’s the new tax balm for your twenty eighteen fund-raising plan if you missed any part of today’s show, i didn’t think you’d find it on tony martignetti dot com were supported by pursuing online tools to small and mid sized non-profits data driven and technology enables twenty dollars, by pursuing your guiding you beyond the numbers regular piela dot com and tell us credit card payment processing your passive revenue streams. Tony got a last tony killers our creative producers try my family, which is the line producer shoretz social media site. Shadow and its wonderful music. In-kind you give me that? We’re not from the radio. Big non-profit ideas for the odd third, ninety five percent go out and records. What’s not to love about non-profit radio tony gets the best guests check this out from seth godin this’s the first revolution since tv nineteen fifty and henry ford nineteen twenty it’s the revolution of our lifetime here’s a smart, simple idea from craigslist founder craig newmark yeah, insights or no presentation or anything, people don’t really need the fancy stuff they need something which is simple and fast. When’s the best time to post on facebook facebook’s andrew noise nose at traffic is at an all time hyre on nine a, m or p m so that’s, when you should be posting your most meaningful post here’s aria finger ceo of do something dot or ge young people are not going to be involved in social change if it’s boring and they don’t see the impact of what they’re doing. So you got to make it fun and applicable to these young people look so otherwise a fifteen and sixteen year old they have better things to do if they have xbox, they have tv, they have their cell phones. Me dar is the founder of idealist took two or three years for foundation staff to sort of dane. Toe add an email address their card it was like it was phone. This email thing is fired-up that’s why should i give it away? Charles best founded donors choose dot or ge somehow they’ve gotten in touch kind of off line as it were on dno. Two exchanges of brownies and visits and physical gift mark echo is the founder and ceo of eco enterprises. You may be wearing his hoodies and shirts. Tony talked to him. Yeah, you know, i just i’m a big believer that’s not what you make in life. It sze, you know, tell you make people feel this is public radio host majora carter. Innovation is in the power of understanding that you don’t just do it. You put money on a situation expected to hell. You put money in a situation and invested and expected to grow and savvy advice for success from eric sabiston. What separates those who achieve from those who do not is in direct proportion to one’s ability to ask others for help. The smartest experts and leading thinkers air on tony martignetti non-profit radio big non-profit ideas for the other ninety five percent.

Nonprofit Radio for September 15, 2017: Run Like A Biz & Program Your Board

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Hillary Schafer: Run Like A Biz

Hillary Schafer brought her 12 years on Wall Street to the Jefferson Awards Foundation, where she’s executive director. She shares her ideas from building core infrastructure to employee policies. (Originally aired September 18, 2015.)

 

 

 

Gene Takagi: Program Your Board

Gene TakagiYour board probably recognizes its fiduciary responsibilities, but does it know its role in overseeing programs? Gene Takagi is our legal contributor and principal of the Nonprofit & Exempt Organizations law group (NEO). (Also aired September 18, 2015.)

 

 

 


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Hello and welcome to tony martignetti non-profit radio big non-profit ideas for the other ninety five percent. I’m your aptly named host. Oh, i’m glad you’re with me. I need a pancreas. Ole affected me for last week’s pancreas volodya, sis, if you hard into me with the idea that you missed today’s show, run like a biz hillary shaefer brought her twelve years on wall street to the jefferson awards foundation, where she is executive director. She shares her ideas from building core infrastructure to employee policies that originally aired september eighteenth, twenty fifteen and programmed your board. Your board probably recognizes its fiduciary responsibilities, but does it know it’s rolling overseeing programs? Jean takagi is our legal contributor and principal of the non-profit and exempt organizations law group neo that also aired september eighteenth twenty fifteen tony’s take two five minute planned e-giving marketing responsive by pursuant full service fund-raising data driven and technology enabled pursuant dot com and by wagner cps guiding you beyond the numbers wagner, cps dot com you’re not a business you’re non-profit apple of accounting software designed for non-profits they’re at non-profit wizard dot com and we’d be spelling supercool spelling bee fundraisers. We b e spelling dot com here’s hillary schaefer run like a biz. I’m glad to welcome to the studio hillary schaefer. Prior to joining the jefferson awards foundation as executive director, she worked as the head of us institutional equity sales in new york. For citigroup, she was one of the highest ranking women in the equity business in the late nineties, she was the executive director of economic security two thousand fighting to save and remodel social security. The foundation is at jefferson awards dot org’s and she’s at beard hillary on twitter welcome hillary schaeffer. Thank you very much. Glad you’re in the studio. Thanks to be here. Eight and a half months pregnant. Eight and a half months pregnant. We got you at the right time. What what’s behind this twitter id beard? Hillary it’s. My maiden name is beard. Okay, until re beard was taken, i presume and hillary beard is probably taking swiped by some. I had that done on youtube. Some joker i hope he was named tony martignetti stole the channel name tony martignetti and i have you riel tony martignetti but he doesn’t use it. So it’s ah, people don’t have trouble finding me? Not that anyone’s looking, but if they were looking, they wouldn’t have trouble finding me on youtube. Um, tell me about wall street what’s it what’s it like making a living equity say institutional equity sales what’s it like, what does that mean, that’s that place, like, actually, frankly, loved it. I did it for twelve years. I went into wall street thinking i would do it for two. Yeah, we’re really, really fell in love for long enough to stay for twelve instruction equity sales is basically where you manage the relationships for the largest institutional investors who invest in stocks. Okay, so on behalf of citigroup, so on you’re like, on account, uh, liaison to big companies buying stocks. Sort of. Yes, i minimize their eyes like so egregiously. Okay, clearly egregiously. So, what do you how do you how do you keep big institutional buyers happy? What you have to do, too, with more of their blackness is making money, right? So investing in stocks that go up and shorting stocks that go down. And so ah, lot of the business of the equity business of citigroup is to provide really good insights and ideas and research into the companies that they care about and delivering that content into your clients in a way which is consumable. Smart fits with their investment style. It helps them make money is really the core of what you do. Okay, but then there are all of these other services that citigroup offers and help clients run their money from financing stocks. Teo, all of the things that go around the core of running that business, okay, banking and credit relationships, things like that, things like that. Okay? And so core of that business is sort of managing that entire relationship to make sure they get the resource is that they need in orderto successfully run the business and a transition to non-profit work. What? What occasioned that, frankly, hurricane sandy, i had left wall street. I have two little kids already at home. And i decided that i wanted teo figure out what i wanted to do next. I had no idea what that was. Actually, frankly thought it would be in the finance world. Yeah, and hurricane sandy hit new york. And i was sitting in my living room working on a business plan for a finance business okay, and i just got really passionate about the idea that there were children who had gone to bed safe and sound the night before that woke up with no signs of food or shelter or warmth, their security. And so i went to work from my living room to create programs that generated millions of more meals, hundreds of thousands of blankets and warm winter coats for families all over the tri state area and my husband on dh, the executive director of robin hood both basically sat me down and said, please don’t go back to finance the passion that you feel around helping people is so significant. Do something else. Stay in the non-profit so you gave away your entrepreneurial dream, the plan you’re working on, you’re going to start your own business. I did put that aside, although running a non-profit is inherently credibly entrepreneur. Okay, if it’s done right, i think that’s done right. All right, all right, tell us a little about the jefferson awards and the and the foundation. Sure. So we we basically power public service. We’ve been around since nineteen seventy two started by jackie kennedy. Senator robert taft. Junior and my father, sam beard and the original idea was create a nobel prize for public service in america. Celebrate the very best of the country. You celebration to not only say thank you to people do amazing things, but also as a force multiplier to inspire others to do something good. We then translated into programs that accelerate and amplify service for people of every age. So, starting about ten years ago, we became one of the largest creators of public service in the country through training mechanisms and programs that engage individuals again of all ages to do service ranging from the donation of a single book from a child to a child all the way up. Tio young people in adult toe like who are impacting millions of lives and it’s ah, jefferson awards so what’s the awards side of this. So when the awards is the celebration peace. So we are effectively the gold seal of service in america. We give out a we give out jefferson awards the national level, you would know basically every name. Okay. Who’s, one of jefferson word over the last forty three years. And then we have a media. Partner program, where we partner with ah, local affiliates, newspapers, etcetera but primary news outlets in communities all over the country. But today, reaching to seventy eight million households on dh, they are empowered to take the jefferson award and celebrate local grassroots unsung heroes. All right, a nobel prize for ah, for outstanding program work and and saving lives for impact impact. How about the foundation itself? Just number employees, just a quaint little bit number of employees annual budget. So it’s about twenty seven, employees, we have a, uh, about a ten and a half million dollar annual budget, of which much of that is in-kind it’s about a three and a half million dollar operating revenue budget. Okay, and we’re going to go out for a break in roughly a minute or so. So just, uh, give us a little overviewing of what? What some of the lessons are that you brought from equity sales on dh wall street. Teo, your charitable work. And i think the biggest thing is just that any organization, whether it’s for-profit or non-profit, needs to be world class in order to be successful and that starts with everything from how you manage and set your employees up for success to your back end systems that govern how you pay your rent, you know, pay your expenses and collect your revenues to don’t hurt management. Teo everything that you do needs to look and feel like you set for-profit world, but it’s really for impact. So i’m guessing you believe non-profit is your tax status? Not your mindset? Correct? Yeah, cool. Okay, of course. Hillary stays with us. We go after this break. I hope you do too. You’re tuned to non-profit radio tony martignetti also hosts a podcast for the chronicle of philanthropy fund-raising fundamentals is a quick ten minute burst of fund-raising insights published once a month. Tony’s guests are expert in crowdfunding, mobile giving event fund-raising direct mail and donor cultivation. Really all the fund-raising issues that make you wonder am i doing this right? Is there a better way there is? Find the fund-raising fundamentals archive it. Tony martignetti dot com that’s marketmesuite n e t t i remember there’s a g before the end, thousands of listeners have subscribed on itunes. You can also learn maura the chronicle website philanthropy dot com fund-raising fundamentals the better way dahna welcome back to big non-profit ideas for the other ninety five percent. Hillary schaefer let’s ah, let’s, dive into some of these lessons that you’ve brought with you this world class let’s start in the back end investment in infrastructure like c r, m databases, data management so that’s a that’s a terrific place to start because really every non-profit is powered by who they reach and how they reached them and how they communicate with, um and management of relationships, whether that’s a whether that’s, a donor, whether that’s, somebody, who’s won an award from our perspective, whether that somebody who has just invested in you are in your programs and how you understand that relationship, how you manage that relationship is all driven by the back end. Traditionally, people would use spreadsheets or just use, you know, sort of word and lists in their own brains, and fundamentally, it doesn’t get you as far as you need to get, and technology today is so sophisticated and there’s so many great great data pay systems that can integrate seamlessly with your website and with donor management tools and with, um, all mechanisms that you need to communicate effectively and really segment that communication into something that makes sense for that individual. It’s. Almost a shame not to you not to use it. Yeah, segmentation, and we’ll get to the benefit of that. I’ve had other guests. My voice just cracked like i’m a fourteen year old. I’ve had have a congratulations e. Everything else operates at, uh, the requisite age at fifty three. But my voice occasionally. Yeah, so we’ll get to the value of segmentation because people want to talk to personally, not not and mass and like everybody else, but so but this can be hard to invest in me, we’re talking about this is not serving program directly. This is not helping people directly. How do we overcome that mindset that we can get by with, you know, the lackadaisical, the the database that we’ve got her the internal processes we figured out our work arounds, you know we’re okay. It’s it’s finding you say that, right? Because they actually when you invest in a really good database management system and and client relationship manager, which is what c r m stands for, um, what you get out of it, that multiplier effect that you can get from having true, powerful relationships and understanding of all of your constituents, all consolidated is worth every dollar you know, and frankly there’s so many great systems which are out there, and they’re not that expensive. The most expensive part is the time of your staff, an external consultants, which you often need teo, take what is all of the stuff that you’ve cobbled together and to make it work for your organization. So an organization as an example we had brought in sales force. We use sales force. Um, we frankly had the wrong system installed with sales force. It took us a long time to figure out how to get the right system installed in all of those things. But it’s also taking us the better part of eighteen months to clean our data. Teo optimize our data to segment it appropriately so that we can communicate effectively with everybody in the way they want to be communicated with and a fair amount of staff time. And it’s that investment of taking somebody away from something that looks like perhaps it’s more important to their day to day life and put them into what’s really tedious work in order to be a better organization. But for us, if i think about it, if we have a database that reaches sixty thousand people, our ability to grow from an organization that reaches sixty this sixty thousand two, two, six hundred thousand to six million all contingent on us having optimized rc era this is key. So if you want to scale, you have to have the infrastructure to support that every organization wants to be at the next level i get so many questions about, you know, how do i get to next level? Can you refer me to somebody help us get to the next level? But i think often they don’t they’re not set up to get to the next level. They don’t they don’t have the support that they need, even if they were able to teo, multiply by ten there, you know the size of their their outreach. Without data, you have no chance. I’ll give you a great example in the nonprofit world statistic terrifies me, but something like sixty percent of donors don’t repeat on average across the non-profit space every year. Yeah, don’t come back, right? Well, don’t patrician right that’s because we’re not loving the people who are there. Everybody is focused on the next level. No, you’re focused on the next person you forget about the person who’s already said to you with their dollars. I care about what you d’oh at the heart of that is your database management system. I had a guest, peter shankman, um social media expert and marketing guy and his book is called zombie loyalists and basically had a last december. I think i had eternal you’re all your clients and customers into zombie loyalists that love you so much that they’re zombies for your work, and they’ll do your marketing, your pr, your communications for you, but ah, some of what he says boils down to the way to get the client you want is to be awesome to the client. You have that’s exactly right? I mean, i think about it from a from a fund-raising perspective. What the great fundraisers tell you is you should have four contacts with a donor for every time you ask them for something. No in orderto have those four contacts but matter to them, you need to know what they care about that needs to be in your database. You need to understand them that meets not only being your head. It needs to be institutionalized in your database. Ah, and then you need to have systems which set up, which push you to reach out to that person to make sure that you’re not forgetting to touch them four times before you go back to them and say, here’s, your invoice your sales force is a really cool example that you mentioned because for small shops it’s ideal, they’re the first ten licenses from sales force are free to non-profits and then they have a very deeply reduced ah fee for going beyond ten licenses. But i think for a lot of listeners ten licenses is enough for more than enough. So, you know, on i’ve had guests on from the non-profit technology conference and t c talking about the benefits of salesforce, you know, i think that’s right and sales force khun b a terrific tool it’s also it could be not that expensive or if you have the budget, the amount of tools that they have that you khun scale in two really optimizing take you to the next level are huge, so we don’t have we personally don’t have the budget we would love to have to spend with sales force, but we have a big, long wish list of things we would like to spend on specifically with sales force, with the tools that they have something bothering me to my head. Now, i didn’t mean to say lackadaisical databases, i meant to say lackluster, lackluster debate. Lackadaisical database doesn’t make any sense, it’s lazy, lazy self, you know, so that people could be lackadaisical. But the databases lackluster let’s talk a little about the segmentation of the benefit of communicating with people and showing that you know what their interests are when their birthdays are what they, how they like to be communicated with let’s, explore this know people are people, and everybody wants to feel touched individually. Nobody wants to feel like they’re part of a marketing campaign or that they’re part of a sort of a blast. People want to be touched individually. It’s why things like instagram work because they feel touched by a photograph ah, it’s the same thing with with donor or constituent segmentation everybody wants to feel like especially in the nonprofit world where you’re talking about emotion, you are effectively touching people where where they want to improve the world, but you’ve gotta understand which part of it inspires them. Yes, ah, and and also people like being cared for around the things that matter in their daily lives that have nothing to do with you. Ah, their children, their children’s ages what they d’oh? Ah, what their hobbies. Are where they like to travel all of those things. It just matters it’s all about having one on one of relationships. And the better your relationship is, the more likely you are to be able to maximize. And everything you’ve mentioned is data worth preserving its all data. You have to have people love it when you send them a note that says, happy birthday, no, super simple. It is very simple now. So what kinds of reminders do you get? Based on what kinds of things aside from birthday? What? Yeah. What others? Ah, it tends to relate to things that people have told you. Okay? And so for us, it would relate specifically to our program. So we have five different programs that have very, very different calendars. So that could relate. Teo, i i just need to get us a of the date because i know you desperately want to come to our national ceremony in new york city in march. Ah, but it could also be i know you really want to be. Ah, judge at our students in action conference in minneapolis. Ana and so getting that date to you in plenty of advance. Notice it really gets down to that level. All right? So the the value of segmentation and investment in infrastructure what about investment in consultants? You mentioned consulting? Nobody knows everything they need to know, but this could be tough to bring, bring other people in and have a fresh set of eyes evaluating you. It’s interesting on the consulting sight because i i personally have two two minds about consultants. Often i feel like you get charged too much for a percentage of somebody’s brain no on dh that’s the greatest risk with consulting. Ah, but also often they’re just expertise. You don’t want to bring in house. You can’t afford to bring in house, but you need somebody who has fresh eyes who knows something really specific that you don’t know ah, and with without which you can’t can’t go to the next level, you can’t execute effectively. So sales forces a terrific example. Um, there are so many tools inside sales force that enable you to do things like optimize your data and get rid of redundancy and all of those things, um and to, uh, to make it spoke for your organization for think the ways. In which you want to connect with people, i couldn’t do that myself, and i don’t have anybody in house who could do that for me. Could you just send your data data manager, database administrator to a sales force conference or course, yes, we do that too, okay, but it’s not enough, and for the cost of bringing you know you’ve got you’ve got away out the cost. So the question is, can you find somebody who is affordable to you in your organization that helps bring in those that kind of expertise in? I’m their things like building out an effective communication strategy where if you don’t have a big, robust communications team who can think about everything from database management, teo email to social media to all the things that go into digital infrastructure ah, and communications calendars and all of those things. At some point, it becomes really smart to bring in somebody from the outside to say, i’m building you a structure i’m helping you think about inside your organization, for you what a structure would look like, that you can afford let’s turn to our people i think my voice is my voice was crack again, it’s. A big bag, maybe. Yeah, you know. Uh, so you’re important asset, probably your most valuable asset. Most important, most expensive it’s expensive. I would guess inside most non-profits that that people are seventy eight percent of cost big, big, big percentage, um, and making impact in the world all relates to the people who you were in power to make that impact on your behalf as as either a full time employee or an independent contractor and losing employees is as expensive as losing the donors we were talking about, if not more so, you know woobox the amount of time you then need to spend teo find the person, bring them in house, and on average, it takes six to eighteen months to really optimize an employee. That’s a long time to invest in somebody new if you have somebody who’s good who’s sitting there right in front of you. The most important thing with people always is that they feel like they’re being set up to succeed. And they’re being given the tools that they need. Ah, to succeed. All right, how do we do this? Ah, well, that everything from the really basic and can feel very cumbersome to a management manager piece. But ah, gold setting and reviews, letting people know where they stand, being really straightforward with them about what they’re doing that’s terrific, and where they need to develop development goals is a big, big, big piece, and i don’t mean development is in fund-raising i mean, personal development, professional development around how can you be a much more effective employees? For the most part? Certainly in my experience, whether it’s on wall street or in the nonprofit world, when you sit in a review with somebody, they barely hear the good stuff ninety nine percent of what you tell them could be good. Everybody waits for the butt, the but needs to be real, meaning it needs to be i understand you here’s, where i see helping to take you as a human being and as a professional to the next level, and being able to deliver that in a way which is non threatening but having systems and structures around delivering reviews around goal, setting around, holding people accountable to those goals and around understanding them and wanting to be on their side are all the the most important things you can do, and it doesn’t matter what. Kind of an organization you’re out to do that my guest last week, we’re from the university of pittsburgh, and they were talking about incentive pay something that pitt has set up. They’ve defined what an exemplary fundraiser is. It’s basically achieving two hundred percent of your goal. But that’s a big organization, university of pittsburgh, might there be other ways of implementing incentive pay around? Aside from strictly money, money comp, you know, incentives are interesting in non-profits because, um, a, for the most part, non-profits don’t use sort of base bonus type structures, but there are tons of other ways that you can make somebody feel really good about what they do and whether that’s simply celebrating their accomplishments to the other employees into your board. People really thrive on that, but it can also be other things, like giving them an extra days vacation. Um, you know, sending them home on purpose when their kid’s sick and you tell them that family comes first, you know, all those things that’s really more around culture, but there are there are smart things you can do where you say, you know what? I don’t have the dollar to give. You. But i do have a day to give you or two or whatever it is. Whatever it is, that you’ve earned benefits structures are very important. Um, covering people and their families, and how you do that and how you communicate it. Incredibly important and totally under sort of undervalued in the mindset in the nonprofit world about what that means to an individual. And you say, i care about you and your health, and i care about your family in there. We have just about a minute left or so we have a couple more than more than a couple minutes. How much time do we have left? Sam? Okay, dahna then let’s. Ah, my mistake. Let’s. Keep talking about some some policies around employment. Maybe around training. You’ve got a new employee. You’ve spent the requisite amount of time recruiting you believe you’ve got the best person, the orientation, the training process, the onboarding process oven employees that one of the single most important things that you d’oh. So with us, justus a simple example. First, everybody gets a very long, very detailed employee manual that they have to read where they really understand what the operating premises are of the organ you’re holding your hands, like four inches apart for inches. It’s not four inches thick. Okay, okay. They’re recording, so that would be way too much street. All right, but i use my hands a lot. I think i’m going to italy and one hundred in italian, so i didn’t think you were using them enough. That must be the eight and half months. Pregnant part. Yes, i understand. Ok, the but having that set of expectations in somebody’s mind where they read it? They have to affirm it. They have to tell you that they’ve read it. That tells them everything from how many vacation days they do have, how they can accrue more vacation, what the benefits are to them, how they can get in trouble, how they can stay out of trouble. What a whistle blower policy might look like. All of those things very, very important, but then bringing people into the culture of the organization into your programs where they really feel armed. Tio ah, to be an effective employees. Ah, it’s. So fundamental. So we we set up a schedule time with all of our program managers. We have our end of its staff. When they come in they go. They shadow individuals who do either their job or even other jobs inside the organization. Because you’ve got to understand the entire organization. I think in order to be effective in your silo. Um ah, and then we do profession. We were very open to paying from people doing professional development and encourage it. Ah, and then we do regular staff retreats where everybody comes together and we work on pieces that feel like they might be holes in the skill set to the entire organization again. Investment where its infrastructure or people? You just you can’t shortchange these things and expect to scale on grow the organization. I mean, for the amount it costs me, tio run a staff retreat every year, eyes about one percent of what it costs me to pay my staff. Yeah, that is a very worthwhile investment to make that staff be a leverage oppcoll army. We’re gonna leave it there. Hillary shafer she’s uh, executive director of jefferson awards foundation there at jefferson awards dot or ge and again on twitter. She’s at beard, hillary. Thank you so much, hillary. Thank you. Real pleasure and gun muzzle tough. Congratulations on your pregnancy. Thank you very much. Jean takagi and program your board coming up first. Pursuant acquisition campaigns. They had a free webinar to help you acquire new donors. That was back on august thirty first. But it’s not too late. This is not a date news. No, no one current news. You can watch the archive. Go to tony dot m a slash pursuant capital p please. And the info was there to watch. The archive video tony dahna em a slash pursuant for the archive on acquisition campaigns. Rechner, cps. They do go way beyond the numbers. They have lots of policy statements for you. Ah, more than from last week. Ethical conduct for board members, disaster recovery, investment policy, independent contractor versus employee checklist i know non-profit struggle with that. We’ve covered it and there’s a lot more resources at wagner cpas dot com quick resource is then guides that’s where you get all this good info stop wasting your time using business accounting software for your books you aren’t a business you’re non-profit appaloosa counting is designed for non-profits built from the ground up to make your non-profit financial management simple and affordable. Please check this out. Our new sponsor, apple, owes its fund accounting, advanced reporting, donation tracking and there’s mohr included in annapolis. Accounting it’s all in one, easy to use. Go to non-profit wizard dot com now for tony’s take two. I still got this five minute marketing for planned e-giving i condensed down to the to the, uh most essential information twenty five minutes. Hard to believe that i could talk for twenty five minutes and it not all be critical. I had difficulty with that, but the whole concept of distilling it down. But i did. And i got it down to about three minutes. Roughly and that’s the best of the five minute marketing tips that i’ve got for you for planned giving. I want you to get started with your plan giving marketing. Watch the tips. Check out the video. Three minutes worth it’s at tony martignetti dot com. And that is tony’s. Take two. And here is jean takagi with program you’re bored jean takagi he’s, a principal of neo the non-profit and exempt organizations law group in san francisco. Gene has been gene has been a regular contributor to show it’s got to be going on three years. Gina i if it’s not three it’s very close. He had it’s, the non popular of the non popular beautiful he had it’s the popular non-profit law blawg dot com non-profit law blogged dot com it’s very popular. And on twitter he’s at jack g t k happy new year jean takagi. Welcome back. Happy new year. Tony it’s. Great to be on. Thank you. I love having you. How long have you been? A contributor every month, i think it’s been a little over three years. A zit? Is it over three? Love it. It could be i think we met three years ago at a bar in san francisco, if i remember, right? Oh, for sure. It’s not like we pick. I picked you up there where i knew you before. I’m not that easy with contributors. I mean, yes, we we knew each other. And then we certainly did meet that’s, right? With along with emily chan? Yes. That’s. Right. Um, let’s see, our board has our board has some responsibilities and around program you’re concerned that they’re not they’re not fulfilling those responsibilities. Yeah, i just feel like there’s there’s, maybe some lack of attention paid on the boards roll on program oversight? I think so often went especially when you talk with lawyers or accountants were talking about financial oversight and we’re saying we’ll make sure you’re solvent. Make sure you have enough money to pay off your debts. They become do we don’t really talk very much about programs, but certainly the management folks and the thunder’s air talking about programs and whether they’re effective and efficient that furthering the mission. So, you know, i thought we should explore a little bit about what the board duties are in in that event as well. Can you just remind us first, we’ve talked about this a while ago. There are three duties that board members have. I was faith, hope and chastity, or on the greatest of those is but yeah, the three duties are the duty of care and that’s act with reasonable care in providing direction and oversight over the organization, the duty of loyalty, and a lot of that has to do with avoiding conflicts of interests that are not in the best interest of the organizations, but are more for the best interest of an insider and the duty of obedience which lawyers air very interested in, and that’s a bang with both the outside laws of you know, that apply to the organization and the internal laws like the by-laws and other policies that the documents may have those air the three to be to be concerned with. Okay and and around program program is essential. Man. That’s what charity’s exist for his programs? Oh, my voice just cracked like i’m a fourteen year old exist that’s. Exciting stuff. Now that it is, it is that’s. Right? Well, you make it interesting. That’s. Why? I love having you back. You make the what could very well be a dry topic. I think you make it interesting. And listeners do too. Yeah. That’s. What? Charity’s air here is for a program. Yeah, exactly. I mean, who cares? The indie at the end of the day, if we’ve got great financials, it’s none of our programs are effective, and we don’t do a service to the community. Precisely. So what? What do we need to be doing? What to boards need to be doing around around program. Well, i think in meeting those three duties, the critical aspect for boards to make sure they’re reasonably informed. Ah, and just get a program report every month or every two months. You know, a ten minute program report from the executive director or program director is fine and good. But does that mean the board really understands the programs and whether the advance the mission on do they understand how the program’s advance emission? And did they ever ask you more difficult questions about are the programs effective? At advancing the mission. Or do we have alternatives? Or should we think of alternatives that might be able to advance that mission mohr effectively or more efficiently, given the limited resources that we all have? First up in this is and we have talked about this, your mission needs to be very clear. Yeah, and one of the things you have to do is make sure you go back. And this is the lawyer speaking, make sure you go back to your articles of incorporation and by-laws and make sure that the mission statement that years, thinking that you’re furthering is consistent with what the law says your mission is, and that’s that’s how it’s displayed on the governing documents and figuring out whether we are effective at meeting our mission. Now we’ve gotto identify cem numbers, right? I mean, it’s, not just gonna be a ten minute report from the program director, we’ve got to be looking at some numbers to figure out whether our we’re having the outcomes that we want, right and it’s such a such a difficult question and that’s, why it’s it’s all about keeping informed? Because you know the whole area of program. Evaluation and that cantor and and a lot of institutions like the stanford center on philanthropy in civil society and mckinsey and, you know, the non-profit cordially foundations under the all have been raiding all sorts of things on program evaluation and how we need more metrics and, you know, but all of that is great, but this is really hard stuff for a lot of non-profits to do so, yes, trying to figure out what what measurements are are important for us to figure out. Are we advancing our mission effectively? And then are we advancing it efficiently is really hard stuff, i think tip typically non-profits will, you know, measure how much money we’ve raised, how many visitors we’ve had or people with served, how many members we have? What is our overhead ratio on? We’ve had discussions on that topic as well, and, you know, those are interesting figures in all important, and i don’t want to downplay that, but what about, you know, then, you know, the number of clients served, for example, does that really tell us what impact that’s done? No before the clients and you know, the program staff may know that, but how does the board know that if we have? If we served two thousand clients last month, did we did we serve them by giving them one meal? Did that change their lives? Did we do more than that? Did we provide services? What? What and impact are we trying to aim for? And what results are we getting those air really difficult things to try to figure out. But i think the board needs to push the organization in that direction. Of trying to figure out are the programs that write programs? Are we effectively implementing it? And if you want to, you know, evaluate your executive and evaluate your programs. You’ve gotta have a good understanding of that. I feel your passion around this, jean. I really do. It comes it’s it’s palpable. Now, in managing these programs, it’s not the board’s roll. Teo to be day to day there’s clearly there’s a delegation that has to be happening. Yeah, absolutely. And and the board certainly has the ability to and should be delegating if they have staff in an executive director. Particularly, um, delegating those duties on those people. And especially, you know, holding the executive accountable. And tasking executive and making sure the executive has resources to be able to do this, to try to figure out what measurements should we take? Teo, evaluate our programs. What what’s important? What do we have the capacity to do now? And what? What do we aspire to do? What are outside stakeholders wanting? What are the foundations saying we must have? And what are the donor’s expecting from us and how to our competitors provide that type of information back? I think we just need to push our executives. We’re lucky enough to have them to figure some of those things out. And none of this has done overnight. Of course, tony. But you know, you you’ve gotto work at this, and sometimes you’re going to move forward, and sometimes you gotta move backwards. But you’ve got to keep pushing, pushing ahead. You just asked five or six really difficult but critical questions. Um, it’s a good thing. This is a podcast cause now people can listen. Go, go back to the past one minute and listen to those five or six questions. Jean just just named, you know, difficulty, but but but critical. And and yet the board’s oversight responsibility remains, and that can’t be delegated. That’s, right? So you know, the board, khun delegate management, but the board can’t delegate its ultimate oversight of the organization and it’s, you know, it’s responsibility to plan the direction of the organization. So status quo, if you know if that’s all you’re satisfied with and you don’t aim to do anything else with that, you know, that may not that may indicate that you don’t have the best board in place, and i was a little shocked. Teo learned, i think two days ago guidestar held a web cast, and there was a survey done of executive directors, and seventy five percent said they were unhappy with their boards and there’s a big disconnect there seventy five percent approved. Okay, what else? What else, uh, is part of the boards oversight of program? Gene? Well, you know, one thing i kind of want to emphasize as well is that i don’t want to put all of this on the board of directors, and i realized that the vast majority of board members are volunteers and have busy lives otherwise and are doing an amazing job. Trying to contribute to their organizations, the disconnect with the exec director is usually because of communications and a lack of understanding of their respective roles. So i just want to put a little bit of a burden on the executive director as well, to make sure that they are emphasizing board development and helping the board understand its responsibilities and sometimes bringing in experts, even though they may cost a little at the outset. Khun b really valuable to an organisation to try to figure out what these roles are, and again put in a little investment up front, and you can get payoff down the road even if you have some failures along the way. But it’s just that continuing to push forward to trying to understand what you’re doing who’s responsible for what? On figuring that stuff out the metrics themselves again. Our khun b, you know, exceedingly difficult if if i asked you give us metrics on changing laws when we were fighting for civil rights, well, that might take years or decades to get any measurable results per se that might make a thunder happy. And you know what would have happened in the early sixties you know, civil rights organizations just had their program shut down because boards didn’t get the right metrics. That would have been ridiculous, right? So we have to understand the limitation of these measurements as well, but continue to try to figure out what important steps or benchmarks we’re shooting for and what’s important to do, even if we don’t get the metrics. Ah, and make sure our funders and donors and stakeholders understand those limitations. Well, just a minute or so before before breaking what? What kind of expert would help us with this? What would we search for? Well, there there are some consultants out there who specialize in program evaluation, and there there are definitely resource is out there. I have named a few organizations already, but let me give you a few more the foundation centre and they’re grantspace website has got some excellent resource is on program evaluation, the national council of non-profits also has some excellent resources. They’re they’re definitely resource is out there. And if you look for non-profit consultants who got program evaluation exper thirties, i think that can be a starting place. This is also a ripe area for collaboration. Amongst organizations that are serving similar populations, or half similar missions, to try to meet together and talked about how they’re measuring, you know, their program, results and what would work for maybe, you know, across the sub sector that that they’re serving, all of those things are really important. I think again, executive leadership is really important to get the board in motion, but the board also has to hold the executive responsible for making sure that happens as well. Let’s, take a break. Gene and i, of course, will keep talking about the board’s responsibility around program and the executive director’s, too. Lynette singleton and at lays, right. Thank you for thank you very much. For those very, very kind thoughts on twitter. Hang in there. Like what you’re hearing a non-profit radio tony’s got more on youtube, you’ll find clips from stand up comedy tv spots and exclusive interviews catch guests like seth gordon. Craig newmark, the founder of craigslist market of eco enterprises charles best from donors choose dot org’s aria finger do something that worked neo-sage levine from new york universities heimans center on philantech tony tweets to he finds the best content from the most knowledgeable, interesting people in and around non-profits to share on his stream. If you have valuable info, he wants to re tweet you during the show. You can join the conversation on twitter using hashtag non-profit radio twitter is an easy way to reach tony he’s at tony martignetti narasimhan t i g e n e t t i remember there’s a g before the end he hosts a podcast for the chronicle of philanthropy fund-raising fundamentals is a short monthly show devoted to getting over your fund-raising hartals just like non-profit radio, toni talks to leading thinkers, experts and cool people with great ideas. As one fan said, tony picks their brains and i don’t have to leave my office fund-raising fundamentals was recently dubbed the most helpful non-profit podcast you have ever heard. You can also join the conversation on facebook, where you can ask questions before or after the show. The guests were there, too. Get insider show alerts by email, tony tells you who’s on each week and always includes link so that you can contact guess directly. To sign up, visit the facebook page for tony martignetti dot com. Hi, i’m kate piela, executive director of dance, new amsterdam. And you’re listening to tony martignetti non-profit radio. Big non-profit ideas for the other ninety five percent. More live listener love junction china ni hao, the netherlands gary indiana the home of christmas story, right? I’m pretty sure a christmas story that movie took place in gary, indiana live listen, i’d love to gary, indiana, and we’ve got a couple checking in from japan, hiroshima and kobe konnichi wa, farmington, michigan live listener love out to you. We have a question from twitter jean very loyal listener lynette singleton asks, do we know why there’s this lack of love between executive directors with and their boards, any ideas what’s contributing to that? I think i’m sorry, tony, that i think there are a number of factors that make be contributing to that, but i think the first is lack of understanding of the rules at each place and then it’s it’s a matter of communication between the two parties there are greater vacations that that board’s place on executives and reliance on the executives tio tio make do with limited resources to produce amazing results, and that can sometimes be a very heavy burden on the executive without a lot of support from the board and exactly what the board’s role is in supporting the executive director’s. Also, i think they’re many areas where there’s a lack of agreement or understanding between those roles and, you know, fund-raising is actually one of the areas of ax. Actually, some controversy, i think, you know, is the board involved. Is the board’s role no to raise funds for the organisation. From a legal perspective, i might answer no to some extent, from a more operational perspective, i would say, of course it is, so they’re they’re different considerations, and that was a charity navigator study, right? I’m not sure. I thought you said i’d start with, i’m sorry, the organization that did the webinar. Okay, okay, god start. Pardon me. Ok wave talking, talking about program meeting the mission, but there’s also legal requirements around program as well. Sure, and then the board should make sure that the executive is ensuring that the program is in compliance with whatever applicable laws might be there, whether it have to do with the facility of the organization or the employees and volunteers working for it, their basic risk management steps that they may want to take a swell, including ensuring that there’s proper insurance that, for whatever activities are are involved. Obviously, if you’re doing a summer day camp involving rope climbing and like that that’s going to be a little bit more significant in terms of risk management than if you’re just doing administrative work, but lots of legal compliance things, licensing, permitting and in all of those think, well, can board members be personally liable if laws are being broken and that’s why we have directors and officers insurance, isn’t it? Yeah, part partly why we have that it’s usually, you know, if there’s some sort of negligence involved when the board members acting not as a boardmember but is a volunteer for a program, then you’re probably looking at commercial general liability insurance to protect against, you know, somebody slip and fall and blaming the volunteer who was right supposed to set it up on the board members, directors and officers. Insurance will really protect against decisions that the board made that ultimately, you know, in hindsight, we’re negligent or grossly negligent, and, you know, if they decided to hold a program in involved involving bungee jumping with six year olds and without adequate supervision that, you know, that would be the type of negligence that could get boardmember personally liable for something like that. But volunteermatch boardmember czar really, really, really rarely held personally liable absent some sort of malfeasance or self dealing really benefit themselves. Okay, i’ve seen some six year olds on the subway that i wouldn’t mind having participate in that that bungee jumping off a cliff i could i could give them a little shove to get them started, but not not kids. I know nobody related to me only only what’s people i’ve seen in some pipe it that it go well, now they’re real. I’ve seen him in the subway, i just don’t know who they are. I can’t name them, but i could point them out easily. Probably on my way home. I’ll encounter a few. Um, what else should we be thinking about? You know, your get before i asked before we do that, you’re an anarchist. Also, you’re making us. I got two troublemakers on the show today. You are making us ask questions that are very difficult, but but critical? Yeah. You know, i think of lawyers and consultants more broadly, that’s what what we do, we can implement the changes that we talked about, what we want to raise the questions because we want boards and executives to really be thinking about these things and discussing them. And that’ll help break down the barriers and the misunderstandings and hopefully make more executive directors feel that their boards air great, make more executive, make more boards feel that their executive directors are doing a great job as well. As i said, i feel your passion around this. We have just about two minutes. What? You have another thought around this? Yeah. You know, just tio, make sure that again and i’ve talked a little bit about this is that there are limitations to what metrics can provide to an organization and some things just take a really long time to figure out research i mentioned lobbying on civil rights issues is one example, but research as well, you know, for going to engage in research of a new program and how it’s going to work or developing a new medical device or drug that’s going to be beneficial to developing nations and that the people there who might not have the resources to be able to afford these things, we’ve got to be a little bit experimental. And i know you know, there’s been preaching to the choir about embracing failure and sharing it so we can learn in advance, but that really is something that all echo as well, that, you know, we’re going to get metrics and sometimes the metrics they’re going to show we failed, but if we never fail, that means we’ve never really pushed the envelope of making a more substantial change, and we’re just sort of, you know, relying on making little incremental changes, and we have to think about our organizations and say, are we detective organization that just wants to stay status quo? Do we want to make little tiny? Incremental changes year by year or do we actually want to look at solving or advancing our mission in a really big way and actually take some risk and find some programs out there that might be more risky and that might fail and help educate our funders and our donors and our supporters that this is what we’re doing and not everything is going to work, but this is the way to advance, you know, our cause lawyer with a heart, jean jean takagi, really so grateful that you’re contributing to the show? Jean, thank you so much. Thank you, johnny. And thanks for basing this serious subject today. That’s all right, uh, we have a little fun with it. You’re an anarchist is no question cubine you’ll find jean at non-profit law blogged dot com that’s the block that he edits and he’s at g tack on twitter. Thank you again, jean, thanks so much. Next week it’ll be a good one. You have my word. I don’t know anything about fermentation. If you missed any part of today’s show, i beseech you, find it on tony martignetti dot com and these are our sponsors pursuing online tools. For small and midsize non-profits data driven and technology enabled pursuing dot com wagner, sepa is guiding you beyond the numbers. With your cps dot com. You’re not a business. You’re non-profit stoploss accounting software designed for non-profits non-profit wizard dot com, and we be spelling supercool spelling bee fundraisers. We b e spelling dot com, a creative producers, claire meyerhoff. Sam liebowitz is the line producer, shows social media is by susan chavez, and this terrific music is by scott stein of brooklyn. Be with me next week for non-profit radio. Big non-profit ideas for the other ninety five percent. Go out and be going. 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Me dar is the founder of idealist took two or three years for foundation staff, sort of dane toe add an email address card. It was like it was phone. This email thing is right and that’s why should i give it away? Charles best founded donors choose dot or ge somehow they’ve gotten in touch kind of off line as it were on dno. Two exchanges of brownies and visits and physical gift mark echo is the founder and ceo of eco enterprises. You may be wearing his hoodies and shirts. Tony talked to him. Yeah, you know, i just i’m a big believer that’s not what you make in life. It sze, you know, tell you make people feel this is public radio host majora carter. Innovation is in the power of understanding that you don’t just do it. You put money on a situation expected to hell. You put money in a situation and invested and expect it to grow and savvy advice for success from eric sacristan. 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Nonprofit Radio for November 18, 2016: 8 Areas of Nonprofit Excellence

Big Nonprofit Ideas for the Other 95%

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Sharon Stapel & Melkis Alvarez-Baez: 8 Areas of Nonprofit Excellence

(L to R) Melkis Alvarez-Baez & Sharon Stapel

The NY Community Trust Excellence Awards are based on tough criteria that reveal the right way to run your organization in areas like fundraising; management; board; financial; and diversity. From the Nonprofit Coordinating Committee, Sharon Stapel, president & executive director, and Melkis Alvarez-Baez, deputy director, explain the standards. They’ve been upgraded since we covered this on March 6, 2015.

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Duitz hello and welcome to tony martignetti non-profit radio big non-profit ideas for the other ninety five percent. I’m your aptly named host. Oh, i’m glad you’re with me. I’d suffer the embarrassment of yours if you rubbed me the wrong way with the idea that you missed today’s show eight areas of non-profit excellence the non-profit coordinating committee excellence awards are based on tough criteria that revealed the right way to run your organization in areas like fund-raising management, board, financial and diversity. Sharon staple, president and executive director, and melkis alvarez-baez deputy director explain the recommended standards. They’ve been upgraded since we covered this on march six twenty fifteen on tony’s steak too, maur ntcdinosaur goes, we’re sponsored by pursuant full service fund-raising data driven and technology enabled, you’ll raise more money pursuant dot com and by we be spelling supercool spelling bee fundraisers. We be spelling dot com for glad to welcome back to the show. Nakis alvarez-baez she’s been with the non-profit coordinating committee since two thousand eleven and overseas their programs and member services melkis is at and pcc and why underscore d d i r deputy director and and pcc is at and pcc and why dot or ge? Marcus, welcome back. Thanks so much for having me back. Did tohave you? Pleasure? Sharon staple she’s the president and executive director non-profit coordinating committee. She was named a white house champion of change. As executive director of the new york city gay and lesbian anti violence project, she joined the non-profit coordinating committee in october of fifteen and she’s at n pcc. And why underscore prez pea are easy. Welcome, sharon. Thanks for having us. It’s. A pleasure pushing up both ofyou. Melkis. Uh, you got a promotion since you were here last time you were you were you were deputy. Then you were deputy director of programmes. I was director, director of programmes. Now your deputy director. I share your whole thing. Cool. Congratulations. Thank you. Um, we’re talking about these eight key areas of non-profit excellence the know that these are a criterion for a competition. Sharon, don’t you start off what you acquaint us with the competition and how these areas fit in? Well, i think it’s important. Understand what? Who and what and pcc is on and why we care about non-profit excellence and and pc sees a membership organization of fourteen hundred non-profits in new york city in the new york area, and we are really the voice and information source for non-profits and one of the ways that we think non-profits need to get information or the things we think they need to know about is non-profit excellence and management excellence because we think that for non-profits to be able to really get to their mission and be able to focus on the thing that they were created to two, they want to be managed and manage themselves as efficiently and effectively as possible. So the non-profit excellence awards is really a formal way for us to teach people about non-profit excellence and two go thank you. So it’s really informal way for us to teach people about non-profit excellence and two really recognized and celebrate that excellence in the sector and melkis having been a part of not just n p c c for five years, but also the non-profit excellence awards is probably our best guide through the history of the probe. Grandma and it’s already anarchy, so i asked you, but you’re going to defer to melkis way just want to make sure you have the best person talking your subject thought so. The key areas are really the driver of our near community trust non-profit excellence awards program on dh, the awards air program that and pcc created on dh manages and so we created the program in two thousand six, so this is our milestone tenth anniversary and it’s an exciting year for us and the awards are really an opportunity for non-profits tto learn from other non-profits and so we really go beyond honoring excellence, and the awards program are truly an educational experience for the organizations that go through it, but also for the other non-profits in the sector that are able to benefit from the best practices that we highlight throughout the process. Okay, thie awards ceremony is coming up it’s friday, december second, right? Okay, that’s the same day of non-profit radio airs every every week, so you may have t pretend you make pretend it’s trouble in new york city area. Okay, let’s see, i am goingto i’m goingto take through the eight areas so that everybody knows what we’re going to be talking about for the next hour. Uh, and then we’ll cover a little more about why. These are bona fide before we actually get into them. But so number one is overall management focus on results and impact and then governance structure moves the organization forward. Financial management is strong, transparent and accountable. Organization is diverse and inclusive. Number five is human. Resource is our valued and developed. Number six use of information technology systems improves efficiency and advances. Mission communications are strategic effective and build brand latto and the final area fund-raising and resource development. Our strategic donor-centric and effective. Okay, melkis let’s, stay with you. How do we know that these recommendations these criteria are are bona fide? I mean is this is not just something. And pcc decided and foisted on the community that’s, right? What’s the process through the get to these eight areas. So when we were creating the awards program ten years ago, we looked at what other state associations of non-profits were doing, and we looked at the other state associations in particular that had standards of excellence programs. There’s about twenty three, of them now on day in total represent about twenty thousand non-profits across the country. And so we looked at what they thought matters for non-profit success and so we picked the areas where there was consensus, but also balance that out with areas that we know are important in the new york city area. So for example, diversity and inclusion is an area that appears throughout the country as part of their standards for us. It’s a discreet section in our guiding eight areas, as we feel that it’s an important topic and management area that organisations in our area need teo be focused on and managed towards. Ok, so ten years ago you crowdsourced the genesis of this yes, through all your sister organizations call a colleague organizations throughout the country, right? Okay, cool. And in the end, they’re updated every year. I’m just gonna get yes, sharon, the awards i’m sorry. The key areas have changed just since last year. Yeah, well, the key, the key areas actually remained the same. We what we did really was to try and make more clear for the non-profits that we’re applying and make more accessible for everyone who is interested in the key areas. What we meant by them. What are the standards for those areas? Where do we think organization should be aspirational and how can they be aspirational and gave sort of slightly more specific examples about what we meant in those eight key areas? So so the overarching eight areas are not change, right? The sort of description and hopefully accessibility of them are ok, you were finding there was some misunderstandings about what some of the areas are meant. You know this, tony, because you do this work, but, you know, a lot of management khun feel amorphous sometimes right, and what it means to be a good manager of religion, good organization or what it means to be effective or efficient, sometimes that’s really hard to grasp. And i think i know as as someone who has applied for the non-profit excellence awards of my former organization that sometimes the standards it’s helpful to have a little bit more clarity when you’re not doing this every single day and when you’re sort of looking into the award greater specificity, yeah, okay, cool. We’re going back for our first break. We come back, the three of us will dive into these eight key areas and get acquainted with them. Stay with us. You’re tuned to non-profit radio tony martignetti also hosts a podcast for the chronicle of philanthropy fund-raising fundamentals is a quick ten minute burst of fund-raising insights, published once a month. Tony’s guests are expert in crowdfunding, mobile giving event fund-raising direct mail and donor cultivation. Really, all the fund-raising issues that make you wonder, am i doing this right? Is there a better way there is? Find the fund-raising fundamentals archive it. Tony martignetti dot com that’s marketmesuite n e t t i remember there’s, a g before the end, thousands of listeners have subscribed on itunes. You can also learn maura, the chronicle website, philanthropy dot com fund-raising fundamentals, the better way. Welcome back to big non-profit ideas for the other ninety five percent. All right, let’s, dive in, ladies! Sharon let’s, let’s stay with you the first area overall management focus on results and impact. You want to see a clear mission statement and articulated values what’s this a little more about the values? Well, i think it’s important that organizations no, not well what i think isn’t actually that important. But what we know from the eight years of non-profit excellence is ah, clearly articulating a mission is critical. Of course we need to know why we exist in what we’re doing and and why the non-profit is is in the world, but understanding the values that go along with that what does the organization stand for? What does the organization wants to be? What does the organization i want to do around the way it treats its employees the way it approaches the issue the way it intersects or interacts with other organisations? Is justus critical as knowing that we want to end hunger? We want to end homelessness. We want to work with survivors of violence whatever the mission is now you have for each sub area within. The eight areas there’s their standards. And then there’s aspirational. There was you standard aspiration. Does does an organization not do well in the judging? If everything is standard and not very much is aspiration, i’ve achieved aspiration? Well, you know, i think it’s there’s sort of two purposes for this program, right? And so one is it’s an educational opportunity. And so any organization whose meeting all of the standards is doing great work, right? Those air what we think they are, the foundations of how folks should be using the eight years non-profit excellence, then there’s the actual competition of the awards, right? And there we have a selection committee of experts who know these eight key areas, and they are looking for aspirational, replicable, innovative and exciting practices when we’re looking at sort of overall non-profit excellence in terms of the competition, the award, okay, let’s, go into some or the area that we’re going to get the education component i know there’s a program for everyone these eight i mean, this is not is not just judging, but there’s a lot of training and help that goes along boosting lots of non-profit whoever wants to participate in let’s see, we’ll do you might can i just say another thing about overall? Management focus on results already anarchy. Yes, but i appreciate your asking. Thank you, it’s, you know, so it’s important to have a clear mission? Absolutely, but it’s also in court, important that we see organisations being able to measure review and most importantly, use data that points to organizational programmatic results, right? And we also want to see that organizations or strategic planning and thinking in a forward way. So when we’re looking at sort of the i talk with my hands too much or got tio here, somebody bumped a micro follow-up s so when we’re looking at the sort of overall area we’re looking for mission, we’re looking for vision, but we also want to know, how do you know you’re doing what you’re supposed to be doing? And how do you use the information? How do you think about your strategy, given that information and how it relates to your mission? And how do you plan in a way that allows for learning environment and understanding that not all programs air perfect all the time? And so you’re going to learn the lessons, but also that you’re able to see that you’re moving toward the ultimate. Goal of your organization. Okay, so they really were to things wrapped up in what you were just saying impact reporting, basically, i mean, i’m i’m not we have to focus a little, you know, i have to make a lot more concise because we have, like, fourteen pages, so so i’m going, to paraphrase the impact reporting and also you want to see a vibrant strategic planning process, yes, and the learning environment, learning, learning from the results that you’re reporting and and then hopefully, i mean, you’re also you want dissemination of the results, right? Is that not a part of this or that? But i mean that somewhere else, but you don’t want to keep the results internal you want you want stakeholders to be seeing these, right? And i think that here we’re focused on the way that you monitor or use the results, but certainly in the governance of the organization for transparency. What you want to see, those results disseminated in communication strategies you want to see, you know, so you’ll see results because, you know, non-profits air created for the social good and to meet their missions, we want to see results used. In multiple different ways, but when we talk about sort of overall management with a focus on results we’re looking at, how are you using the data that you do? You have a data available, and if so, how are you using that data? I gotta be honest, as i was reading through these key areas is okay if i call make standards, is that is that is that is that word bother you if i call him standards or recommendations or what? What besides areas give me another word that you’re comfortable with, so i don’t offend the program. So i would say that the the eight areas and we call them that on purpose is because they go beyond standards, right? So one of the things to know what you’re right, they become aspirational. Yeah, give me a word. Besides harish, i just keep using areas. Yes. Okay, you’re right. So as i was reading through the areas, i was thinking, i mean, this is sort of a test for non-profit radio. Like how much of how much of this stuff have we talked about? Because the mission of non-profit radio is two help small and midsize non-profits with all the areas that they are struggling with a face challenged every day. So i’m sorry, you know? I mean, like, testing the show against now. S so i’ve got some shows to recommend. I haven’t got it. I haven’t got a recommendation for every single area, although we were, but we’ve hit every area, but i can’t i can’t impact report that, but so if anyone wants teo, get learn more about impact reporting. Look for the guest doctor robert penna, whose book is the non-profit outcomes toolbox and he’s been on a couple of times. More recently, he was on talking about the history of non-profits going back to the sixteen hundreds in in england. But before that he’s been on it was on talking about his book non-profit outcomes. Toolbox. Ok, ladies, let’s move on. Melkis you ready for? You want to take area to governing structure? Move the organization forward. You dealt me out with this defined. Ah, boardmember has a strong fiduciary. What does that mean? Sure. So what we mean by that is that board members are engaged in the oversight of the organization, not just in the finances and making sure that they’re engaged in the budgeting process and making sure that the finances are in order, but really that they’re holding the organisation accountable, promoting and ensuring transparency and accountability on that they’re also partnering effectively with the staff to really drive the organization forward and to support the mission of the organization. How do you tell that all these things were happening through examples right that the thie organizations are highlighting throughout their applications, right? So they give examples that really show not just that the practices exist, but that show riel impact on the organization, right? So it’s not just enoughto have a stellar boardmember show us what that stellar, what meat? What having that cellar boardmember on your board has meant for your organization has have they’ve been able to connect you to, you know, particular donors? Or have they been able to help advocate for certain policy and change that that impacts and influences the organization? Okay? And then now for semi finalists, there’s an interview is that right? Or there’s there’s onsite visits? I want to get to the semifinals, so we’re at eleven semifinalist now we’ll narrow those down to six finalists, and they’ll have in person meetings with our selection committee, okay, is there an onsite component to it? You visit officers? We’ve reformatted that part of the process and so would you used to, but you don’t anymore. We don’t anymore on dh, so they all come and meet with this election company at a neutral space and it’s great to see what different organizations do with the same space, okay? And don’t no shame in that i’m not like him shaming your in that we’re not ashamed chaillou think decision, but i think i think durney since we’re talking about the application process, one of the things that we’ve done this year in an effort to make the awards and the educational opportunity more accessible to people is we created at the very beginning of the process of readiness assessment, which is basically a yes, no check, you know, sort of list and it’s an online application it’s, an online assessment, you go online, you answer the questions and we have sort of ah scale of scoring on the higher end it’s like this is you guys are doing great, you should definitely consider applying for the excellence are on the lower end it’s like, you know, you may have some work to do before you want to actually think about applying, and we then linked to resource is in specific air specific eight excellent the areas and then if it’s in the middle, we say to people like, give us a call and we can talk to you about where you’re at because we know it’s a big lift for organizations to apply for the excellence awards it’s a multi month process for them. The first round is four open ended questions about how the areas affected their meaning or how their management is is viewed through those areas. And then the second round is an incredibly intense application that examines each of the eight areas carefully, and then you have to do as you’re saying this in person visit and it’s it’s very rigorous, and we don’t want organizations wasting their resource is applying if they’re not going to be there. But we do want to give everyone the opportunity to assess their management practices through the eight areas because we think it’s an excellent tool to get people to move in the direction of making management changes. The sticking with the governance structure, the board has a giver get policy, one hundred percent board giving melkis you wantto you wantto emphasize the importance of that? Sure so that i would say that that’s something that the selection committee is looking for across the board of all organizations of all sizes and missions, is that there’s one hundred percent board e-giving on dh the idea behind that is that if your board members don’t give, how can you convince other donors other funders to give right? And so i think, and sharon, you might be able to speak more of this as a leader of a non-profit but foundations are increasingly asking for that metric that that board members are giving it doesn’t matter what the amount is per se, but that they’re giving something to again show their commitment to the organization on to the mission. Okay, and later on, when we get teo fund-raising you ask for a personally significant, i think that’s the phrase personally significant, okay, we’ve had lots of people are talking about boards. The ones that come to mind are michael davidson. You could search his name he’s twenty martignetti dot com michael davidson’s on your selection committee. Army veteran one has served since the beginning of the program, standing all ten years, years, he’s been a guest on the show, like three, four times i let happen. Um, we both are i could, and also for board fund-raising specifically, when get to the board fund-raising part. Gail perry, whose book is fired-up fund-raising she talks a lot about board fund-raising she’s been a guest. All so you could look for her on the history of the show. Um, okay. Oversight informed board provides oversight you haven’t, you haven’t. Interesting aspiration here. The succession plan. So it’s aspirational though it’s not standard. Why? You know, that doesn’t seem like it should be a standard thing. A succession plan. I think that many organizations think about succession planning as something that stops at the leadership of the organization. And so the aspiration here is that there should be a thoughtful succession plan in place for board leadership as well. Okay, okay. That’s, the operational partner. Right? The board evaluating its own performance? Yes. Say something about that s o we’ve seen a range in terms of how what this practice looks like. So we’ve seen that some organizations will do individual assessments of board performance in terms of meeting attendance fund-raising participation at events, site visits and involvement in programs. But we’ve also seen organizations do a performance assessment of the entire board, right? So instead of individual assessments doing a group evaluation but now your standard says that is boardmember performances individually assessed him. Reported back to the individual yes. So you really want to see that as a standard, the individual performance we dio and bored performance also board as a whole performance also we do, and the ideas that were striving towards engaged board service and having an evaluation process allows board members to know where they need to up their game and where they’re doing great in terms of supporting the organization like that, you specifically say, and is reported back to the boardmember there’s no there’s, not a lot of value for the boardmember if his or her performance is evaluated and it’s only discussed among the executive committee that’s absolutely what am i learning as a boardmember if i don’t know where my shortcomings are so like, okay, we evaluate what we’re going to share it with you, okay? I don’t know, like i don’t mean really do ping pong, but it’s turning out this way, sharon, you wantto area three years comfortable with the financial management is strong, transparent and accountable. Absolutely okay, and so i think what we’re looking for here and this goes back to the idea that non-profits are built for the public trust that there’s an obligation to be transparent and to build that trust with their donors and a part of that for a lot of donors is understanding. And frankly, a lot of a lot of constituents of the organisation is to understand where the financials air at, so we want to make sure that as a team, minimum organizations or transparent about their financials, posting things like their nine nineties and their audit on their websites and making sure that those air easily accessible documents, but we also want to make sure that internally, they’re really regularly reviewing what what is their performance versus their goals, not necessarily their performance versus what life looks like right now, which is, i think, what a lot of profits non-profits end up doing, um, did you want to say something? No, i’m agreeing with you and yeah, and and i think i think this is really hard, especially when you don’t talk, i’ll just interrupt, uh, i think this is especially hard during times of economic uncertainty, and we’ve sort of we may have in parts of our non-profit sectors climbed out of the sort of two thousand eight uncertainty, although there’s still a lot of non-profits as we’ve seen in recent reports that are teetering on the edge and we want to make sure that folks are being as intentional as they possibly can in times of crisis or near crisis, right? And and so that means having a plan that goes beyond the sort of reactionary and his various you’re proactive talk about budgeting, budgeting for surplus. Exactly. Exactly, actually, that’s an aspiration? Yeah, just included. Surplus, right? And then also, we want to make sure that people are looking at their day to day sustainability because a lot of times financial, financial analysis is can often be done at a board level on a quarterly level on an annual, you know basis. And we want to make sure that the leaders of the non-profit are looking at what does this mean for your day to day? What your cash flows look like? How profitable or your programs are you investing money in the right places? Are there places that as painful as it might be? You have to say, this isn’t either profitable and profitable in the sense that the program can pay for itself. Um, or it’s? Not as related to our mission as it should be. And we need to think about the finances there. You you have something? A statement under standard, the organization’s chart of accounts is aligned with the organization and program budgets what’s a chart of account is that just an excel spreadsheet? So hopefully, i mean, i suppose you don’t know in some very small, so basically it’s, the way that your accounting system categorizes the way that you spend money, right? And some for some organizations, they could be incredibly detailed for other organizations that could be less detailed, but basically what the standard is, you need to know where every dollar is going, and you need to know whether that dollar is going to the right area, right? So if it’s restricted program funding, it should be in your chart of accounts as restricted program funding if it’s unrestricted and you’re using it for fund-raising then you should be able to tell how many dollars you’re using for fund-raising versus if you’re using for management or other purposes. Or maybe you’re using your unrestricted dollars to cover the costs of your programs because you’re funding sources don’t cover the full costs, but you should know where each of those dollars is going, and you should be able to tell people about where each of those dollars is going. Okay, we have about a minute before we take another break. Heimans and i want to get back to something if we could do this in a minute. Sharon what you were just talking about earlier, you know, the assessment for on dh, not wasting non-profits time. But it sounds like the assessment is something valuable. Is that available now? Knowing that the awards are in process or not wear? Where where can we find find it on and pcc. And why dot or ge? Do you know the the actual part of the website it’s on it’s under the non-profit excellence awards are and it’s called the assessment a readiness is matter-ness assessment? Okay? Because it sounded excellent. It’s i think it’s such a huge resource for non-profits. And they should take advantage of it all year round irrespective of whether you’re in new york and you can fly these awards or not. Okay, exactly. Okay, ladies, if you’ll indulge me for a couple of moments, we have more on these areas coming up first. Pursuant, they help you raise more money. Their tools are ideal for small and midsize shops. That’s. Why? They’re a perfect sponsor for the show because they have online proto tools that you use for yourself velocity it was developed for their consultants to use internally to manage big client campaigns, and they found that was so valuable they rolled it out for you to use in managing your own campaign. You don’t need the pursuing consultant, you can use the pro tool on your own and that tools again velocity you’ll find it at pursuant dot com we’ll be spelling spelling bees for non-profit fund-raising they make spelling bees incredibly fun. It’s fund-raising but there’s also live music and dancing and stand up comedy. If you are looking for a millennial event for your organization, i think you should talk to we be spelling there at we b e spelling dot com and there’s a very cool video there that demonstrates all those things that stand up comedy that dancing, etcetera. Now, tony’s, take two i was at the non-profit technology conference back in march on in fact, i’m going to talk about and ten more. We got to the section of the eight areas, so, you know, i was there because you’ve heard the interviews now i’ve got the video’s up, i’ve got mohr of the thirty video interviews that i got in this two and a half day conference was incredible rush thirty interviews in two and a half days all the smart guests you’ll see my introductory video with links to this batch of interview videos at twenty martignetti dot com and that is tony’s take two. Okay, thank you very much, sharon. Thank you, marcus. Short indulgence. Thank you very much. Hey, well, it was important to talk about our sponsors graciously let’s move on. We’re in the next area four and melkis you want to take the organization is diverse and inclusive. I noticed that it it’s not only policies, but also practice, right? So as i said before, diversity and inclusion is one of the areas that we feel is a true value to highlight in our area. As i said, diversity is part of other standards across the country. But for us we thought we needed to have diversity and inclusion as a standalone area so that we can continue to focus on it as a riel area for management performance for non-profits and what we mean by that is that the organization’s practices and policies need to reflect a commitment to diversity and inclusion at all levels of the organization. So not just making sure that the staff is reflective of the communities that they’re serving, but also that the board and the volunteers are as well on. Do you include training’s? Yes, yes. I want to see training’s regularly with all these different constituent areas that you mentioned, right, exactly. So that everyone can effectively support and promote the mission on deliver on the performed the activities effectively that move the organization and towards achieving its policy wise. You have ah, you’re looking for. And this is a standard looking for a written diversity policy and a policy for reporting discrimination, right? So at this point organization, the selection committee is looking for for organizations to have a written diversity policy which is different from an affirmative action statement. But is where a lot of organizations just stop there on the election committee. Can you differentiate between those for us? Sure. So, sharon, you might have a better thought of these, but my for diversity and inclusion. My understanding is that the organization is stating those two areas and cultural competency as well as values for the organization and they’re informing hiring practices, promotions as well in terms of also the training of professional development that’s offering that are offered to the staff. Sharon, you might be able to distinguishing that with affirmative action. Yeah, i mean, i think affirmative action is a legal obligation, right? You’re not you’re legally prohibited from discriminate against people based on certain classes of identities. Well, we’re talking about diversity, inclusion, cultural competency and to some extent, equity, which we don’t really get into in the key areas but is an important part of the conversation. What we’re talking about is affirmatively embracing and understanding the value that diversity, inclusion, cultural competency bring to being able to achieve your mission, right? So it’s, not a sort of prescription it’s really a value and a business decision that the organization makes that we will be a better organization if we have a diversity of people. If we have a diversity of ideas, if we have a diversity of approaches to the work that we’re doing and making sure that that at a minimum that is encompassed in their policies and procedures, you know, and also assessed you have one. Of the standards assessing staff inboard diversity, yes, i mean and goals measured time against measurement against goal. Absolutely. I mean, i think that there is ah lot of people i think when they’re thinking about diversity inclusion, they often think about it as identity characteristics and that’s really important right race, ethnicity, sexual orientation, gender identity, religion, all citizenship, immigration status, all of those things are really important, and we want people to be aware of and tracking where they are at, especially as it relates to the consistencies that they’re serving. But we also want people to understand diversity as bigger than just identity care characteristics. It’s also do you encouraged disagreement that is healthy and constructive? Do you have diversity of opinions and ideas that can result in innovation and moving people forward? And we know that from the literature and from the research that that makes it that that makes business better, that makes the meeting the mission better. And we also know that people who come from diverse backgrounds are going to be more likely to have diverse opinions, right? So it all sort of works together two with the aim being that it’s our job to the best work that we can do to meet our mission, and if that means that we need diverse people, which we think it absolutely does mean, then that has to be one of the key things were looking at when we’re managing the organisation, it can’t be an afterthought or as the affirmative action plan might be sort of a legal, you know, legal disclaimer in our problem exactly, exactly. Okay, let’s stay with you, sharon. Talking about human resource is the human resource is air valued and developed now in small, small shops there’s very likely not even in h r for a person devoted to this topic, i mean, it could fall to i don’t know, theo, or maybe the executive director even this this could be a tough one other thing, i think it can be tough. I’m going to take a moment to say that part of the reason n pcc exists is to provide for our members thes trainings in this information so that they don’t have to have someone on site to still know what they’re doing, so there is a resource for smaller organizations, but i think it is tough. And i think that we do our very best to keep non-profits particularly are smaller members apprised of compliance issues and legal issues so that they’re running the best hr department that they or their running the best organization is in terms of hr as they can. But this is also about and and i was actually listening to your most recent podcast where you had against talking about happiness and well being, and this really is also about what, how we treat our our human resource is, like, literally after anna lisa sherman just exactly like the happy, healthy non-profit exactly, and, you know, really, i think we say hr without understanding, we actually mean, the human beings that are in a sit in are non-profit and we need teo and study after study shows your guest last week talked about this that healthy work-life balanced work environments which are incredibly difficult to achieve and non-profit sometimes because of the under resource ing and thie over demand, but really focusing on are your employees happy and are they are? Are they finding a work-life balance that’s going to make your business more effective, more efficient? You’re going to be reaching your mission. One of things you you’re looking for a standard. His job descriptions, including for well, it’s, aspirational. I think for volunteers, you have definitely job descriptions for employees on board members. And then is it aspirational when it’s job description for volunteers or is that part of the standard? I mean now volunteers when you realise they’re considered the end of the meeting, the mission. So now you’d be looking for job descriptions for volunteers, i think. Yeah, i wantto listeners. We have. Ah, just recently replayed heather carpenter. Her book is the talent resource platform, and she was just on a couple weeks ago talking about job descript. Specifically, the the segment was called your job descriptions could search that and also going backwards. One just occurred to me. Um, fields jackson has been on the show talking about diversity and the value of diversity in your non-profit his name again. Fields. Jackson. Okay, see everything else on, uh, a charm. And you covered quite well. Oh, succession planning is important. Charon. Right for ah, in succession. In hr. We talked a little about that with melkis. Anything more you wanna say about importance of succession? Planning? No, i think i think melkis when she was talking about it, with the board that’s really important and not a lot of non-profits do it, i will say the one thing that i hear most often about succession planning is the fear to start it because it might seem to signal a departure out of the organization on and really, i think one of the things that we’d like to see is tohave succession planning be so routinized that it begins on day one of the Job that on day 1 you’re starting to think what would happen if i wasn’t here, who would be doing this and who would be doing that? Because it also helps you figure out your chord structure and are due to the right people in the right places, and it helps you figure out your strategy and who’s going to put that strategy forward, and i think we have to get over this sort of, i don’t know and it’s almost like this embarrassed like shyness about doing succession. Look, if there’s if there’s trust between the bored and the video, then i think the board chair can reassure the ceo that this is not about your departure exacts about the long term viability of the organization and a potential crisis exact a cz well, as you know, you, you might decide that you found a job that dropped in your lap, and you want to take it five years from now or ten years from now, we need to be prepared exactly it’s all those things. So hopefully there is that trust between the board and their ceo. I could have one more thing, i think that what we’re talking about, a succession planning beyond the ceo that were also thinking about succession planning as an opportunity to really invest in the staff and going back to your first point about developing the talent in the organization and just building up the bench in the organization. S o succession planning is not just about the ceo potentially leaving, but also being really smart about who you have on your staff and developing them to take on more responsibility in the case of an emergency or in the case of just more opportunity, teo, grow and and promote your staff and that feels good for the staff to they see you, they see a career path within the organization or they see that when they get to a certain level, there’s a discussion of career path within that organization. So you know that i mean that’s promotes honesty and comfort within within the organization. You working for let’s? Go to aa number six. Let’s. Go. Sharon, if we stay with you for information technology, i feel like playing this ping pong game. I don’t like it. So information technology improves efficiency and advances the mission. You got some very basic standards. I hope these are not hard to meet. Offsite, elektronik back-up surge protectors, virus scans, firewalls. Are their organizations still struggling with just the standard stuff? I think so. And i think you know melkis khun speak much better than i can t the applicants that we’ve seen with the excellence words, but i think one of the things about it is that it is hard to find funding for specifically for idea. So you may have folks who know what to do and who want to do it and are desperate to get themselves up to the standards and really want to aspire to the aspirations. But there just isn’t. Any sort of funding that is earmarked for upgrading it tea or connecting your networks, or doing any of that if you’re including this in, if you’re if you’re a grants partially grantspace porter or condition partially, of course, because you want to be very diverse and your fund-raising including that in grant application, is that realistically no, no, i think if you’re right, it is important to running your programs and someone sponsoring your someone supporting your programs. It’s a direct and sometimes indirect, but often a direct cross for your programs. And obviously each organization has to analyze what it is for them when they’re making the application on. And i also think that we should be we should be thinking there are lots of really wonderful tech organisations that work on non-profit tech and i know you’re about to talk about why i’m probably they’ll do it not now. Thank you very much. Not intend. Non-profit technology network uh and and tien and ten dot or ge, of course. Amy sample ward, the ceo is a regular contributor on this wonderful, you know, maybe sample, you know and who she’s wonderful on the show every month welchlin cubine i’m returning, it gotta get it back now. She’s back off maternity leave, but yes, and ten, of course, or amy’s on every month, i go to the int’l unconference every year, i’m just saying i captured thirty interviews in the last twenty sixteen conference. I’ll be back, i’m sure twenty, seventeen lots of and ten videos at ah, my youtube channel, real tony martignetti and also lots of n ten interviews, lots of technology interviews here on the show. Okay, just let’s. Stick with area six, the six area, just for another minute or so before i go to a break. Sharon, basically, i mean, you want to see investment in technology resource? Is that technology’s actually supporting mission? Someone’s responsible somebody’s responsible for it. And again, this is a hard position teo create as a full time employee at an organization, right? And so we don’t think that responsible employment means that you have to have an afternoon for you, you know, on on on your payroll. But we do think that you have to be working with a night provider who is reputable, who knows what they’re doing, who is responsible. And, you know, it can often create many crises in the ways that you know firewalls, air down or whatever that are in critical to the organization. So they have to be someone you can rely on is well and making sure that you’re thinking about this is an interval business structure, strategy procedure, potter, not an ad on exactly equal to your to your business to your mission. Exactly. Okay, we’re gonna go out for this break. When we come back. We’ve got two more areas communications and fund-raising stay with us. Like what you’re hearing a non-profit radio tony’s got more on youtube, you’ll find clips from stand up comedy tv spots and exclusive interviews catch guests like seth gordon. Craig newmark, the founder of craigslist marquis of eco enterprises, charles best from donors choose dot org’s aria finger do something that worked neo-sage levine from new york universities heimans center on philanthropy tony tweets to he finds the best content from the most knowledgeable, interesting people in and around non-profits to share on his stream. If you have valuable info, he wants to re tweet you during the show. You can join the conversation on twitter using hashtag non-profit radio twitter is an easy way to reach tony he’s at tony martignetti narasimhan t i g e n e t t i remember there’s a g before the end he hosts a podcast for the chronicle of philanthropy fund-raising fundamentals is a short monthly show devoted to getting over your fund-raising hartals just like non-profit radio, toni talks to leading thinkers, experts and cool people with great ideas. As one fan said, tony picks their brains and i don’t have to leave my office fund-raising fundamentals was recently dubbed the most helpful non-profit podcast you have for her. You can also join the conversation on facebook, where you can ask questions before or after the show. The guests were there, too. Get insider show alerts by email, tony tells you who’s on each week and always includes link so that you can contact guest directly. To sign up, visit the facebook page for tony martignetti dot com. Hi, this is claire meyerhoff from the plan giving agency. If you have big dreams but a small budget, you have a home at tony martignetti non-profit radio. Did you think that i had forgotten the live listener? Love perish, perish the thought live listeners, wherever you happen to be, were pre recorded it’s ah it’s the end of september, right now, september twentieth, and were pre recorded but the live lister loved it goes out the live love is out, so wherever you, whether you are domestic or foreign, here or abroad live listener love goes to you, and ah, but send this in the yeah let’s handle ah, linguistic live love konnichi wa r ni hao on your haserot come sodom, ham, nida. And if you happen to be listening in mexico, which often is the case point a start is if you’re in the czech republic. Dobre din german gooden dog us live love to you accompanying the live listener love has to be the podcast pleasantries because we have over ten thousand listeners from itunes, stitcher and then smaller platforms like player in pod bay and the one in germany couldn’t talk two to all those podcast listeners that’s, the vast majority, the audience, all the audiences i’m grateful for, but the vast majority happens to be in the podcast audience pleasantries to all. Those listeners, all of you, each of you and our am and fm affiliate affections have to go out. You’re going to do the live. Listen, loving the podcast pleasantries. You have to do your filling affections or am and fm stations throughout the country. Let your station know that you hear non-profit radio on their station on your station. They would appreciate that. Feedback. I would appreciate that. Affections to our affiliate listeners throughout un tree melkis alvarez let’s turn to you for ah, our seventh area communications. They should be strategic, effective and build brand what you want, let’s? Open it up broadly. What’s this about. So what is this about? So this is about effective communications and planning. We think that communication should be strategic and integrated again. As we’ve said before, communication should not be an ad on or something that is just done every once in a while, communication should engage thie organization in terms of programs and other key areas of operations. It should be a organization wide conversation, and we’re proud to do that at and pc. See if we can put ourselves on the back. Andrea lee, i think that one other thing to know about communications is that it’s it’s two ways, right? So it’s, not just about what the organization is putting out there, but also how are we responding to what our key stakeholders and audiences are telling us? Are we listening right? And so it sze that feedback loop the loop and being mindful of the feedback that we’re getting and being responsive to that as well annual annual report, you want to see a robust annual report, right? So that is, i think, one of a key marketing to elena and a fund-raising tool that many organizations use and it’s it’s meant to highlight thie organizations, accomplishments from the prior year and so that’s one key way that they can communicate impact of the work that they’re doing, i would say that that’s external facing for the most part, this area also considers internal communications and the power of effective communications, too inform and motivate staff on dh so just making sure that that communications doesn’t stop with social media or e blast, but really thinking about how staff are communicated with as well. Um, you’re looking for hyre understanding among lots of stakeholders that they can act as representatives, outward facing representatives of the organization and that their empowered to do that right. So boardmember is there’s a good example? Right? So how can they be strong ambassadors for the organization? Bond? We we’ve seen organizations do this successfully when they prepare they’re boardmember sze to be effective champions, making sure that they can communicate the mission and the values of the organization and to be able to really speak to the impact of the programs and the effectiveness of the work. Other volunteers to rather volunteers. You want them, you want them to be empowered? Exact. We want people talking about the organization that they love, that they’re spending time or money with or, you know, i mean, these are critical. Resource is people e-giving you want you want them in power, right? You all right? See one of these? Oh, you have a nice ah, organization has this a standard organizations confidentiality and opened this policies and procedures sabelo about the openness policies. Is that is that basically we were were talking about yes, that is that. Okay, cover that. Okay. Yeah. Okay. And then confidentiality what’s that related to well, that you have the proper safeguards in place to protect confidential information both of the staff, but also of donors. A. Cz. Well, you wanna make sure that you have the systems and policies in place to make sure that that information doesn’t go beyond the organization and that only the folks that need to know it have it. I love the one two that’s ah sites website content updated regularly. Having this static website is not going to encourage people to visit on dh, melkis says. You said the communication is to go beyond social media, and that includes your website, it’s basic. But for for guess that we’ve had on this. Well, kibby larue miller was on recently because i interviewed her as part of a panel, of course. She’s, the non-profit that marketing guide guru, guru. But give you a room, miller’s been on, and you could search a tony martignetti dot com for branding or marketing communications. We’ve had lots of other guests on talking about that. Let’s, move on. Two fund-raising general, you don’t need us for this, tony. You could do this one way. Natural not fund-raising plan e-giving fund-raising and the child administration work i do. And that’s ah, minor minor part of what you’re looking for here, that resource development is strategic donor-centric and effective, the chief executive and development staff, together with the board, set the fund-raising strategy. Why? Why is that important sharing so inclusive? I think you can. And this goes back to actually what i think melkis was just talking about in terms of of who could be your ambassador for the organisation. What you were saying about multiple people should be able to talk about the organization, and then also something you said earlier about, which is also ah focus of this area that you’re fund-raising has to be diverse in order for it to be sustainable, right? And so you can’t really rely on one type of funds and be sustainable on along over a long period of time. So hear what we’re saying is the strategy to raising money can’t just come from the development director who says, okay, that’s, why i think our options are can’t just come from the d a who says okay, this so i know or can’t just come from the board saying, like, okay, this is what we need to do, it has to be a group activity and a group strategy because everyone is going to be deployed in that strategy, and you need to be able to have people understand what it not just what the strategy is, but where they’re headed in the long term. So we think that that work has to be done holistically in the organization, ok, wait can’t spend as much time on fund-raising as we did the other areas as critical fund-raising is so what i would like to do, sharon, is where can people find these areas and all the bullet point of this, some tub sub areas and the bullet points that we’ve been talking through? Where who knows best where to find that going to be on our website? Www dot n pcc and why dot orc and you can visit our non-profit excellence awards tab all of our resource is and compilation of prior years best practices are available there, okay? And this is an incredibly valuable fourteen. Page document really, really valuable melkis we have just a little under a minute, but i want to cover the education part of this. You have a webinar for each of these a day, a key areas, right? Yes. So we have a subsequent pathways to excellence workshops where we bring back past winners to really detail they’re winning practices in each of these areas, and again, they’re meant to promote ongoing learning. But i would say that the the biggest way that organizations learned through this process is by applying and putting together their team and going through the application process and getting the tailored, comprehensive feedback from our experts selection committee. Excellent wrap up, you’re going to find that it np all of this at n pcc. And why dot org’s and i apologize that we kind of ran out of time and we didn’t cover fund-raising to the extent that it deserves that really is that’s that’s my fault? I didn’t quite manage the way i like to, so i did not meet the aspiration today for me next week. There’s no show it’s. Happy thanksgiving next week except for our am and fm affiliates, of course. I will find a very good archive show for you. If you missed any part of today’s show, find it on tony martignetti dot com, responsive by pursuing online tools for small and midsize non-profits data driven and technology enabled, and we be spelling supercool spelling bee fundraisers. We b e spelling dot com pursuant is pursuant dot com. Our creative producers, claire meyerhoff. Sam liebowitz is the line producer. Gavin dollars are am and fm outreach director shows social media is by susan chavez. This music is by scott steiner. Brooklyn. Be with me next week for non-profit radio. Big non-profit ideas for the other ninety five percent. Go out and be great. What’s not to love about non-profit radio tony gets the best guests check this out from seth godin this’s the first revolution since tv nineteen fifty and henry ford nineteen twenty it’s the revolution of our lifetime here’s a smart, simple idea from craigslist founder craig newmark yeah insights, orn presentation or anything? People don’t really need the fancy stuff they need something which is simple and fast. When’s the best time to post on facebook facebook’s andrew noise nose at traffic is at an all time hyre on nine a m or eight pm so that’s when you should be posting your most meaningful post here’s aria finger ceo of do something dot or ge young people are not going to be involved in social change if it’s boring and they don’t see the impact of what they’re doing so you got to make it fun and applicable to these young people look so otherwise a fifteen and sixteen year old they have better things to dio they have xbox, they have tv, they have their cell phones. Me dar is the founder of idealist took two or three years for foundation staff, sort of dane toe add an email address card. It was like it was phone. This email thing is right and that’s why should i give it away? Charles best founded donors choose dot or ge. Somehow they’ve gotten in touch kind of off line as it were on dno. Two exchanges of brownies and visits and physical gift. Mark echo is the founder and ceo of eco enterprises. You may be wearing his hoodies and shirts. Tony, talk to him. Yeah, you know, i just i’m a big believer that’s not what you make in life. It sze you know, tell you make people feel this is pa public radio host majora carter. Innovation is in the power of understanding that you don’t just put money on a situation expected to hell. You put money in a situation and invested and expected to grow and savvy advice for success from eric sabiston. What separates those who achieve from those who do not is in direct proportion to one’s ability to ask others for help. The smartest experts and leading thinkers air on tony martignetti non-profit radio big non-profit ideas for the other ninety five percent.

Nonprofit Radio, April 5, 2013: Talk Between The Generations

Big Nonprofit Ideas for the Other 95%

Listen live or archive:

Tony’s Guests:

Phyllis Weiss Haserot
Phyllis Weiss Haserot
Phyllis Weiss Haserot: Talk Between The Generations

Phyllis Weiss Haserot, president of Practice Development Counsel, is a consultant and coach in cross generational communications. Think 60ish boss and 25ish employee. Or 70-year-old fundraiser and 30-year-old donor. Phyllis has strategies for understanding and working across the generations.

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Durney hello and welcome to tony martignetti non-profit radio big non-profit ideas for the other ninety five percent. I’m your aptly named host. I hope you were with me last week. I would develop gastroenteritis if i heard that you had missed discover your brand. Nadia touma is a brand innovation strategist with clark vertical line mcdowell your brand goes much deeper than logo and tagline what’s the process to discover your brand strategy once you’ve found it, how do you manage it? Nadia and i discussed and content marketing scott koegler was with me he’s, our tech contributor on each month and the editor of non-profit technology news. What content should you post for consumption? And where should you put it? How do you start your content? Marketing scott and i discussed this week talk between the generations. Phyllis weiss haserot president of practice development council, is a consultant and coach in cross generational communications. Think sixty is bosh sorry, think sixty issue boss and twenty five ish employees or seventy year old fundraiser and thirty year old donor phyllis has strategies for under standing and working across the generations midway into the show at roughly thirty two minutes into it tony’s take two. The transcript for my web chat with maria sample is posted on my block. I’ll say little about that, and also reminder of how important it is for you to be registered in each state where you solicit donations. My pleasure. Now to welcome phyllis weiss haserot she’s president of practice development council she champions cross generational conversation to help non-profits and for profits, solve intergenerational challenges that can hinder productivity, employee attraction, employee retention and succession planning. Her newest project is national cross generational conversation day. Phyllis weiss haserot welcome to the studio. Oh, thank you for inviting me. Delighted to be, have you? Thanks for sharing your expertise. Is today national cross generational conversation day? No, it’s, not also. Why we why we talk of why we’re here. We should be here. We should be celebrating the day. When is the day? Well, we should celebrate every day and i booked way. We should have a cross. A cross generational conversation every day. I’m really encourage off all kinds of organizations to foster that welfare people. One’s national day. What is this project of yours? Way? Haven’t designated yet or not yet. The national day will be in twenty fourteen were expecting to do some pilots and late fall okay, so i will let you know what you mean. The date national cross generational conversation day will be in late fall of next year. No late fall of twenty thirteen, where we’re planning to do that with some pilot cites nationally, will be a year off, okay, but are you are you willing to announce the day when you two so i can mark my calendar? I don’t have the day you don’t have a day yet, okay, you’re working on it, i gotta go. I am working on it. Well, i got two people working on, okay, well, i want to mark my calendar, and i will let you know there’s, an anniversary, absolutely. Let’s just set our terms straight. So we know what that everybody is thinking about the same brackets and generations. What are the generations on? Dh? Their approximate age is okay. We have for now that are in the workplace, mostly three. But but also the traditionalists were still there and we haven’t gotten to the youngest generation yet. So starting with the oldest, we have the traditionalists. And those are people who are generally over seventy. Now. Ah, boomers are bumping up on seven seventy and to, um, late forties. And then we have the generation x which is from late forties down to about thirty four. And then from something like, you know, seventeen or eighteen to thirty three or four is what we call either generation. Why? Or millennials those of the most popular names? There are many others as well. Okay, how do we how do we choose these cut off ages? You say roughly thirty three or thirty for between gen y and gen x how did those get selected? Who to door? Who are? Well, they’re you know, they’re they’re a number of people who have just studied what’s what’s going on and there’s you know, it’s, not absolute. Ah, there are many things that will determine what generation you’re in because it’s really about what influenced you in your formative years, and i when i’m saying the formative years, i’m talking about probably high school and college ages, not not toddlers that was too inert, too young, so people have common things that they, you know, tend to be influenced by wars, economy, music, political, social, economic, cultural and influences so that there is some common things that form patterns. Do we have a name for people who are, say seventeen and under today is any kind of, ah, moniker emerging for them? They’re a couple there’s a corporate naming opportunity way we call them the goldman sachs or the facebooks or something that could be a corporate naming opportunity? Maybe, but it could they might try all right, but they’re they’re they’re a couple of things, you know, those like x and why have have said, well, the next one could be z andi have about a prime something, right? You start at the beginning, but you wouldn’t want to be just a a prime or a double primer so well, a prime would do it. It doesn’t seem like a very what else? What else is emerging on? A couple of i don’t like kensi so that’s out. I actually, like see, i have my son’s name is ain’t we like these, but i wouldn’t use it for the thing that was missing. So a couple of people are using regeneration the re the regeneration re hyphen generation. Yeah. Okay. What? What does that refer to? It refers to all the kinds of things we have to change in the world. For one thing there, you know, there were a number of things that that’s defensible released. I’m just trying to get away, you know? Yeah, i’m not sure that that that’s what i would choose, but there are some people, is that one emerging that you like or you’re you’re still open minded or what? Oh, and i think we’re we’re looking so much on the whole digital native thing, you know? And if there’s some demarcation between the general room, millennials and the and the younger ones, and i think i think we have to watch what’s happening and another thing that i that i feel strongly about accepted it complicates things is that a generation of sixteen to twenty years, it’s much too large and the older and the younger ends were halfs of the various generations are very different from each other, and so, you know, i think you have to slice and dice a lot more war more than then have these, but it just confuses people and complicates things. I certainly when i entered ah, the boomers, so i guess we’re not late forties. I didn’t feel much kinship with those who are seventy or so now, now that i’m or in the middle or a little a little closer to the middle anyway, i feel a little more kinship on both sides, but i’m at fifty one, but yeah, i i didn’t i felt that when i was like i said, when i was forty, i didn’t feel much in association with seventies, but but we were those in their seventies, but we were we were in the same group and i tried to opt out, but there’s no, nobody sent me a check off, you know? And now he was checking on my direct now response pieces there’s never a check off for opting out and, you know, opting may be for the lower the gen x, you couldn’t. You can’t do that, right. Well, i’m cross generational, and i strongly identify with boomers x and y i am actually age, wass boomer. But, yeah, i do. I really, you know, i see the world the way younger people do, and i have lots of young friends and get a lot of energy out of that lab, very allowed to socialize outside my my boomer group, right, i hope. I hope you didn’t do no, yes, of course i did, but i can think thoughts to that gen xers and generalize, think its okay, i hope you do. You can go outside, okay, very good, all right. Let’s see, so we have just, like, a minute a half or so before break. So but well, twenty time you know you’re here for the for the hour. What are what are some of the factors? Well, you mentioned economic could be wars, the digital age. Are there other things that that divide the that that are different across the groups? Um, well, i think, you know, we put those are big categories, if you say cultural, political, social, economic, but there are lots of things within each of these categories that that will divide them. And and i think also that people are so much affected by their background, where they come from and whether it’s a conservative family, a religious family or, you know, other things in the life cycle may be important factor, and that could actually could trump certainly absolutely rule what what person rocket, right and personal style, i think, personal behavioral style and some of that you’re born with and some of it is just your, um, how you respond to your environment, but very often you’ll find the people of two very different ages might get along much better than people who were peers and age, just because they have a much more similar personal behavioral stuff. We’re going to go away for a couple minutes, and when we come back, phyllis weiss haserot stays with me, and i hope that you do, too. Talking alternative radio twenty four hours a day. Are you confused about which died it’s, right for you? Are you tired of being tired? How about improving your energy strength and appearance? Hi, i’m ricky keck, holistic nutrition and wellness consultant. If you have answered yes to any of my questions, contact me now at n y integrated health dot com, or it’s, six for six to eight, five, eight five eight eight initiate change and transform your life. Are you concerned about the future of your business for career? Would you like it all to just be better? Well, the way to do that is to better communication, and the best way to do that is training from the team at improving communications. This is larry sharp, host of the ivory tower radio program and director at improving communications. Does your office need better leadership, customer service sales, or maybe better writing or speaking skills? Could they be better at dealing with confrontation conflicts, touchy subjects all are covered here at improving communications. If you’re in the new york city area, stop by one of our public classes, or get your human resource is in touch with us. The website is improving communications, dot com, that’s, improving communications, dot com, improve your professional environment, be more effective, be happier, and make more money improving communications. That’s the answer. Hey, all you crazy listeners looking to boost your business? Why not advertise on talking alternative with very reasonable rates? Interested simply email at info at talking alternative dot com welcome back to big non-profit ideas for the other ninety five percent. I’ve got lots of live listener love, olive et michigan, reston, virginia, brooklyn, new york welcome live listener love going out to all those cities and we’ve got more to come. We’ve got dublin and mullingar, ireland well, good welcome shaman china, guangzhou, china and chang ching china ni hao he’s happy to have all of you and there are many more listening. Before the show, i pulled listeners, and one of the questions i asked was do you directly supervise? Or are you directly supervised by someone who is twenty or more years from your age? So that’s roughly a generation, right twenty years is approximately b and fifty percent said yes. Fifty percent said no, so half half our listeners have to listeners who were polled our inn in a work relationship that’s at least one generation from them. And the second question i asked is if you answered yes. So now we just have half the half the group from the first question if you answered yes, do you feel communication between the two of you is often hampered by your age difference? And i said often hampered and ah, twenty five percent said yes. Fifty percent said sometimes, but not often, and the other twenty five percent said, no. So it’s, sort of a mix, right. Okay, um, we certainly wouldn’t want here. That was one hundred percent who were having trouble relating to each other often, right? It’s. Only twenty five percent. Yes, on behalf said sometimes, but not often, so maybe we can help. We can especially help those twenty five percent who are often having communication troubles. What are what are the what of the feelings that people are are experiencing when it’s ah, you know, maybe sixty year old fundraiser and a ah, a donor who’s a millennial or or gen x? What? What, what? What are the feelings across these across these people? Well, i think i think it really depends on the people and whether, you know, some of it might even be their own relationship with their own children or their parents, and if we’re looking at the boomers and generation, why, that those two generations are the closest parent child relationships that we’ve ever had in history? And so it is the debt dynamic can be very interesting about that. Ah, a lot of the younger people really have a good warm feeling for older people because they have those good relationships, but it may be and, you know, even if we’re talking about donors and fundraisers, ah lot of the younger people have different ideas about philanthropy, then then the older generations do the kind of things that they want to give to how they want to do it, wanting to be more hands on involved, not just writing checks or you know, doing it electronically, but, you know, knowing getting to know, interact in some way with the people that they are donating to, and i think that’s something that we see really growing, i’m not an expert in the philanthropy area, particularly although i have cause i, you know, so fascinated by everything generational i’ve done that, and i’ve done some speaking to corporate philanthropy people too, and do follow that you have, um, for instance, a lot of the silicon valley people who have made a lot of money now and there are are getting born in their forties, yeah, and they they’re doing their philanthropy in different ways than the generation older than you. So i guess we have to generalize to some extent we’re gonna be able to have the conversation is talking generalizations. And there a cz you identified there are factors that transcend these generalizations. Individual people, your relationships with family, you’re your own personal style. Okay, so but we have to generalize in that in that situation where it’s ah, a fundraiser who’s, you know, could be thirty years older than the then the donor is there. Is there insecurity with typically from the the fundraiser is feeling that here she is talking to somebody so much younger, and they and that younger person really has the power in this relationship. Is there the donor there? The one with the money is there in security? Feelings are, i suppose it could be, but not nearly as much as it probably is when it’s the other way around, when the younger person is asking for money from an older person or the same thing in a in a work situation, when you have a new, older boss, and i mean a younger bus and an older worker reporting to him. Okay, so let’s, look at that, then. So the older, older worker, younger boss, what the one of the feelings are, how do we work with that team to transcend those feelings? Okay. It may be that the younger boss, especially if they have no come newly to that position, maybe feeling, ah, you know, uncertain about how to how to do it and how do you manage other people and even their own age? That’s another, another issue of managing your your friends that you were, you know, just coworkers with with but with older, with other people, you know, sometimes the fear that the other person knows so much more and you knows, maybe going to be trying to take over for them and what they’re doing, like some intimidation it it could be, yeah, it could be intimidated and, you know, and it may be that that there’s absolutely no reason for that it doesn’t mean that the older person really feels that way, right? But the younger person lives might might feel based on these generalizations and stereotypes, right mean, isn’t well, not only stereotypes, but, you know, if you haven’t been doing something for a long time and somebody else has ah, may feel well, you know, they they think they know so much more so why should they listen to me? Am i going to be looked? At enough as an authority figure so that that kind of thing can happen. And i think that what we need to remember is that people have to have respect for each other and to respect experience and not think, oh, well, you’ve always done it this way, but i have a better way or i have done it, you know, and it’s been proven to work for twenty years. So why you trying to get me to do something in in a different way just to say ok? You know it’s not about you, it’s, about whether our common goals here, you know, we have some objective we’re trying to read which we’re trying to do something for a client or for the organisation or trying to serve, solve world problems and it’s not about, you know my way or your way or the highway it’s how can we best work together? How can we take what i know and do really well and what you know and you do really well and figure out what the role should be based on our skills, our knowledge, our interpersonal relationships with people, the contacts we have, whatever it is, what? We need here. And how are we going to make this work? Right? And how can we start to how can we start this conversation across these two people if there is a little tension, a little intimidation, little fear, how do you how does your work work with a team like that? Well, you know, i think facilitating dialogues within work teams, people who have to work together, um, is really something that’s so important and not being done enough, and it should be encouraged by the employers and, you know, sometimes you have to bring in coaches, and it could be i’m not just saying from somebody from the outside, but it could be somebody within the organization. I i think that sometimes with mentors and mentoring circles you can have or this employee resource groups that are that set up around some kind of affinity s o that you see a lot of those for for gender, and you see them for lbgt now you see it for racial, ethnic and, you know, that kind of thing, and we’re starting to see some of them around generational issues, too. And so if you, you know, you have these discussions, you know, whether they’re internally were, you know, coming from the outside, getting people in a non threatening way to start surfacing, how they, how they feel, what you know, what they see is their obstacles. What i’ve read about the millennials is that they like to be like to have their voices heard absolutely, i don’t know so much that they need to see that what they’re recommending, you know, he’s always carried out i mean, i don’t read that there that’s selfish, but they would liketo have input they liketo be know that they’re being heard absolutely, you know, and i think from the older and two when they’re no longer running things, they also want have have a voice, but this opportunity for everybody to have a voice is really important and for the younger ones and one of the one of my favorite names for a generation wireframe millennials, it’s generation, why? W h y for all the questions that they’re always asking and you know when when managers have come to me with, you know, what do i do about this? I mean, sometimes you know either sometimes it’s annoying, but even when it is a nice child. Five year olds kinds of why? Why is the sky blue? Why are we doing it this way? Yeah, and and we taught our kids to ask questions it’s a good thing, but sometimes it’s inconvenient, you know, you’re running off to a meeting to the bathroom, whatever, whatever it is, and there are people who actually managers sometimes feel guilty about it because they can’t on the spot. It’s fun to feel like a prop that question, i can’t answer all the questions that are being thrown at them, right? Okay, so so what one thing that i’ve suggested? Because especially the younger people like working in groups is, you know, why don’t you schedule every couple of weeks a session where anybody can come and ask their questions and get answers to them? And then people can hear what other people are asking that can learn from that they all have their opportunity for for their voice, their self expression, whatever, whatever it is, and again, they don’t expect to get everything that they’re asking for, but also they want to know what’s going on that has an impact on me and i think anybody in or place really wants to know that the more they’re more vociferous about asking exactly not keeping it inside, right? But the more transparency there is, i believe it’s so usually better for everybody. Okay, let me send some live listener love. Tio medford, new york. Middleboro, massachusetts. Bangor, maine live listener love bangor. I love bangor. Yeah. That’s. When? When? When i was an urban planner. And my first incarnation. And that was a client that remained was in urban. That was an urban durban downtown bangor. Okay, i hope it’s benefited from your work. Can you remember something? You wantto somebody’s listening from bangor? What do you what did you do? You put it. Build a park oversea a parka monument. What? What? What can you point to where we were doing? We were doing studies on downtown commercial revitalisation. And what kind of businesses should come in and and attract them? And it really was a while ago. It was like i have no idea what bangor is like. Not sure, but it was a nice being shoretz a thriving small town. Lovely. Because because of your work there, taiwan taipei tai pei has checked in ni hao. Also none. Ching china was not with us before, but none. Ching is now with us. Ni hao out to you also. We have, ah, few more way have several minutes before break, so we’re talking about openness, transparency you want these feelings to be shared in the workplace, but typically we’re not especially, i’d say boomers in traditionalists. We’re not really accustomed to sharing feelings in the workplace. So much is that is that difficult toe overcome their? They’re traditional feelings about about sharing feelings in the workplace? Yeah, i think that you probably have a better chance with the boomers and, you know, especially some of them you don’t remember when boomers came into the workplace, they were going to change the world. No, especially the older hand. I’m on the young side of rumors, so well, i was on the young side, but i’m still a little on the younger younger, so i don’t remember that so and they’re still in trouble and they were going they were going to change things. Yeah, okay, you know, and and were kissed of all kinds of things. And you know what? What are they growing? Long hair? And what is this about woodstock and and the beatles and civil rights, you know, against the vietnam war, all of those kinds of things very politically involved. Ah, so and i think that what we’re seeing also with some of them who were thinking, what am i going to do? And i either voluntarily or involuntarily leave what i’m what i’m doing now, our thinking back to the three kinds of things that they wish they had gotten an opportunity to do when they were younger, but they were encouraged by their parents who came from a much more insecure, you know, depression area, a year era. Ah, to do something that was very respectable, that they thought was a secure job, like, you know, be a doctor, a lawyer, an engineer or something like that nothing is secure anymore, and so that, you know, thinking that there’s still, you know, deep down somewhere, things that they would like to do that that would be helpful to the problems we have in the world, they could join the occupy movement on dh, some of it but but actually occupies similar really start analogous toe the the counter culture and political ah, not really revolution but turmoil and and that we saw in the sixties when the boomers were were of that a war. Of the you know, now what’s now the millennial age, so because i’m trying to compare the with the boomers were for in opposite were opposing politically and socially with what occupy that’s true accepted it and and yeah, it’s very similar, but the younger generations now have a different way of going about most of them would not be involved in protests out on the streets. Ah, they they would go about it in a different way. They tend to their political involvement tends to be different, but but they’re still very, you know, interested in doing something about cleaning up the environment. That’s a big one there, you know, some other issues just took a different form of unoccupied was more of a one of a cohesive group in a lot of different cities than than my at least my sense of what was happening in the sixties, which was much more scattered, and there wasn’t really there wasn’t really even a name to it. Now we have occupy and the and you know, you know, the tagline, the other ninety nine percent, so they even branded themselves sort of all right, we could take take another break. When we come back, tony’s take two. And then we’ll continue the conversation about cross generational conversations with phyllis weiss haserot stay with us. Co-branding think dick tooting getting ding, ding, ding ding. You’re listening to the talking alternate network duitz waiting to get in. E-giving good. Are you suffering from aches and pains? Has traditional medicine let you down? Are you tired of taking toxic medication? Then come to the double diamond wellness center and learn how our natural methods can help you to hell? Call us now at to one to seven to one eight, one eight three that’s to one to seven to one eight, one eight three or find us on the web at www dot double diamond wellness dot com. We look forward to serving you. Hi, i’m ostomel role, and i’m sloan wainwright, where the host of the new thursday morning show the music power hour. Eleven a m. We’re gonna have fun. Shine the light on all aspects of music and its limitless healing possibilities. We’re gonna invite artists to share their songs and play live will be listening and talking about great music from yesterday to today, so you’re invited to share in our musical conversation. Your ears will be delighted with the sound of music and our voices. Join austin and sloan live thursdays at eleven a. M on talking alternative dot com. You’re listening to the talking alternative network. Duitz dahna i’m leslie goldman with the us fund for unicef, and i’m casey rotter with us fun for unison. You’re listening to tony martignetti non-profit radio big non-profit ideas for the other ninety five percent. Durney what a lovely chorus that was love that time for tony’s take to roughly thirty two minutes into the hour late last month, maria simple and i hosted a live chat for the foundation center on prospect research, and that was called what’s in your donordigital see, eh? The transcript of that chat is on my block. So if you are interested in that, the block is that tony martignetti dot com and also wantto just take a moment to remind you of the importance of charity registration. It’s ah it’s, part of the practice that i do aside from the plant e-giving fund-raising consulting because not complying with the state laws in every state where you solicit donations can be a little embarrassing. I remember that chris christie was embarrassed because he created a sandy relief fund, and unfortunately, the fund was not in compliance with state laws. They’re in new jersey that sell embarrassing. Um, mary j blige was embarrassed. Sometimes i call him mary j bilge, but but i do like like most of her music, so i don’t usually call her build, but mary j blige, she has a charity and was not it was not. In compliance with st charity registration laws and that she was a little embarrassed. But lest you think that it’s only for the famous and the notable, a small connecticut police charity was embarrassed when the leader was actually find twenty two thousand dollars for failure to comply with these these laws, and it was a personal fine that was not for the charity that was for the executive director on and i’ve got a little more motivation around charity registration on my block at tony martignetti dot com. If you go there and just search the phrase charity registration, you’ll find one of the posts called charity registration matters and that one details a couple of other episodes of charity registration embarrassment that you want to avoid. And that is tony’s take two for friday, the fifth of april, the fourteenth show of this year. Let me send some more live listener love absecon, new jersey see ya, but i know everybody pronounces it abso khan, but i know that it’s absecon because i have a deep love for belmar, new jersey, which is not too far away. They’re not in the same exact vicinity, but there generally related. And, ah, i still go to belmar every summer, and i hope that bill maher and absecon have well will have recovered from the devastation of sandy. Bye bye the summertime so absecon good good wishes to you and new bern, north carolina live listener love also seoul, korea well, i love the asian thie asian listeners it just incredible. So far, it’s been taiwan, china now seoul, seoul, south korea got to send you an io haserot and we’re also thinking of you soul for some for attention very tense time we’ve seen these episodes before. I certainly don’t know anything about no very little. Well, let’s say nothing about the politics of the peninsula, but i don’t know anything more than i’m reading on our thoughts are definitely with you in in seoul and all of south korea continuing our conversation with phyllis weiss haserot she’s, the president of practice development council, which you will find at p d council dot com that’s ah, if you were going to do that fanatically, radically, that would be papa delta candy counsel. And, of course, counsel is c e o u n c l e dot com oh, and that’s where she’s the president and you can learn more about phyllis is practice there on if you want to google her her last name spelled h e a s e r o t haserot on dh thank you for pronouncing it right. You’re doesn’t just well, i suffered. What do you think i suffer with the name martignetti martin? Ellie. I find that the tease get transformed to elza latto. I get a lot of martinelli’s or martinelli martignetti martignetti they transposed the g in the end, i get o r martin getty there’s the transposition martin getti. So i have ah, have a deep and abiding respect for proper name pronunciation. Was it again? Has a rot? No, no, i know that’s not, uh, okay, so childish, so puerile, like, like i’m you know, i’m a gen y minus minus ten years. It’s terrible let’s talk about some of the some of the other advice that you might have. You know, if you’re consulting around opening up these conversations, you know, certainly talked about facilitating dialogue and having meetings where people, younger people can ask the questions what the strategies have you got for non-profits? It may be struggling. Around these issues. Well, i think that if you have, if you have something that i have met mentioned to you and we’ve talked before, who is about setting up mentoring circles, okay, i want you to describe what mentoring circles are, i think that the first phase of mentoring that we’ve seen is older people mentoring younger word that’s the typical right and done the reciprocal well, let’s say reverse mentoring on which, you know, got some attention because thie younger people tend to be better about technology than the older ones, suggesting that someone is twenty four years old has something to teach me. Is that your is that what you’re suggesting? I think less than would have been true ten years ago? I think that most of the boomers are techno tech dahna logically competent enough to do for most of the things that they need to dio, whereas, you know, you used to have people who had their secretaries assistants doing their email for them. You know which an email it’s really easy, i never understood well, why that was a difficult thing, but, buddy, i think we’re we’re coming together much more, even though you were not born with the computer and all of those things, and, you know, you can imagine a world without them. Yes, i remember, but it was yeah, i think the first thing people thought about was the tech, the gap in technology from one generation to another. And so but but there were other things as well, that the different generations could learn from each other, and the younger generations can teach older generations. I i very often ask i have ah linked in group called cross generational conversation and that’s, we want to do the things i’ve asked, and i ask when i’m doing workshops, what can you personally it’s a younger person? Ah, what do you have to offer as a mentor to an older person? And i think, you know, they need to it’s important, that they think about this for their own confidence as well, because a lot of times, people are reluctant to ask someone that they would like to mentor them because they don’t know, you know, what can they give in exchange? I want to be a taker, right? And, you know, maybe maybe that person wouldn’t particularly be interested, they’re probably pretty busy, but if they have something to gain from mentoring you, then they’re going to be much more apt to say, oh, yeah, you know, i’d love to help you. Well, let me ask you what kinds of things did you see? What kind of response did you see that young people felt they could contribute to an older mentor? You know, sometimes it could be the contacts they have, it could be the way you know, what they observe in the world. Ah, you know, even what? What’s, you know, what’s new and coming up in the market place, you know, what kind of products do you think? What kind of needs air people going tohave that that we weren’t noticing before? So they have, ah, you know, a different sense of that. They talk to different people, they might watch and and, you know, use different media, they’re getting different messages, they’re interacting with people in a different way. And so, you know, anybody who has a business or is trying to interact or rays, or whatever it might be, can get a lot of out of their perspective out of a younger person’s perspective. So you would suggest if someone seeking if someone younger is seeking a mentor, that they explain what value they could bring to the absence. So okay, let’s say, i think the first thing you want to do is whether you’re networking or you’re looking for a mentor or you’re trying to get a client. The first thing you want to do is try to offer something before you’re asking for something. You know, reciprocity is a very big thing about, you know, as as an influence principle, and if somebody gained something from you, they’re usually going toe want to as soon as they can give back, i think most people wanted yeah, i mean, we don’t want to be owing people something for one thing, and you know it and just to be nice still don’t want to do that too, but getting getting back to the mentoring. So so so? So first you have it going one way from older, younger, then you have going the opposite direction as well. Um, reciprocally, your mutually mentoring, but people are so busy now, and a lot of mentoring relationships really fail or wither away because that one person who’s supposed to be mentoring can’t find the time and has other things that might be high priority, and if you put together a circle of people of different generations, different skills experiences and all of that who can draw on each other and people can still pair off went one. But you have a whole lot of people to draw on a whole lot of people to give to, because even if you do ah, you’re lucky enough to get the time of one particular person, no one person can give all the advice that any other one person may need. I mean, everyone does not have exactly the same needs the same life that’s always been my reluctance when people ask if all mentor them. Ah it’s, i’m not sure that i can provide everything that they they’re in need of. Saand i can’t i’m certain i can so that’s always been my reluctant, so you know, sort of qualifying sale, do as much as i can for you, but with a circle you have the expertise of lots of obviously lots of people to drop and their time and so would the circle so you could set up a mentoring. Circle in a workplace you certainly can meets what? Once once a month. The way? Well, i think i went a week it’s probably more time than anyone’s going to devote to it. But if you could do it once a month that that would be very good, or even if it was every couple of months. But other people got together in the interim. A cz they needed or wanted smaller groups. Yeah. Okay. And you’ve seen these mentoring circles work? I have i think again, people have to be very committed to doing doing, you know, you have to show up. You can’t just say the first time, okay? I’m going to be there and and you don’t on a regular basis because not only what should be giving, but you won’t be getting either. Yeah. Okay. Cool mentoring circles. Um, you talked about the, uh, life cycle of ah of a person. Um, what is there? Is there? What are we have defined stages of of our lives? Is that what you meant? Um, well, yes, there are that, but a person can be ah, undergoing or experiencing the same sorts of things at a somebody very different age on the easiest example is, you know, medicamentos years, i’ll get right, okay, dumb it down. Yeah, is men can have children and a much older age than women can. So if you have, ah, father with young children in their sixties that may be experiencing and having the same concerns is somebody who’s in their thirties or twenty or twenty or twenty? If yeah, if people in their twenties air getting around to having children not as much as it used to be, but yeah, right, okay, we’re going to take another little break, and when we come back, we’ll continue. We’re going talk about veterans to you, have some special advice, can be very, very important subject, because, of course, we don’t we don’t deal with trivia here on tony martignetti non-profit rated that goes without saying, phyllis, come on, okay, and let’s, take this break in. Phyllis stays with us, and you should do. You’re listening to the talking alternative network. Schnoll are you stuck in your business or career trying to take your business to the next level, and it keeps hitting a wall? This is sam liebowitz, the conscious consultant. I will help you get to the root cause of your abundance issues and help move you forward in your life. Call me now and let’s. Create the future you dream of. Two, one, two, seven, two, one, eight, one, eight, three, that’s to one to seven to one, eight one eight three. The conscious consultant helping conscious people. Be better business people. Have you ever considered consulting a road map when you feel you need help getting to your destination when the normal path seems blocked? A little help can come in handy when choosing an alternate route. Your natal chart is a map of your potentials. It addresses relationships, finance, business, health and, above all, creativity. Current planetary cycles can either support or challenge your objectives. I’m montgomery taylor. If you would like to explore the help of a private astrological reading, please contact me at monte at monty taylor dot. Com let’s monte m o nt y at monty taylor dot com. Talking alternative radio twenty four hours a day. Durney welcome back, big non-profit ideas for the other ninety five percent, continuing with the live listener love leave massachusetts, minneapolis, minnesota and columbus, ohio. Columbus, ohio. That’s, the appreciate the capital of ohio. I think i believe that’s, capital city live with her love to all those massachusetts, minnesota and ohio. Thailand. I’ve been to thailand. I was in bangkok and i was in pata also thailand, tokyo, japan also japan, konnichi wa. And why are you? You know, we have all these asian listeners taiwan, china, japan, thailand. Now, why are you listening at att one? Almost two o’clock in the morning. It’s oh, it’s. Remarkable. I don’t know why you’re you’re night owls or but consistently, you guys are up late on. Ah, well, this is friday night. Maybe that’s. The reason, but love to have you have you? Have you all, um, veterans? Phyllis, you have some special advice around generational cross generational conversations for for vets. What the special issues first to prevent. Well, first of all, we have ah, we’ve been at war for so long. We have a whole lot of people in their twenties and thirties who are coming back and either wanting to go to school, be educated um, her to teach or to get jobs. And if you think about it, the experience of somebody in their twenties who has been in iraq or afghanistan, or something like that has to be very, very different from the people that you see on the college campuses or, you know, at at at work, if they might have been on the thirty eighth parallel in the korean peninsula, they could have twenty eight, thirty, thirty thousand troops there, right? Right? Well, many, many places, but especially when you, you know, in danger of being fired out every day and their training is they s so much more leadership training, then younger people get now and that thie stress the and, you know, and i’m talking about now, even for people who don’t have post traumatic stress and all of those kinds of things, but that that they’re they’re pretty healthy physically and mentally, even so that you know, that that would put other layers i know on all of this, but they they’re also used to so much more structure if you think about it now, young people tend to and especially you. Know if you’re in school, you go to class when you want you dress the way you want, you don’t have very strict ways of behaving and those expectations, and so i think that the veterans arm or, you know, really more like the older generations because they’ve come, they have more structured workplaces and have been, you know, enough experience, so the lot of them have been leaders and think in that way, whereas the, you know, generalized seems to need a lot of guidance and wants to know what air their expectations, where have you been, the military there very quickly, there’s the court clear, very clear? So is so they’re really not like piers in in many ways. And so is there a problem of perception that people who are older tendo lump them as being the same as people that are in their same age group? And so that those of us who are older or not fully appreciating the differences that that air across vets and non vets, i think that’s very possible, i think that’s very possible on dh way just, you know, these people have been serving our country we need to get some jobs we have dealt with, um, you know, get educated, and so often they will look to people who have had similar experiences. So if there are older veterans in your in your work place, they can be good mentors or help them get up to see speed to how things are ah, loosen up. I mean, because if you’re used to a very rigid structure and suddenly you’re in a different environment, you have to loosen up more, uh, forming these affinity groups so that they are, you know, the veterans feel like they’re not, you know, standing out on different from everybody else around them who is their age can be very helpful. They just really have to think through what it is they’re looking for, what, what their needs are. A lot of them have families more than some of the younger people, particularly in school, and so they may have totally different needs. I want i want to close with what it is that you love about the work that you’re doing. Why do you love this? What moves you about this? I i just find differences fascinating. For one thing, i get a lot. Of energy from the younger people as well as people who are older as well. I saw something just yeah, totally, totally, i mean, i think that’s, why it’s hard to you know, we’re thinking about whether the boomer is going to do they’re not going to retire for most of them and, you know, not thinking even if money was not an issue of, you know, spending their days playing golf and lying on the beach and doing the traditional things that people thought about wanting to dio so what can i do next? I i appreciate the differences, and the other thing is that i just think that it is so important that we get all the generations talking together, working together for what they do in the workplace and solving the world’s problems that we have instead of pointing fingers at each other and say, we look at the world that you’re, you know, leaving to us. Duitz phyllis weiss haserot is president of practice development council at p d council dot com. Phyllis, thanks so much for sharing your wisdom around my absolute pleasure. I’ve had a lot of fun. I’m glad most guests do some are tortured, but not not many, and i’m glad that you’re not among the tortured, and there was no jargon jail there was all such a simple conversation, no jargon, jail love that absolutely, i don’t jarden next week followship not fellowship follow-up ship alison fine is co author with beth cantor of the networked non-profit and alison has been thinking lately about opening organizational culture to allow non-profits to be more reactive to the interests and motivations of their followers while still keeping goals in sight, and alison is going to share her thoughts next week. Also, jean takagi are regular legal contributor returns. We’re all over the web. You can’t make a click without dahna testes piela still trying to say, smacking your head hard into tony martignetti non-profit radio. What i what i actually need to learn is how to say put me on your do not call list in spanish. I’ve been getting telemarketing calls in spanish and i say, put me on your do not call list and they say, no, no, no, auntie ende they don’t understand, so they’re doing an end run around the federal do not call list, so if someone could explain to me how to say put me on your do not call list in spanish. I would be grateful. Any case we’re all over social media and youtube is but one example. My channel, their israel tony martignetti is over ninety videos i’ve got craig newmark, the found of craigslist is on there with me. Seth godin is there. Rachel sklar are from huffington post is there charles rich, the founder of donors, choose dot org’s where teachers post there, their needs and donors give to those needs he’s i’ve interviewed him so that all those people and lots of other videos at riel tony martignetti dot com also some stand up comedy is there. Our creative producer is claire meyerhoff. Sam liebowitz was not our line producer today. Janice taylor was the line producer today. 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This is tony martignetti aptly named host of tony martignetti non-profit radio big non-profit ideas for the other ninety five percent technology fund-raising compliance, social media, small and medium non-profits have needs in all these areas. My guests are expert in all these areas and mohr tony martignetti non-profit radio friday’s one to two eastern on talking alternative broadcast are you fed up with talking points, rhetoric everywhere you turn left or right? Spin ideology no reality, in fact, its ideology over intellect, no more it’s time. Join me, larry shop a neo-sage tuesday nights nine to eleven easter for the ivory tower radio in the ivory tower will discuss what’s important to you society, politics, business and family. It’s provocative talk for the realist and the skeptic who want to know what’s. Really going on? What does it mean? What can be done about it? So gain special access to the ivory tower. Listen to me. Very sharp. 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