Tag Archives: cloud computing

Nonprofit Radio for July 31, 2015: People Far Away & Files Far Away

Big Nonprofit Ideas for the Other 95%

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My Guests:

Lisa Jervis & Jeanine ShimatsuPeople Far Away

(l-r) Lisa Jervis & Jeanine Shimatsu at NTC 2015
(l-r) Lisa Jervis & Jeanine Shimatsu at NTC 2015

Distance collaboration—whether a single co-worker telecommutes two days a week or you’ve got offices across multiple time zones—isn’t as easy as vendors would have you think. Let’s talk tools, work habits and organizational practices. Lisa Jervis is principal consultant at Information Ecology and Jeanine Shimatsu is IT specialist for Forward Together. We talked at NTC, the Nonprofit Technology Conference, hosted by Nonprofit Technology Network (NTEN).

 

Tom Moberg: Files Far Away

With Tom Moberg at NTC 2015
With Tom Moberg at NTC 2015

Moving your files to the cloud presents options, obstacles and obligations (don’t make your staff cry!). Tom Moberg, independent strategic technology consultant, talks us through. This is also from NTC.

 

 

 


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Hello and welcome to tony martignetti non-profit radio big non-profit ideas for the other ninety five percent i’m your aptly named host. Oh my goodness! What a terrific fun show last week! I hope you’ve heard it by now. If you weren’t with me live, i hope you were there. It was great fun loved it two hundred fiftieth last week and i’m glad you’re with me this week, i’d be stricken with familial advomatic polly pope says if i had to digest the fact that you missed today’s, show people far away distance collaboration, whether a single coworker telecommutes two days a week or you’ve got offices across multiple time zones, this isn’t as easy as vendors would have you think let’s talk tools, work habits and organizational practices. Lisa jervis is principal consultant at information ecology and janine shimatsu is it specialist for forward? Together, we talked at ntcdinosaur non-profit technology conference, hosted by non-profit technology network and ten and files far away. Moving your files to the cloud presents options, obstacles and obligations like don’t make your staff cry. Tom oberg is independent strategic technology consultant, and he talks us through files far away. This is also from auntie si on tony’s take to charity registration, responsive by pursuant full service fund-raising you need more prospects there, smart technology will find them pursuant. Dot com here are lisa jervis and janine shimatsu from ntcdinosaur welcome to tony martignetti non-profit radio coverage of non-profit technology conference twenty fifteen we’re at the austin, texas, convention center my guests are lisa jervis and janine shimatsu their workshop topic is effective distance collaboration hint it’s more complicated than vendors like to admit. Lisa jervis sitting closest to me is principal consultant for information ecology and janine shimatsu is specialist at forward together. Ladies welcome. Thank you. Thanks for having us should have you both. Thank you, lisa, why don’t you get us started? What? What? What are non-profits not really thinking strategically about when they need to collaborate in a virtual office? Sure. Well, let me tell you a little story that i think is representative of a lot of people’s experience. Love story. I got interested in distance collaboration back in two thousand nine, i was working as the operations director for an organisation in oakland, california called the center for media justice. We had seven staff and one location. We just all worked in our office, and that was that. And then we hired someone who lived in chicago, and my edie said to me, so next week amalia needs to be on staff meeting, so figure out how to make that happen. And i was like, oh, oh, i have to think about how to make this happen. We now have this whole employee who lives elsewhere and, you know, so i was like, well, this is easy. We’ll just have her call in to the conference phone. And so every week we start having these staff meetings where the seven of us would sit around the table and look at the conference bone call amalia, talk to us and we, you know, and we kind of stopped talking to each other and started all talking to the phone. And, you know, i just i started noticing all of these ways in which our work was going to have to change in order to accommodate this one new staff person we kept growing. We eventually grew to two offices and ten staff, and that staff included two people who work remotely in neither of the offices so way. Started to want to see each other in our staff meetings. We had people who could not get files because the vpn wasn’t very effective and they couldn’t access the file server. You know, there was just this full constellation of needs that duitz we ii as the operations person had not had an opportunity to philly. Think through because, you know, the was like we heard this person let’s just, you know, go and include her in things now and was like, oh, well, there’s a whole set of issues to think about janine, why don’t you help us out? What are what are some of the things we should be thinking about? Oh, and we have plenty of time together, so we’ll be able to talk about them. But just as an overview. What? Where where should we be thinking? In terms of in general. Yeah, well, there are a lot of components of effective distance collaboration. There is not only the conference in peace that we started talking about. There’s also file sharing. There is also chadband calendars. How we manage email. There are a whole there’s a whole gambit of stuff where things can go right. But also where they could go wrong and it’s really, really important for organisations to know what their needs are and to be able to meet those needs. Ok? And i’m it sounds like the organization should be thinking more than a week in advance uh, from lisa’s story well, at least to talk about her stories, but but more than a week is probably a good idea. It is a good idea, although that’s not always the way it happens, because as lisa was sharing that story, i was just laughing because very recently, i just found out that one of our staff, people who work from home just moved and i didn’t find out until after they moved that they’re no longer located in new york, they’re located in los angeles, and that has a whole other has a lot of implications, such as internet connection and all this i don’t know if they’re living with you, alan, if they are renting or what’s, the situation with their landler is, like or any of these things that would really affect how they’re going to be working with the rest of staff. How it’s going toe play into the system that we already have developed on dso yeah, more than a week or a day would be great. Okay. Okay. Lisa let’s, come back. What? Where? How do we break this down? What should we be thinking about? Sure. We’re planning either bring someone in or yeah, i mean, o r we’re a virtual organization now, and we don’t feel like we’re doing it very smartly. Sure. Well, there’s one main overarching consideration that i think that people often don’t realize. And it has to do with the way that the business press and a lot of collaboration tool vendors talk about remote work there, like, just get a good internet connection and our software, and nothing will change and you’ll be able to do everything. And, you know, the reality is that things will have to change and things there’s overhead involved in remote work. And if you don’t plan for it in your organizational plans in your meaning agendas and in your individual work plans, then you won’t actually have enough time to accomplish the work that you had planned to dio. And so i think the most important thing is just to remember to build in that overhead into all of your plans as faras specific areas of work, there’s, kind of three main aspects, there’s meetings, then there’s file sharing. And then they’re well, yeah, i mean, janine took a whole bunch of stuff. Calendar, chat, email, file sharing conferencing, yeah, yeah, and then there’s, the process of kind of and a separate piece ofwork. Just choosing your tools and making agreements together as an organization about how they’re going to be used. Okay, now, jean let’s, go back to your i thought email was an interesting one. Why, i mean, email. Seems to me to be a fine distance tool without needing any planning. What am i missing? Well, the email is a great tool, and it doesn’t always work the same in all organizations. And i think, culturally are. My organization in particular, uses e mail a lot, especially because we do have a lot of people who don’t work in the same office. You can’t do the same. Drop by, and you can respond whenever you want and that’s. Great. Um, email. I think protocols need to be set for email in terms of setting expectations with other people internally with what is appropriate and how your staff is going to work best, just as with any other form of communication. What are some ideas you have around what these protocols should be? Um well. That’s great. I’m gonna think about that. Okay, back, teo. I mean, i have i have an answer a little bit. I mean, it does depend on the organization. It really is just about making agreements about what’s reasonable and what works for for the staff. I mean, in one organization that i worked in, we had a twenty four hour turnaround time agreement for internal emails. But if you needed something faster than that, you had to use another method. It was an agreement that we made as a staff that for emergencies, you will text or chat or call, you know, because those air, more immediate things, like people were not expected to be on their email, you know, within five minutes. And so you just couldn’t email about goings, and then i’m thinking, two security is that that’s an issue for people who are remote email preservation? I mean, these things well, it’s, just as we thought about security, yes, i mean, absolute security is an issue, whether your remote or not, but it certainly plays into very much what tools you select, who you’re willing tohave host your files. How you’re going to protect those files. What kind of configuration tresses you need, and so in-kind of determining what i like to call on organizations, collaboration, profile. Um, security security needs a really important part of that. Okay, you’re tuned to non-profit radio. Tony martignetti also hosts a podcast for the chronicle of philanthropy. Fund-raising fundamentals is a quick ten minute burst of fund-raising insights, published once a month. Tony’s guests are expert in crowdfunding, mobile giving event fund-raising direct mail and donor cultivation. Really, all the fund-raising issues that make you wonder, am i doing this right? Is there a better way there is? Find the fund-raising fundamentals archive it. Tony martignetti dot com that’s marketmesuite n e t t i remember there’s, a g before the end, thousands of listeners have subscribed on itunes. You can also learn maura, the chronicle website, philanthropy dot com fund-raising fundamentals the better way. Dahna what’s this collaboration profile. What is that? Well, basically involves assessing your organization to help you choose and configure your tools and make these kinds of communication agreements. And so, you know, because not every organization is going to have the same needs and so questions to consider our you know, how many staff do you have? How many time zones are you working across? How many different roles are functions? Are people fulfilling? Is it just staff that your systems are going to be set up for? Or is it do you also need to include program participants are volunteers in your information systems, you know? And then there are some organizational culture. Things like janine was getting at about, you know, is email going to be the best way i would like to be on the phone or, you know, those kinds of work style questions. And then, as you noted, their security security questions, like, what kinds of information are we storing in transferring? Does it contain any personally identifiable information that may need to be protected and, you know, subject to regulate regulations like hippa or others, you know, is your organization or are your partners? And participants potentially targets of information breach attempts by political enemies. I mean, it sounds a little weird, and i don’t think that but it’s really, depending on the kind of work you’re doing exactly very real. Exactly. So that’s all all of those factors go into choosing. What are the most appropriate tools? Okay. Your communications protocol? Yes. Okay, janine, you want to take us to one of the other one of the topics you mentioned, like conferencing or file sharing or calendars? Uh, let’s talk about calendar going ok, please do i love calendars? My organization works in three different time zones right now, and, uh, we are currently using google calendars, and but i think the same principles that i’m about to talk about what applied teo, if you’re using outlook or many of the other calendar ring systems that are available. But i really can’t imagine being ableto work with other people, especially across geography, without being able tio very quickly and very effectively see when people are available and, you know, not have to like talk about negotiate meeting time. And you can also get us not only when people are available, but you can. Also, get a glance of what people are doing, and you get so much information from being able to view someone’s calendar um, sametz it’s okay, anything you want to add on a calendar, i mean, just that it’s sometimes it can be a struggle to actually get people to use an electoral elektronik counter that’s, not your organization or culture. And so that’s one of the changes that you’re really gonna have too many murders, there was a heavy side were story around that are well, yeah, i do have a story around that, actually, because when we moved over to using teo for when we moved over to having our entire organization using the calendar, it was a bit of ah, push because people are really attached to their paper calendars. There’s something about having the tactile feel, a planner that people really didn’t want to let go of and even still, you know, r executive director, she doesn’t manage her own calendar and that’s, this is kind of a system where everyone has to participate. Otherwise it doesn’t work, and we only have one exception and it’s because that staff person has an entirely other staff person. To manage a calendar for her s o it really does. That is this is somewhere it’s great. And also you need everyone’s cooperation with it for it to work. Okay, let’s, look at, uh, what about file sharing? That sounds like a pretty big, pretty big topic. I want to start off. File sharing doesn’t matter. I mean, you’ve just gone through this big file sharing change, okay, so my organization was using an internally managed file server and we’ve grown a lot over the past few years. So before really similar to what lisa had described earlier, we were one location with one person working out of their home office, and they would connect into the server via a vpn and it was okay. But as we’ve grown over the past few years, we’ve expanded into a satellite office, three different time zones, and now a third of our staff are working outside of that main office and the connection people were just not able to access their files, and it was just really, really awful sze really difficult for people. And so we we made the decision to move teo cloud file sharing it’s been a really good decision for us, especially because hyre, you know, it’s, our remote staffer, just so thrilled. It is a transition that required a lot of communication with staff and training and ongoing support. So even though our migration is done, the work is certainly not over with it. And it’s definitely that situation where it was not as easy as the vendor head or originally express there’s a lot more that went into it way have to think a lot about the learning curve. Yes, on dh training time, etcetera. Good. Well, that these the learning curve in the training are very important, but it’s also really changing people’s habits about where they keep their files. I mean, if you have a situation like that janine’s organization where you can’t access the vpn reliably so you just start storing all of your working documents on your hard drive. Then when you fixed the situation and get a centralized file repository that works, people are still in the habit of keeping things locally and getting them to remember to file documents centrally when they’re finished getting them, too. Be familiar with e centralized file structure so they can find the things they need, getting them out of the habit. I mean, i don’t know if this was happening to eugene, but when i was the operations director in this kind of situation i would get requests for from people for me to go on the server and email them. A file if they were outside the office and as you can imagine, that’s a it’s, a it’s challenging from a time management perspective for everyone to have to do that. But once people are in the habit of it, it could be hard to get them to stop. Okay. That’s. Excellent. That’s encouraging. How do we how do we get the the universal buy-in that we need? Janine? You mentioned it for the calendar ring. Essential, but obviously essential for file sharing, too. I’m thinking mostly of the structure. Like somebody some. Maybe you do this collaboratively. You come up with the literal file structure or does one person impose it and say this way? Believe this. I believe this makes the most sense. And so please comply. Oh, man. I mean that’s a really hard one. What did your tio thoughts? Well, when i initially started this conversation with people on the organization, i asked them what, in an ideal situation, what would they get out? What would they be able to do? What would be a great situation for them? And i think by starting the conversation that way, people felt like they had some say and then whatever the new solution, wass and not only that it really helped that i had buy-in fromthe leadership at my organization, there was a very clear signal to staff that this is the direction that we were going in, and people have to get on the bus, so yeah, okay, so some collaboration and some some input gathering, but in the end, somebody’s gotta decide and everybody’s gotta gotta agree pretty much. I mean, participate, even if you don’t agree. Yeah, yeah, disagree and commit is okay, but i think that i mean, what i have, what i often recommend two clients is that one person, the kind of the point person on the file migration project, whoever that is, should be someone who is really familiar with all of the organizational files, and they kind of come up with the top level structure that makes sense and is aligned with the way the organization works. But then, as you drill down deeper, you know, everyone people have tohave dominion and control over their most direct area of work files, because if you try to impose a taxonomy on people and it doesn’t work for them, it’s chaos and they will rebel, so autonomy is important, okay, at least at the the more granular level. Yes, ok, yeah, i mean, the important thing is really that there are some principles that are clear and communicate a ble to everyone. You’re never everywhere. Clients always come to me and say, we want an intuitive file directory and it’s like, well, you can’t have that, because what’s intuitive for one person is not into it for somebody else to, as long as you’re working off some clear principles that everyone can agree on. That’s what you want, four. Okay, gene, anything you want to add to the file sharing conversation. All right, now think. Well, we have child jack, one of the issues around chatting some people don’t like to log in to chat, you know? And i think that for me and the organizations that i’ve worked in the most effective uses of chat or when people are just in the habit of logging in in the morning so they have theirs, the presence, visibility indicator, you know, i’m here, i’m not here yet, i’m in a meeting, you know, and that is a really, really easy way to communicate your co workers where you are and if you’re available. But again, it’s a big habit shift for some people. I mean, i was doing in-kind part time gig at a very, very large organization with two offices and like, i mean, twenty thousand people in the whole organization and a hundred people in my kind of immediate department, and there were a few people who just never logged and it’s, like i saw this person i know she’s here, but her chad says that she is, you know, presence unknown, and so, you know, you can’t make people, unfortunately, what do you end up doing? And this could have lied beyond chat. Any of the any of the areas. We’re talking about. What you do with the people who are recalcitrant. Anybody who has a suggestion, what do you do? I mean, there’s a whole methodology of change management. I mean, it’s a whole field of study. And so i think that, like, any technology project, but particularly justin collaboration, really delving into change management and having a plan for it, which involves communication training, reinforcement oppcoll, you know, it’s it’s complicated. Okay, well, that’s, that’s an important thing to know anything more gin, anyone i’ll just echo that nothing people to change their habits is really it can be really difficult. Or, you know, a lot of times people at my organisation will log in, but they won’t update statuses, so oh, i’ll just wonder, wow, is that person unavailable all day? All day there and available? I’m not going to be interrupting them and something really important if i i am not, um but it’s, i think i will say that for the people that use it, it is great. Okay, so ah, good outcome is definitely achievable again. Yeah. I mean, i have one. I think my kind of most successful change management story is very, very small. But at an old employer, one of the things that i had to do was get people to fill. Out their online time sheets and no one wanted to do it because that’s a slog and it is, you know, they perceive it as a waste of time, and it kind of is except that i was in charge of the bookkeeping and i couldn’t allocate our totals for the month properly and closed the books until everyone in the organization and filled out their time sheets. And so reminders didn’t work. Nothing worked until, you know, and this i think this’s particular indicative of small organizations where people really have each other’s backs is i just such everyone i was like, look, you guys, you’re making my life a lot harder, there’s this crucial task that i can’t do and prevents us from getting accurate financial reports, and you’re making my life frustrating because you’re not doing this, and that was the thing that got people to do it all right, some guilt. I like to think of it more as a personal connection way a accountability to your co workers, and he was getting them to really understand why they had to do this piece of bureaucratic work that it actually had meaning in the organization it wasn’t just a piece of bureaucratic work. All right, we’re gonna leave it there. Thank you very much, ladies. Thank you. Thank you. My guests have been lisa jervis, principal consultant for information ecology and janine shimatsu specialist at forward together. Non-profit radio coverage of and tc non-profit technology conference twenty fifteen. Thanks so much for being with us attorney. State to and files faraway coming up. Sorry, i can’t do live listener love were pre recorded this week, but of course the love goes out. I just can’t identify exactly where it’s headed to by city and state or country. But the live listen i love, of course, does go out. Podcast pleasantries are over ten thousand wherever you are, whatever device. Thank you so much for being with us in the time shift and affiliate affections. Always sending affiliate affections to our stations and listeners on affiliate stations throughout the country. Very glad you’re with us little about pursuant, you know they do full service fund-raising from web only for small and very small and midsize shops up to on site campaign counsel for those other five percent who might need that fund-raising obviously constant challenge essential to you to get your work done. I routinely here on get questions about how can we bring our fundraising for the next level? 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Jo garics, the fund-raising authority that’s the name of his podcast that these are the requirements that you be registered in each state where you solicit donations. So if there’s a florida charity and they are sending email to georgia and maybe hosting events in south carolina, then that florida charity needs to be registered not only in florida but also in georgia on dh south carolina and this is different than incorporating enjoy in florida, where you you know, if this is again a florida based charity there incorporated in florida, this is very different in that it’s sort of parallel because it involves charities but it’s not incorporating your non-profit this is registering with state authorities to solicit donations in florida and also georgia, south carolina and wherever else you might be so sitting donations it’s a real morass because each state has its own forms and timetables and fees and definitions of what is a solicitation? That’s, that’s really? Where you start? What is a solicitation? The examples i gave, like email and u s mail those air solicitations in just about everywhere u s mail is a solicitation guaranteed every state. Ah, no state is goingto make exception for u s mail. Email is so ubiquitous and it’s ah, solicitation in so many states that you might as well just consider email a solicitation everywhere there are some states that haven’t caught up with technology, not like email is anything i can’t even i was anything new, but there are states that who’s legislatures, you know, haven’t codified whether email is a solicitation, but it isn’t so many states. I think you should just consider it also, if you’re hosting events in different states, if you are buying ad space in publications, in other states, these air, all solicitations and you need to be registered with the state authorities everywhere is that you are soliciting. Um sometimes i’m asked why this is important and you know why i bother? It is true that there aren’t that many enforcement actions enforcement is rare, but your irs form nine ninety hopefully you’re filing that each year that is signed under penalty of perjury by an officer, and it enquires about your compliance with thes state laws. So that’s, the irs enquiring about state law compliance on also your board is potentially liable. Jean takagi and i have talked about this. They are fiduciaries to your organization and if you’re not in compliance with laws, your board could board members individually could potentially be liable. So please pay attention to charity registration. It’s on my web site, you go to tony martignetti dot com. You see a tad for charity registration cause i do this work. You could do it on your own too. I have a book about it. You could check it out at tony martignetti dot com. And that is tony. Take to tony’s. Take two it’s it’s ah it’s a it’s. A possessive latto plural. But it’s not tony. Take two that’s tony’s. Take two for friday thirty first of july thirtieth. Show of twenty fifteen here’s tom oberg recorded at ntcdinosaur moving into the cloud. Welcome to tony martignetti non-profit radio coverage of the non-profit technology conference twenty fifteen it’s hosted by and ten the non-profit technology network. We’re in austin, texas, at the convention center. My guest is tom wolber he’s, an independent strategic technology consultant. And his workshop topic is moving your files to the cloud. Options. Obstacles and obligations. Sounds a la menace on the obligation side. Tom oberg. Welcome. Thank you. We’ll get to talk about all three. We got plenty of time together, so maybe it’s. Not so ominous, but there’s, obviously, things that you thinking about. Lots of things are in the clouds. Why might files make sense for a non-profit, you know, for a while emails sort of in the big thing to move the cloud and that’s dahna that there’s been a lot of good options for doing that? And as people have been more comfortable with moving to the cloud and using tools that both from in their personal lives and in their work lives, um, it’s it’s started to make sense to have their files available, maur remotely in various places and to be able to get access to things beyond the walls of their their office and the tools available do that have been involving and getting better as well. So the other piece that’s made this start to happen is it for a lot of smaller organizations who may have had big file servers, those take a lot of effort to keep moving, and as your file server needs to be upgraded, our updated one option is to say, you know, we’re just not going to do that anymore and pay those costs. We’re going to move our files to the cloud and be able to access things i’m a little bit a little bit easier could also be a distributed environment. You might be have employees who are off site virtual organization and that made that maybe a stimulus. Also, it isthe yeah, in our session this morning, we had a lot of that was one of the things we talked about, why why do this? Why are people doing it? And it ran, you know, there are a lot of different reasons, but, you know, some people said, well, we have sixty locations where we’re trying to have people work and tryingto have sixty servers or one server that everybody tries to get into remotely it’s just it’s very hard. So if they khun you something like office three, sixty five or google drive or drop box or box, that could be really good option. Okay? And when we talk about some of the tools you later on, ok? Yeah, all right, because i don’t want to ask you anything that you didn’t prepare for your your workshop, but if we could talk about some of tools that will be helpful. Yeah, how do we start to make this plan? Well, is there anything more you can say? About how we shouldn’t what we should be thinking about to decide whether this makes sense for us as an organization. Yeah, we’re questions we should be asking, yeah, maybe yeah, there’s, there’s lots of questions on dh lots of that was sort of in my presentation, the whole obligations, things like how do you how do you not make your staff cry? That was that was what we were talking about because you don’t want to make him cry. That’s, that’s sort of a rule at number it’s and and doing this kind of project moving files from where people are used to getting them to someplace else can freak people out a little bit. Eso, you know, how do you do that in a good way? And so the organization first, like you’re saying, needs to figure out why why do we want to do this? What? Why does this make? Is this a good idea for our organization? And again, it could be a lot of different things, but but often it’s about doing it in a way where we can get access to the things we need to be able to do our work and meet. Our mission do it in a way where people can get at things from wherever they are and that they can have some assurance that the files they’re working with are the ones they should be working that it’s not, you know, there’s one on my my documents folder and there’s. Another one heard another one there. So what’s ah what’s our next step we are we ready to think about what tools they are be appropriate to do this after we’ve made. We’ve now made our decision that we’re it’s going to be beneficial to us. Yeah, yeah, i think if you know if the organization said okay, this is this the direction we’re going to go part of what i was talking about was, you know, it’s it’s more than just a thing to do, it’s a project and so having a plan a project plan is is is really important, and part of that is the is the tool selection, and we can we can talk about that. Some of the other things that that really need to be thought through are things like what’s, the timeline that that you’re going to use to do this kind of project. Who are the people who are going to be involved in it? Are we going to try and do it in house? Are we goingto use consultants to help out? And we’re going to have, you know, certain teams that are going to be kind of internal champions. They’re going to help help do this, which is something i recommend people doing. So you get some early buy-in from some key people and maybe keep teams or something, if, you know, if the accounting department has an accountant who thinks this is a good idea, it’s going to go a whole lot smoother than if you don’t have somebody there doing okay, so yeah. So some key key allies? Yes, indeed, indeed. Makes this kind of thing much, much easier. Okay, yeah, go ahead. So, yeah. So then we can talk about tools if you want to move to that. Some of the options. Yeah, go ahead. Let zoho you mentioned office three sixty five. Google docks. Obviously. Dr google drive drop box box box is his box of variation of drop box. It’s not. And we have to be a little careful because we’re here in austin. And what i didn’t know before i came here is that this is the home of box. So box is is a company that that has a tool that is sort of like dropbox, the differentiation i’ve heard before is that drop box kind of started as a consumer tool and box started as more of a corporate organisational in-kind of tulle and they’ve they’ve kind of met in the middle a little bit. The box offers more consumer stuff drop box now has drop box for business, but bso boxes here, there now is box one x or two or three they’re not triple x are they are not as far as i know, just one ex, okay? Just once we’re in the booth next to flux and their two exes. Well, but boxes only one act, but box is only one issue so people can find it. And yet and they’re here at the conference. And yeah, and so their their tool is something that you can you can download ah, little application that could be on your on your desk top so you can synchronise things to your desktop. But they’re also is the web interface for it. That’s very, very useful. You, khun, look at the files that air there. You, khun have some viewers where you khun view some files online and you can even beyond the web durney a portion of it. And if you have the correct application on your desk top, it’ll open up the file from the web in your desktop. And then when you do a save, it saves. It back-up down into the web. Big differences you see between dropbox and box, aside from their their culture, where they where they began and how they migrated to the center. Yeah. I think that’s one of the biggest things, one of the things i’ve seen, and we saw this in the in the session this morning is that because non-profits are who they are drop box has been free, just the plane drop box has been free and so people have gotten comfortable using it and, um, use it in organisations, whether the organization knows about it or not. And so what do you mean, how could you be using it if if you don’t know about it? Well, what i mean is that you as an individual employees may have found something like dropbox useful in getting your work done, but the the i t department, if you have one, may not know that you have it on one of the quotes that i put into the session today was that what i’ve found is that people will get their work done one way or another, and that means whether they use the tools you give them with you, with you or against you with you or against you or without you or whatever happens. And so the you know, some problems that non-profits ran into using dropbox is that it’s a personal kind of thing and staff can leave or maybe it’s a volunteer, and then maybe those files disappeared too. And so drop box now has drop box for business, where the organization can have some control. People can still use both their personal drop box and the the business files that are being shared with them. But if they leave the organization, the organization can stop access to those files, so they have some control and box has a similar thing. They just no it’s it’s been a pay service, and so i think fewer non-profits have used it in in the past, but many of them are learning they need some of this control, and that makes both of those both those products useful, and they both have non-profit discounts to i should mention that let’s move to office. Three sixty five yeah, it’s a big one and and partly it’s really big for non-profits right now because it used to be if you’re non-profit you want to kind of move to the cloud, especially with female, the player was google because that was free. You could get google apse for non-profits for free, but last year, microsoft made a version of office three sixty five free for non-profits as well, and so especially for non-profits that are using our windows based oppcoll it isn’t very attractive, offering and it’s basically a big server in the sky that you can interact with so there’s the email piece outlook works very well with it. And then there kind of two parts of the file storage piece. One is called one dr up and one drive for business, and then there’s sharepoint are sharepoint online. It’s the piece that’s, that’s, part of office three sixty five so if you have office three sixty five, you can use both of those tools, at least at this point. What microsoft says is that one drive, which has pretty much unlimited storage, is it’s kind of your new my documents area it’s for you to have your own personal files, and if you want to share them out with someone, you can do that, but by the individual file and then share point is mohr for creating an organizational structure for your documents. So you have document libraries within a sharepoint site and you, khun, you can upload files and have them available to people. In both cases. You, khun synchronize back to your desktop. Also sharepoint been around forever as a server based tool. And in the sharepoint online is the cloud version of it. And it it’s, very powerful. It can take a little bit more set up bonem to be able tio structure everything the way you want it. Do you need to be expert user too? Just to set up a share point? Um, i think office three sixty five in general has fairly easy administrative controls. But the mohr knowledge, you have the mohr functional, you can make it. So having some kind of it t advising on it, i think is good. Whether it’s, an internal person where you’ve maybe sent them to get some training, an external person, whatever, whatever it is it’s, it’s. Pretty straightforward. But there they are things here and there. And with this file piece, we talked about this a lot, and we had a lot of stories come up this morning in the session. There are some limitations of how you need to get your file. If you’re gonna move files into sharepoint, especially there’s. Some limitations you have. To watch for the migration that the whole migration piece there’s. How long are the file names and the directory structures? What kind of files? Khun move? How many can be synchronized back to your desktop? There’s someone, some, some limitations in there that you need to be aware of. Or else you can have some surprises as you move into the process. Like what you’re hearing a non-profit radio tony’s got more on youtube, you’ll find clips from stand up comedy tv spots and exclusive interviews catch guests like seth gordon. Craig newmark, the founder of craigslist marquis of eco enterprises, charles best from donors choose dot org’s aria finger do something that worked. And levine from new york universities heimans center on philanthropy tony tweets to he finds the best content from the most knowledgeable, interesting people in and around non-profits to share on his stream. If you have valuable info, he wants to re tweet you during the show. You can join the conversation on twitter using hashtag non-profit radio twitter is an easy way to reach tony he’s at tony martignetti narasimhan t i g e n e t t i remember there’s a g before the end he hosts a podcast for the chronicle of philanthropy fund-raising fundamentals is a short monthly show devoted to getting over your fund-raising hartals just like non-profit radio, toni talks to leading thinkers, experts and cool people with great ideas. As one fan said, tony picks their brains and i don’t have to leave my office fund-raising fundamentals was recently dubbed the most helpful non-profit podcast you have ever heard. You can also join the conversation on facebook, where you can ask questions before or after the show. The guests are there, too. Get insider show alerts by email, tony tells you who’s on each week and always includes link so that you can contact guess directly. To sign up, visit the facebook page for tony martignetti dot com. I’m peter shankman, author of zombie loyalists. And you’re listening to tony martignetti non-profit radio. Big non-profit ideas for the other ninety five percent. Hyre what about the document tools in in ofthis three, sixty five word, power point, etcetera? You’re getting sort of, ah, light version of those compared to what you see on your desktop. Yes, you are. But for all of this and especially office three, sixty five, it has been evolving, and they’re putting a great deal of effort into augmenting those tools and making things a cz useful is possible. So dahna, word online, powerpoint online, excel online are very useful, and you can get basic editing done in any of those. If you want to do more things, you know, create a table contents or some of the more detailed document kinds of things. It’s. Easier to use the applications themselves, okay. What about google drive? Yeah, you know, it’s been around a long time, we also when i had people raised their hands about what tools are you using in the organization? The same hands came up for multiple things what’s happening is that all of this has been evolving a lot, and i think people are still trying to get some kind of getting a handle on how to manage files as they go to the cloud so that they’re adopting everything and seeing what works best for them. I think so. And i think it’s ah, it’s this push pull of staff again trying to get their work done and using tools that, you know, maybe they find someone who has shared something with them from another organization and drop box than they put drop box on their desktop so they can do that now they’re using that buy-in but and and so and google drive has been around for a while google docks, and so people are comfortable with it. So it’s one of those ones that that a lot of folks are using it. The quote i had from google and my slide wass for google drive. Was designed to work with google and to me that’s the if there’s a caveat. That’s, that’s the caveat is that it’s best if you want to kind of go all in with google docks and google spreadsheets and, you know, google slides and things like that? Dahna it’s, it’s a little bit easier. Two use other tools if you’re going to use straight microsoft word documents and things like that, you can still store those things in there, but, you know, it’s it’s a little easier to kind of go all in with the google stuff and then and then use those do you see us going to getting to a place where there’s there’s, google doc and there’s and there’s microsoft onda office docks, which would be in which which would be counterintuitive to the way most of computing is going? Yeah, you know, i think they’ll they’ll keep, um, trying to support each other and still trying to keep you know, their own thing so that i mean, there is some way to bring in where documents in into google thing it’s impossible to do it right, but you get the maximum benefit maximum management tools if you’re if you’re using the native? Yeah, native google doc with google drive? Yep. And and so microsoft trying to kind of push you into office three sixty five by doing things like building in access from the word application that you run on your desktop building in dahna a way to grab things from office three. Sixty five directly in there so that that that communication is as easy as possible so that we’ll try and kind of have you worked with all of those all of their tools. What about some obstacles to avoid that za part of your your your topic to yeah. Yeah. This is the ominous part. Wasn’t through with the obligations were no. I said obligations are ominous, but we just start with obstacles. Yeah, yeah, we want to keep it. And really, when i said obstacles, some of what i meant wass things to think through it’s, it’s the issues to kind of think through before you start doing a project, like talking about it. And and so we talked about, you know, sort of the file preparation and migration piece, but there’s other things to think about, too training for your staff. Is going to be, um, a big thing what’s the schedule going to be for people went, when is the change actually gonna happen? People are gonna want to know where their files are. Are they here today and over here tomorrow? And then it didn’t work, and then we’re back over here again. Or how is this? How is this all gonna work and bandwidth? There’s another one that we talked about is we’re talking about the cloud. We’re talking about the internet now where moving files back and forth from, you know, not just on our own network, but through the internet, which we have a little bit less control over, but we can try and have a cz much control as as we can get. So, um, thinking about how good is our internet connection, not just the download speed, but also the upload speed? Because now we’re pushing our changes up. Yeah, so that’s important to think through and the other thing that we end up talking to people about is so you’re moving to a cloud, maybe you’re using sales force and office three, sixty five so all of your important data is on the internet what if your dea cell line goes down? Is everybody just done for the day you sent everybody home? Or do you need to think about getting both the d s l line and a cable line and maybe a box that can kind of coordinate the two things? If one goes down, you go to the other and things like that. So trying to think about how we make sure we are online all the time starts to be a kind of ah bigger issue for folks. We haven’t talked about security buy-in thiss was a huge issue when the clouds start to become popular. I don’t see it getting as much attention now, but it’s still important mean, especially we’re talking about c r m our database? Yeah, that could be credit card numbers, dates of birth, lots of personal information. Yeah, i mean it’s, it’s, huge and it’s potentially depending on what you put there. Right? Right. And so there’s. Sort of. Ah, due diligence that needs to be done on whatever vendor you’re going to go with. Microsoft has a whole website about how it treats security in office. Three sixty five we had somebody. Bring up in the session this morning that they had gone with, i think box because it specifically talked about hippa compliance, and that was important to them. Um, you know, we kind of have to agree that the nsa is just going to look at all of it. So i guess we take that out of the picture, but it sort of depends on both your organizational culture and the kinds of data that you’re dealing with to see how important that stuff is. And i will say at the same time, it it’s we need to be thinking about it. And it’s, not a new issue. I still run into places where there’s the file server with a notebook with the password to get into the file server sitting right next to it. So, you know, it’s, it’s, new and it’s old, we’re going to get there. All right? It’s your soul. That sounds like a good place. Stop. Okay. Tom oberg is an independent strategic technology consultant. And you are with tony martignetti non-profit radio coverage of the non-profit technology conference two thousand fifteen in austin, texas. Thanks very much for being with us. As always, my thanks to everybody and ten, the non-profit technology network, i’m already looking forward to being back there in twenty sixteen, which i believe is san jose, california. You should check out ntcdinosaur non-profit technology conference next week, it’s going to be an archive show. That means i am taking the week off. I hope you’ve been enjoying your summer. I have been, and i’m going to again next week. If you missed any part of today’s show, find it at tony martignetti dot com. Where in the world else would you go pursuant full service? Fund-raising they’ll hope you find more prospects pursuant. Dot com. Our creative producers claire meyerhoff. Sam liebowitz is the line producer. The show’s social media is by susan chavez. Susan chavez. Dot com on our music is by scott stein. Duitz be with me next week for non-profit radio. Big non-profit ideas for the other ninety five percent. Go out and be great. Yeah. What’s not to love about non-profit radio tony gets the best guests check this out from seth godin this’s the first revolution since tv nineteen fifty and henry ford nineteen twenty it’s the revolution of our lifetime here’s a smart, simple idea from craigslist founder craig newmark yeah insights, orn presentation or anything? People don’t really need the fancy stuff they need something which is simple and fast. When’s the best time to post on facebook facebook’s andrew noise nose at traffic is at an all time hyre on nine a, m or p m so that’s, when you should be posting your most meaningful post here’s aria finger ceo of do something dot or ge young people are not going to be involved in social change if it’s boring and they don’t see the impact of what they’re doing. So you got to make it fun and applicable to these young people look so otherwise a fifteen and sixteen year old they have better things to do if they have xbox, they have tv, they have their cell phones me dar is the founder of idealist took two or three years for foundation staff, sort of dane toe add an email address their card it was like it was phone. This email thing is fired-up that’s why should i give it away? Charles best founded donors choose dot or ge somehow they’ve gotten in touch kind of off line as it were on dno, two exchanges of brownies and visits and physical gift mark echo is the founder and ceo of eco enterprises. You may be wearing his hoodies and shirts. Tony talked to him. Yeah, you know, i just i’m a big believer that’s not what you make in life. It sze, you know, tell you make people feel this is public radio host majora carter. Innovation is in the power of understanding that you don’t just do it. You put money on a situation expected to hell. 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Nonprofit Radio for July 10, 2015: Reach The Rural And Marginalized & Discovery Visits

Big Nonprofit Ideas for the Other 95%

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Osvaldo GomezReach The Rural And Marginalized

Osvaldo Gomez reveals lessons learned as he used online, mobile & cloud technology to improve health care outcomes in hard to reach communities. He’s technology director at Upleaf. We talked at NTC, the Nonprofit Technology Conference, hosted by Nonprofit Technology Network (NTEN).

 

 

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Maria Semple

These one-on-one meetings are critical to your prospect research. Maria Semple, our prospect research contributor and The Prospect Finder, makes sure you’re getting the most out of them. She also shares her recommendations for summer conferences throughout the U.S. that will help your research.

 

 


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Oppcoll hello and welcome to tony martignetti non-profit radio big non-profit ideas for the other ninety five percent. I’m your aptly named host. Oh, i am very glad you’re with me. I’d bear the pain of mass toid itis if i had to hear you say tony, i missed today’s show reach the rural and marginalized osvaldo gomez reveals lessons learned as he used online mobile and cloud technology to improve healthcare outcomes in hard to reach communities. He’s, technology director at upleaf we talked at ntcdinosaur non-profit technology conference hosted by the non-profit technology network and ten and discovery visits thes one on one meetings are critical to your prospect research maria simple, our prospect, research contributor and the prospect finder make sure you’re getting the most out of them. She also shares her recommendations for summer conferences throughout the us that will help your prospect research on tony’s take two important legal stuff responsive by opportunity collaboration that working meeting that unconference on poverty reduction that will ruin you for every other conference. Here is osvaldo gomez from auntie si. Welcome to tony martignetti non-profit radio coverage of the non-profit technology conference it’s day two were hosted by intend the non-profit technology network and we’re in austin at the convention center. My guest is as valdo gomez he’s, technology director for upleaf. Welcome, osvaldo, thank you for having me, it’s. A pleasure. Your topic is using technology and online communication to reach rural or marginalized populations. Excellent that’s, a riel niche topic before we before we get into it, and we have plenty of time to do that let’s, define the rural and marginalized. How do you consider those? So i think that the most important thing is to understand that. There are lots of populations that could be considered rule. Remember, analyzed the most. The most obvious one is hispanics. There’s, obviously a language barrier. There’s ah, you know, on documentary me grant. So are other circumstances that by default, you assume that it’s a somewhat marginalized population, then when you add up hispanics that live in rural areas, then they kind of have the double warming. Okay? We’re very hard people who are very, very hard to reach exactly online. Kind of off the grid. You all right? Do they have? And this is really dangerous. Got nowhere generalizing about lots of different populations. Exactly. But we’re talking about the hispanic population because the work was with the hispanic access foundation. Yes, correct. Okay. All right. So how can we with with recognizing that were generalizing? Yes. They didn’t have mobile devices largely. So that was very interesting for us to learn. When we started working with the project, we realised that the the word three things that could help us first is online communication. Because because you are it’s, a nationwide effort, it’s really hard to get to everyone in person. And there was a grassroots component to it also yes, there were. I don’t want to take you off your way have plenty of time don’t want and so they it was hard to get to everyone in person and they was also expensive to get to everyone through attritional media. If you do tv it’s very expensive. So the obvious choice was to go online. Okay, online number one. Exactly. Then the next one is mobile devices and mobile devices helped us. No, no, not just in the front and just, you know, because people like you are saying there’s a high incidence of smartphone use there is there’s there’s good penetration? Yes, even among the marginalized in rural. There is this ok and then but it didn’t also didn’t on ly helped us there. But it also helped us in the back in for us to actually run the operation. So when we were doing aggress receive into then it made sense to have the staff that was running the event using in their case it was ipods and using a mobile device because it allowed them to do data entry on this part. Okay, so for the back end also there was that there. Was online. And then is there a third of that is yes. Oh no eso so we said online communication and we say mobile devices, the third big part of this was clouds services, okay? And that is kind of the perfect pair for mobile devices, because then you have this holy infrastructure of this whole team on a national level connected and connected are low cost, which was really important because obviously it’s a non-profit it’s, not unlimited funds. And so those three things were the ones who allowed us to really reach this population. And what we proved with this project was that using online communication, mobile devices and cloud services, you can effectively reach rural or marginalized populations at a national level with a very small core team on a low budget. Alright, very exciting. I love i really i love the niche so let’s dive into it. What were the first steps? So what we did was essentially use a whole host ofthe tools to get to do to do this. We didn’t discard mass media. Well, let me ask you first, what about assessment? Determining where the people are, what they’re levels of connectedness are well, that was easy. There’s there’s a lot of information about distribution of hispanics and in our presentation, there’s a very cool map that shows you the share of the population for county that is hispanic. Ok, so there’s this’s and this is all in the us exactly, and and that the census is of the first go to place, and then it’s very easy to flag where to go, but in their case what they did, because obviously this has to be funded, so they had to prove the concept. And so they started in houston with one community, and when it went really well there, then they expanded to five communities and then more and more, and then four years later, they’re reaching eighteen states in the united states. Obviously, the goal is to get toe all state offgrid taken incremental with a community and then a bunch of states which is that’s a big leap on praveen eighteen states exactly and it’s very important to prove to the donors that the money’s will spend that you’re doing a good job, and so they’ve been doing that very effectively, and i think that the those eighteen states have bean chosen based on you know where you’re going to have the biggest impact. Of course states like texas, california winning first, how were they able to measure? And we can go? We can come back to this later on just you’re just sort of overview. How were they able to measure outcomes or definitely had an impact? The biggest tool that they used was a sales force system on this system was what the field team used. We’re on their ipods on the field, and it was what the people in washington had also available in this system runs the entire operation. And so everything that happened if you attended an event that data was entered, if there was ah, say that ran on your show that was logged, and ultimately once you put once you do all that data entry and in a decentralized way so that every user does their part, then because you have an integrated system, it all comes together, and then you can report on it more effective. Okay, so so the outcomes were points of contact. That was one part of it. The other thing was, first of all, we would do we still do post event surveys, so we collect data from people, and we collect data from the speaker about how the event went, how what you learned, and we kind of tried to gauge whether they actually learn the talking points of the okay. All right, so it was more than just a contact. But what was learned exit from the contact of the event, exactly. The other thing that we did make love sense they’ll think what it was a huge population study to evaluate whether not only they learned because there’s through three stages for for behavior to change, you have to have knowledge about, you have to know that there’s a problem, you have to be motivated to change, and then you have to have access to the resources you need to change. And we’ve been addressing all three but to be able to prove that the last one, the access and the action took place and we need it to we needed to do a study. So we did, and we proved that when you were able to educate people through a grassroots event with a community leader that they trust and kind of build that knowledge and create the position of risk. For example, we did a one big part of what we did was cancer, breast cancer and colon cancer prevention. Yeah, i was going to ask you about what some of the messages were, but go ahead, we’ll get to that. Yeah. And so for that you have to actually make sure people got tested screened exactly. Eso this study allowed us to prove what the success rate wass and, you know, out of all the people that attended this event that received the information, the motivation and was made available resource is for them to go get tested. How many actually did get this all right? And the results were very good on dso we’ve bean just building on that and improving over the years to make sure that that we reach us many hispanics as we can. Okay, really cool. And of course, you mentioned sales force. You’re doing this on a low budget sales force, of course, donated except for non-profits i think it’s up to ten licenses, i believe. Yes, that right salesforce’s free for non-profits. Well, the first and licenses are donated, and then you get a huge discount for the one after that, okay, it’s huge on for these organization in particular. So far, they’ve received three hundred three, six thousand dollars worth of donations part of that or most of it from sales force. But a lot of that also from google through the google non-profit program they run google ats donated by ghoul okay, one hundred percent you’re tuned to non-profit radio tony martignetti also hosts a podcast for the chronicle of philanthropy fund-raising fundamentals is a quick ten minute burst of fund-raising insights published once a month. Tony’s guests are expert in crowdfunding, mobile giving event fund-raising direct mail and donor cultivation. Really all the fund-raising issues that make you wonder, am i doing this right? Is there a better way there is? Find the fund-raising fundamentals archive it. Tony martignetti dot com that’s marketmesuite n e t t i remember there’s a g before the end, thousands of listeners have subscribed on itunes. You can also learn maura the chronicle website philanthropy dot com fund-raising fundamentals the better way so let’s, talk about some of the tools that were used, so we’re we’ve we’ve touched on sales force. Yes, dribble used ripple. Yes. That’s that’s a quaint listeners, maybe more, probably more familiar with word preston droop a lso. Explain what dribble is drew police, a condom management system platform and it’s being used very widely. The white house website is built on drew people really and so it’s, very popular and very robust and it’s amazing the nuggets you can learn on non-profit radio. The white house platform is not is not word press or even customized. It’s ah, droop a little bass. Yeah, all right. And so there was non-profit radio. I’ve been telling you for years. Listen to me. Listen to osvaldo. And so the main thing is, whenever we chose the technology was is it open source? Or is it donated or discounted? Because no, the savings are remarkable and so do people was what we used for the front end sales force for the back end. But then they also because this is a distributed team throughout the country. They needed to be able to claret. And so again with a google for non-profit. Program, they were able to get google maps for free and so their e mail their calendar, they can do hangouts and collaborate and and also have a share, dr using google drive and so using all of these tools, they’re able to stay in touch, to stay connected on to coordinate. And this goes not just to do the core team in washington, but they also gave ipods to the field team to the community and faith based leaders in the community so that they could stay connected with this network. So they expanded their teams through volunteers essentially very, very effectively, through the use off the mobile of isis on the clock services and, of course, online communication to distribute the information. All right was was was more of the communication mobile based than than online because because there’s a greater penetration of mobile devices than there is desktop and laptop computers. So what we try to do is i mean, i guess i mean mobile native or was it was a more online and then mobile mobile optimized exactly that’s the that’s the the key because of cost it’s very for non-profits it tends to be prohibited. To have a nap for every platform. Especially when you have to. Do you know it’s andre for so many different devices. And so web apps or web solution’s make more sense. Okay, okay. Let’s, turn to the grassroots component of this. Because that was important. A huge yeah. Very important was not just online with, i guess local community organizations that are trusted in the low in the local place. Exactly. And trust that he’s a key word. Because, you know, an undocumented immigrant is probably not going to trust on outsider to come and tell them. Let’s. Let’s, gather you all in this room right now and talk to you. And so being able to reach them through the church that they attend, or through the community center in their community that they already trust. And the people eating there that they already trust andi, instead of having an outside and talk to them, have the leaders that they already know talk to them about the specific topic was very, very, very important. So the organization try to engaged these leaders on dh. Right now, the network is two thousand people strong throughout the united states about more. Than two thousand leaders throughout the united states are connected to this organization engaged by this organization and participate and lead these events that are happening as we speak that’s, the hispanic access foundation. Yes, we’re all the messages about rest in colon cancer. Well, that was part of it. The address they have for areas there’s, education, there’s, health, of course, and the kid. The cancer project, is an example of that. There’s also finance on dh. There is the environment, and the reason why these four are important is because in the case of finance, what, what they realized this. You have to help people improve their lives throughout, if, if there’s, no money, there’s, no health, and so being able to. And the main thing for for immigrants is. Being in the numbers being in the statistics and so submitting your taxes, even if you’re undocumented is huge because if at any point in time, in future there’s immigration reform, you have to have that history that you’ve bean reciting innis they file your taxes compliant for years exactly all right, all right, and that’s a huge thing because there is no tradition in america of doing that. So educating people that in the united states you do have to file tarsus taxes regularly is a big deal. What were the outcomes you were measuring in thie environment, part messages. So the thing about the environment is that when you pull hispanics, they’re all very aware of it. They were aware that you have to preserve the environment, that climate change is important, but many times, even though they want to a lot of hispanics living or been city in urban areas, and they don’t really get out much besides a lot of doing a lot of work and so being able to create a world, especially among the youth, that all these national parks are available to you that you have to take care of them if you go to a national park you take care of. It was very important because he created this more well rounded. How did you measure citizen? How did you measure the impact of those national parks announcements? So the idea is beyond announcements we actually organized tours and took people there. And so the post, sir, the post even survey was very important to gauge how how many people numbers attended the tours and what they’re what they learn and how they felt. Definitely excellent. Excellent. And what about on the education side? Were the messages there? There was a lot about making sure that the people can, first of all, with those very interesting price about distributing books two, two hispanics and creating their habit of off reading of learning. So so that was a big part of it. But i think that the most important take away is that it is possible that a non-profit with a low budget, a small team can really use thes three tools online communication, mobile devices and cloud services to reach very hard to reach populations effectively. Yeah, excellent. All right, now we still have a good amount of time left. So tell us were there any other tools besides the a dribble sales force and and the google maps that were that were important? Yes, so they’ve used a whole whole host of things. So one one, because this is all valuable, i mean, even if you’re not trying to reach rural and marginalized pompel definitely in terms of low cost, valuable, you know, really helpful tools for for non-profits we’ll definitely yes, whatever whatever work you’re engaged so well, what else was valuable? So they important thing i think we think sales force the top exchange what the application store that they have is very important because there’s a lot of free it’s, a sales force petition store, the ap exchange, okay, okay, and they having these aps available for free was huge because it allowed us to expand the infrastructure and do more things than what the course ellsworth system can do at a very low cost. The most important one for them was project management, and you can imagine running in national operation with a bunch of volunteers spread throughout the country, how hard it could be if you don’t have the system in place to manage every little to do and organize things and so there’s a free up in the ap exchange called milestones, pm milestones milestones piela all right, there’s, a free program management tool that you can just installing your in yourself was application and having it in one system was huge. There are others that are there’s. A lot of you know is outstanding to me because first of all, sales force is free. First ten first, ten licenses so let’s do. Our audience is small and midsize non-profits excesses him. They probably don’t need more than ten licenses, but anyway, but then there’s a deep discount beyond that. But then the then the everything in the ap exchanges free. Well, not everything but a lot of it, but just wanted this project management, which is again called milestones being ostomel p m free, so free sales force and then free add on and obviously valuable because it’s, managing a project of two thousand volunteers across eighteen states, exactly really outstanding. What what other tools can you share? So the other thing that we did was looking for whatever was donated, open source or discounted and so in terms of email marketing, very good. Response has a at that point, when we started, i think they’ve changed a little bit recently, but they had this donation program that you would get the first ten thousand emails for free and so for them it made sense to start without because it gave them a in an instant saving, even if they had to pay for the extra write emails he gives them gave them just like socials gives you this instant push, and so but the beauty of it is that it integrate two cells were so they could go toe one place and do everything they needed to do so. Vertical response there’s an app in the exchange from vertical response that allows you to integrate it into cells. Whores it’s remarkable that’s outstanding these air this a great great resource is really alright. I’m adding vertical responsible list now that’s that’s um that’s! Excellent! What else could please more? What else should we use? Share don’t don’t hold back with tools are there so i think that they being able to when you, when you combine all the key tool that i think it’s very important to understand that they would didn’t exist. A few years ago is this mobile devices in the case, in their case, the ipod and they they had ei paso were connected to a cell network so they could be moving around and doing that entry. But even if, even though it’s not donated or free having a tool for a relatively low budget that you can distribute two people, you know, remote for them to work remotely is huge and being able to use all of the other tools sales for his google labs and all this stuff through this device really empowers people on what we saw was, you know, a pastor that’s, sixty years old and had never had access to a device like this, getting training and having so much enthusiasm for learning to use this tool and then realizing that it really helped them, even if it was a little scary at the beginning, it really helped him do what he wanted to do, which is help people. All these people, they’re not any for the money, obviously. So they really want to help people. And when you give him a tool that allows them to help more people, they just love it. Love that of the story of the pastor let’s spend a little time our last couple minutes on lessons learned on the the and the grassroots level, so we talked a lot about the digital onda technology side let’s talk about the the personal side, the people side of the grassroots work, some lessons learned there, yes, so the key thing for us was don’t go it alone, partner, and the profits are very good at doing that partnering, but in this particular case, it’s key because you can’t go into a community that is already a little off the grid and pretend to be an outsider and be heard and access people, and so being able to to go to get to these community through people they trust was very, very, very important. Now, these people also need to be able to trust you as an organization. And so a lot of the work that the spending explanation did was reaching out to these pastors, getting them into a room on dh, showing them everything that was in the works. Everything that we’re doing, this is our this is even how we’re handling data. This is how we’re handling privacy if we collect data from an undocumented immigrant, we’re not sharing that with anyone and creating that trust between the organization and the leader was important because if the leader trusts you, then the committee trusts you and i think that’s the biggest takeaway from this there there vouching for the larger organization exactly local leaders are vouching for exactly they’re putting their name on the line. And so they want to know that you are really for real trust critical both between the organization and the leader and the leader and and the people. And then you’ll get the third you get the third leg of the triangle between the people and the organization, exactly, little by little. And then okay, well, then i would say, and then the messages will be trusted except by little. Sounds like there’s something there? Yeah, so? So even so, we’ve been at it for a few years on dh. What we’ve seen is that you go in the first time pastor or the priest, in some cases, partners with youand brings people in and educates people the first time the attendance might not be. You might not feel the room the next time you do, on the following time, then they they asked for, and i think that there’s a real need for information people just don’t really they don’t feel comfortable asking for it. Yeah, all right, but but they they open up? Yes. Okay, we have another like minute and a half or so. What else? On the personal? The grassroots organizing side. Other other lessons there? Well, the other thing is don’t be afraid to use technology. This story about the pastor that was kind of scared of the beginning. It was very easy for everyone at that point to say, well, let’s, just not do that let’s go to back to paper latto pencil on paper, but that has a huge cost over the long term, especially for you to actually measure impact and don’t and so don’t don’t not being afraid off putting people out of their comfort zone and telling them let’s, do this let’s do it together and it’s okay is important. And i think that that was a big lesson for for me, because a technology guy, i thought, everybody, we’re going to say, just say, yeah, sure, that’s it, andi, wasn’t it? Took some convincing but beeper system because ultimately, once they get used to it, then it becomes something that they can’t work without. Oswaldo gomez, technology director for upleaf very inspiring story that’s outstanding. Thank you very much for sharing. Well, thank you for having me at my pleasure. This is tony martignetti non-profit radio coverage of the non-profit technology conference and t c twenty fifteen. Thank you so much for being with us love the story that he shared lots of valuable information, even if you’re not trying to reach the rural and marginalized, but just about free and very low cost resource is excellent. One let’s do live listener love and let’s start abroad. Seoul, south korea always with us gratefully. I’m very, very grateful. Anya haserot soul guangzhou, china ni hao, we’ve got jakarta, indonesia very glad you’re with us live listener love to jakarta and tokyo, japan also very frequent listeners. Konnichi wa in bangladesh, we’ve got listener in dhaka i’ve been there. I spent a day in old dhaka but spent several days in ah in the capital generally welcome dhaka and also in brazil. Camp in ious live listener love how about domestic ridgefield? New jersey. My dad used to teach in richfield ta ta ta ta ta ta. Instrumental music in the elementary schools in richfield, new york, new york. Thank you very much for being with us. Cranford, new jersey, hubert, north carolina and oxford, maine. And i believe oxford main maybe. Read stockman. He was tweeting that he is listening in maine that maybe read live listener love main north carolina, new jersey, new york. Thank you very much for being with us. Tony stayed too. And the open movement coming up. Uh, pardon me. The discovery visits air coming up. See, i need an intern so i could blame someone when i make a mistake like this. Tony’s take two and discovery visits coming up. Where’s the intern to blame. But first i got to talk about opportunity. Collaboration. It’s ninety three percent sold now. It’s, thea unconference in x top of mexico for non-profits around the world grantmaker zoho social impact investors, venture capitalists, academics and companies. If you’re working to reduce suffering anywhere in the world, you need to be at o c. There are no plenary speakers. There’s no power points. Every session is in a circle. Obviously collaborative three hundred fifty people and there’s lots of time. Deliberately set aside for meeting each other. I was there last year. I’ll be there in october. I did get my reservation in opportunity. Collaboration dot net. The video this week is a new entry in the non-profit radio knowledge base. Important legal stuff. Jean takagi. You know who he is? Our legal contributor and the longest running contributor to non-profit radio uh, four years. He’s been with me four years. He’s, the principal at the non-profit and exempt organizations law group in san francisco. That’s his, you know, that’s, part time gig. But most of the time he spends with non-profit radio he’s been with the show. As i said four years and i chose the best stuff from his four years. And i added it to our knowledge base. And the video is at tony martignetti dot com that’s tony’s take two for friday tenth of july twenty seventh show of the year. You also know maria simple she’s, the prospect finder, a trainer and speaker on prospect research. Her website is the prospect finder dot com. Her book is panning for gold. Find your best donor. Prospects now, she’s. A diet of dirt, cheap and free. You can follow her on twitter at maria simple. Welcome back, maria. Maria so i give this screen here. How are you? Where you been? What’s going on there? What do you think? That’s? Too much that’s. Too much. I had myself on mute while you were doing on minute announcements there. Sorry about that. Um, i’m glad you’re with me. Welcome back. Absolutely. Thank you. Pleasure. We’re talking about discovery visits today. These, uh, he’s let’s, define the discovery visit. And then once you explain why you think they’re so critical, the prospect research well, you know, as prospect, researchers, unfortunately, we don’t have access to every little piece of information that would be useful for you. As you’re thinking about cultivating or soliciting someone so actually sitting down face to face with a donor is going to yield so much insight about what motivates them, why they love your organization and potentially yield larger gifts for you down the road. I blogged this a while ago, and it may be one of the first times that you and i met online because you commented on it. But i don’t think you were on the show at this point. But i blogged the value of face-to-face meetings and i was not. Diminishing prospect research online and all through all the resource is that you and i have talked about from chambers of commerce and libraries toe online resource is wasn’t diminishing those, but yeah, the value that you get from having lunch with someone i happen to like doing it over meals, but whether it’s over meals or a meeting in their office or a site visit to your place, those could be great buy-in you just pick up so much just by talking to somebody for for an hour? Yeah, yeah, and and definitely even in the body language alone. So you start steering that conversation in a certain direction, and you see people getting uncomfortable or fidgety or ah, in the opposite way, if maybe they start leaning in and leaning forward and looking like they’re really engaged with with what you’re talking about, perhaps a new program that you’re looking toe launch and get funded, all of that can yield so much great information for you. Sometimes it could be a little awkward. You hear things that you, you’re not sure how to document, and we’ll talk about the importance of doing that, like, you know they don’t really like the ceo or your boss? You know, are there glad that you’re at the lunch with them and not this other gift officer? Yeah, and you do have to be careful about that. How you document that? Because, you know, a donor does have the ability to walk into your organisation at any time and say, let me see what donorsearch crowds you have on me. So you think you would want to document it in as a subject in an objective manner i should say objectively think of yourself as a a nen vested gate of reporter, right? When you’re trying to write down what the comments were so you might, you know, just right, you know, they did not seem particularly interested in the new x y z program and period end of story. Now we’re talking about the documentation it’s critical to save this in your hopefully have a cr m database, right? A donor database, cr m someplace this has tio this information you know, it’s what we call, i guess institutional memory, right? And you’re not going to put me in jargon jail for that? Are, you know, that’s a pretty straightforward one. Okay, i don’t join you for a while if you as a development officer or is an executive director, sit down and have a conversation with someone, and then you decide to leave the organization a year later. Ah, and then the new person takes over and goes in and has a visit with this long time donor sort of starts asking that same set of questions that donor’s going to kind of look at him like, don’t you already know this? Because i’ve already talked to your predecessor about what my interests were, etcetera. So you really do need to make sure that you are taking, you know, the time and it’s time well worth, you know, spent just documenting what happened during the conversation. What were the critical point? What were the things that need to be followed up on? You know, maybe it’s a timing issue, maybe they say, well, you know what? This is a really bad time for my family right now, but in two years we feel that our finances will be in a different situation, you’ve got to get that documented and that’s an ideal example of one of the many, many things that you’ll find out from talking to somebody that you’ll never find online or any other resource is it’s talking, you gotta you gotta drop people out and and they love your work, otherwise they wouldn’t be meeting with you, so they’re happy to talk about what it is they love how, how their situation can impact your organization. I mean, positively or negatively, you know, like you’re saying, this is not a good time for us, you know, we just had a downturn in my business or from death in the family or, you know, whatever i mean, stuff you’re not going to find out anywhere else than talking to people, you’re absolutely right. And, you know, one of the interesting things, too, is you sometimes when i’m having conversations with with a non-profit maybe it a networking event or at a conference or something, and i’ll last generally how is your fund-raising going and then steer the conversation towards you know, well, you know, when was the last time you had a chance to meet with who you would consider to be your top ten donors? And they kind of look at you like, uh, am i supposed? To be regularly meeting with donors. Oh, boy. Yeah. That’s ah, that’s yeah, that’s where the person in charge of development needs to be stewarding and managing up the, you know, the sea level people and that maybe that’s only one person may be the ceo is executive director is all there is but that, you know, yeah, yeah, you’ve got to be managing up and making sure that these relationships are nurtured with your your most important donors, your most important volunteers as well. Yeah, and if you don’t have the time to do it as a staff member, get your board involved. This is a perfect role for a board to get involved in. Even your board members who say, i hate to ask for money. I’ll do anything for this organization. Just don’t make me ask for money and it’s so simple for them to just go in and have it it’s really a conversation, you know, you can provide them with, you know, prompt them with a list of questions that they might consider asking this individual. But it really is a conversation all about discovering what is this donor-centric about why are they giving any? Money to you at all when you know when did they start and, you know, where do they see themselves going with your organization? As a consultant? I do hardly. And, you know, i don’t i don’t meet with donors and potential donors alone ever and very few of the visits that i am on our discovery visits, you know, where we don’t know the person all that well, but when i was a director of planned giving at a couple of colleges, i should do these all the time, and i remember my head’s spinning with oh, i don’t remember that, but i’m trying to stay in the conversation, too, but you can’t take notes while you’re having lunch, but i remember my head swimming over my gosh, i can’t remember that and that. Oh, and this news about his sister and that relationship, you know? Oh, you know, but there’s so much too, and you get back to the office and you just have to spill it all out, and i agree with you, i usedto have ah, client who said never write anything about someone with potential donor or donor at anybody boardmember that you wouldn’t want them to read basically the same standard you had when you said someone could come in the office any time and ask what you have on them. That’s fine, you know, today with with technology having advanced right, i’m hoping that people who were in those positions that you were holding at that time in the plan giving departments and so forth are using their smartphones and the recording feature not to record the conversation, but afterward, one the meeting has ended, and you’re getting back into your car or getting to a quiet place, you know, in, you know, a different space or something like that. Just data dump it right in by voice because you can speak a lot faster. Most people can speak much faster than they can write or type, so why not just get it in that way? And then if if you needed to, you know, use a transcription service of some sort to then get it into a print format and then edited from there, i think you know, that could be a particularly great way to use technology. Yeah, great. Cool tip. I like that. You’re right. You can dump into a voice memo excellent. I also like your idea of using board members for this purpose idea we’ve we’ve talked about it, but good many times, but good to mention that also, this is ideal for board members for organizations that have a prospect research person, do you think that these contact i’m going to call them contact report? Because as we used to call him at the colleges, right? Should they flow through the prospect researcher? Or should they go right into the c r, m database and then it’s a prospect researchers job follow-up and read them? How does? Because the prospect researcher is the the focal point of a lot of this, the prospect activity? How should this info get to the to that person? Well, you know, it really again depends on the size of the department and the type of cr m that you’re using and who has access to it because some will allow you no board members to have access and others won’t. So then clearly, if it’s your boardmember that needs to be providing the information in many cases, they’re not going to have access two, uh, to that database, so don’t need to get it to that prospect, researcher some other way. If it is ah development officer who does have access to the database. And i do recommend that they inserted directly themselves. If it’s a small organization, if it’s a larger organization with multi level, then, you know, you would want to make sure that there are certain procedures in place for me. No, but certainly the prospect researcher in some way, shape or form should be alerted that there’s been an update to that record in case there’s, you know any additional updated information that they need to provide? Yeah, right. It could be a simple is ah, niu new email address or you are. Whatever a new relationship. Um, i know in the in the colleges where i worked which bigger organizations that the prospect researcher was the like. I said the focal point, and they would pull out something from a prospect research report that would say, oh, you know, i should. This is consistent with this other contact report that i read for this other person done by a different gift officer. And these two need to be talking to each other for whatever reason that was always that was always the done through. The prospect researcher i don’t know is that it makes sense to you. Yeah, yeah. Does absolutely. And i can tell you that, you know, having attended various conferences in the past that are, you know, attended by prospect researchers. They would love to be on every one of these donordigital covering visits, making sure that the right questions get asked and so forth. Okay, so this should be from training there, maybe maybe training the gift officers by the prospect researcher. When again, when it’s an organization that has prospect research. I understand a lot of listeners. Organizations. Problem. May not. But if you do, should there be some training that the prospect researcher was doing for the gift officers? Yeah, absolutely. There should be some sort of training. And in terms of not only what they confined online, if they needed to find some information quickly. What are some of the go to resource is when they’re out on the road, etcetera. But also you know what? Air the typical questions you should be sitting down and asking of every single donor and prospect and, you know ah, good development. Officer, this should really be intuitive and second nature for them. But if there’s somebody fairly new in the role, or if it’s an executive director who is, you know, that that’s, it that’s the only person there is no development officer. Oh, and perhaps they’ve been so very used to running an organization, and on the day to day management of the organization that they really haven’t gone down the road of, of getting trained on, you know, how to ask the right questions to elicit the responses we need to move this prospect forward. We’re gonna go out for a break. Marie and i will keep talking about this a little bit. And then she also has, um, unconference dates coming up this summer. That would be valuable for your prospects, research or stay with us. Like what you’re hearing a non-profit radio tony’s got more on youtube, you’ll find clips from stand up comedy tv spots and exclusive interviews catch guests like seth gordon. Craig newmark, the founder of craigslist marquis of eco enterprises, charles best from donors choose dot org’s aria finger, do something that worked, and levine from new york universities heimans center on philantech tony tweets to, he finds the best content from the most knowledgeable, interesting people in and around non-profits to share on his stream. If you have valuable info, he wants to re tweet you during the show. You can join the conversation on twitter using hashtag non-profit radio twitter is an easy way to reach tony he’s at tony martignetti narasimhan t i g e n e t t i remember there’s a g before the end he hosts a podcast for the chronicle of philanthropy fund-raising fundamentals is a short monthly show devoted to getting over your fund-raising hartals just like non-profit radio, toni talks to leading thinkers, experts and cool people with great ideas. As one fan said, tony picks their brains and i don’t have to leave my office fund-raising fundamentals was recently dubbed the most helpful non-profit podcast you have ever heard. You can also join the conversation on facebook, where you can ask questions before or after the show. The guests were there, too. Get insider show alerts by email, tony tells you who’s on each week and always includes link so that you can contact guests directly. To sign up, visit the facebook page for tony martignetti dot com. I’m dana ostomel, ceo of deposit, a gift. And you’re listening to tony martignetti non-profit radio. Big non-profit ideas for the other ninety five percent. Got more live listeners in san francisco, california live love going out to there now podcast listeners and affiliate listeners. Did you think i forgot? How how could you live? Listener love always is accompanied by podcast pleasantries and affiliate affections very grateful to all the podcast listeners wherever, whatever device, whatever you’re doing love having you with us and all those affiliate listeners in the many stations across the country affections out to r am and fm affiliate listeners perish the thought that i would forget podcast pleasantries and affiliate affections. Maria, any last thoughts you want, leave us with on discovery visits and before we move teo unconference ideas. Well, you know, really, just to figure out what what is a donor’s? Why, right? That that’s, what you’re looking to get to understanding there? Why, um, to the heart of why they’re investing in your organization and, you know, try and use that language when you’re speaking with them, you know, why are you investing in us? What? What motivates you to continue supporting us? What do you like best about our non-profit? And you know what? Can we actually improve? So try and really elicit some good conversation from them and, you know, you’ve probably heard that old adage tony asked them for money and they’ll they’ll offer you advice and asked him for advice, and they’ll offer you some money. So, you know, it’s a great way to get people engaged in your organization, so don’t be afraid to start those conversations, even if somebody proposes something or says something a little bit on the negative side, take it as constructive criticism and look for areas of improvement. Yeah, you’ve got to hear the negative and a lot of what you’re what you’re suggesting comes out organically, you know? I mean, the person knows that you’re there to talk about the organization, you know, they talk about politics or hopefully you keep politics off the table. I always think that’s a bad idea for these kinds of visits, but yeah, they’re talking about the organization that’s, what the two of you have in common, so, you know, a lot of that stuff just gets elicited. I love this program, or i didn’t understand this or i didn’t know you’re doing this thing, but i just read about it in the newsletter and you know that stuff. Uh, i mean, you’re right ask if it’s not coming out, but a lot of times, it just happens organically because right that’s what you have in common. That’s what? You share, right? Right. All right. So, uh, you gots unconference ideas for us? Prospect researchers like to meet during the summer. Yeah, absolutely. So the biggie for prospect researchers is the international conference that happens every summer for apra, which is the association of professional researchers for advancement. And this year, the conference takes place in new orleans. Metoo and it’s going to be july twenty second to the twenty fifth, and they actually also have a new researchers symposium as part of that uh, they have a full day symposium just for new researchers. So this is a great way to get i think, you know, a full day in ah dedicated to a newbie. And, you know, if you’re just getting your feet wet in this whole thing about prospect research, that might be something well worth while attending. Are you going to the international conference? I will not be going this year. I’m actually attending other conferences, but you know, this one is definitely if you’re thinking about prospect researchers this truly is the one to consider. You know there are fall conferences that you know, we just missed a few conferences that are more regional. So, like in new england, there’s, an organization called nedra, the new england development research association, they they had a conference in april was not researchers look okay, let’s not look backwards, let’s go forwards, but but the good thing about it is that some of those organizations will still put the presentation’s in power point on the website so still perhaps worth just checking into even if you book market for next year. If you’re in those regions, certainly something to think about seeing what what have they shared from the past conference cause you might be able to just do a little, you know, your own online learning are these all apra chapters that we’re talking about? Yeah, yeah, they really are there. They’re more regionalized chapters of research association years ago, i spoke a couple of apra chapters, i think in new york and new jersey years ago, back when i know i’m not even sure i was consulting at the time, maybe more than twelve years. Ago, but glad they’re still around. Okay, what else? What else you got besides the international? Also coming up in arizona? There’s going to be a false symposium on the topic of campaigns and that’s going to be held november fifth through the sixth in tempe, arizona, so that might be one to consider and also in california, they have several events going on. The california advancement researchers association has several things on their website, so i’d be glad to share some of these links on your facebook page, if you like and then people can check them out and if they’re in those regions and see if they want to attend. I love it. Why did you do that? As a comment to the takeaways that’ll be posted around four o’clock eastern today? Sure. Okay, that’s outstanding. We still have another minute or so left. What’s ah what’s going on in? Oh, i’m sorry. Are there other conferences or that you got it? That’s covers it. You know, i think because several have already passed. Those were the ones that i really found that i thought, you know, were sprinkled throughout in different places that you might consider going. Tio okay, sounds good. Tell me, uh, yeah, now we just have about a minute or so, right, sam? So what what’s going on in your world, what you’re seeing among your clients in our last minute, you know, well, i’m definitely seeing a tick up in activity, capital campaigns and so forth. So, you know, it’s great to see that that good news came out with e-giving yusa numbers, and i think that that generally just kind of buoys people a little bit and their spirits. So i am seeing more activity and more research request because of these larger campaigns and the need to research some of these high net worth individuals before visiting them. So in general, i think it’s it’s all good news, okay, i’m glad you’re optimistic looks. You’re so upbeat. Andi, you’re going to be back with me in two shows on july twenty fourth for the two hundred fiftieth show. Yes, you’re going to here in the studio. Cool. I will. All right, looking forward to it would be nice to have you institute a sze yu were not made a cz we would say in latin i’m fluent in latin is a worthless skill, but thank you very much. Good to see you. Good to talk to you. Thank you. You’ll find her at the prospect finder dot com and on twitter at maria simple. Next week, two interviews from the non-profit technology conference walked to work, walking as part of your work day as an integral part of your work day, not a break from it with beth cantor and re to sharma. Also keep current after launch. Farrah trompeter and kira marchenese help you keep your sight current after a redesign in two weeks as i was just talking about july twenty fourth, two hundred fifty of show five years of non-profit radio, we’ve got giveaways, music with scott stein comedy a new sponsor i’m going to introduce and much more going on two weeks, july twenty fourth, two hundred fiftieth show be with us if you missed any part of today’s show, find it on tony martignetti dot com opportunity collaboration with world convenes for poverty alleviation, an outstanding unconference that will ruin you for every other conference opportunity collaboration dot net, our creative producer is claire miree off sound. Liebowitz is the line producer shows social media is by susan chavez. Susan chavez dot com on our music is by scott stein yeah, thank you, scotty, for that information with me next week for non-profit radio. Big non-profit ideas for the other ninety five percent. Go out and be great. Buy-in what’s not to love about non-profit radio tony gets the best guests check this out from seth godin this’s the first revolution since tv nineteen fifty and henry ford nineteen twenty it’s the revolution of our lifetime here’s a smart, simple idea from craigslist founder craig newmark insights orn presentation or anything? People don’t really need the fancy stuff they need something which is simple and fast. When’s the best time to post on facebook facebook’s andrew noise nose at traffic is at an all time hyre on nine am or eight pm so that’s when you should be posting your most meaningful post here’s aria finger ceo of do something dot or ge young people are not going to be involved in social change if it’s boring and they don’t see the impact of what they’re doing so you gotta make it fun and applicable to these young people. Otherwise a fifteen and sixteen year old they have better things to dio they have xbox, they have tv, they have their cell phones me dar is the founder of idealised took two or three years for foundation staff to sort of dane toe, add an email address card it was like it was phone. This email thing is right and that’s, why should i give it away? Charles best founded donors choose dot or ge somehow they’ve gotten in touch kind of off line as it were on dh and no two exchanges of brownies and visits and physical gifts. Mark echo is the founder and ceo of eco enterprises. You may be wearing his hoodies and shirts. Tony talked to him. Yeah, you know, i just i’m a big believer that’s not what you make in life. It sze, you know, tell you make people feel this is public radio host majora carter. Innovation is in the power of understanding that you don’t just do it. You put money on a situation expected to hell. You put money in a situation and invested and expected to grow and savvy advice for success from eric sacristan. What separates those who achieve from those who do not is in direct proportion to one’s ability to ask others for help. The smartest experts and leading thinkers air on tony martignetti non-profit radio big non-profit ideas for the other ninety five percent.

Nonprofit Radio for February 28, 2014: Increase And Engage Web Traffic & Moving To The Cloud

Big Nonprofit Ideas for the Other 95%

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Sophia Latto & Mike Snusz: Increase And Engage Web Traffic

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Sophia Latto & Mike Snusz

From bbcon 2013, Sophia Latto, principal consultant at Blackbaud, and Mike Snusz, senior internet marketing consultant at Blackbaud, uncover strategies to use metrics—beyond Google Analytics—to help you increase web traffic and engage visitors.

 

 

 

Scott Koegler: Moving To The Cloud

scottkoegler2009-150Scott Koegler returns to talk you through moving your critical functions—think donor management and payroll—to cloud computing. Scott is our technology contributor and editor of Nonprofit Technology News.

 

 


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Hello and welcome to tony martignetti non-profit radio you know what you’ll find here? Big non-profit ideas for the other ninety five percent? Of course i’m your aptly named host. Oh, i am glad that you’re with me. I’d suffer the unsightly nous of eruptive xanthou mma if it came to my attention that you missed today’s show increase and engage web traffic from b become twenty thirteen sofia latto, principal consultant, that blackbaud and mike’s news senior internet marketing consultant that blackbaud uncover strategies to use metrics beyond google analytics to help you increase web traffic and engage visitors and moving to the cloud. Scott kegel returns to talk you through moving your critical functions think dahna management and payroll, for instance, to cloud computing. Scott is our technology contributor and editor of non-profit technology news, so i covered that up on today’s. Tony’s take two between the guests non-profit radio news. We’re sponsored by rally bound peer-to-peer fund-raising and by t b r c saving you money on credit card processing fees. Let’s go right now to the interview from bb khan twenty thirteen about increasing and engaging web traffic. Welcome to tony martignetti non-profit radio coverage of bb khan twenty thirteen we’re at the gaylord convention center outside washington, d c and maryland with me are sofia latto and mike’s news. Sofia is a principal consultant for blackbaud on mike is senior internet marketing consultant also a blackbaud sofia, mike, welcome. Thank you. Thanks, tony it’s a pleasure to have you both you’re workshop of topic is tactics twenty tactics pardon me, teo. Increase in engage web traffic. I don’t want to don’t want to undermine already. You have twenty ideas. I’m i’m guessing that this starts with analytics. Mike, you wantto where do we begin? Yeah, yeah. So we had four different kind of topics or or categories for the different sessions, but a lot of it was based on ah, analytics and how non-profits are kind of under utilizing some ways to increase traffic things like search engine traffic and what tools are out there. What house search has changed in the past couple of years and even in the last week and and basically how they can take advantage of these to do some of the things that the corporate marketing world relies on heavily to increase it engaged traffic so we shouldn’t be fearing what we can learn from the for-profit sector? No, no, not at all, and i know it’s a little scary sometimes for non-profits they have limited staff, they have people who have different backgrounds that may not be an area they have expertise in, but there’s a lot that they can actually do to kind of stand out from other non-profits, for example, search engine results have changed quite a bit in the last year or two there’s a lot more local results coming up. When you search for, say, high schools, you’ll see high school’s around where you’re searching so google’s pretty smart google knows that you’re probably looking for something around your area, and so this is an opportunity for non-profits to have a better chance to drive traffic for mohr kind of general words like volunteers and events and things that previously they may not have come up that high, but now if they if they localised search engine optimization, they could drive more traffic that they weren’t getting before. Okay, so you want to say more about this localization of of search results? Well, in terms of localization way actually have ways that people actually use terms in a regional area. So one of the things that we recommended, one of the tools that we talked about was using google trends. And so if you are let’s, say, an organization that’s based in a ocular state and you’re looking for the best phrase phrasing for call the action or maybe a very prominent link on your website, you can actually use google trends to find out if the kind of words that you might be considering are going to be high search words of those popular searches. And you can actually dig down a little bit deeper and get into certain metropolitan area. So places like around florida or metropolitan new york or even in l a and you confined that you’ll you’ll notice regionally, people use different language teo to search information than they do across the u s o in terms of localization, you can actually drill down a little bit closer and get words and phrases for your links and your calls to action that’s going to resonate with your area with your reason region excellent how do we start? With google trends, where do we find that you find it in google analytics and you can go in and what’s nice about google trends is it allows you, teo compare terms with each other to see, so for example, you could take the words like donate, make a gift and give now and run those through google trends, and you confined what people, what words people normally used for searching and if you do that today, you’ll find that the word donate is actually a more popular trending term that people are using in searches. So maybe if you’re if you’re an organization that relies on donations from people let’s, say, you know, hurricane sandy, you’re actually going to help those people and you know that people are searching. Teo give teo a natural disaster. The likelihood of people finding you easier is if you use terms that people search with more often on your calls to acting so donate hurricane sandy relief would actually be a better a better bet for you in terms of driving traffic than saying, you know, give to relieve victims so that it’s just one of the tools that you can use, ok? Outstanding let’s, stay with us. How do you activate google trends in google analytics? It’s actually, nothing that you activate its a simple tool and a lot of search engine optimization professionals might use it for research and so it’s just very simple. You you khun, you know google google trends and get on to that tool and you can pop in terms that you want to compare and then, you know, clicked quick go and it’ll actually show you a nice graph, and then you can start to drill down in certain areas in region. So if you’re an international organization, you can look globally at what trends are, what words are trending, or you can actually dig down a little bit more locally and go to more metropolitan areas. So it’s it’s a handy tool it’s very easy to use like you mentioned search results changing even just within the past week. Yeah, we’re recording on monday, september thirtieth, twenty thirteen what’s happened in the past week. No eso google had a big announcement last week that kind of upset or i guess, i guess less a lot of search engine professionals little bit dismayed that usually in google analytics you can see the phrases people search by to find your organization and a lot of non-profits used this to see, okay, they’re searching for mission names or the name of our organization, and this is data that you can see about who comes to your website. Google announced it to be a little bit more private and to make sure that they’re there respecting people’s privacy is this is not going to be available to non-profits or anybody moving forward that this information about what terms people search by to find your website are no longer going to be available in google analytics, but they will with the word is initial word that they’re still gonna have this and something called google web master tools that a lot of non-profits don’t use and there’s a lot of great information in there. It actually shows a lot of information about people who see you in search results, but they don’t necessarily click through to your website. So now i think the challenge for non-profits is to utilize this a little bit more. It was kind of under the radar tool that organizations weren’t used a web master tools. Let master tools yeah, and this is where it this is where the word is that you’re still gonna be able to see this information. You could go back three months now, and i think they’re going to change it to a year. You can go back and see that data shows a lot of valuable information, so i think that’s going to be one shift for for online marketers and non-profits okay, let’s, help them, then our audience is small and midsize non-profits about nine thousand of them. How do they? Well, first do they need to be a web master with that level of skill to use google web master tools? Yeah, not really, so they can use the same log in that they use for google analytics, right? And it’s just it’s activating google web master tools, there’s a little piece of code you can add onto your website and it starts tracking the information so it’s not a very complex process that they would have to do. Okay, is it more than we can talk through? I mean, where would you find this code if you don’t? You don’t know where the code is, so so. Go to google what master tools just just google it it’ll come up as the first result. Log in with your google log in that you use for analytics for your organization and it’s going to give you very clear instructions a couple of things you can do it different ways you could take a little snippet of code and then you add it to your website. Google makes it pretty easy to do if they can’t find, you know how to do it, then you know somebody, somebody, maybe within the team can do it, do it very easily. So don’t be put off by the name web master tools right now, i have that you don’t need to have that level of skill toe, right? Take advantage of you. Go ahead. So i mean with google there’s there’s such a vast array of things that you can look at and you, khun d’oh, and they cover all skillsets so if you’re not, you know, web master, there are things that you can get from those tools and still use that data, you don’t have to be a genius, but in some cases, you know, some web masters are going to be using those tools for some very high, high level code analysis, so it runs the gamut. Ok, don’t be scared. Yeah, there are things in there for you that you can use. Yes, absolutely. They didn’t think that shooting, good ending. You’re listening to the talking, alternate network, you waiting to get in. Cubine do you need a business plan that can guide your company’s growth seven and seven will help bring the changes you need. Wear small business consultants and we pay attention to the details. You may miss. Our culture and consultant services are guaranteed to lead toe right groat for your business, call us at nine one seven eight three three four eight six zero foreign, no obligation free consultation checkout on the website of ww dot covenant seven dot com are you stuck in your business or career trying to take your business to the next level and it keeps hitting a wall? This is sam liebowitz, the conscious consultant. I will help you get to the root cause of your abundance issues and help move you forward in your life. Call me now and let’s create the future you dream of. Two, one, two, seven, two, one, eight, one, eight, three that’s to one to seven to one eight one eight three the conscious consultant helping hunters. People be better business people. You’re listening to the talking alternative network. All right, now i know in your in your seminar you went beyond google analytics. Sofia, where did you start? Well, one of the things that we were talking about is, you know, google’s great, because it’s giving you data, it’s giving you numbers and so numbers tell you a story, but they don’t tell you the full story. So, you know, let’s talk about driving traffic to your website and so, you know, getting traffic to your website that’s, something that google is really helpful doing, you know, search engine optimization, you get traffic there, but once you get traffic there, the whole issue is, are you going to engage those people? So, you know, you literally have seconds for somebody to make a decision about your organization. Do they want to engage with you? Do they find you credible? I mean, we’ve all done those searches where you know, you’re clicking on something after a google search, and you get to this hideously design website, it looks like a ransom note and you immediately say that’s, not a credible organization, i don’t want to engage with them and you and you move away, make that decision and within. Like within seconds, we’re five seconds, absolutely. And so, you know, the whole idea is you can actually do some tests to find out if your home page of your landing page is resonating with your audience and, you know, design is what’s going. Teo, draw somebody into your side and it’s goingto make somebody want to click on your site so there are usability test that you can conduct, and one of those is a five second test and that’s a great test that we do a lot with their clients at blackbaud and we do what we do is like, if we’re embarking on a web design, we usually run a primary conversion path. So, for example, a donation will run their original website through a usability test, and we can identify some problems in that conversion path and what’s nice about usability testing as well. Google gives you numbers, you can actually drill down and look in a usability test result and see where people are clicking from step to step within a conversion path, and that can help you identify some issues. Okay, so when we finish a design, we’ll run the same thing through usability. Test the new design and we can actually measure to see if we’ve actually made improvements. Okay, mike, could we get some detail on how we conductor usability? What? Sophia just called a five second usability test. Yeah, way we start that. Yeah, well, i think the tools that the team uses a lot free tools out there or some that are small feet per month usability hub i know is one that you recommend sophia usability hope dot com o k it’s a great tool for another one, i think there’s also, i don’t know off the top of my head, but there’s there’s other ones out there and there’s also ones where you can actually measure convergence on mobile on mobile applications. Well, ok, now would we just google usability test? Is that going to find us the platform? Absolutely. So, mike, summer free and summer lo fi based. Yeah, i think a small monthly fee, but but definitely when you’re thinking about people coming to your side, i think i think that is well worth that. There’s also some other tools. Well, we can talk about when it comes to email testing and getting more from your email that are definitely worth it as well. Yeah, let’s talk about fine let’s talk about email testing to go ahead. Yeah, so so well, i think that’s really one of the underutilized areas that non-profits look to do with their emails so, so much they want to get emails out and they get him out the door. But one of the things that could really improve the result of your email campaigns are testing things like subject lines or you’re called action links. We did a campaign with a back to school campaign last year with an organization, and they went through six different subject lines bef for they found one that really resonated with their recipients at twice the conversion rate, and they were able to use that for the rest of their campaign, and they raised two to three times more money. So it’s he’s really simple things that if non-profits could focus on them and being efficient that they can really help to improve their their email programs. Sophie, i know you. You have some examples of working within different types of testings to get mobile results to get to get other kind of information without on tools that you could use for your emails as well. Ok, so let’s, stick with the mail. Well, how do we start doing this email testing? What are there again? Platforms? Tools or what? Well, a lot it’s a lot of times, they’re they’re right. Within the system where you can, you can utilize within the system, you know you may split up your list into small little chunks or segments and do a test of a subject liner. You may do a test of a lincoln and flexible age simulating, yeah, do it to ten to twenty percent give it a day or two, see which one does better, and then send the winning message to everybody else, and especially with end of your campaigns coming up fund-raising critical time for non-profits to make sure they get the most of their under your campaigns, and there may be a better version of an email that’s out there that’s going to get you more donations hyre conversion rate, a lot of that’s free, a lot of that’s, right within simple email tools that we offer that’s offered out there on and then there’s some ad on things that if you want to dig a little bit deeper and find out who’s opening up a mobile device who is how long they’re seeing your email really, really interesting things are people taking a couple seconds? Are they taking ten or twenty seconds that you can start to find out which of your your messaging and you’re content actually resonated and people people were engaged enough to read it. Okay, we’re gonna get to the mobile twice now in sofia’s nodding every time we’re gonna get to the mobile let’s stick with you, mike. What? What are some of the variables that we should be testing mentioned? Subject line. Yeah, yeah. What else should we be? A be testing. So marketing sherpa does a huge four hundred page study every everything second again marketing sherpa sherpa, they put out a study. And what they found in the last couple years is the effect of elements to test were targeted, targeted audiences and tailoring content to them. Which organizations really should be doing anyways, if i’m interested in a certain aspect of your organization? If you deliver information about that, say it’s a certain type of cancer lung cancer, breast cancer i may respond more to an email about that or an ask about that tailoring, you know, content by audiences, by interest, but if you’ve never done testing before, subject lines are a great place to start way see results and different types, you know, whether they’re intriguing, whether they’re shorter, whether they’re fun or direct testing, what what’s going to resonate their studies out there, but until non-profits tested with their constituents, they don’t actually know what resonates with their comm in situ in bass called the action links or another great variable to test and, you know, when eating meaning the words that are that are that are linked, yeah, yeah, yeah, like donate now we were, you know, that donates going t vs chip in and move on dot org’s uses chipping a lot. Yeah, so that is that what you mean? The wording of the of the clickable links? Yeah, yeah, and sometimes they just say, click here sometimes it’s just register and when you’re scanning e mails using these tools and you see some people just look at it for a second or two, they’re probably going to look at your leg because that stands out. A little bit more and if they just seek, click here. If they say register it’s not really going to tell them what? Why they should do it when they should do it by so testing out, maybe longer legs testing out when you have images, donate buttons, different placement, different colors. You know, the ultimate goal of a lot of e mails is to get people to the next step to your web page. The more you get there, the greater chance you have of raising money, getting people to register. So if you could increase that, click through rate. It’s it’s a great variable to test as you get into your different emails and campaigns. Okay, excellent. Sofia, we contest mobile. I’ve heard i’ve heard rumors to this effect in the past couple minutes, way contest people’s reactions on mobile to our site. Well, it’s not necessarily the reactions on mobile, but one of the important things i mean obviously email is i call it the lava lamp. Its ever changing and you can never figure it out. It’s always a challenge for everyone. There’s. So many e mail readers out there there’s so many different devices, so many different sizes, and so you have a choice of either sending a scalable e mail or response of email, and they’re both very challenging. And so how do you make sure that you’re delivering a good experience a scalable e mail versus a responsive yes on tony martignetti non-profit radio. We have drug in jail that neither of those words or phrases are particularly difficult, but you’re gonna have to define them once the words get put together. All right, so a scalable e mail, it can also be referred to as a mobile, friendly email and that’s, an email that is usually designed a little bit more basic. So it’s usually one column, the fonts are a little bit larger. You usually have very simple copy the links, their very large because the scalable email and also it’s, usually a little bit narrower and it’s designed so that when it gets delivered into a desktop or a tablet or a mobile, it actually scales to the size to fit in the wit. And so you want larger font so that when it scale small for a mobile device, you can read it and you want links that air. That air open that have space around them. So when you put your thumb on that link, you can actually click it when it’s really small, responsive email actually realize on media queries and so a lot of devices that are out there have media queries. And so what it does is it’s actually based on a grid, and it actually performs calculations, and it delivers a different experience and different devices. So your desktop is one experience and it looks great. And then if you deliver let’s, say, on an iphone it’s going to change the configuration based on some calculations and it may stack all your information so you have one nice long, thin email that’s, easy to read and the pot charge sizes change, but it only works for media for devices that have media query. So the good news is it’s going to look great on all of those devices? And the bad news is that all devices have media queer so it’s hard for me to believe that this is all going on, but it’s all going on behind on email message yeah, and it’s a chance. So so when we’re selecting une male provider whether that’s, i guess, a sophisticated pay service there are, or something like e mail, mail champ or or constant contact, we need to know whether it’s sending responsive versus scalable e mail well that’s in the code of the email so it’s not whether they consent it any any email service provider provider consent either one of those e mails, but it’s, how the emails coded so it’s the back in code, the html, and so and so one of the tools that you can use there’s a couple of tools out there, there’s email on acid, which is actually built into eliminate online tool, and you can use another tool called litmus. These work with any email service providers and it’s usually again a small and on fi, and when it does, does it actually take a little bit of code and you run your email through these through this test and it actually will show you what your email looks like and all the e mail readers and all the devices so you can actually start to see how your email is being rendered in all these things. So not everybody. Not every non-profit has a budget. Tohave ah, big testing lab, where they have twenty devices, they can check everything so what’s a little bit better is to use one of these great tools and actually see how your emails being rendered. And then you can make some changes based on, you know, whether or not you feel like you need a scalable e mail. If you’re content, dick state dick takes for scalable or response. If you have a lot of content, you know, maybe you might be working with the response of email. Now the tools you mentioned that that’s working with blackbaud products working illuminate luminant online has email on acid built in to its email tool. Okay, but email on acid is a great tool that’s out there, that’s available to anybody if you’re using male chimp vertical response in the same thing with litmus, let ms dot com that’s another tool that’s great to use, and that will help you actually take a look at how your emails being rendered in. Another thing about these tools is that especially litmus, they actually have a subject line. They show you what your subject line looks like an email inboxes and it actually helps you look at your pre header techs to see how that works with your subject. What is your pre header text? Well, if you have a mobile device and you take a look at your inbox, you see that there’s a subject line and then there’s about eighty to one hundred falik isn’t usually if you can’t read this message, but that seems like a waste. It is the way it’s doing it wrong. Okay. All right. So this is this is usable landscape, arable land on an e mail that is being wasted. These the way i usually see them is if you can’t view this properly, etcetera. Right. What first, mike, how do we how do we get into this pretender? Text? Where is it? S so it’s it’s usually the opening tex of your email. It can also be coded into an email if you want something different than what? What is the first line? Or the first couple of lines? But what’s interesting is a lot of emails. Usually at the top of the newsletter is something else. Save you this in a browser view this in some other technical language. You know courtney, your show you can throw people in jail for using these people don’t always understand this and having that, when they see that with the subject line there’s a disconnect, they see a subject line on one subject. They see the technical jargon the really good non-profits it are taking advantage of this and doing it the right way, they use their subject line together with the pre header to really engage people. So the subject line may start to engage you with one element of the campaign or what what’s contained in the email and then the pre header gives you more information. I think one example comes to mind best friends, animal society did a really good campaign last year with the subject line talked about e-giving toe animals and then the pre header actually went a little bit further and engaged you enough. So you wanted to open up the email because in your inbox, it’s, very easy for people just to delete your email out out of the inbox on mobile devices, everything else, and so the real challenge is getting them to the next step, and the pre header could really help to engage if it’s. Taken advantage of it. Compliments the subject line. Okay. Excellent. I just assumed that that was uncontrollable. I don’t know so many. So many of them are abysmal. As you said, mike. Okay, uh, we have, like, another three minutes or so left. What else? Sofia let’s. Go back to you think you’re looking at mike. I’m gonna go. I’m gonna shake you up, but i think what’s, uh, what happened? I ask you about what more can we share about this? Well, i can i can actually share one simple thing that i actually mentioned a mike and mike said, wow, i never really thought about that. And so one of the things that i shared with the group this morning, as i said, think mobile first when you’re making social media posts and the reason is that most people are looking at social media on their mobile device. And so i start to think about putting your information at the top of your social media post to make sure that they see the important information. And then the most crucial part of this is any page that you’re linking through social media, it better be responsive and it better be mobile friendly because if you’re driving people to your site and they’re going to your site on a mobile device, you have to make sure that that experience is good for them when they’re coming to your site and they’re getting a desktop site on their mobile device, they’re going to leave. So always think mobile first, when you’re posting for social media, all right? And then how do we go ahead and optimize those pages that we are sending two for mobile? How do you do that? You cannot create a mobile page or a mobile, a micro mobile site that you can use for for special landing pages and actions that you want teo draw people into, or you can create a response of website so that your website actually looks great on all the devices. Okay, can it also be a simple if you have a wordpress site is just turning on the mobile theme? Is that going to do what you’re talking about? I believe so, but i don’t know this for sure, but yes, i think so. Okay. Okay. We got another minute behalf. Mike, what do you want? What you want to? Wrap up with yeah, so i would say a thing to focus on better email sign up process, so email generate online donations greatest source of online donation generator, but non-profits don’t always put a great emphasis on female sign up on their home page on their internal pages. It’s sometimes buried have abetter process where it’s prominent on your home page, he tried to convert people on internal pages when they go to the form, have it engaging, tell them what they’re going to get, overcome their objections of too much email. Repeat that in the confirmation e mail. If non-profits khun grow their email list, they’re going to have a greater chance of raising more money online from email. See, the thing is that i would say if they haven’t checked out youtube’s non-profit program, they should sign up for that because all of these videos that are out there that are compelling that caused people to donate. If you sign up for youtube’s non-profit program, you could put a link at the end of the video or in it, where people can click on it and go to donate right from there rather than seeing videos of kittens or dogs or anything else on youtube that may distract them after they watch it? There’s a call to action that takes them right to your donation form could really look to boost could versions that way by by signing up for that program and utilizing those links. Where do you find that youtube program for-profit good. Sign up. Youtube dot com slash non-profits. Okay. Yeah. Excellent. He’s a terrific ideas. You guys are chock full of ideas. Twenty of them one way only. Really scratched a couple. Really outstanding. Sofia latto is principal consultant with with blackbaud and i shortens our title. But we were doing a be testing. I shortened it in the beginning. Why don’t you give me the full title of the section that you’re with a principal consultant within? I work with the user experience. A design group in blackbaud interactive. Thank you. Andi mike’s news, sr internet. Sorry. Senior internet marketing consultant erect. Thank you very much. Thank you so much. Enjoyed it. Tony martignetti non-profit radio coverage of bb khan. Twenty thirteen. Thanks so much for listening. And my thanks to everybody at b become for helping me get all these terrific. Interviews tons of live listener love, it’s, amazing haskell, oklahoma. Beaumont, california. Fort lauderdale, florida. New bern, north carolina. Charleston, south carolina we got another south carolina. Do you know each other? Goose creek, south carolina also worcester, mass atlanta georgia live listener loved to each of you let’s go abroad. Only one listener in china today. Ni hao to jeonju how? Where are all your friends? There’s? Usually multiple chinese listeners? Moscow we’ve got one listener in moscow. Wonderful. Welcome. I don’t think i’ve seen you before. Welcome moscow live listener love to you konnichi wa too. Matsuyama, iga tokyo and tokushima, japan. Konnichiwa live listener loved to everyone there’s, more there’s even more live listeners. I can’t do them all right this moment, of course. Podcast pleasantries. If you’re listening in the time shift, wherever the heck you are listening. I love you too. Podcast pleasantries to everyone listening at their leisure. Our sponsors. They helped me bring you this show this non-profit radio you’re listening to right this moment. Rally bound is one of them. They make simple, reliable peer-to-peer fund-raising campaigns. Pick up the phone and talk to joe mcgee. It’s that simple. I personally i like talking to people rather than doing business over the web, if i have a choice and a lot of times you don’t have a choice, but with rally bound actually, you do. I mean, of course, you could go to their website rally bound dot com naturally, but you could talk to joe magee and get advice in a conversation about what rally ban does for you and how you can set up a campaign. Talk to him. Triple eight, seven, six, seven, nine o seven six or rally bound dot com of course they have fake use that rally bound naturally, but why deal with f excuse when you could talk to somebody? I wouldn’t? If you had that choice, would you rather talk to someone? Talk to joe? We’re also sponsored by t b r c cost recovery. They save you money on credit card fees when donors make a credit card gift, you don’t change companies t brc talks to your existing credit card processor to get them to lower the fee that you pay on each transaction. If they don’t lower your rate, you don’t pay them. This’s yourself, rabinowitz he is the genius behind. T brc i’ve known this guy very close to ten years in about another month, aiken say ten years, but i’m such a literalist i’m still saying very close to ten years. I’m pretty sure it’s next march that we first met i mean, in march, um, i’ve referred him many times over the ten years i’ve known him nearly ten years that i’ve known him. Talk to yourself for benefits, you know, i don’t know what to say. You could go to his website. Sure t brc dot com, but would you rather talk to someone and do business with them in a conversation two one two, six toe before nine triple xero yourself rabinowitz non-profit radio news welcome. If you are new to the show from last week, which was the big show, we have their face off between atlas of giving and giving us a i got lots of very good feedback from that, but if you are new to the show from last week, welcome, i’m very glad that you are with us. I am grateful, in fact, to each of our over nine thousand listeners, and i’m getting very personal here, i’m thanking you, i’m in your ear right now, radio even internet radio very personal medium and i’m getting personal. I’m thanking you. I appreciate you for listening for spending time with me. Thank you there’s. More non-profit radio news on my block at tony martignetti dot com and that is tony’s take two for friday, twenty eighth of february ninth show of this year scott koegler you know him he’s, the editor of non-profit technology news, which you will find at n p tech news dot com and you’ll find him on twitter at scott koegler. Scott, welcome back. Hi, tony. Good to be here again. It’s. A pleasure. We’re talking about the cloud. You and i first talked about the cloud and software as a service or sas in a segment that i called sassi because that’s, my clever creative wit sassy on that was april fifteenth of two thousand eleven. So even, you know, back almost almost three years ago, you and i were talking about cloudgood puting and software was a service. What has happened in three years? Why are we talking about this again? Well, you know, interestingly, what happened is that people talk about it less. Um and i think that’s a good thing, because when we first talked about it, it was kind of the new oh, wow. This is cool. You know what we’re gonna do with that kind of a thing? Yeah, and anymore, it’s. Just the way things work. And it makes all kinds of sense. Um, just because, well, i’m sure that you have had your you go rounds with stalling software and maintaining updates and, you know, purchasing disks and installing them on computers and having this match is between this computer and all that kind of stuff, right? Yes. I have experienced that from time to time. Yes. And i think it’s common, i mean, it’s one of those things that has been the bane of computer administrators forever until crowds came along. Our sas. Same same thing. Well, it’s moving the program’s off into a vote computer and connecting to them buy-in in that connection so that it doesn’t matter what you have on your desktop or in your hand, right? Right. And, you know, the experience is pretty much the same way you’re looking at a screen. You get a keyboard and allison, you click and type and move. Things around and for most of us, it’s way really can’t tell the difference anymore between something that was installed locally and is running on a crowd service. Um, that’s a good thing. Okay, so we are over the security issues that you and i know talked about close to three years ago. Is that? Is that off the table now? Um, security issues in the cloud are off the table. A cz much of security issues in the office. So yeah, in a way, it’s less of an issue because there’s always a security issue. You know, you can’t get away from the half target about that. Well, yes. Oh, right. So, you know, it’s reality that has to be dealt with, but the clients turned out that called computing is no more or less secure than then locally hosted. Okay, are you aware of any, um, a large? Not well, any any non-profit security breaches that have that have resulted from from cloud computing? Is there anything that i’ve maybe missed through the years? Have you ever heard of anything? I have not heard of them. And hopefully that’s because they haven’t happened. You know the thing with target was just so big that number one legally they can’t avoid announcing it. Secondly, there were so many people affected by it that it was impossible to avoid the kind of publicity. Um, you know, we have way had a similar thing here in south carolina. I think it was a year ago. Now where the in the states i think it was the tax records got hacked, so i know if he called state of non-profit i guess that qualifies okay, okay, but i haven’t heard of any any particular non-profit entities, nor non-profit service is that tak tonight, i think you probably have the same level of legal obligation to announce those kind of things, maybe more so of them. Maldon public companies. Okay, certainly to their constituents anyway, so that that could be why we hadn’t heard. Also, i think about throwing at the listeners if you have been aware of or been a victim yourself or somehow have heard of ah, non-profit that that had a data breach. Let me know that may that may merit a show. Maybe there are lessons there that that can be learned. Or if if the institution would rather not do a show then of course, we don’t have to, but but i’d be interested if if you’ve heard of anything and just so that we know that everybody is thinking our eyes on the same plane. What scott’s referring to with respect to target the the retailer was millions of credit card users. Information was stolen right around christmas time just last year. Yeah, talk about bad timing. Yeah, well, yes, for for all of us who aren’t the hackers, it was brilliant for them. Maybe i shouldn’t call them. They’re all thieves, but but they’re they’re they’re the rare thief. I think most thieves not too brilliant. All right. But anyway, we’re going to be on the social social commentary tangent. Sorry, or i am. I don’t know where i’m going so open. So i’ll stop going there because it’s ridiculous. Okay, what should if we know that we are now pretty secure in the cloud. No worse off than the desktop on. And we have great compatibility problems that don’t exist anymore. What? What kinds of processing and data belong in the cloud for us? Well, you know, in general, i would say everything i’ve gotten personally, to the point where i have very few applications of locally, i used the google, um, you know, google bach’s suite. So all my emails up there, like my documents are there, um and, you know, part of the initial problem or concern with that was that what if my connection goes down? You know, it happens, right mean, cable get cut on all this kind of thing, bad weather that whether can interfere, yeah, definitely, yeah, like we’ve experienced, there may be a storm that puts out an entire region so right, you know, so the question there is is the baby that’s on your local computer that is also backed up to the cloud, which one is the one that you could get to? So the good point is that if you have that kind of facility with duplication of data, duplication of programs, but then one of the other is is probably going to be available to you. Now you may have to go somewhere other than where you currently are because, you know, your your officers or your living soul did maybe under water or electricity may be out, but your data, you know, should be either maybe on a laptop that you’ve got that you can use or is a safe and available by the cloud once you get somewhere else. All right, let’s see options that really could save, you know, you save anybody. Well, let’s, use your example of google docks on google calendar, i presume you use google calendar. Also, i do. Okay, obviously, in the cloud now for local, though, are your are your google documents stored locally? Also, yes, i have what’s called google drive, which is a connector. So when i say the document, it is saved to my local and also saved to google docks on my google drive, i didn’t know that, you know, for instance, i will be traveling next week, so my google ducks that are on my desktop computer will remain mayor, but all i need to do is connect my laptop to the internet, and i’ve access to, you know, all of my email, my calendar and my documents. Okay. Ah, let’s, explore this little bit google drive so google drive is accessible locally on your on your desktop even if you don’t have an internet connection it is. And how do you how do you get to the documents that are stored locally on your on your desktop? Um, well, first i’ll say that i’m using a windows based desktop computer. I assume it works similarly for mac, but i i don’t have that experience. So there’s a little program that i installed from google called google drive, and what it does is it sets up the location on my hard drive on my computer it’s really a folder on the drive, and anything that i put into that folder is automatically synchronized with my of my cloud based google docks. Cool dr so it’s an automatic function, so i when i want to open a file, i can either go to my file folder on my desktop, go to that document, double click it and it opens up whore! I couldn’t go to my google drive, which actually looks just like a local drive, but its timeline click on the document and it opens up so there’s two ways to get to it, then, thanks. I’m not really sure which one of you’s most frequently, but i switched that enforces because you know, they’re both there and and i do. Whatever’s. Convenient at the moment. Ok, so that local and remote capability should be should be very reassuring and that’s that i presume this is something we should look for. If we’re doing any kind of cloud computing it is. And i have to say that not all fast paced programs offer a local the local options. Some of them do. Certainly, if you have a constituent management system, um, that you know where you store all of your constituents data and pretty much everything else for you. Non-profit, um, part of the appeal there is that the information, the data, the programs and the activities are available for use anywhere by anyone who you allow to have access to it. It’s all password protected, that kind of thing. Um and so the fact that it is, um i guess, for lack of other description, that it doesn’t exist anywhere in particular, it means that everyone has access to it. In that case, having it also locally would not really be a good thing because it’s not personal data, right? Share data. Right? Right. All right, we have teo to go away for a couple minutes, but we’re going to comeback scott. Now they’re going to keep talking about moving to the cloud, including, we’ll get teo. Back-up we haven’t talked about back-up we’re talking about operating, and i’ve got more live listener, love, stay with us. You’re listening to the talking alternative network. Duitz have you ever considered consulting a road map when you feel you need help getting to your destination when the normal path seems blocked? A little help can come in handy when choosing an alternate route. Your natal chart is a map of your potentials. It addresses relationships, finance, business, health and, above all, creativity. Current planetary cycles can either support or challenge your objectives. I’m montgomery taylor. If you would like to explore the help of a private astrological reading, please contact me at monte at monty taylor dot. Com let’s monte m o nt y at monty taylor dot com. Are you suffering from aches and pains? Has traditional medicine let you down? Are you tired of taking toxic medications, then come to the double diamond wellness center and learn how our natural methods can help you to hell? Call us now at to one to seven to one eight, one eight three that’s to one to seven to one eight one eight three or find us on the web at www dot double diamond wellness dot com way. Look forward to serving you. Talking alternative radio twenty four hours a day. I’m chuck longfield of blackbaud. And you’re listening to tony martignetti non-profit radio. Big non-profit ideas for the other ninety five percent. Welcome back to big non-profit ideas for the other ninety five percent. Did we just hear that? Ah, let’s, go abroad, live! Listen, love bangkok, thailand, i’ve been there. Welcome to the show. Bangkok, iran this is the second week in a row. Pretty sure iran was on last week. Welcome to you, live listener love to thailand and iran, iran. I’m sorry. We can’t see your city if we could, i would certainly shout out your city, but we know you’re with us. Um, did i shout boston, massachusetts in roswell, georgia live listener love to you if i didn’t, if i did so more love, but you can’t send enough what’s the big deal, uh, on your haserot too many listeners in seoul, south korea, and also an young south korea on your haserot. Scott koegler he’s in south carolina, and i wanted to talk. Scott, i want to ask you about privacy versus versus security. Do you do you worry that google can read everything that you put in your google docks and in your google calendar and possibly serve you up ads or use it for other purposes? I do, i worry about it now. I don’t worry about it, i take it for granted. Yeah, okay, well, it’s wise, to take it for granted, because we know they’re doing it. That’s what they’re i mean, that’s. Their business information is information and and targeting advertising, too, you know, to appropriate audience is doing, and i like it. But you know, the the truth is that most people see those ads and almost nobody clicks on them, you know, it’s it’s a sad thing, but it but it is the case there was a, uh, there was a study down on facebook ads, and i don’t sorry that i don’t recall the specifics about it, but the quick rake on them is just abysmal. So even though they’re there and kind of, um, you know, you see them, they become eyesores. Most people just disregard them completely. For instance, i’m looking at my gmail right now and in my primary list, okay? Just the inbox. There are no abs. It’s just it’s just you know what? Yeah, once i opened one of the e mails, now i begin to get ads across the right hand side. Yeah, they’re pretty innocuous. Okay? I don’t know. Yeah, the targeted ads bother me. Maybe i’m maybe i’m an aberration. Um, i feel like i’ve talked about this before when it’s come up. Other times i feel like i’ve been a little invaded when i get a ad. That’s that’s targeted that i know is because i went to the site but didn’t close a sale or something, you know? I went to a site and browse around or it’s because i read some kind of content and so, you know, you could sort of see the relationship. I know i feel like i still feel a little invaded when i when i get those i haven’t, you know, i have not overcome that yet. Well, it does give me pause because i know that i went looking for boots from my wife one time and everywhere, every page on every website that i went to where these women’s boots coming up. So you gotta wonder, okay, what does that say about me? And god forbid, i go anyplace that i really don’t want to know about anymore. Yeah, right. Well, what also says about you is that you’re a cross dresser. Well, exactly. Well, not exactly, but it’s it’s out now, but don’t nobody listens to the show, so i don’t want nobody knows nobody hears this show. Don’t worry about that. Let’s talk a little bit too. Moved to the subject of of back-up in the cloud. Very well advised, right? Yeah. Back-up is back-up there’s? Definitely something that you want to do. I mean in general, but in the crowded is even better. The issue with that is that if you are backing up local data, there are restrictions about the practical restrictions, not necessarily legal or technical, but just practical restrictions on how much you can actually back-up based on internet bandwidth. Good on we all look at the the download statistics for no the speeds. You know, when you get an internet connection to your cable company, they brag that you get twenty megabits of download. What they don’t talk about is the upload. And if you’re backing up it’s the upload that little matters that’s, the that’s, the speed at which data moves from your computer to their cloud server. Cool. Okay, so typically a twenty megabit god download speed, which is pretty fast. Ok, they fast? Actually, the comparable upload speed is more like one two, two megabits. So when you download a whatever a gigabyte file, you will get that in a minute or two. But when you try to upload a file even now, let’s face it. A digital image photograph is going to be a couple of megabytes. Um, it’s really going to take a long time for that? The upload now, what’s what’s constraining the upload speed is that your own service that’s slower than the server the clouds over giving it back to you? Or what’s what’s constraining us it’s the it’s, the connection that you’re paying for yeah, so you have a if you have a cable connection, right? Cable cable company connection uh, it’s it’s their service, that is slower. Yes. Okay, now it is possible to get hyre speed, but obviously it comes across so major corporations they’re goingto have called by synchronous in other words, it’s the same opposite is down what they’re saying, lots of money for that, you know? All right, so we need a small non-profit probably doesn’t write s so when we’re talking about backing up in the cloud, we need to be aware of our upload speed. And then and then you know how you get it back is important because that’s your retrieving your data? Yeah, exactly. And where you get it back, you know, may not. How you get it back may depend on where you are and what you need to do with it. So if you’re, uh, if you’re local, computer environment is underwater for instance. And you moved to a new location. You need to download essentially your entire data. Your entire set of data. Yeah. So if it’s a lot when they want to order a order it on the hard drive and have it settled tonight rather than try to download it. Okay, a lot of services offer that kind of capability. Scott, we have just a minute left, and, uh, i want everyone to know. This is scott’s swan song he’s he’s going to be leaving after about three and a half years. We’ve had a good long run together. Scott, we have it’s been a lot of fun planning. It’s been my pleasure, you’ve been you’re the longest running contributor, it’s all because, you know, i want to change up topics and more about that another time. I don’t wanna talk about new person coming on to talk about scott and the three and a half years that he has spent. As you know, basically a monthly contributor. Definitely. Regular contributor buy-in technology. Scott, just as it’s really been a pleasure working with you. Thanks, tony. And same to you, it’s been a good run and, uh, you know, i uh, how would we go? Sounds very good. I know we’ll be in touch on twitter. Yes, we will. All right, thank you very much. Scottie scott koegler tulani take care, my pleasure editor of non-profit technology news n p tech news dot com and at scott koegler on twitter next week, another interview from bb con earning that society level gift and jean takagi are legal contributor returns he’s a very smart guy always learned something from gene rally bound and trc they support non-profit radio. I’m asking you to talk to them joe magee and yussef rabinowitz ifyou’re in the market for either peer-to-peer fund-raising or if you accept credit cards, talk to gdpr rally bound or tb rc rally bound is at triple eight seven six seven nine o seven six or rally bound dot com and t brc dot com or to one two, six double four nine triple xero our creative producers claire meyerhoff. Sam liebowitz is our line producer. The show’s social media is by deborah askanase of community organizer two point oh, we have to say farewell to debra. This is the last show that she’s going to be social media manager of we’re going to be making a change starting march first. Deborah, thank you very much. Farewell and good luck. The remote producer of tony martignetti non-profit radio is john federico of the new rules, this music you hear it’s by scott stein. I met him last night at a gig. He was at symphony space, thie barth, aaliyah and symphony space. What a nice guy took pictures and everything. Check out the facebook page, be with me next week for non-profit radio. Big non-profit ideas for the other ninety five percent go out and be great network duitz get in. Thank you, cubine. Are you stuck in your business or career, trying to take your business to the next level, and it keeps hitting a wall? This is sam liebowitz, the conscious consultant. I will help you get to the root cause of your abundance issues and help move you forward in your life. Call me now and let’s. Create the future you dream of. Two, one, two, seven, two, one, eight, one, eight, three, that’s to one to seven to one, eight one eight three. The conscious consultant helping conscious people. Be better business people. Hi, i’m ostomel role, and i’m sloan wainwright, where the host of the new thursday morning show the music power hour. Eleven a m. We’re gonna have fun. Shine the light on all aspects of music and its limitless healing possibilities. We’re going invite artists to share their songs and play live will be listening and talking about great music from yesterday to today, so you’re invited to share in our musical conversation. Your ears will be delighted with the sound of music and our voices. Join austin and sloan live thursdays at eleven a. M on talking alternative dot com. You’re listening to talking on their network at www dot talking alternative dot com now broadcasting twenty four hours a day. Have you ever considered consulting a road map when you feel you need help getting to your destination when the normal path seems blocked? A little help can come in handy when choosing an alternate route. Your natal chart is a map of your potentials. It addresses relationships, finance, business, health and, above all, creativity. Current planetary cycles can either support or challenge your objectives. I’m montgomery taylor. If you would like to explore the help of a private astrological reading, please contact me at monte at monty taylor dot. Com let’s monte m o nt y at monty taylor dot com. Are you suffering from aches and pains? Has traditional medicine let you down? Are you tired of taking toxic medications, then come to the double diamond wellness center and learn how our natural methods can help you to hell? Call us now at to one to seven to one eight, one eight three that’s to one to seven to one eight one eight three or find us on the web at www dot double diamond wellness dot com way. Look forward to serving you. Talking. Come on.

Nonprofit Radio, November 18, 2011: Your IT Plan & The Goods on Google+ Pages

Big Nonprofit Ideas for the Other 95%

Listen live or archive:

My Guests:

Jason Hutchins

Jason Hutchins: Your IT Plan

Jason Hutchins, president of Nonprofit Solutions, tells you why you need an IT plan and what belongs in it. He’ll get you thinking about budget, equipment, outsourcing, the cloud and a lot more, so you avoid an IT crisis.

Please take a moment to take the survey for this week’s segment with Jason! You’ll find it here at the end of the guest and segment descriptions. Thanks!
 

Scott Koegler
Scott Koegler: Your Mobile Website

Our tech contributor, Scott Koegler, the editor of Nonprofit Technology News, kicks the tires on the recently released Google+ Pages for organizations. Should you take one for a test drive? How are they different than Facebook pages? How do you interact with supporters? What’s the mileage on these babies?
 

 


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Here is a link to the survey: http://www.surveymonkey.com/s/KLB36GN



Top Trends. Sound Advice. Lively Conversation.

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If you have big dreams but an average budget, tune in to Tony Martignetti Nonprofit Radio.

I interview the best in the business on every topic from board relations, fundraising, social media and compliance, to technology, accounting, volunteer management, finance, marketing and beyond. Always with you in mind.

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Here is a link to the podcast: 068: Your IT Plan & Google+ Pages.
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Welcome to tony martignetti non-profit radio we’re always talking about big non-profit ideas for the other ninety five percent. I’m your aptly named host november eighteenth, two thousand eleventh i hope you were with me on november eleventh, two thousand eleven. It was the work life balance, rachel and the silverman reporter for the wall street journal and contributed to their blogged the juggle shared what she’s learned about managing your personal and professional lives when both of those scream out for your limited time and it was volunteered his ability, our prospect, research contributor regular contributor maria simple, the prospect finder, talked about the new volunteers section on linkedin profiles to help your research and increase your visibility, and also with me with joe ferraro from the westchester association of fund-raising professionals talk about their national philanthropy day conference this week. Your plan? Jason hutchins, president of non-profit solutions, tells you why you need a night plan and what belongs in it. We’ll get you thinking about budget equipment, outsourcing the cloud and more to help you avoid a night crisis, and then scott koegler our regular tech contributor, the goods on google plus pages, of course we know. That scott is the editor of non-profit technology news. He kicks the tires on google plus pages recently released, should you take one for a test drive, how are they different than facebook pages? How do you interact with supporters? What’s the mileage on these babies google plus pages on tony’s, take two in between the guests. The only true job security is working for yourself. That’s, my block post this week. Plus, we were at two conferences this week doing interviews for the show, and i’ll tell you about those. We’re live tweeting the show as we do every week. Use hashtag non-profit radio to join the conversation on twitter. Right now, i have some messages for you, and then, after those, i’ll be joined by jason hutchins. We’ll talk about your plan to stay with me. You’re listening to the talking alternative network. Are you suffering from aches and pains? Has traditional medicine let you down? Are you tired of taking toxic medications, then come to the double diamond wellness center and learn how our natural methods can help you to hell? Call us now at to one to seven to one eight, one eight three that’s to one to seven to one eight one eight three or find us on the web at www dot double diamond wellness dot com way. Look forward to serving you. Is your marriage in trouble? Are you considering divorce? Hello, i’m lawrence bloom, a family law attorney in new york and new jersey. No one is happier than the day their divorce is final. My firm can help you. We take the nasty out of the divorce process and make people happy. Police crawl. Offset. Two, one, two, nine, six, four, three, five, zero two for a free consultation. That’s lawrence h bloom two, one two, nine, six, four, three five zero two. We make people happy. Hey, all you crazy listeners looking to boost your business? Why not advertise on talking alternative with very reasonable rates? Interested simply email at info at talking alternative dot com durney welcome back to the show where we’re always talking about big non-profit ideas for the other ninety five percent. I’m with jason hutchins now and he’s with me in the studio. He’s, the president of non-profit solutions, which was founded in nineteen ninety eight to help non-profits boost their productivity, lower costs and improve operation through the use of technology. His work has included the non-profits, the brooklyn bridge park conservancy and the very institute of justice jason hutchins. Welcome to the studio. I thank you for having me today. Pleasure to have you let’s talk about the plan. Why is an i t plan important? So non-profits organizations they’re really familiar with doing strategic planning, strategic thinking, that’s a real part of most, you know, non-profit cultures, they there’s a kind of an army of consultants in there. You know, they do a lot of work within organizations coming up with some really, you know, close looks of what management is doing and all the other aspect of what the organization is doing. But a lot of times it is not not really part of that or not made part of that. So non-profit might might say that we what we don’t have the resources to do it work or we don’t have the resources to do what we want to do next in it. But if you if you really had the time to look at it, you’ll see that they are spending the resource is they’re putting resources into into systems, they’re just not doing it in a maybe a strategic way or thought away because things are going things going to break, right, whether you have a plan or not, you’re going to have to replace things over time. You’d rather do it in a coordinated way. So so what happens is a lot of purchasing has done on that emerged agency basis they, you know, one morning something’s not working hard drive can’t boot up the hard drive is dead, things locked up, the network isn’t working the server’s down, right? Sure, even even larger decisions like, you know, putting in a new database, you know, maybe they’ll they’ll go through a period where there’s an advocate for a particular system and and so that that system has put in, but that might not really connect or work well with the other systems the organization has or if that advocate that moves on to another organization in there, they’re not sure really what to do with that asset come the other thing that happens to a lot of times, the way the funding streams work in the nonprofit world, you know, either you might have a particular grant or particular funder, so there’s an opportunity to get a certain amount of money to do something, and then that just kind of stays there, you know, there’s, no there’s, nothing set aside for maintenance so there’s nothing set aside to, you know, to say, how does this fit in to all the other things we’re doing here? And so so eventually you might have an environment where you have a multitude of systems, and not really any resource is to to maintain it, or or or make sure it’s interconnected and what you wanted to do, that they’re not buy-in are coordinated systems that i mean, in the worst case against it wouldn’t talk to each other like your finance system isn’t talking properly to another administrative system that it ought to be, and they haven’t been a coordinated plan. All right, so let’s talk about taking a little bit of time to kind of look at all of these different aspects, and we can almost throw them into into different buckets and there’s some that are, you know, maybe unique buckets that an organization might look at, but there’s many of these have, you know, they’re similar things that an organization could do, you know, on their own or with it with a consultant to help them. Okay, so let’s czar way into the plan. So as we’re developing this plan, who were the people that should be contributing to our information technology plan? So you want you want to talk to as many people as possible because you see, the users of an organization are really, really important to get you. The advocates tohave a plan implement, so if i were to come out with some some new tool or new recommendation or a new way of working or let’s, say, nuit policies, but you haven’t involved the leaders of the departments or kind of some key staff, then you’re not really not really going tohave the adoption and and the usage that you really want. So if you’re able to to include those people right from the get go and spent time interviewing them, your program officers, your project coordinators in addition to senior management, you know that you’re head of finance, the organization’s executive director, other other high powered people within the organization you’re then able to get, you know what you would consider advocates to go back to their teams and say, hey, we’re about to roll this new system out, and so they’re they’re advocating for that tool to be used out in the field. Okay, so you really do want the users because all the people you named are sitting in front of computers day after day. You really want users at all different levels. This is not just a senior management project that there was a project that senior management is solely contributing to clearly not writing a lot of times. This has come a kind of a top down a top down approach where either consultants come in or new edicts come in or a new state rule, right? So new system comes down, so by talking to the users, you really find out what their day to day is like, and you’re also able to understand the culture of an organisation, because every organization is different, some solutions that might work at one organization, maybe might not be the best fit at another organization. We have maybe different type of staff staff, that or maybe mohr, you know, just using different tools, just familiar with different things. So and then you’ll really get a sense of what those, what those struggles are, and you’ll find that those those staff, those team members, they’re actually really excited that senior management is interested in collecting that from them. Okay, excellent. We’re going to take a break. I’m with jason hutchins is the president of non-profit solutions network, which you’ll find it non-profit solutions dot net. And after this break, we’ll get into the details of your plan to stay with us. You’re listening to the talking alternative network. Are you suffering from aches and pains? Has traditional medicine let you down? Are you tired of taking toxic medications, then come to the double diamond wellness center and learn how our natural methods can help you to hell? Call us now at to one to seven to one eight, one eight three that’s to one to seven to one eight one eight three or find us on the web at www dot double diamond wellness dot com. We look forward to serving you. Is your marriage in trouble? Are you considering divorce? Hello, i’m lawrence bloom, a family law attorney in new york and new jersey. No one is happier than the day their divorce is final. My firm can help you. We take the nasty out of the divorce process and make people happy. Police call a set to one, two, nine six four three five zero two for a free consultation. That’s lawrence h bloom two, one two, nine, six, four, three five zero two. We make people happy. Hey, all you crazy listeners looking to boost your business? Why not advertise on talking alternative with very reasonable rates? Interested simply email at info at talking alternative dot com elearning all right, welcome back with jason hutchins talking about your information technology plan, jason let’s start to get into some of the details of what should be included in a in a proper plan what’s the first section that you’d like to see. Well, we’d like to look at the overall the overall, maybe footprint of the organization, like, is the organization operating from multiple locations because there’s some unique challenges that come in a place with that? So they there there’s like network infrastructure and just how does that play into what they’re doing and there’s lots of questions the organization has about the cloud because they’ve been hearing so much about it, or they have received so many sales calls related to the cloudgood wondering, let’s define that first before we go any further, because there might be some people who may even be using the cloud and don’t even know it. So what? What do you mean when you say the cloud? Sure, we’re talking about, you know, servers that are outside of their network, that aaron the public space. So, you know, google using google mail that’s, that’s cloud using a online hosted application like a sales force or something like this that’s in the cloud or sugar serum that’s in the cloud. So what was that last one? Sugar cr m sugar sierra. Okay, so, you know, a lot of these kind of individual applications cos they’re using a lot of amazon, amazon hosted servers and things of this nature. Where were your requisitioning space in the cloud? They’re all probably really using the cloud in some some fashion. For instance, their website is in the cloud where they’re they’re paying a hosting provider a monthly fee for space on a server. Okay, excellent. Just liketo jargon jail we have on the show. We have judge and jailer. Night it’s. Good. I don’t want you to tread too closely to your little taser. If i get to town. Also up to this point, i only have to use handcuffs. But taser, if you know if you prefer that we can, we can do taser. All right. So talking about the the database is going? No. You talked about the locations multiple, possibly of multiple locations, and how that impacts your plan. Right? So? So normally the trend really is, you know, are there aspects of your infrastructure that could be in the cloud and reduce your costs and and work effectively. And then are there certain assets and usually there are where you need on an internal network. So, you know, there’s there’s different strategies because everyone is unique and how they’re functioning and and what needs to be internal on what can be what can be external? Ok, let’s, talk a little about that. Since the cloud is so common and growing in popularity um, what are the you mentioned cost? First, before we get into what could or maybe shouldn’t be in the cloud? Why is the why is cloud computing cost effective? Well, not only not only is it is it a very low cost, often often a very low cost solution? Sometimes sometimes we can get into scenarios where it’s, not if we’re paying a licensing fee per user, but but there’s certain products where non-profits get just tremendous discounts on so okay, you know, you take you take google apse. Where where non-profit not only could have their email in the cloud, but but could be storing, storing enormous amounts of documents. And this is essentially free to non-profits so that that’s google doc you’re referring, teo? Yeah, because that’s, you know, that’s a attached rate rate to the google email system, you know, so it’s just a tremendous, tremendous product where, you know, non-profits are able to get it through a grant from google for if they have up to three thousand users and they’re certain restrictions, you know, maybe religious organizations or things of that nature, but but, you know, it’s just a fantastic, amazing, amazing product for them, and again, their all their emails than in the cloud is being backed up. They can integrate it, they can connect it with their local microsoft outlook. They want to how would you as a non-profit take advantage of this dahna offering you saying if you have three thousand or fewer users, which is probably all of our listeners, how do they connect? How did they get access to this there’s there’s a there’s, an online tool where you’re able to essentially apply for this for this grant at at google? Google is not great. It may be let’s say, answering the phone to service request because of their size and because the nature of the program so so you know, there’s an online step where they can go through and do this themselves or they could, you know, ask whatever it provider there working with to help them to complete this task, ok, do you know, do you know the name of the program? Call google non-profit something know they’d be looking to apply it’s essentially, like it’s, google, it’s, the google academic or google education? They’re trying to apply for a grant, essentially. So what? They’re going to going to a page that google has, they don’t have the link right in front of me, and they’re they’re filling out this application there, miguel, you’re you’re you’re handy crew has brought this up so so google for non-profits so right here in the studio, just talking about it, doing a quick search on google was able to bring it up on and there’s a process to fill it out, there’s online trainings and how to use it. Okay, so considerable savings because this is a grants all free. Is there anything else? Just give us another example of something that could be in the cloud, like email and documents. What else might be? Well, many of the many of the databases that non-profits we’re looking at now are are in the cloud or they’re done on what could be termed, like an internal cloud. So for instance, let’s say you had a non-profit and you have twelve locations. If you had a network that connected those sites together, you could have a database running at one of your locations and servicing out like an internal cloud to your twelve locations within your network. So it’s sort of like this hybrid model it’s, really? And you don’t hear much a discussion about it. Usually people just talk about the cloud or should we take everything to the cloud are nothing to the cloud, but really there’s some certain certain things that are like low hanging fruit. But you can take advantage of whether it’s the google, whether it’s microsoft’s alternative is thie office three, sixty five product which is a very low cost for non-profits and not not free but low cost. Yeah, hello coca yeah, and and then there’s internal internal internal opportunities where you know there’s there’s sugar serum, for instance, that guy and cr m is what it’s like a it’s like a it’s a database tool, it will be similar to sales force. But there’s a version where you’re allowed to, i think cr emma’s customer relationship management in this case. Yes. Okay. Okay. Sometimes. Yeah. So so so? So an organization could could download this, install it on a server, customize it to their needs and shared out within within their network. Okay, so as part of our plan, we’re going tow. Decide what of our applications belong in the cloud and what need to be stored locally. Right? That’s part of the important decision making, right? Okay, okay, other things that don’t belong offsite on dh really should be. Not if they’re not in the cloud. I know they’re on the ground, but there should be internally maintained and not off site. Are there things like that? A lot of this comes down to an organization’s policies. So if you were to talkto large organizations let’s say, a hospital or someone dealing with patient records, there’s certain requirements they really want to follow for for their own, their own compliance, their own hipaa compliance, their own, their own internal kind of process. So, you know, does it doesn’t meet those requirements, and so so even in a process like this, if you were to come up with potential solutions, most organizations of that size or in that in that field have an internal compliance officer, they have a compliance committee, you’re able to just kind of say, okay, because here’s, the solution does this meet the requirement and go through and again, you’re including everyone within within the organization, okay, what’s, another section that should be part of our plan, so so so databases just to finish that off for a second, a lot of times organisations they’re not really looking at what is the database built on. So it’s it’s sort of like down to that maintenance level, how are they connecting? So unorganised ation overtime might end up with five or six on unconnected databases, so here they have client records all over the place, and then they’re trying to come up with a solution. How they how did they merge them all together to do data analysis? So just kind of looking at that and saying, like, each one of those solutions might have been perfectly fine, but they really might not work all together again. So that’s just part of, you know, a road map on telecom non-profits just because they’re there, you know, there’s, an aggressive kind of sales push in the telecom space, you know, where we’re folks are calling them and their reselling these thes services, so a lot of times they end up on plans that me may not be really benefiting them, you know? And so that’s really no way to make decisions is by a on aggressive sales person calling and prompting you into a different telecom plan or voy data plan or certain hardware that’s not the way to make a decision, and usually the approach is that it xavi things you’re going to save a lot of money and and net and truth be told, the savings aren’t aren’t necessarily there and the performances and isn’t really there for what they want. So it’s it’s sometimes ah struggle, so they want to look at that you might be looking at, you know, a multitude of locations with different phone systems that don’t connect to each other and all of these kind of challenges. So again, we’re back to this fact that the spend is there like the non-profit is thinking they don’t have the reason we’re gonna have to spend the money anyway. They’re they’re pouring if if they were to really look at the numbers, they’re pouring money into maintenance of these systems. I’m with jason hutchins he’s, president of non-profit solutions network, which you’ll find it non-profit solutions dot net, we’re talking about your plan. We are live tweeting the show reminder use hashtag non-profit radio teo join the conversation on twitter khun small non-profits negotiate telecommunications plans and rates do they have any leverage? Well, um, it’s a good question and you can always you can always ask, you can always ask and non-profit really isn’t shy asking for a better deal, you know, because because the non-profit manager, you know, seizes that that’s that’s part of their part of their roles, they’re always there always kind asked that now now the sometimes they’re not sure of what to ask for, and i think that might be, you know, sometimes that’s the hurdle. So, you know, a very expensive product you know with with features that they may never utilize is put down and they’ll ask and they’ll get a discount on that, but there might be. Another product that that really could could do better for them that’s already at that lower price point that’s right there that they just don’t hear about. So you know, whether it’s whether it’s, you know, right now, for instance, you know, verizon will give you a seven meg dear cell for fifty eight dollars time warner would put in a fifteen by two meg internet line. Okay, whoa jargon jail hold on. E-giving taser taser thinking bull i’m thinking live bullets. Okay, fifteen by two what was what was all that? This is the data rate speeds or something. So, you know, you can get you can get just enormous amounts of band with at a very low cost and so normally non-profits now, because they’re already moving so many of their their items into the cloud and they’re getting familiar with doing it. They’re they’re attending webinars. They want that internets alright, alright, but so what’s fifteen by two what did that mean? It’s a it’s. A pretty fast internet line. That’s a fifteen meg download speed and to make upload speed. Okay, that’s first. All right, so the speed at which you get stuff to you is your download speed and writes the speed at which you send stuff up is your upload speed that’s, right? Is upload always going to be that much slower than download is a film? Lee is yeah, they’re not encouraging you to act in that capacity. So so usually that’s where the costs incurred. Okay, so that’s, the data calm and telecom part of the plan. Yeah. And so usually that that that again, if you when you when you look at that there’s there’s tremendous kind of confusion around around those those aspects, ok, okay? And i guess just around that section out, i mean, it wouldn’t only be the plans. And but also the hardware, right? You have to have telecom hard, we have phones. So is that is that? Is that hardware a piece of our plan also? Yeah, because we’ve seen we’ve really seen everything. We did some work with the three one one program and we saw organizations, you know, paying for lisa’s on equipment that they already owned. Because the least bill will just keep coming. You know, organisations are told to just buy a new phone system every time the lease is up. When in reality, the system is probably working fine. And so this, you know, all comes into this, you know, you know, like, what do we really need to do and where we going as an agency? How about staffing? That should be a part of our plan, whether we’re goingto be with a consultant or whether we handle this in house staffing and staff training that part of our plan? Yeah, i think so. So, so so, again, normally the hybrid solution, i think, i think, works well for organizations. They they you take it organization. Once they get past a certain number of a certain number of employees, they really do want it in house capacity, as faras on, you know, on sight presents so so so again, they they often want that person to be working for the organization that they can. They can interact with a consultant to help them bring in the kind of viewpoint of what’s going on in the field what’s happening out in the marketplace, how can we benefit? And then? And then if if you’re able to get an environment where that internal staff is able to collaborate with the consultant and you’re able to get a lot done, okay, so there’s, your hybrid and the and what about training, training, non staff? I mean, most of this, most of the users, if the reason it could be a small shop where there isn’t even a night staff, but most of the users or not tech people, what should be rethinking about around training. So a lot of times, it’s not done, and you’ll alaskan organization, have you ever done any training? And they’ll say, really, really know, you know, it’s, a line item that’s just removed, so, you know, if you don’t have the resource is there, you can go to kind of a trainer train the trainer modality, you know, if you have a lot of a lot of staff, a high account, you could go back to that kind of advocate model where those advocates are really, you know, getting to know the system, so so they’re involved in the process, their understanding, how it works, and they’re able to then spend time with their group, their team, their coworkers. You could also really use some simple tools to control your cost there if you were to do a one on one training, you know, just tape it, do a webinar, archive it, have it for new staff that air coming in how to use the organization’s database. So a lot of times you hear issues like a complicated system might be in place, but there’s a high staff turnover. So how do they keep training new staff route of they? How did they do that? And we’re talking about training just quickly. What? What are a couple of things that we should be training about? What are we training people on? Just how to again, like once once you’ve defined what those company policies are and how they’re using it. So if you were to roll out google aps, how you want to use her to be using the google aps within the organization, the way documents or shared or put in folders in this type of thing on dh while we’re talking about the users of the system, what about their own personal devices? Just and we only have about two minutes left, and i want to get to one other area in the plan so labbate well, everything about whether people can connect with their personal devices to the to the to the network, right? It goes back to the policies. So some organizations we work with there’s a strict policy where they can’t use personal devices, other organizations, you know, again, it’s a it’s it’s really made its way in the marketplace, people, especially with iphones and ipads, that it does reduce the cost of the organization. And depending again on that company culture, the type of data they’re dealing with, you know, it’s acceptable in other place is sort of like, just what are our rules as an organization? Why are we making these rules? And if we’re changing the rules, what are the repercussions there? And and then what happened? So if if someone has email on their personal device and they leave us to work in another organization, it’s just really a simple process to say that emails part of the organization and i’m not a ceo and not your sneering what’s one final area we just have about a minute left what’s, another final area that should be in our plan. We have not talked about finance and again, you might want to take a quick look at just, you know where’s, the organization headed, you know, does the finance system work now? And if we’re looking at a new financial system, what type of work are we doing? What new contracts are we going to get over the next few years to go into place and that? How should are? How should our staff be trained on using that system? Okay, that’s so finance would include accounting and all the receivables and things like that, the finance bank that goes back office and then just in thirty seconds, what about our social media policy? Our social media presence? Does that belong in the plan? Well, i mean, again, it’s, you have what you know, it would fall under kind of, i guess, you know, social communications, the communications department in social media, so so again, we’re then looking at how how is that information cause? A lot of times we’re looking at online databases we were really talking about is online databases or a website that then connex over to facebook and how is that information collected? So if you have an external consultant doing all of your online work and one platform well, your internal consultant doing all of your database work and another platform well, then you’re going to have to do extra work to connect that information because you’re dealing with the same users, we have to leave it there. Jason hutchins, thank you very much for being a good keeper. Having me, jason is the president of non-profit solutions network. You’ll find out non-profit solutions dot net. We have some messages. Then, after those tony’s take two and then scott koegler joins us to talk about the goods on google plus pages, so stay with me e-giving living, tooting, getting, thinking things, you’re listening to the talking, alternate network, things get anything. Good. Are you stuck in your business or career, trying to take your business to the next level, and it keeps hitting a wall? This is sam liebowitz, the conscious consultant. I will help you get to the root cause of your abundance issues and help move you forward in your life. Call me now and let’s. Create the future you dream of. Two, one, two, seven, two, one, eight, one, eight, three, that’s to one to seven to one, eight one eight three. The conscious consultant helping hunters. People be better business people. Hi, this is psychic medium. Betsy cohen, host of the show. The power of intuition. Join me at talking alternative dot com mondays at eleven a. M call in for a free psychic readings. Learn how to tune into your intuition, to feel better and to create your optimum life. I’m here to guide you and to assist you in creating life that you deserve. Listen every monday at eleven a, m on talking alternative dot com. Are you feeling overwhelmed in the current chaos of our changing times? A deeper understanding of authentic astrology can uncover solutions in every area of life. After all, metaphysics is just quantum physics. The express buy-in montgomery taylor and i offer lectures, seminars and private consultations. For more information, contact me at monte m o nt y at r l j media. Dot com talking alternative radio twenty four hours a day. I’m leslie goldman with the us fund for unicef, and i’m casey rotter with us one for unison. You’re listening to tony martignetti non-profit radio big non-profit ideas for the other ninety five percent. Durney welcome back, it’s, time for tony’s. Take two at roughly thirty two minutes after the hour, and the two is spelled out in tony’s. Take, too. We had a question in the studio. It’s, of course, it’s spelled out. My block post this week is the only true job security is working for yourself that’s pretty self explanatory, but i’m interested in your opinion of my conclusion that the only true job security’s working for yourself and you’ll find that on my blogged at m p g a d v dot com. I was at two conferences this week, the westchester county chapter of the association of fund-raising professionals hosted national philanthropy day that was up in briarcliff manor in new york and interviewed they’re about eight people interviews for upcoming shows on things like building a culture of philanthropy within and around your non-profit themed events monthly e-giving strategies. Those were a couple of those are three of the eight interviews that i did in westchester, and i was also at the next-gen charity conference duitz that was just yesterday, and we were in lower manhattan. Regina walton, a social media manager, was there, and we also took shot some video and some of my interviews. They’re included craig newmark, the founder of craigslist. You know, i talked about consistent messaging for your non-profit mark echo of eco enterprises talk about collaboration, and i also talk teo peter. Thumb, the founder of ethos water, he and i talked about perseverance in the face of rejection, and there were many more interviews from both of those conferences this week, and i’ll be playing those oncoming shows, and that is tony’s take two for friday, november eighteenth with me now is our regular tech contributor, scott koegler how you doing out there? Scott? I’m doing great, tony, how you i’m well, where you’re calling from today, you’ve been all over the country recently. I was in phoenix this week, i got home yesterday afternoon and now i am back in north carolina, okay, back home, we’re talking about the goods on google plus pages. Scott koegler is the editor of non-profit technology news, which you’ll find at n p tech news. Dot com scott, we have facebook pages. What what what’s the difference? What? Why? Why do we need google pages? Yeah, you know that’s a good question. Facebook pages certainly are a big deal. Um facebook with eight hundred million users, and i think that that’s pretty much they’ve got the market stumped, but as google plus came along, one of the things that was obviously missing was any kind of ability to put a day a page foreign entity for a corporation for a group, for non-profits none of those things were available. You actually had to actually be a person and prove that you are a person that was a little unusual, and it caused google some issues and some criticism what beginning, but not too long ago, i think a week or so ago they introduced their google plus pages, and that is, as you kind of indicated there roughly equivalent to the facebook pages or canvases or whatever component they want to call them at this point. Okay? And, uh, s so is this something that non-profits should be paying attention to? Should they be jumping in at this point? I would say it’s probably better to jump in then not because the cost of entry is pretty much xero all right, and there is an audience in google, plus one of the things that’s not there yet that i really believed will be coming along shortly is any kind of advertising and promotions. Google plus just doesn’t have advertisement in there right now. It’s very clean. It is it is set up specifically for users to connect with users and not really a commercial venture yet. All right, so well, i just wantto interrupt you. Sorry, that’s, an important distinction between facebook and facebook pages and google page is because way all know we all see on facebook pages that over on the right side there’s lots of ads and they’re targeted to you based on where you live, where you went to school, things like that. But you’re saying google plus is void of all that at the moment. Yes, google pages is probably make no doubt that google is all about advertising and money, but at the moment it’s pretty clean, okay what’s the what’s the plus one that i see on ah, google plus and how does that relate to the facebook google page is the plus one. The plus one is roughly equivalent to facebook’s like function, so when you see the plus one, you click that, and it indicates that you are a supporter of that particular comment of that person. Foreign pages of that particular page, and there’s there’s something the difference is now with plus ing, or liking or following just to bring twitter into it, okay. That what happens, what happens in group a process is what i would call a synchronous liking. In other words, if i like the tony martignetti show and i click the plus one on your google plus page, then you get the benefit of my life, you know, plus ing your page, which it was you certainly would do when we create the twenty martignetti print non-profit that’s not an if it’s okay, otherwise you’re off were out, you’re out, you don’t plus one me, i’ll be nonplussed if you don’t want it all yeah, there you go. Um, that also allows you to put me into a circle and at the same time, i could put you into the circle. So it’s, you know, it’s a mutual admiration, admiration if you’re okay now, we’ve talked aboutthe circles when when you and i first talked about google plus, but why don’t we just remind people what those circles are in google? Plus circles are categorizations in other words, i have you in my in my work circle, not in my family circle, and so you can set these things up on facebook had has just recently introduced the same kind of thing. So when you add a friend in facebook, it’ll what what group do you want to put that in? It seems like they’re they’re certainly doing that in response to the google plus circles, right? Absolutely playing catch up there. But the difference here is that with google plus, when when we like each other, it’s a it’s, a conditional like in other words, it only lasts for a long as i like you for you like me. One of the tactics with twitter was to gain twitter followers, of course, right, right, so if you if you connect with someone on twitter, the idea is that that person will then connect back to you and that what has worked pretty well. What happened next, though, if you’re using one of the strategies, is that i would say, i like you, you know, i’d add you to my twitter, i follow you, right? Follow me back and then i would just follow you leaving me, you know, leaving you still following me. So i got the benefit of basically pulling you into following. So you look better because you’ve you’ve still got me following you, but you’re not. Following me so you look like you have more followers and and that’s ah, devious strategy right there people have been using on twitter exactly, and how come you can’t do that with google pages? Google pages doesn’t just doesn’t support that if you like my google page and, uh and i then like, you know, plus one you back or add you to a circle, all right? And then you take me out of the circle, then you will disappear from my circle, okay, so it doesn’t automatically automatically, okay, i think it’s a good way of doing it, none of that shit that we see on twitter, yeah, what they’re saying is there their strategy is to make this a more balanced way for brands and non-profits brands be able to interact with people that are actually general, that are actually supportive of them? I’m not just because they’re following because they’re being followed right by the way i have in google. Plus, i have ewing, dear close friends circle, and i’m a little disappointed that i’m only i’m liking your work circle is that? What do you say? People? I hardly know work, circle or something, you’re in my dear close friend circle, i will change. I will change you immediately, and i don’t care just create that and just make me the only one in there it doesn’t matter to me i’ll stand by it. I’ll stand alone in your circle. Okay now the good part about google circles is that one never knows what circles exactly where we go have said reading one night that i was in your dear close friend circle you could be lying. Oh, hello. Oh, the connection broke down. No. Uh, no, i hear you. Fine. Good let’s. See? Okay, what we can do? Ah, we could do hangouts on google pages. Can’t wait. Yeah. Why don’t we remind let’s? Remind people with the hangout is and then and then tell us that we hang out is a can be a video conference with multiple people participating. Not everybody has to have the camera on, but in general that’s, the way that it’s promoted is that we will have our cameras on you get a little box with with the with the participants in there and it’s text as well as audio as well. A video and up until just recently, it was limited. Two ten participants. Just just a week or so ago. They raised that. I think they did it at the same time they brought out the pages. You can now have twenty people in a hangout. So that’s that’s. Pretty interesting in it. Uh, i can see where this is moving toward unlimited. Hang out, sweetie. The technology is there. The web cams are easily available. As soon as you have in-kind around tables going on live hangouts you could have seen the technology is they’re so so for a non-profit they could just have a spontaneous. They could just have a hangout. It’s redundant to say spontaneous. Hang out. They could just have a hangout, right? Just declare one and get a bunch of people who who are there. They’re friends. Teo. Teo, participate. Can you can you limit the people who comes like, could you have? Ah, impromptu boardmember board meeting, which you wouldn’t want just anybody. And can you just have certain people in your hangout or you can’t do that? You could do that. Mostly. You do that. By who? You announced the hang out, too. Okay, right. Just don’t, uh, google plus does not automatically announced the fact that you’re hanging out. You could do that, and then you can have a circle of board members, and you can announce a hangout to your circle board members, and it doesn’t have to be spontaneous. You know, you could schedule it, announce it, tell people that you’re going to have it, and then on then, when you bring it online, announce it again, just to remind them, okay, so so not necessarily spontaneous, right? You could do it in advance. Okay, so if you had a hang out with all the people in your dear close friends circle, that would, i would just be hanging out with myself. I was just like me looking in the mirror. It would be me and you, tony that’s it. Okay, dahna. Let’s, see, and we have just about a minute before a break. How do you what’s the best way to promote your your new google plus? Sorry, i keep saying that your new google page at the moment, probably at the same way that you would promote any other page or function that you have you posted in your newsletters, you send it out on facebook or on twitter and announce it the same way that you would announce anything else. It’s, just another venue at this point. Okay, all right, i’m with scott koegler he’s, the editor of non-profit technology news. We’re talking about the goods on google. Plus pages were going to take a break for some messages, and then we return. We’ll start talking with scott about some of maybe you can measure and use some of the google analytics around your new google page, so stay with us. Talking alternative radio twenty four hours a day. Hi, i’m carol ward from the body mind wellness program. Listen to my show for ideas and information to help you live a healthier life in body, mind and spirit, you’ll hear from terrific guests who are experts in the areas of health, wellness and creativity. So join me every thursday at eleven a, m eastern standard time on talking alternative dot com professionals serving community. Oppcoll this is tony martignetti aptly named host of tony martignetti non-profit radio big non-profit ideas for the other ninety five percent technology fund-raising compliance, social media, small and medium non-profits have needs in all these areas. My guests are expert in all these areas and mohr. Tony martignetti non-profit radio fridays one to two eastern on talking alternative broadcasting are you concerned about the future of your business for career? Would you like it all to just be better? Well, the way to do that is to better communication. And the best way to do that is training from the team at improving communications. This is larry sharp, host of the ivory tower radio program and director at improving communications. Does your office need better leadership? Customer service sales or maybe better writing are speaking skills? Could they be better at dealing with confrontation conflicts, touchy subjects all are covered here at improving communications. If you’re in the new york city area, stop by one of our public classes or get your human resource is in touch with us. The website is improving communications, dot com that’s improving communications, dot com improve your professional environment, be more effective be happier and make more money. Improving communications. That’s the dahna i’m christine cronin, president of n y charities dot orc. You’re listening to tony martignetti non-profit radio big non-profit ideas for the other ninety five percent. Welcome back, scott koegler and i are talking about the goods on google, plus pages got their google analytics is so rich in measurement. So is that connected at all to the google pages? Come, we evaluate your page? Yeah, it’s built in on dh it’s it’s a nice thing because pretty much any website now has has google analytics kind of baked into it, so people are already accustomed to looking at analytics and understanding how how google accumulates and reports that information. So the fact that the pages are also included in your analytics accounts, it is just it’s great and it’s a it’s, a natural kind of flow in the in addition to what google plans on doing, and i think it’s going to go farther, i think any of the components that google already produces in any of its properties is bound to find its way onto google plus, so if someone plus ones your page, then you can learn about who those people are that are doing it in the aggregate, like what their interests are is that is that kind of is that the kind of data that a non-profit could enjoy using and a good question. I’m not sure how deeply into the specifics the analytics gets, and there are privacy issues, of course. Facebook, it’s, it’s well known that you khun subscribed the facebook and the people that you like can either send messages to you automatically by way of the attributes that the things that you like, but i’m not sure whether google is going to get to the point where they’ll say, hey, tony liked you in that that you could get out of your circles, but in terms of analytics, i think it’s kind of more broad in terms of numbers and times and events and why and when rather than who? Okay, okay, would we be expecting less spam on on because of google pages or because of the because of the this automatic, unlike ing, i guess, or i’m not sure how to say it, but un connecting when when i disconnect. So is that going to you think lied to their being less spam, fewer messages that that i don’t want? I would think so. I think that google has a plan tto make this a more riel and more direct connection between brands and their supporters that’s kind of the overall mantra that i’ve repeated many times they want to make this a real connection between the people that like or support a particular brand and the brand itself, so that can be more engaged and they use the word engaged quite a bit. I’m not exactly sure what that means, but i’m sure they will tell us how they’re going to enable that, so we’re likely to see then fewer plus ones on a google page. Then we see there are then we have likes on a facebook page, but the connection is closer. Aye, that’s the plan yes, with connection should be closer again. I’m not sure how that how that will work out what the plan is to do that, that that that is where they’re going with. Okay, where would a non-profit goto to create a google page? Where’d you even get started with that? The best? The first thing to do is to create a google plus account, which means creating google plus or google profile, so you have to start with a with a personal page, and at that point you can then create a a little plus page. And that, i believe, is right on the right on your google plus account. In fact, i think it said, just close mine over on the right hand side. Yep, there it is, toward the bottom of page create a google plus page. Okay, so simply click that and off you go. Okay, so you started on your own personal google plus pages that right? And then down in the lower right you’re saying is where it says create an organization page or something like that, right? I looked at my stream, so the stream of it is my personal google plus account. And the beginning point of all this is the google needs to know that you are actually a real person and that’s why they want their profile once you validated yourself, then you’ve got the ability to create a google post page, which you could do for an entity for a company for a non-profit for a group of what okay, you represent and to create that google plus account to prove that your identity you have to have a valid email address, right? Yes, correct. Is that that’s how they know that you’re a real person? Cause they’re going to confirm exactly. Okay, got anything else you want to leave us with? About google pages? I would say jump in early and get something going. And there’s no, no downside to it. And it really. I set one up. It took me about ten minutes. Very simple to do, of course, it’s possible to get very, very complex. Look at some of the examples that are up there bmw and mercedes, coca cola. And there are literally thousands of this point, but they could be essentially full websites in and of themselves, but i would say, start out, get going and get prepared. Excellent. Thank you very much. Scott koegler my dear close friend in my dear close friend, circle on google, google plus is also just incidentally, i mean that’s the most important thing. But incidentally, he’s, the editor of non-profit technology news which you’ll find it n p tech news. Dot com and scott will have you back. Of course, next month. I think it’s only have a good one. Thank you very much. Happy thanksgiving to you too. Thank you. Next week, because of thanksgiving, there won’t be a show, but i hope you’ll be celebrating the things that you have to be thankful for, and we all have many of those and take time to do that, and i really hope you don’t go shopping on thanksgiving day. I just think that’s atrocious, that shopping will be available on december second. Oh, so we won’t have a show next week, but on december second, friday will be kristin schultz from crescendo interactive and she’s going to share. Schultz is sharing social networking best practices for planned gif ts that’s, kristen schultz from crescendo sharing social networking best practices for planned gif ts and that is based on her research and their interviews with non-profits and are contributing legal team will have something legal to talk about. That is, of course, jean takagi and emily chan from the non-profit and exempt organizations law firm in san francisco, are regular legal contributors. Keep up with what’s coming up on this show for pizza! Sign up for our insider email alerts on the facebook page you can fill out a very simple form and get the weekly alerts. If you like the show like us on facebook, you can listen to the show live or archive. You’ve been listening, live i archive is on itunes, and you’ll find itunes our page at non-profit radio dot net. Subscribe and listen on the device of your choice at the time of your preference on twitter. You can follow me, you can use the show’s hashtag, use it with impunity that hashtag is non-profit radio, the creative producer of tony martignetti non-profit radio is claire meyerhoff, our line producer. Today is janice, the owner of non-profit, the owner of talking alternative broadcasting is sam liebowitz. Our social media is by the excellent and today in the studio, regina walton of organic social media. I hope you’ll be with me on friday, december second, when i’ll be back in the studio at one p, m eastern for tony martignetti non-profit radio, always heard at talking alternative dot com. No, i don’t think you’re getting it. You’re listening to the talking alternate network. Thank you, e-giving thinking. Duitz good. Looking to meet mr or mrs right, but still haven’t found the one. Want to make your current relationship as filling as possible? 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The Premiere of the Tony Martignetti Show: Big Nonprofit Ideas for the Other 95%

Rideau ! courtesy of Constuview on Flickr
THE TONY MARTIGNETTI SHOW: Big Nonprofit Ideas for the Other 95%

— Compliance.
— Board relations.
— Fundraising.
—Technology.
— Volunteer management.
— Accounting.
— Finance.
— Marketing.
— Social media.
— Investments.

Every nonprofit faces these issues. Big nonprofits have experts in all areas.

The other 95% have The Tony Martignetti Show. Trusted experts and thought leaders throughout the country join me to take on the tough issues facing small and medium size organizations.

This week:

  • I Welcome You To My Show (so new it’s not branded yet)
  • Starting Your Planned Giving Program; guest Steve Imperato, Future Funds.
  • Cloud Computing is Perfect for Smaller Nonprofits; guest Scott Koegler, editor, Nonprofit Technology News.
  • Boards: Recruiting; Retaining; and Releasing Recalcitrants; guest Michael Davidson, board coach.

Listen: Friday, July 16th, 1-2 Eastern, and every Friday or listen to the podcast; coming to iTunes soon.

Where: Talking Alternative Broadcasting

You can subscribe on iTunes and listen anytime, anyplace on the device of your choosing.

Sign-up for show alerts!

“Like” the show’s Facebook page.

I hope you’ll join me. Please don’t listen to just the last 15 seconds.