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Nonprofit Radio for August 5, 2016: Multichannel Fundraising Survey & Smart Email Marketing

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Peter Panepento: Multichannel Fundraising Survey

Which channels are earning nonprofits the best returns on their fundraising dollars and where will investment expand in 2017? Consultant Peter Panepento authored The Chronicle of Philanthropy’s report, “Fundraising In A Multichannel World.”

 

 

Tiffany Neill & Ann Crowley: Smart Email Marketing

Tiffany Neill & Ann Crowley at 16NTC

It’s one of the successful channels and it takes more than good copy. Our panel from the 2016 Nonprofit Technology Conference takes on the full process of a successful email campaign. They are Tiffany Neill, partner at Lautman Maska Neill & Company, and Ann Crowley, vice president of membership and online strategy for Human Rights Campaign.

 

 


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Hello and welcome to tony martignetti non-profit radio big non-profit ideas for the other ninety five percent. We have a listener of the week pulawski joshy. She messaged me that non-profit radio was one of her first shows when she started working in the sector and she loves my solitude video more about that in tony’s, take two so pulawski thank you, olivia joshy, thank you for being with us and congratulations on being our listener of the week. Oh, i’m glad you’re with me. I get hit with a bad case of mathos thomas iesus if i merely smelled the fishy idea that you missed today’s show multi-channel fund-raising survey, which channels are earning non-profits the best returns on their fund-raising dollars and where we’ll investment expand in twenty seventeen. Consultant peter panepento authored the chronicle of philanthropy is report fund-raising in a multi channel world and smart email marketing it’s one of the successful channels and it takes more than good copy. Our panel from the twenty sixteen non-profit technology conference takes on the full process of a successful email campaign. They are tiffany neil, partner at lautman, maska, neil and company, and and crowley, vice president of membership in online strategy for human rights campaign between the guests on tony’s take two solitude and major announcements that i should’ve made last week. We’re sponsored by pursuant full service fund-raising data driven and technology enabled, you’ll raise more money pursuant dot com and by we be spelling not your seventh grade spelling bees for charities, we be spelling dot com glad to welcome back peter panepento he’s, a freelance writer and principle for panepento strategies, a communications consultancy working with non-profits foundations and companies that serve the sector. He’s, a former managing former assistant managing editor with the chronicle of philanthropy, you’ll find him at panepento dot com and at p panepento peter panepento welcome back. Great to talk to you, tony. And glad teo. Glad to be back on the show. A pleasure. Pleasure. I love your name. Because it’s so musical and a literate ivo i just love it. Peter panepento i like saying very, very fortunate with monica. I didn’t like it growing up, but i love it. Oh, yeah. Now the obliteration. Of course. I love liberations. But you know it’s, just it’s. Very musical. I love it. And ah, little italian pun, eh? Bread pento is repent. So did you know you have? Surely i’m sure that you’ve surely you’ve translated your name before having you. Oh, absolutely. Yeah. Yeah. So repentant bread. I don’t know. Have you sinned? And you’re baking bread in independence or what? I don’t know what that means. But i think that for another podcast completely, i think so. You don’t talk about well, okay, then. That was in that. In that case, we talk about this for twenty minutes, then on multi-channel fund-raising gets about three. Okay. Um, you know, i love move your name. Okay. Oh, yeah. Go ahead. You know, i mean, it’s always great when we get martignetti together. It’s a great combination of names that’s true and don’t i love the way you pronounce martignetti thank you. Thank you. Um, so, multi-channel fund-raising this, uh, this report based on a survey tell us about this. Yeah. So i started working with the chronicle late last year to take a real close. Look at how non-profits and specifically fund-raising departments are making, uh, making sense and investing in the explosion and the number of channels that they have at their disposal for fund-raising aziz. You know, and i’m sure a lot of listeners know we’ve we’ve really seen ah, really expansion of a number of options that fund-raising shops have to talk, teo acquire and solicit donors, you know, from everything from email, social media, online’s mobile. I’m all of these new channels are giving folks a lot of options, and there were also rendering a lot of other channels are absolute, so we wait really set out to try tio talked to non-profits and survey them and find out how they’re shifting their reese is and which which of these channels are more most successful to them? And what we did was we ended up working with a survey firm, campbell rinker, out of california, and we got responses from nearly five hundred non-profits of all sizes. Hoo hoo provided some really interesting insights on how these spring and what they might be in the fundraisers. Did you do cement? Irv uses part of this too? Yes, once we got the results back, i i reached out and spoke teo quite a few fundraisers across the country, from both local small organizations to some really big national charities to okay, cool now, um the headline is that the the old school one toe, one solicitation, my voice just cracked like i’m fourteen again hyre is ruling in in terms of effectiveness, yes, and i would imagine it doesn’t surprise a lot of folks to know that even with all of these different channels that we have that the most effective and the most popular form of fund-raising still is the one on one half, and when we we spoke to fundraisers about you know which channels they used the most and which ones were most effective, we found that personal solicitations were not only the most still the most popular and more than nine out of ten charity say that personal solicitations are are a part of their fund-raising mix now, but that also that they are still the most effective in terms of r a y and in fact, seven out of ten organizations in the survey said they’re becoming more effective than in the past. So with all of these different channels that we have to communicate with each other now, and maybe even because of that, all of these channels exists. Um, one on one the you know, the art. Of a person asking another person directly that they, you know, presumably built a relationship with remains the most effective form of fund-raising now, this does this include online one toe, one like i’m we’re doing a, you know, a peer-to-peer campaign does that does that include this? Or is this familiar? Peer-to-peer separately and okay here was actually did very well as well. In fact, half of the organizations in the survey said that peer-to-peer fund-raising is becoming a more effective form of fund-raising for them than it has been in the past, you know, it it doesn’t quite have the same level of popularity that personal solicitations do, but you know, those peer-to-peer campaigns and and, you know, the act of having, you know, one donor askanase other donor for for support for their favorite charity is is has been and is continuing to be very effective, okay? All right, i got you. All right. So the so the personal solicitation we’re talking about is the old school calling on the phone or meeting and and making an ask right that we’re talking about personal, so okay, okay, alright. Cool. That’s the headline, but there’s a lot more. To cover s o, peter and i were gonna go out for a break. When we come back, we’ll cover all the rest of this multi-channel fund-raising survey. Stay with us, you’re tuned to non-profit radio. Tony martignetti also hosts a podcast for the chronicle of philanthropy. Fund-raising fundamentals is a quick ten minute burst of fund-raising insights, published once a month. Tony’s guests are expert in crowdfunding, mobile giving event fund-raising direct mail and donor cultivation. Really, all the fund-raising issues that make you wonder, am i doing this right? Is there a better way there is? Find the fund-raising fundamentals archive it. Tony martignetti dot com that’s marketmesuite n e t t i remember there’s, a g before the end, thousands of listeners have subscribed on itunes. You can also learn maura, the chronicle website, philanthropy dot com fund-raising fundamentals the better way. Dahna welcome back to big non-profit ideas for the other ninety five percent. I feel like doing live listener love right this minute, and there are a lot from texas, so i wanted very much thank j c and joan, the hosts of the previous show. Twenty first century entrepreneur forgiving non-profit radio, a shout out that was very gracious of them and it looks like a lot of their texas listeners hung in there. Houston, austin, sugarland live listener loved to you, let’s. Bring it right here to new york, new york, new york, bronx, new york, queens, new york live listener love to all five boroughs, even though staten island and and who’s, who we missing staten island in brooklyn, are not not with us this minute. They certainly have been in the past. So extend the live love even to the to borrow is not represented and focus on the three that are bronx, manhattan and queens gillette newjersey live listener loved to new jersey that’s ah that’s fairly new i think charlotte, north carolina love north carolina live listen loved head they headed there and lincoln tonight oh, lincoln’s in north carolina also. Thank you. Cool love. North carolina, you know, i’m on emerald isle ah, three weeks out of each month, let’s, go let’s, go abroad. Mexico, mexico, monterrey, mexico live listener loved to you. That would be a good afternoon. So we would say, argast artis, when a star dies precisely romania, iran, cambodia live. Listen, her love to you, love, ah, cambodia, don’t think we’ve seen you before in southeast of asia. Welcome on biron and romania. Also korea, you know, always so, so gracious, south korea, always with us on your haserot comes a ham nida and china always always at least one from japan, although i mean china, although we’ve got multiple today, ni hao and multiple from japan as well, so grateful for that live listen love to japan, konnichi wa. Peter panepento we’re going to get to the rest, i mean, don’t forget the affiliate affections and podcast pleasantries, of course, but peter panepento is waiting patiently, their hearing, breathing heavily science coming durney live listeners does this clown has give it a rest already in romania, they know you were a man of so many languages well, so many listeners, yes, only a few languages, but but there’s, this this show cut across states, counties, continents, we’re everywhere. All right, um, okay, anything else you want to say about the personal solicitation being the most way we covered that you think, well, i think i think one one point i thought of during the break there was that, you know, as i spoke to some fundraisers about this, i think one of the takeaways on this is just the fact that with people being so tied to their, you know, mobile devices and so connected online that they actually really appreciate the personal connection mohr when they can get it, and that is actually, you know, working in the favor of organizations who are investing in, uh, more on the ground face-to-face fund-raising there, you know, donors really appreciate that x for personal touch probably now more than ever before, and that applies also to millennials. I’m finding that, um, the misconception there is a misconception that millennials don’t want to meet anybody, they just want to do all their giving and shopping online and, you know, they love events they love coming out now, i’m not sure about the personal solicitation meeting, i’m not i’m not going quite that far, but in terms of gathering’s face-to-face meetings, events, you know, as long as the thing is fun, they love getting out absolutely and a big thing for millennials to is authenticity and there’s nothing more authentic than you know, shaking somebody’s, hand and looking him in the eye and talking teo and that’s that’s a really i value that the millennial generation is bringing to the table on dh articulating quite a bed. And i think as that generation matures and they actually become more likely to be ableto give it higher levels, i think those personal solicitations air going toe going to continue to be really important for those dahna relationships i get so many invitations for just usually une male coffee or lunch coffee line you know from people from millennials twenty thirties on, and i’m happy to do it, you know? I mean, if they want to sit with fifty four year old that’s their life, you know? So what am i going? No, but there’s a misconception that we need to beat that down. And the last thing about personal solicitation, i see you have this outstanding graphic about future investment. And ninety nine percent of charities that answered are goingto either spend the same or invest more in personal solicitations next year. That’s absolutely right. And, you know, that is really on an important stand, i think. It’s it’s, um, almost, you know, almost surprising just how overwhelming that is and help those two thirds of them are actually planning to increase their investment. And in personal solicitations, nominally, they’re investing in that they’re going to be increasing their investment in it, which is which is really powerful. Yeah. Agree. All right. Excellent. Um, direct mail doing very well. Yes. Direct mail. One of the really interesting things that came out of this survey. Wass the shift in attitude toward direct mail. I remember. And we had some discussions about this. A few. Years ago to tonia, i remember that, you know, direct mail is is, you know, in danger getting phased out of some organization. Were you really wondering whether or not they should just kill the of the the direct mail letter in investing all digital? And what we’re finding is that direct mail is not only remaining the third most popular channels for multi for multi-channel investment, but that it’s also ah channel, in which organizations are starting to step up their investment again after years of scaling back in it. Um, we found that almost a third of organizations that they’re planning to invest more resource is and direct mail over the next year by-laws than they have in the previous year and and that’s actually at a faster rate than things like email in social media in terms of increased investment over the next year. Yeah, you have a quote in the in the study that its still a world where people were thinking print first and digital second in planning campaigns. Yeah, i mean, even with all of the increased investment that we found in digital channels, latto you know, direct mail remains really, really popular and builders still respond to what a particularly the more mature donors, too, you know, are used to giving that way and remain a very important audience for non-profits so important to recognize our our top two channels, our traditional what might have been called dinosaurs, you know, years ago as social media emerged, but they’re not dinosaurs, they’re not. If they’re dinosaurs are not extinct yet because they’re talking about we’re talking about face-to-face and direct mail? Absolutely. And and and not only are they not going extinct, they’re they’re making a bit of a comeback. So what does that make them? Uh, i don’t know what we have. Ah, was i mean, i know that maybe they were the share of ah share. Tio that’s. Very good. I just picked up one of her dvds a couple months ago with this she’s got his flamboyant pink outfit and the cover the dvd is, is it called a hologram? Or you you turn it, you know, you you turn in the light and you get different images of her. I think i picked up for a light. Well, sorry share. I picked it up for like, a book, but i had to i had to just have it for the cover. I loved it. I loved. Um okay, so maybe the share. Yeah. Um all right, so don’t abandon traditional methods. Ok? So let’s move into the more current and social media also strong also strong. Not always this strong, but organizations are really continuing. Teo double down on their investment in social media. Um, we sell that sixty percent of organizations over the last two years have put more resources into social media, and they’re reporting that they’re planning to continue to to to invest more in it. More than half of the groups in the survey said they plan to invest maurin social media over the next year. And this really comes despite the fact that for a lot of organizations, they’re they’re having a hard time really articulating what the return on that investment is. Yes. So they’re not necessarily seeing direct dollars coming in the door through social media. But they are still thing enough value and where they want to continue to invest more in it as a as a donor acquisition tool and dahna communication stole. I see ninety seven percent are going to spend the same or mohr you said, as you said, over half spending mohr and, like forty four percent spending the same why why is it still getting increased investment? Um and so much attention so much the share of resources if we are having so much trouble identifying r a y well, it’s interesting, i spoke to a number of organizations, including some really sophisticated groups like make a wish and and the less association who say that even if they can’t put a direct dollar figure on what’s coming in, they’re they’re noting that social media is a great channel of bringing new people on their websites and getting them to sign up for e mails and other things like that. So that’s one thing and other is that it’s becoming increasingly necessary for organizations, particularly on facebook, to get noticed, you actually have to invest in promoting their posts and, you know, actually, you know e-giving facebook and lincoln and twitter um essentially at you no at investment, tio have their post get noticed by doing that, not only are they getting more clicks and like, they’re also getting some better, some better metrics back from those platforms, in terms of how people are engaging with their posts to sow some of that, i think is out of necessity, you know, you can’t keep the same level of investment and get the same results on facebook if your charity anymore. So, you know, some groups are putting ad money against it, where in the past they weren’t doing that right? I hear a lot of frustration about facebook because the organic reaches so small now and so much smaller than it used to be, and and you do have to put ad money against it if if you want to keep that reach high. Yeah, it’s purely i hear a lot of frustration, okay? And another part of your message is that there are other ways of measuring success besides strict return on investment. So if you’re getting more people signing up your email list, if that’s an action that you’re asking for, you’re seeing more unique visitors to your sight may be to the donation page on your site, even if they’re not translating to donations there are there are other methods of measuring return on social media other than strict dollars absolutely, and that’s i think the really interesting point that and and way of expressing it, tony, is that, um, you know, it may not lead to a direct donation, but those those folks that you’re engaging with on social networks are, you know, that that might be their first weigh in the organisation for them to be communicating with you in other ways, and you may actually be getting success through some of the other fund-raising channels as a result of you making that initial contact with a potential donor on a social network. You have you have a graphic in the survey that that covers the different methods of measuring success besides the ones we’ve talked about growth over previous efforts, long term donorsearch al you net yield per donor. So those are some other method, good, right? Right? And, you know, in on top of things, just like revenue raised and donors acquired, which are, um, kind of the obvious wants some of these other ones are metrics that organizations are starting to use mohr regularly to try tio to figure out how these different channels are performing and how they can make better decisions about where to invest later, yeah. You know, it’s, just yeah, you have to be able to say more than, you know, you just got to be there, but i mean, intuitively you do because there are just so many billions of people on facebook on four billion or five billion or something twitter, i think is over a billion users, um, you gotta be able to say more than that, it’s just it’s a lot of people, and so i like that the survey got moves like seven different six different methods of measuring return, not just yet. I think that, you know, what we’re starting to see is that organizations are becoming more sophisticated and how they’re measuring how they’re measuring these different things, and they’re putting mohr effort into actually trying tio better understand, you know, dahna behavior and their own in their own efforts at acquiring and, you know, building relationships with donors, how would you characterize non-profits as a group, we’re generalizing in terms of technology, adoption, do you feel like they’re slow to adopt? They wait for the corporate side to do it? Or do you feel like they jump in a little quicker, but not fully understanding and maybe that’s ah, maybe that’s to their detriment. That’s an interesting question, and i think, you know, if if you when you asked that question five or ten years ago, i think the consensus in the non-profit community was that, you know, that we were slow to adopt and that we were really reticent to to invest in new things and trying new things with technology, i think that’s starting to shift, i don’t necessarily think that we’re, you know, as a zone industry, we’re going to be rivaling silicon valley in front of of our willingness. Tio tio, jump in feet first, things that we don’t really know online, but, you know, there’s been enough success out there, and there have been enough for thinking organizations that have in front runners on some of these technologies that that it’s, you know, that the case can be more easily made toe boards and too, and the top leadership in organizations that it’s worth experimenting a little bit with new things and trying them out, but seeing where they go and you know, the digital capacity is still probably not where it needs to be with a lot of organizations but it’s a lot deeper now than it was even a few years ago. Andi, you only have to look at things like the growth of of interest in the non-profit technology conference every year and just the amount of social media and online activity that’s happening across the sector now. Let’s, talk about mobile, you call mobile a conundrum. Yes, um, and this was an area where a number of groups actually dove in and tried to invest in mobile and text to give early on and found out that they weren’t really getting the results they wanted to. So they’re starting to scale back a little bit in in their investment and mobile. Now. So, you know, of the groups that are actually using mobile, only forty percent say that their efforts were more effective in the past year than they were yeah, in the past year than they were the previous year they’re started there’s a really, um, there’s a real struggle out there for organizations to really figure out how to best use mobile other than using it as a you know, kind of, i know of ah, you know, a modified way of looking at their websites. There, there aren’t a whole lot of really successful mobile e-giving campaigns that that organizations air finding to be useful, important to point out that only thirteen percent of the respondents are actually using mobile and of those of those platform, you know, you know, in talking to organizations for the reporting on this, we’re finding that groups are finding some pretty creative ways to use mobile, even if they’re not using it as a standalone channel. Um, i spoke tio, the top fundraiser at the quietness institute in rochester, new york, which is a which is a private high school there, and they have actually done away with their traditional phone, a phones where a woman i would gather and do a night of calling teo their classmates and i have kind of replaced it with almost like a texting and facebook base kind of outreach for using the same idea everybody gets together with their mobile phones that starts texting classmates that they knew and hitting those short donations or or messaging them through facebook on their mobile phones. Hill yes, she didn’t count that as mobile fund-raising but it’s still using mobile devices for for, you know in-kind of using the unique powers of mobile devices fund-raising and hybrid ing that with the peer-to-peer za peer-to-peer ask itjust happened, happens by text exactly exactly so in some cases, we’re seeing these channels, you know, maybe falling in one bucket, but but they actually utilize technology that might be included in another bucket of in terms of how they’re measured. Peter, we have just a little less than a minute left, and i want to wrap up with the management of all these multi-channel methods is now multi department that’s, right? That’s one of the other interesting storylines coming from the surveys we asked, you know which department is in charge of all of these different all of these different channels? And in which cases is that more than one? And you know, by and large, you know, the development shop is still very engaged with with all of these different channels, but, you know, depending on the channel, usually between a quarter to assist of them are being managed by multiple departments means that there’s some, you know, they’re both being held accountable for the results of of those campaigns and it’s becoming a much more collaborative. Environment now where the development of the development department really needs to be working a lot more closely with you, with communications, with marketing, with technology to make sure they’re being success. Peter panepento follow this guy on twitter for pizza because you’re gonna learn a lot at at p panepento and he’s at panepento. Dot com peter, thank you so much. Thank you. And the surveys also free and for download that philanthropy dot com slash multi-channel fund-raising for anybody who wants to check it out in more detail philanthropy dot com slash multi-channel fund-raising cool. Thank you again. Thanks a lot, tony. Smart email marketing is coming up first. Pursuant, they’ve got free research for you. Also another free research report. It’s their report optimize your donor pipeline. You need to raise more money. You need a fat pipeline of pipeline that’s a pipeline of potential donors coming in that’s a piece today. This report is going to help you do that. It’s going, build, retain optimize your daughter pipeline it’s free optimize your donor pipeline it’s at pursuing dot com and then click resource is we’ll be spelling again. You need to raise more money host we’d be spelling spelling bee. This is not your mother’s spelling bee this’s, not even your seventh grade spelling bee. We’ll be spelling bees have live music and dance, stand up comedy prizes in lots of categories, not just best speller. That would be so mundane and there’s, a spelling bee wrapped up in all this. The ceo alex career. I hope you were with me last week for the three hundred show he was on the line, called in. Check them out, we be spelling dot com and b is b e. For tony steak, too. Solitude. You are doing very giving work day in, day out, saving lives, changing the world. You need to take time for yourself. And i encourage this. Nearly every summer, i think my effort, my campaign. This summer is encapsulated in ah, in my video encouraging you to take time alone, my solitude video and it happens to be the first video with a full cast. You could figure out that that is at tony martignetti dot com. I’ve got major announcements announcements that i was so excited last week that i forgot to make first pursuing continuing their sponsorship, pursuing to staying with us so grateful to ceo trent ryker and all the people i work with that pursuing holly snell and and down hillary, etcetera, grateful for their continued sponsorship at pursuing thank you so much. Also brand new. You may have heard of the stanford social innovation review you may know that ssr has a podcast page getting hundreds of thousands of your tickets and downloads each month. Well, guess what, the newest entrant there’s going to be non-profit radio, thank you very much. Stanford social innovation review you’re going to start to be ableto here non-profit radio on the ssr podcast page that’s going to be starting shortly. Very excited with that that’s. A big name. Stanford, california. Come on. I mean, come on. And that is tony’s. Take two podcast pleasantries. I disassociated the podcast pleasantries from the live listener love and that’s okay to do. I think they can stand independent of each other, but the pleasantries go out to the people listening in the time shift, whatever you’re doing, whatever device, whatever time you are listening pleasantries to you are over ten thousand and the affiliate affections they could stand with the podcast pleasantries or the live listen love, or they could stand alone because the affections air strong, they could stand independent if they needed to, and maybe they will. But for now, they’re associated with the podcast pleasantries because i am sending affections to our am and fm affiliate stations and listeners throughout the country. So glad that you’re with me on the traditional the old but still critical, just like the face-to-face solicitations system solicitations, the am and fm media still important affections to those listeners. Here is my interview on smart email marketing, a very important channel from the non-profit technology conference. Welcome to tony martignetti non-profit radio coverage of sixteen ntcdinosaur twenty sixteen non-profit technology conference at the convention center in san jose, california second session of the of the conference and i’m with tiffany, neil, and and crowley tiffany city closest to me is a partner at lautman, maska, neil and company and and crowley is vice president of membership and online strategy for human rights campaign. Ladies welcome. Thank you. Thank you. Your session topic is what you mean. There’s more to email, more to mail than just writing copy for a fund-raising email so we’re gonna go way beyond just good copy out let’s see, tiffany, what you believe is the dahna shortcoming that a lot of non-profit or shortcomings latto non-profits have around email marketing. I think a lot of organizations spent a lot of time thinking about that first message that people are going to receive, and they don’t take a lot of time thinking about the total experience that that person is going to have once they choose to engage with that email so they don’t think about it in terms of the supporter, the donor who’s receiving that message, they just say, i am sending this wonderful email and they will just do exactly what i want there’s a whole process, there’s a whole process begins within gay exactly through your well written email. Exactly talk a little about subject line, etcetera, but yeah, we want the whole lot the whole process. Exactly. I mean, i can ignore every email in my inbox if i want to that’s my prerogative, and i think a lot of times non-profits just assumed because human rights campaign, which is a wonderful organization, is sending a message that everyone’s going to open it and respond. And did you feel that you needed some help around your email channel? I think we’ve been very fortunate in our ability, tio send out e mails and get people to respond, but that’s, mostly because our issue has really been on the front lines of of the, you know, what’s happening in the last few years, but i do believe it is getting harder to get folks to open our emails and engage once we’ve gotten past marriage equality, the response rates were starting to see a slight decline, okay? And you do have i mean, it seems like human rights campaign would have headlines nearly every day, if not way have refugee crises around the world, and i’m just scratching the surface you work there, but now there’s a lot to talk about. Yes. Although hrc only works on lgbt issues in the u s o okay, all right, so then refugee crisis worldwide is appropriately okay, very good. Still all right? So after marriage equality, okay, so then you didn’t have so many headlines drop correct? Yeah, just got a little bit more of a challenge, although right now we’re experienced experiencing a lot of states, trying to revoke a lot of the rights that have been voted in so it’s, still very pertinent and happening and that’s, our job is to get people toe, stay with us and engage in the same level that they had been. Okay, let’s, stay with you. And i’m sure we first approach are thinking about une mail campaign that were you want? Yeah, i mean, i think it depends, is it is it fund-raising or is it sit advocacy? And if it’s advocacy is that because something is currently going on right now that you need to engage your list in? And if the answer to the advocacy question is yes, then we always ask ourselves, what is the theory of change if we send out this e mail and we ask arlis to do something? What is going to come out of their action? So for instance, we are in the middle of trying to get congress, in particular the judiciary committee, to hold a hearing for the vacancy of the supreme court, and we’ve been asking our list too directly email mitch mcconnell and hold a hearing so there’s a clear theory of change there. So if it’s fund-raising and you guys, you know, organizations feel like they need to send out e mails to raise money is which we all do then really think about what the messages and his tiffany alluded to earlier, not only what the message is initially, but what the visuals are, what comes after they send in money? Is there a proper thank you, there’s? Just various steps to the process. Okay, again, a long process, but sounds like starting with what is your goal exactly? Call ultimately there’s some call to action that’s, right? Is it? Fund-raising isn’t volunteering write a letter. Writing is calling. Raise it. Signing a petition? Yeah. Calling the governor. Yeah, that that’s exactly right. I mean, we really stop and think about every situation and if something is needed and we feel like we can make a difference in particular in a state, for instance, then then we’re going to do it. Okay, okay. All right. So, tiffany, after we’ve got our goal set, where do we go? Where we go from there? Well, i think where i mean, really where it starts from us. Who is that message going to be from? And i think that that sender is something that, especially with hrc, we spend a lot of time thinking about in testing different senders to make sure that when someone’s looking at a bunch of emails in their inbox, they want to open this it’s it’s from somebody that they feel has something to tell them that they need to respond to sew that it’s that’s the first part is to figure out who’s this message going to be from okay, who it’s from and i guess maybe this is subsumed in what you were saying and but who’s it going to? Yeah, we’re subset of our constituency is going to get get this. All right? We’ve got we’ve got our center. We’ve we’ve tested and testing of course, important throughout this process. How does that work if you’re trying to listeners tryingto inaugurate a campaign. How do you test them and kick off at the same time? Well, it’s, i mean, these work together it’s great with a sender. Because we can send ten percent of the message out and send half of that ten percent one centre and half of that ten percent another center in whichever sender gets more opens. Then we send that out to the rest of the constituencies. So those kind of things we contest really in real time so that we know we can get the immediate response subject line forward, subject lying falls in that for the preview text. The thing that people see in their inbox before they actually opened the message. Those first few words, all of those things we test on the outbound message, especially with things that are time sensitive. We want to get those test results back quickly so that we can implement it. And if people need to act quickly, we get we get to them right away. We spent a minute on something that’s. A little bit of a peeve. Which is seeing in that preview to view this message better, right? If it’s not rendering right in your mobile version. Click here. Right? Is that a terrible waste of landscape? Yes, absolutely. Yeah, yeah. Oh, yeah. I know what it’s called. What? The preview pain. Okay, and actually we in our presentation today, we actually touch on that because i don’t think it’s one of those things that organizations are moving so quickly, maybe they haven’t thought about that the experience, but for us, hrc our list is younger than a lot of other organizations and therefore there’s ah hyre usage of their mobile when they’re reading our emails. So we do everything mobile optimized, figuring that our folks are reading it on the phone. They’re moving quickly. We’re going to say it in the preview text what we want them to do or what the issue is, and at that point, they’re going to decide to open it and go take the next step or not, when you have your session, would you please tell the audience that this ticks me off? Well known, everyone will say, tony is very annoyed by that. Come back with one thirty four and render your your support for a proper preview checks but it’s one of the things that hrc does well is there’s an army of testers, and every tester has a different mobile device. So what may work on apple may not work on android, so, tony, if you have a different phone, yours may break up in someone else’s won’t. So we do all of that testing before the message ever goes out to consider, you know, even at work, someone was workout of outlook and some of us work out of google and things were under differently and while maybe annoying, i’m always the outlook girl, so i’m always like, it looks funny on that look and, you know, so for the seven other outlook, users were going toe we’re going to see it, right? Okay. All right. What? What else? So let’s, stay with this a couple seconds. What else can we easily test? Got sender subject line preview text? What else? Simple detect. The other thing that we test is in the call to action the words that appear on the button. We’re asking people to do something and really wants to test. Click here. We’re calling it the nineteen nineties tests, but we’ve found that saying, tony, you know, act now versus just act now versus, you know, change, change this do their job. And then i see more organizations using chip in exact and contribute exactly, and those air easy things, the test and you can test it on small number and then see how many people take the action that you intended them to and then roll that out said earlier, we’re testing to maybe just ten percent of the way debate test quantities frequently, but yes, i mean, in general it’s, about ten percent of the total, okay, seems like a good relationship. You’re going back and forth? Yeah, frequently on. Okay. Absolutely. Yes. Next to each other. It’s civil. Yeah. No, no, no. Tiffany and her team at law men are terrific. And we really view them as extensions of the human rights campaign staff well and to the point about subject lines and is frequently a sender of the hrc emails. And one saturday, there was an e mail from an and it was an official hrc email. But the subject line was i know it’s saturday, but and we all open it very quickly because we assumed it was work related and something? Yeah, it worked. It worked. It really was an accident. You know, it was everyone just forgot that that was going out that day at ten a m on saturday and that that was the subject line. All right, the best stuff comes from improvisation, it’s straight, solid improvisation. All right, so we’ve done some simple testing and what’s our next what’s our next step in this campaign? Well, i’m a big believer in the visuals, so if you can have a picture in the call out box, i’m also big believer, frankly, in the call out box, i feel like the call out box is the next step. After the preview text, you get somebody to open it because the preview texas either intriguing enough or important enough, it feels to me that most people then go to the call out box, and so if you’re looking at the email, the call out box can be in the center for us, it’s often to the right and it’s literally a boxed section and it’s it’s in my mind. It’s the headline it’s the action in a nutshell we want you to do x because of why and it’s it’s a shortened version if you want to read more there’s the whole email text that you can read and learn more about what the issue is. But the call out box is going to tell you what we want you to do. Why? And it’s gonna have ah, click it’s going to have a button to or link to click and immediately do the action or send in the money. So this is for somebody who’s, maybe just previewing. They read this cold outbox, but ultimately it’s the same action as if you got to the middle of the full tech that’s a bottom of a check that’s, right. Same action. And you sew for us too. We have a link or button often throughout the email throughout the call out box. I mean, we really make it easy for people to immediately we take action versus going through the entire thing. Do we have statistics on how popular the call out boxes versus going by showing further into the text? We would be able to know the amount of klicks from the call outbox versus the other clicks. Yeah, we could measure it. I don’t think we have. Just you found the flaw in the progress. You’ve done some consulting work this morning that we shouldn’t tell that it is a new toast way. Not like that. We’ll put that on the testing list meeting to the session. Exactly. Your audience would not have heard. You know, if you had not been here before. Yeah, before this, before the session. All right. No charge. Thank you. Thank you. Thank you. Through with no it’s. True it’s. Good point, actually. Very gratifying. Doesn’t happen often. Melkis. Okay, let’s. See, uh, all right. So we get past our email were also obviously testing different body of the text right now that this is more that’s. More elaborate. Yeah. It’s. More elaborate. And we it’s funny. We’ve tested some copy things, but often what will test is copy heavy versus image heavy things that are are more substantial. That are gonna move the needle a bit more. We try not teo. I mean, there’s tests that are interesting. And then there’s tests that we want to do that are really trying to get people tio to move the issues forward. And so we haven’t tested a lot within the copy itself. Unless it’s specifically the call to action that’s interesting now, because this is what i think people focus on the boat they dio so their focus is misplaced. It’s okay to say, well, i want i want people to approve we want people to improve, i’ll just speak for us. I mean, for hrc, i don’t think that is where our focus should be, which is why it’s not there for other organizations. It may be different, and we have tested for other organizations that may have a cause or a mission where they’re trying to figure out their messaging and in that case, figuring out how they want to state their case for support that’s a critically important tests to do and then something that should probably be done over several email messages where you have control groups getting a similar theme, or if you have a mission that has several different components. You spoke earlier about international work trying to figure out what part of the world people care about that’s, something that is worth text testing heavily with hrc there’s really don’t appreciate you bring up my one thing i said wrong well, see and overly latto that, with my brilliant way, gave you the brilliant oil pockets. No, no, you gotta remind people that i begin. What it does not get the i was right hat. So yeah, but that i mean, for some groups that’s, critically important for hrc that’s. We have so many other things past, so, yeah, okay, yeah, i would say that’s. True, all right. Like what you’re hearing a non-profit radio tony’s got more on youtube, you’ll find clips from stand up comedy tv spots and exclusive interviews catch guests like seth gordon. Craig newmark, the founder of craigslist marquis of eco enterprises, charles best from donors choose dot org’s aria finger, do something that worked neo-sage levine from new york universities heimans center on philantech tony tweets to he finds the best content from the most knowledgeable, interesting people in and around non-profits to share on his stream. If you have valuable info, he wants to re tweet you during the show. You can join the conversation on twitter using hashtag non-profit radio twitter is an easy way to reach tony he’s at tony martignetti narasimhan t i g e n e t t i remember there’s a g before the end he hosts a podcast for the chronicle of philanthropy fund-raising fundamentals is a short monthly show devoted to getting over your fund-raising hartals just like non-profit radio, toni talks to leading thinkers, experts and cool people with great ideas. As one fan said, tony picks their brains and i don’t have to leave my office fund-raising fundamentals was recently dubbed the most helpful non-profit podcast you have ever heard. You can also join the conversation on facebook, where you can ask questions before or after the show. The guests were there, too. Get insider show alerts by email, tony tells you who’s on each week and always includes link so that you can contact guests directly. To sign up, visit the facebook page for tony martignetti dot com. If you have big dreams in a small budget tune into tony martignetti non-profit radio i d’oh, i’m adam bron, founder of pencils of promise. So now let’s move next stages. We’ve we’ve refined our email as best we can. Nextstep is in a landing page. Yeah, yeah. Okay. I want to speak to what retested test every landing pages. You know, it’s interesting. I mean there’s, different landing pages. So for hrc, if it’s asking for a donation, they’re landing on a donation page and we spend a lot a lot a lot, a lot of time and energy and testing and thinking through exactly what they’re going to see when they get to that landing page. One of the air, the donation page. Because one of the things that hrc does very effectively is trying to get people to make monthly gifts. So we try to look at the donor experience of saying what’s going to encourage me to sign oppa’s a monthly donor. So we test what the text is. We test what numbers, aaron, the different donation options. We test it and there’s a brand new donation page for hrc. So that whole process, if it’s an action, then it’s a landing page where you’re asking people to take that action, and in the that case, we just try to go for clarity, making sure that it’s very clear what you’re being has to dio and as an said, making sure that theory of changes prominent so that people understand when they take that action there, having a positive impact on the issues they care about landing yeah, i mean, listen, first off, it’s tough to get people to open your e mails that’s number one so now you’ve gotten them to open it. You’ve gotten them to read it, you’ve gotten him to click to the landing page or to the action page or to the asian page, you have them so you don’t want to lose him at that point, so it in our minds, if they’ve gotten through to that point and let’s, say, it’s a fund-raising email make it as simple and as quick as possible to just have them, you know, hit the button and charge the credit card don’t spend a lot of times reiterating everything you’ve just said in the email and if it’s an action page, same kind. Of thing clear concise we’ve laid out the case for you. This petition is going to go to the governor for x, y and z reason click here so, you know, if you already got him where you want him, you’ve gotten them to take out the wall don’t oversell it basically, yeah, well, i make it consistent with the experience. I think one place where some organizations fall down is they’ll have that go to just a generic landing page or a generic donation page that doesn’t in any way reflect the experience they were having, so it won’t have i mean, we worked to make sure that the headlines are the same as in the emails they received in that sort of thing. So that’s, one of the reasons that we put the session together is because we were looking at the industry of things that people could be doing better than hrc does really well and go from there, i feel so strongly about consistent, consistent conversation with the reader that if we offer, say, a premium in the email for certain amount let’s say it’s, thirty five dollars and then they land on the contribution page. And it doesn’t mention it again, or we don’t start the thirty five dollars, unlike guys, we’ve just said this is going to cost thirty five dollars, then they land on the donation page, and we don’t make that reference again. So for me, it really is about the user having authentic conversation with your reader with your list and having a consistent, authentic conversation reassuring, yeah, i read this on the last page, but now it doesn’t say it anymore. Exactly five dollars like today and up in the wrong painting. Am i going to get what i wanted? It’s it’s, very it’s really important. Okay, okay, consistency, conversation. Um, after landing page, we have ah share page or some kind of post post post action post action and that’s, especially one of the other opportunities that hrc takes advantage of is if if the main action is to get people to sign a petition or call their congress person or something like that, there’s always a follow-up action where they’re given the opportunity to give because, as an said, if you’ve captured someone so deeply around this issue that they took the time to read the email to click it to fill out the petition they are most likely to want to embrace you even more and make a gift so that’s a really opportunity to encourage people to give that a lot of organizations miss out on and if it’s a donation, once people have donated, we want them to feel good about it. So we give him the chance to share the issue or to sign a petition or take take another step so that the experience continues. You always say, thank you, obviously, andi. So if this is tiffany said if they’ve taken an action, you know, get an email that said, okay, great, your actions been sent to the governor or whatever it is now, would you like to do more? You know, here’s an opportunity to give a donation. It’s not heavy handed, it’s just they’re given the opportunity many people don’t, but we’re often surprised at the amount of money that comes in from a post action shopped donation page. Yeah, yeah, yeah. Pleased, very pleased. Yeah, and it doesn’t cost anything extra to add that step. Really? So so i never i never thought they were that successful. I guess i’m not obviously, don’t go by me. Yeah, and it depends on the issue. I mean, for some people, certain issues, they’re goingto be more important in the argon and not only take the action, but then donate for others. They’re just they’re comfortable with just taking the action, but but always give them the opportunity because you never know. Okay, you you’re spending some time in your session to talk about on order responder? Yeah, what are we talking about? First, i’m gonna keep you out of jargon jail, but i’m the one who said it. I don’t get you let you get me out of jail. Is that message that people automatically get through email once they’ve taken an action or made a contribution? And ah lot of email providers are set up to kind of send those auto respond messages and some organizations. All that auto respond message says is, thank you for taking an action with the human rights campaign. We think through what that says so that it is, as an says, consistent with e action, they just took it follows the experience they just had and a lot of times that will also give people another chance to act they’ll get a chance to do something else when they get that latto responder that that message that they get right away and his and said it always says thank you, yeah, usually so the order responded immediate, this is the immediate follow-up yes, right, right, okay, we didn’t talk about including video mentioned all about images. What about use of video in the email? Are you doing that more often as it isn’t working? Not in not in the email directly because it affects the affects rendering? I believe right now can it hurt delivery box is going to show up what people say on mobile, it doesn’t, because the hrc has found that they have when they actually embed the video within the email, the all of the open rates click through rates that sort of thing fall just because of potential rendering issues on different people’s individual technologies. So what we do instead is yes, so we’ll have an image of a video and with a narrow so it looks like you’re hitting the play button, but it actually takes you two in our case youtube, which is where we’ll and embed the video and that all that way they can see it and it’s a quick transition transact transition from that email to the video. Okay, and then within that video, we way try toe have words so that if people are viewing it without sound, they can still get the essence of what the piece wass eso last year, for example, at the end of the year, hrc had a very successful year. Last year, marriage equality was it was done by the supreme court. There were a lot of good activities, so to give their members the chance to participate, members were encouraged to send in their photos of the year and to make a urine video. So we thought, i don’t know, i thought maybe a couple thousand people. I don’t know how much you thought would do it. I thought maybe two. Three thousand. Yeah, i didn’t. I didn’t expect much, but we got seventeen thousand pictures. I mean, people were so excited to be a part of this. It was really i got phone calls from members saying i sent in my pictures. Could you please include them? I got permission from the photographer to include them. We got an ambassador calling, we got boardmember is calling. I mean, this ended up being so important, it really surprised me. So then when we put that video together, we had words throughout it sort of highlighting what the different groups of photos were, but we really let the photos speak for themselves. But the overall campaign, we had to really think of three because there were so many more pictures than we thought there would be. We created a siri’s of photo albums on facebook and then had other emails wherein post actions or things like that people were encouraged to then go to social media sites see the rest of the pictures because clearly we couldn’t put seventeen thousand pictures on a video or it would just be like a michael bay movie, and you were able to make it very, very inclusive. Yeah, yeah, it was clear to us that to not include i mean, everyone took it so so seriously that we wanted to honor that that feeling for them and include him wherever we could. All right, we’re gonna we’re gonna leave it there. Great. We’re gonna leave it with inclusiveness, okay? Like for human rights campaign? Yes, perfect. Now that twenty martignetti learned what human rights campaign does. I don’t mind it’s. Okay, if i do it different. But that xero durney neil isa, partner lautman, mascot neil and company and crowley, vice president membership in online strategy at human rights campaign again, ladies. Thank you very much. Thank you. Think, stoney. Sharon. Thanks, tony martignetti non-profit radio coverage of twenty sixteen non-profit technology conference. Thank you so much for being with us. And thanks to everybody at and ten the non-profit technology network next week, master google adwords and master your decision making. If you missed any part of today’s show, i beseech you, find it on tony martignetti dot com. We’re sponsored by pursuing online tools for small and midsize non-profits data driven and technology enabled pursuant dot com and by we be spelling not your seventh grade spelling bees for charities, we be spelling dot com our creative producers claire meyerhoff. Sam liebowitz is the line producer. Gavin dollars are am and fm outreach director. The show’s social media is by susan chavez. And this music is by scott stein of brooklyn. Scotty, how come you weren’t listening today be with me next week for non-profit radio. Big non-profit ideas for the other ninety five percent. Go out and be great. What’s not to love about non-profit radio tony gets the best guests check this out from seth godin this’s the first revolution since tv nineteen fifty and henry ford nineteen twenty it’s the revolution of our lifetime here’s a smart, simple idea from craigslist founder craig newmark insights orn presentation or anything? People don’t really need the fancy stuff they need something which is simple and fast. When’s the best time to post on facebook facebook’s andrew noise nose at traffic is at an all time hyre on nine a m or eight pm so that’s, when you should be posting your most meaningful post here’s aria finger ceo of do something dot or ge young people are not going to be involved in social change if it’s boring and they don’t see the impact of what they’re doing. So you got to make it fun and applicable to these young people look so otherwise a fifteen and sixteen year old they have better things to do if they have xbox, they have tv, they have their cell phones me dar is the founder of idealised took two or three years for foundation staff to sort of dane toe add an email address their card it was like it was phone. This email thing is fired-up that’s why should i give it away? Charles best founded donors choose dot or ge somehow they’ve gotten in touch kind of off line as it were and and no two exchanges of brownies and visits and physical gift. Mark echo is the founder and ceo of eco enterprises. You may be wearing his hoodies and shirts. Tony talked to him. Yeah, you know, i just i’m a big believer that’s not what you make in life. It sze, you know, tell you make people feel this is public radio host majora carter. Innovation is in the power of understanding that you don’t just do it. You put money on a situation expected to hell, you put money in a situation and invested and expect it to grow and savvy advice for success from eric sabiston. What separates those who achieve from those who do not is in direct proportion to one’s ability to ask others for help. The smartest experts and leading thinkers air on tony martignetti non-profit radio big non-profit ideas for the other ninety five percent.

Nonprofit Radio for December 4, 2015: Ask When Not Asking & What Are The Wealthy Thinking?

Big Nonprofit Ideas for the Other 95%

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Marci Brenholz: Ask When Not Asking

Marcy Brenholz at Fundraising Day 2014

Strong, real donor-centered programs will save you money because you’ll hold onto existing donors rather than having to find new ones. Marci Brenholz knows how. She is director of development at the Ralph Lauren Center for Cancer Care and Prevention. (Originally aired November 21, 2014 and recorded at Fundraising Day 2014 in NYC.)

 

 

Stacy Palmer & Glen MacDonald: What Are The Wealthy Thinking?

Glen Macdonald & Stacy Palmer at Fundraising Day 2014
Glen MacDonald and Stacy Palmer at Fundraising Day 2014.

Stacy Palmer & Glen MacDonald dish on the changing landscape of philanthropy: what giving habits persist and what new trends are developing. Stacy is editor of The Chronicle of Philanthropy and Glen is president of Wealth & Giving Forum. (Also from November 21, 2014 and recorded at Fundraising Day 2014.)


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Hello and welcome to tony martignetti non-profit radio big non-profit ideas for the other ninety five percent. I’m your aptly named host it’s, our first show of the last month of the year happy december, we have a listener of the week it’s tracy kramer she is vice president of development at habitat for humanity new york city, she writes on linked in to lawrence paige no ni i just heard your interview with tony martignetti i wanted to tell you i am rushing out to buy your book everything resonated can’t wait to read it. Tracy kramer, don’t waste money buying great guests books. Just listen to the show if you listen to non-profit radio. That was an hour with lawrence paige, no knee. You got everything you needed. I’m sorry. You’re spending your money on the book. It’s. Just it’s. Just not necessary. Tracy kramer. Listener of the week. I love it. I love that it all resonated with you. Lawrence pack. Tony was an outstanding guest. Cool. Congratulations, tracy. Oh, you know, i’m glad you’re with me. I’d be forced to endure the pain of neuro core oid itis if i saw that you missed today’s show. Ask when not asking strong riel donor-centric programs save you money because you’ll hold onto existing donors rather than having to find new ones. Marcy brenholz knows how she is director of development at the ralph lauren center for cancer care and prevention, and that originally aired november twenty first, twenty fourteen, and it was recorded at fund-raising day twenty fourteen in new york city. And what are the wealthy thinking? Stacy palmer and glenn mcdonald dish on the changing landscape of philanthropy? What giving habits persist and what new trains are developing? Stacy is editor of the chronicle of philanthropy, and glenn is president of wealth and giving forum that’s, also from november twenty one last year and recorded it fund-raising day last year on tony’s take two thank you. We’re sponsored by pursuant full service fund-raising data driven and technology enabled, you’ll raise more money pursuant dot com here is ask when not asking with marcy brenholz welcome to tony martignetti non-profit radio coverage of fund-raising day two thousand fourteen, we’re at the marriott marquis hotel in times square, new york city with me now is marcy brenholz her seminar topic is howto ask when you aren’t asking. Morsi is director of development for the ralph lauren center for cancer care and prevention. Marcy brenholz welcome to the show. Thank you, tony. Good to be here. Thank you. What a pleasure to have you how, teo latto ask when you aren’t asking what are what are non-profits not quite getting right about stewardship. Well, i think you know, in this day and age, we have a lot of focus on acquisition and acquisition is really expensive, so there’s direct costs like buying lists if you’re doing direct mail there’s also staff costs for prospect research and things like that it’s a lot less expensive toe hold onto the donors you already have, but not the easiest thing to do. So in the seminar, i’m going to kind of break it down into two things that you can do. What is getting your house in order at your organization? So meaning your acknowledgement processes streamlined, you have a great way of recognizing staff might redo your cash reports, some kind of really boring things like that make an assessment of what kind of stewardship each department is doing. If you’re a bigger organization on dh, then the more fun. Part of it is to think about what you have to offer to your donor’s that’s really special. Do you have access to celebrities? And that doesn’t necessarily mean, you know, beyonce and jay z, it could be an expert in the field where you work. It could be a great event that you do. You could add on opening session for special donors there could be travel any number of things that you can do to make donors really feel like they’re part of your work. All right, so why don’t we start with the the more dry but still important? Yeah, right? You’ve got to get yourself in order before you could go outside. Yeah, we have a good amount of time together. So that’s, where should we start with assessing? I mean, how do we figure out where we’re what do we need to look at? You figure out where we are and then we’ll look at where we gotta go? Yeah, well, i think it depends on the size of your organization. So the case study that i’m going to use is from the u s fund for unicef, where i worked for about three and a half years it’s, a bigger organization, a bigger staff. So what we did is we put together a working group. I mean, people hear the word words working group and just generally roll their eyes, but sometimes they can be effective. We made sure we had representation from all of our departments. And during the first meeting, we just talked about what we thought would be challenging for donors. Attention. So at a place like the us fund, for instance, we acquired a lot of donors to emergencies, the indian ocean tsunami, the haiti earthquake, et cetera. And then we really struggled to have plans about holding on to those donors. Okay, so we talked a lot about whether we were being donor-centric as an organization. So on a two inch of you, you’re my second of you so far from the first one was all about donor-centric zm he was ceo of food for the poor in florida on concerned about donor-centric sametz well, but trying to make it true not just not just a flash phrase that doesn’t really have a meaning behind it. Yeah, it’s kind of a buzz word, but you know the way i think about being donor-centric and if it’s not kind of resonating for you, every fundraiser kind of has low moments, you know why i did it? Why did i become a fundraiser? Why am i doing this on dh for me going back to being and it can make you feel better in a way if you think about why donors are given to you and how much of their time and personal resource is there devoting because they believe in your cause, it makes you want to be donor-centric it makes you want to be a good friend in a way, you know, if you have a friend who’s, incredibly supportive and thoughtful, who remembers your birthday always asks you about important things in your life, you know who shows up at your party with a great hostess gift every time, and then you do nothing in return, you’re not being a good friend, so that’s like being donor-centric if the donor is so generous to you, but you’re not respectful of his or her wishes, you know, you’re just not doing the right thing, there’s such a thing is doing the right thing so well, where should we? Look, specifically to determine whether we are doing the right thing well, our marketing communications our, which includes the website print and, you know, let’s, let’s, drill down to some some of the things we should be looking at. Specifically, i think probably where to start is financial accountability that’s also kind of a buzz word these days, i think, but making sure that you’re letting your daughter so and this is the drier stuff again, this is the getting your house in order, making sure that your donor’s know where their money is going and making sure that you’re respecting where they told you they wanted it to go. You know, there’s some great donors who say here’s, some money, i don’t care what you do, it could be operating costs, it can be salaries, and then there are other donors who say, no, i really wanted to go to the specific program, and we have to make sure that we’re being a accountable to the donors on and i liked your work too respectful, yeah, respectful of what their wishes when when they do don’t make a designation right back to the friendship example, you know, it’s just what’s the right thing in the friendship in the exchange you mentioned website it’s a great point. You know, there are all of these charity rating organizations now, including charney navigator, who look at two things they look at your your finances so they’ll read through your audited financial statements in your nine nineties. They also want to see certain things posted on your website, and that includes your audits and your nine nineties on dure leadership staff. And you have to really be telling donors how you run your organization and not be afraid of letting them in. I think we’re often afraid that donors will find something out about us that they don’t like and that’s what marketing communications has forts it’s for telling the story, but you really do have to be pretty open with your donors. I think in the more sophisticated days where we live, so making sure that that stuff is up on your website is great for ratings on charity navigator, but again, it’s just the right thing to do. Also interesting parallel about not not fearing letting donors in. I think of a parallel with social media. Know what everybody’s got? A facebook page now, but the early fear was, what if donors post comments that we don’t like right? And there haven’t been many instances of that, and when it does happen, it’s an open communication and if it’s, of course, if it’s blatant and doesn’t belong, there could always be eliminated. Deleted but but that’s that’s, the that’s, the that’s, the rare rare exception yeah, no it’s it’s a conversation, right? It’s it’s a dialogue, and so we shouldn’t fear the openness. And now facebook pages are rampant but seven hundred whatever five or seven years ago, probably steven’s many, seven, five, four, five years ago, the fear was when we can’t let donors post on our what are our new facebook page? They might say things we don’t like, right? Yeah, reputational risk is obviously huge, and the problem with the google accessible world right, is that you confined if there was a faux pas non-profits passed it’s just like any person going to be on the internet, so if some risk to your effort reputation occurs, it lasts forever, so it makes a lot of sense that we’re apprehensive, but i think you’re making a great point if someone comes out whether it’s on your facebook page or if they send you a private message and says, i’m really worried about some aspect of your business practices. I’m really worried about your program design it’s a great opportunity to be able to say, you know what? This is how we really do it. Let’s, let’s have a conversation. So yeah, i mean, it’s a lot to manage its a lot more to manage than we’ve ever had, but i agree it’s a good opportunity to be out there and that person who’s saying that to you cares about you? Yeah, if they didn’t care, they were just written you off and said they’re screwing it up, you know? I’m not gonna bother, but they do care enough to to learn and maybe and they’re even trying to help, yeah, and just to bring it back to donor intention to kind of tar tar topic, if someone cares and they have a concern and you address it, you probably have that person for life, right? I mean, you, if you’re honest, if you’re open, if you’re thoughtful about how you’re telling your story, you’re going to be able to hang onto two donors and it’s better in the long run for your business? What else should we be doing in internal e-giving getting our own house in order? Welchlin look, so i think once you’re kind of clear they are out there that you’re financially accountable, then a lot of what i encountered when i was looking at stewardship again, i’m using the us fundez and fundez an example, but there’s this’s applicability other places, too, is how motivated staff were to retain donors, so sometimes that way organisations put together their cash report or the way that they recognize fundraisers might recognize acquisition more than it recognizes retention. So just making sure that you’re you’re making sure that it’s really a priority for your staff and they’re being recognized and evaluated on the right, the right kind of metrics, right attention as well as acquisition? Yeah, exactly an internally a lot of organizations have started to measure their retention, but they don’t necessarily measure upgrades or donorsearch atis faction and i’m just going to name check here because this is that not something that i thought of this is actually from karen osborne of the osborne group and these are her recommendations specifically to measure retention upgrades and donorsearch atis faction as a wayto make sure that you have a healthy stewardship for donor relations program going on, so some organizations are not even measuring retention necessarily. So that’s a great place to start, but measuring how often you’re moving, the donors up the pipeline that’s also really helpful, and then whether or not donors think that your mission is crucial whether they feel that you’re one of their top five organizations, how committed are they to you that reflects on how you’re communicating with them? How do you how do you judge these things? Well, if you have a donor database again, i’m talking about a little bit of a bigger organization. You can actually run reports on these kinds of things you can set them up in, and i’m sorry. That’s what i meant donors feel that your mission is critical. Are you one of their top five charities? That’s got it all be done by survey conversation. Yeah. So if you want to do, you can do a doner satisfaction survey with smaller donors. You can do it online, but you can also sit down. When you’re talking about major donors are board members, you can do individual interviews with them where you’re really not asking them. So why i called the session howto ask when you’re not asking, i hope everyone doesn’t show up and think, oh, good, i don’t have to solicit anymore marcie’s going to tell me how it’s more, what are the moves that you’re doing in between? The asks that are making the donor feel really good and really invested in you? So sitting down and talking to them about what they think about the organization without asking them to write a check is could be a good move, you know that old saying if you want to ask for money, ask for advice, it’s like that? Yeah, so you would do it face to face or you could do, you know, an online survey or something like that and agree maybe to do it every two or three years, you know what i’m talking about really takes a lot of resource is and not every small organization, so now i’m a one person shop at my new job on dh this kind of thing is probably going to be a little bit more challenging than it was when i had more research. Resource is at a bigger place. So there’s that, too. But you’re going, you’re going to find a way. You’re tuned to non-profit radio. Tony martignetti also hosts a podcast for the chronicle of philanthropy fund-raising fundamentals is a quick ten minute burst of fund-raising insights, published once a month. Tony’s guests are expert in crowdfunding, mobile giving event fund-raising direct mail and donor cultivation. Really, all the fund-raising issues that make you wonder, am i doing this right? Is there a better way there is? Find the fund-raising fundamentals archive it. Tony martignetti dot com that’s marketmesuite n e t t i remember there’s, a g before the end, thousands of listeners have subscribed on itunes. You can also learn maura, the chronicle website philanthropy dot com fund-raising fundamentals the better way. Oppcoll now, so one person fund-raising shop, you are talking to donors a lot. Yeah, so some of these questions could weave their way into your daily conversations with donors. Maybe not everyone, right? But you can sample, right? Yeah. And one of the things that i’m doing so there was ah, one year gap between development directors at the ralph lauren center. So some of the things that i’m doing there are sort of resurrecting some relationships that we had before. And i’m making sure that there’s no stone unturned if you’ve given money to us before, if you cared about us before, i’m going to try to bring you back. You can’t be successful all the time. You’re gonna lose some donors. People’s circumstances change. It might have nothing to do with your organization. But it’s really important to make sure that you’re being very methodical about renewing let’s let’s, switch to the more fun the donor side of good donorsearch worship. Yeah, so i had a great experience again at the u s fund for unicef. Where i put together are a major donor e-giving society now abel he managed by another colleague at the us fund-raising donors. We decided to talk to our board members about what they might like to see, so when you structure a major donor e-giving society, you’re basically putting together a list of tiered benefits and that’s also an important part of putting your house in order. What are you offering to donors? A different levels is a consistent who are the donors that your leadership and board members need to be involved with? And do you have plans for howto steward those donors? So with us one farina’s have is lucky they have a lot of board members, so they have a national board and then seven regional board. So some people may say that’s very unlucky, that’s true. Thankfully, it was thankfully was fortunate for the for the us fund. These board members are great. I’m a board relations person, so right, i think that’s great and some people think it’s a nightmare. Now i have an eight person board, so i’ve, you know, i’ve gone on, but they have about probably about one hundred twenty five port members between all those groups, and we did some surveying of them and i’m not saying that these air the answers you would get from every a group of board members, but this is the kind of thing that, like on your terrible worst day, you just think about it and feel good. These board members were like, i don’t care about recognition that’s fine, i just want to be more connected to the mission. I just want to talk, teo, the workers in the field and really understand what you do. They were looking for these really meaning for awful engagement opportunities. It wasn’t like, oh, yeah, i’d like a tote bag or i’d really like to meet beyonce when i’m named checking her. Maybe she’ll call me, uh, you know, they really wanted more programmatic depth, and they also wanted to network and connect with each other. So we tried to build benefits that felt a little bit less transactional and more in-kind of life affirming. Like what? What? What were a couple of examples? Well, you know, again, this is not something that everyone can offer, but travel to the field is an example at a certain ok, but a small organization, maybe maybe it’s not travel to on exotic country, but maybe welcome to the to our office. Yeah, to the place where we’re serving people that you’ve never seen, you know, we internally take it for granted because it’s on the floor below us who’s down the hall, but our donors have never seen it however modest you may think it is. It might mean the world to the donor. Yeah, to be invited. Absolutely, i mean, at the ralph lauren center. So i work on site at the cancer center it’s in harlem on one hundred twenty fourth and madison. I’ll be honest, a lot of donors don’t go up to that neighborhood very often because of the involvement of ralph lauren. The center is really beautiful looking, and i love walking in there every day and seeing the patients in the in the waiting room, not it’s, a very unhappy time for the patients, but i feel really connected to them into the mission, and we do a lot of site visits at the ralph lauren center. Before unicef, i worked at a education non-profit called learning leaders, and we did school volunteerism, so we used to do a lot of site visits to schools, and that was great. And whenever i was feeling kind of disconnected elearning leaders. I would get up and go to a school and be like, okay, this is why i’m doing this, so yeah, the travel with units of the will sexier, right? But every charity has got someplace that you can come. Yes, absolutely. Or some meeting that you can come to that you haven’t previously been invited too. Yeah, something is going on at your charity. I just went teo, a special events training session at robin hood. So the ralph lauren center is a robin, but grantee on the special event staff was sharing that their donors love to come to their office and just see where the work is done. So just just the administrative, like, ministerial type officers. Yeah. I mean, the stuff that people who work there take for granted every day has no interest. I mean, it has interested them, but it would never think of inviting an outsider. But you got it. We got stop thinking like that. They’re not outsiders, they’re insiders, and we want to welcome them. Welcome to the workplace. Yeah, you do it one day a month. Who have a bunch of invite a bunch of people. And have a breakfast and maybe you know that that half a day a month becomes more donor-centric yeah, then the other nineteen and a half workdays that you have in the bunk. Yeah, absolutely. And i think that’s why i found the responses from the board members of the u s funds so encouraging, they were saying exactly what you’re saying. We want to know how you do your work. We want to really drill down with you. We’re not necessarily looking for a lots of glitzy stuff we want we want the day to day, and it kind of relates financial accountability. Also, fixing your marks were full of table, right? I’m i’m getting violent with my mike. I’m better that way. Yeah, although we’re close enough, you could, but i appreciate that i appreciate your not breaking down that you haven’t done anything. Yeah, it’s been it’s been ok? Not feeling well. I’m mind myself across the line either of this relates back to financial accountability again, if we’re afraid to let donors in, then they’re not going to come closer to us and we want them to be closer. That’s not every single donor, but the important ones and the ones who care. So yeah, that’s. The interesting part that was so us fun for unicef. It was travel abroad. Make clear that it could be traveling to your administrative office. Yes. What else? What else did you do on the outside? It could be also in individualized porting. So back to how donors want their money spent. You know, a lot of us do kind of ah, general operating support report, which is okay, but at certain levels, you really want to make sure that you’re doing an individualized report and, you know a lot, i think most of us do this, but that was included because unicef being such a big place, sometimes people were getting a more generalized report and not feeling like we were really drilling down into the program that they wanted to support. Then we did a couple of other things, like at the higher levels dinner hosted by a boardmember dinner hosted by the global unicef executive director. So that thing that i said about celebrities before a lot of people think that tony lake, who is the executive director of unicef globally, is a celebrity in the world. Of, you know, international charitable work. People really want to meet mr lake and he’s more of an academic than he is anything else but that’s really interesting to donors. So we did travel to see unicef’s work in the field, and then unicef has some other interesting international properties to visit there’s, a research center in florence there’s a supply division in copenhagen, so travel to those places also, which is again inner workings. Okay, way covered travel. Yeah, but but your phone is ringing. I think it was beyonce. I heard a phone ringing. This is more important. I mean, i’ll get to her after i agree. You’re everything in the world in your life has brought you to this moment. Exactly don’t want to surrender it to be on no side. It might have been someone else’s phone. I heard that you could actually be calling. I always keep mine on site could be calling somebody i’m sorry, it’s. All right, you’re next on the list. I’m sure i’m sure i’m sure what else? Wait put on there. So receptions before big events for having a gallery you don’t spend a lot of money to add a small reception before you’ve already got the space, the caterer is already coming. Yeah, marginal cost buy-in before or after reception every great, especially when you’re putting on a bigger event on that gets to the donors wanting to network with each other and to know each other, they don’t always get to be in the same place either. And, you know, a boardmember meeting or another kind of meeting isn’t always the best place to network. So something like that, which is probably a lot a lot of my my work is planned e-giving consulting way. Do a lot of those vips receptions before the larger event? Right? Another thing that doesn’t cost much is v i p seating at an event. Yeah, because nothing because the a couple of strips of masking tape yeah, mask often area and and have vips seating for an event you’ve already paid for the tickets, for you’ve already got the seats rope off ten or twelve seats for vips. People feel like the world way because the i p c yeah, and, you know, what’s funny about that. We’re already doing it right when you think about it when you’re doing your gala seating you are putting your most important people in the front, but they don’t know that we’re not revealing our methods. So if you make that a little more open and say by the way we’re going, we’re gonna give you the best seats here this important, i think, you know, we’re continuing on that theme of tell your donors what you’re doing, and it might make them feel good, so yeah, great. Ok. Ok. What else? We still have a couple minutes left. Marcie. What? What else? What else can we talk about? Well, we could talk about volunteer opportunities. Maybe i think that that is a big saying. That’s emerging volunteers helping with stewardship donors having volunteer opportunities to make you feel more engaged because i think it’s emerging as a theme because corporate supporters often are asking, well, how can my employees come for a day and do something and it’s a little bit difficult for some organizations to figure out how to do that? I had the luck. This is back tio sometimes stewardship moves are a little easier at one place or another. A little more obvious when i worked in a volunteer organisation. I got a lot of my donors and my board members through a pipeline of one particular volunteer program, which was an art program, and it just attracted the kind of volunteers who were also able to be donors. Not everybody has that. So ralph lauren center does a lot of stuff with our physical plants, having people come in and paint having people come in and plant flowers outside. You know, i just think it’s important to make sure that you have at least a couple just up your sleeve and ready to go a couple of volunteer opportunities in case either of corporate supporter asks or, you know, a group of boardmember xero group of donors say, i don’t really feel like writing another check. What can i do so that’s? You know, i think that’s big and a lot of donors also want to do things that involve their children and family. Family philanthropy is such a big emerging topic. So if you can think of a program or a volunteer opportunity where people can bring their children that’s also huge. We have just a couple minutes left. What about the board’s role in the stewardship? Yeah. That’s a really good question. Okay, come up with one. Twenty. Only took me about twenty four minutes. Well, i mean, this is like a house in order. It’s you know, it’s, the more kind of the more boring stuff. So i had mentioned that bored hosted annual dinner could be an interesting big storage it move. Thank you calls. Thank you notes all those kinds of things. I hear that from a lot of guests. Just get the board together, do it for an hour before a meeting right? Dahna and they’re going to get a great feeling from it themselves. And you’re just right. Just calling to say thank you, thank you. Nothing else. Don’t do don’t do anything more you don’t i’m not asking for anything more. I’m just calling to say thank you, and and a donor has gotten a call from from a pipe and the organization it’s a boardmember it’s really big it’s big you people. A lot of people in the international world love teo support the carter center because the carter center does great work, but also jimmy carter calls you. I’ve had a bunch of donors like president carter called me. Okay, so not everybody has jimmy carter, but it’s still important to hear from, you know, a leadership voice if you much you mentioned the executive director who’s not not really thought of as a celebrity in-kind, in a way, popular media, but within the organization within that mission he’s very well known. Yeah, so it could just be somebody in your office. Exactly. And also, i didn’t mention loyalty recognition. I think calling donors and thanking them for gift that they’ve just given is fantastic. Don’t take that off of your roster, but five years in a row, ten years in a row recalling their thing irrespective of the size of the raft, is that kind of loyalty? Yeah. Recognition for for the that history. Yeah. How gracious and thoughtful is that? If you just say thank you for giving to us for five consecutive years, we really appreciate it. That’s it and we didn’t care how much it was. Marcie, thank you very much. We have to leave it there. Thank you. My pleasure. Marcie brenholz. She is director of development for the ralph lauren center for cancer care and prevention. Thank you very much. More. See again. Thank you you’re listening to tony martignetti non-profit radio coverage of fund-raising day two thousand fourteen what are the wealthy thinking? Is coming up first pursuing they’re perfect for our listeners, small and midsize non-profits they’re fund-raising tools are ala carte, and they’ll help you raise more money. It’s just that simple. You take the tools you need, like velocity, which is a fund-raising management tool keeps your fundraisers on task day to day and measures time against goal. Plus, it has a lot more analytics and you just take the tools that you need. They will help you raise shopping carts more money. I’m not talking about those handheld ones they hold on your arm or carry at your side. I’m talking the monster jobs and bjs that seat. Two kids comfortably have headlights and back-up cameras filled with money pursuant dot com now it’s time for tony’s take two thank you. I’m grateful for all the ways that you support non-profit radio listening, getting my weekly e mail alerts telling you who the guests are going to be tweeting, retweeting loving the show on facebook however it is you are enjoying non-profit radio i thank you and my thank you. Video is at tony martignetti dot com that’s tony’s take two for friday, it’s a simple one fourth of december forty fifth show of the year. Here are glenn mcdonald and stacy palmer welcome to tony martignetti non-profit radio coverage of fund-raising day two thousand fourteen we are at the marriott marquis hotel in times square, new york city with me now are stacy palmer and glenn mcdonald. Their workshop topic is whatthe wealthy. What are the wealthy thinking now? It’s a question, not a statement. We’re going to answer that question. Stacy palmer is editor of the chronicle of philanthropy and glenn mcdonald is president of wealth and giving forum stacy glen welcome. Thank you. Thank you for having us. Pleasure to have you, glenn let’s, start with you. What? What? What is this topical? About? What? What? What are the wealthy thinking now? Well, the first thing i want to say as a preface is that we like to categorize the wealthy as a homogenous group. But in fact, that’s really not fair of anybody are very diverse. I’m just like any covert group that you would mention they spend this political spectrum young and old. You know, that wealth can be minute very quickly, especially in silicon valley and and interestingly enough with on that topic, you know, it is young generation that is spurring you trans e-giving um, and the number one trend right now is thinking about their philanthropy across everything they do not just in the check, right? Meaning how they invest their portfolio and what sort of for-profit cos they invest in ones that they believed that they could be transformation on society, and i think that’s really the number one trend that i see on they are shifting the thinking of their parents and grand parents to be quite frank. And when you say the young, are we thinking of people in their thirties, you know, early, early twenties coming out of college and thinking about the business choices they make the careers, they want to be involved with the types of companies they want to work for, they want their doing good and doing well and making money to be integrated into one it’s no longer separate, and i think that’s a trend that’s here to stay, and i’m sure we’ve read, you know, in the press in the chronicle of philanthropy wall street journal that socially responsible investing and impact and interesting are considered alongside of the donations and grantmaking that foundations are making right now. Stacey, what do you have to add? Early on, i agree that’s one of the big trends, the other thing that some people are starting to talk about is whether there’s a whole third wave of philanthropy coming among the young and whether mark zuckerberg really kick that off and he’s, not even thirty yet. But by giving so much money to the silicon valley community foundation rather than setting up his own foundation, he said a model for the other ways of thinking about giving, not institution building, but really saying, i want to do this differently and others may be following his model. So i think we are seeing a pretty big shift. Yeah, glen a third wave. I agree wholeheartedly, i think even before mark zuckerberg, warren buffett said look, rather than build a new private foundation, i’m gonna give my money to bill gates. I respect him. I trust him. I like his work. I like his team he’s built. Why start over? I think you know station. I would probably agree that the proliferation of new foundations and new non-profits, when a lot of great organizations have already been and built a small and large and everything in between already available to donors and in some respects by giving to the community foundation what market burton zuckerberg is saying, staff is there, there’s, a lot of programs already in place, and we can be flexible because the community foundation structures allowed for flexibility, not only in the way they given the timing e-giving, but also in the number of programs that are available. Now. Those watching a video will note that the room got darker, durney martignetti non-profit radio is continuing. The overhead lights are flickering, a little bit of that coming on off, but it makes no difference. We persevere here non-profit radio, absolute. Nothing stops us earthquakes, bring them on. We will continue. We are not leaving this set until until we flush this out. Let’s see, let’s, talk a little more stacy about this this third wave, what else? What else characterizes this? You know, i think in addition to things like impact investing, we also see growing interest in merging political giving and philanthropic e-giving and thinking about the various ways that you can use your money to influence change and of course, as came pain finance limits are basically going away. It’s easier for the wealthy to think about doing that when you think about the scale of their political giving compared to philanthropy, it’s so much smaller anyway, but they’re definitely looking at both ways to do things. I think that’s got good sides and bad sides. The good side is that they’re getting engaged to the bad side is people are starting to worry about whether the plutocrats are setting policy and are starting to hear more about that. I think that could kick back on philanthropy in some pretty serious way, so we have to talk about, you know, sort of are people going to be accused of trying to sway public policy through their philanthropy and the wealthy, setting the setting, the agenda, setting the research research priorities? Indeed, but the flip side of that, of course, is that we all know that you can’t create change unless you change some systems we’ve everybody influence if he’s been talking about about that for so long, so in some ways you would think that they might be applauding the two billion years for finally getting more engaged in public policy. But yet we don’t see that going to see you nodding a lot. Yes, absolutely agree, and i think that, you know, in some respects, there is some advocacy and political influence of the wealthy that are looking to take care of themselves by not having more taxes or limiting wreck regulations on businesses, and i think they’re the coke brothers are a big example, and tom style on the other side of the fence would say, well, yes, but i’m advocating on behalf of those who don’t have but you know that the challenge there is that while i think tom’s tires is well intentioned, that sometimes the billionaire’s advocating on behalf of those that are less fortunate don’t really see the issues at the depth that the underbelly really does and that they should be advocating for themselves, and the only way to do that is, you know, frankly, this is getting bleeding out of philanthropy and into a political commentary is through true democracy. And so i think there is an issue and stacy’s spot on and saying, you know, by philanthropy and the ability to raise dot org’s toe, advocate and influence the political process, the challenges that will philanthropy get, you know, a little bit of a black spot when there’s so much goodness like in this room, you go upstairs, there’s a thousand organizations that are doing are wonderful things that nobody hears about it, and you don’t want the non-profit charitable sector and philanthropy world to be a viewed as to to link tio, you know, just the wealthy influencing the way the political game happens because the real truth is so much goes on beneath that’s. Wonderful. Yeah, yeah. Stacy looked like you wanted to add. Well, and i also think part of it too is that there’s so much influenza b that doesn’t have anything to do with politics. And so that is we need to bear keep things in context. Yeah. What else? What else are you planning to? Your session is this afternoon. What else is on your minds for the for the audience? I think one of the things we’ll be talking about is the different ways to appeal today’s donors and to talk about what kinds of things draw them in it’s not enough just to say that they’re motivated by a particular cause, but what kind of language do you use, teo, get them engaged, you know, do you need to talk about financial metrics when you’re appealing to an investor? Do you need to talk about how you’re fixing things when you’re talking to an entrepreneur? I was talking to a wealth advisor the other day who said she was advising an ophthalmologist, and he looks at everything through what people aren’t seeing because that’s what he does all day, you know, and so trying to think about donors in those ways, um, and what their professional obligations are, that that might shape what it is that they want to hear about how you draw them in and get them engaged. So we’ll talk about tips for doing that so segmenting absolute across your constituencies will want to share and share some of the some of those tips let’s not hold out on listeners. Well, again, i agree with stacy. You know, you know, the real challenge is that i say that that every individual who is a donor giver investor in for-profit solutions to social issues has his or her own own formula for wanting to give. And it involves the head in the heart and summer, morehead oriented and rational thinking about. And they focus on outcomes and measurement more than thie emotional joy of that comes sometimes from giving and everything in between. And i think that to stacey’s point and wealth advisers have the same challenge in managing money. They have to figure out what makes the person tick. And i think the most important thing and i think everybody in this room would agree, is what’s most important is the discovery processes, the listening and then the appeal khun b couched in the framework of the individual not in some standard way of of soliciting money. Ask the listening, the list listening, whether that’s done through social media channels right at our one to one conversation with a survey. Yeah, i think that’s that’s something that i hear on. The show often is that we’re not active listeners. And you love listeners. I have read of nine thousand of them. I do love them, and i listened to them. But they are sometimes not listening the way they need to be less exactly to their various constituents, whether that’s vendors on one hand or donors on the other, yeah, sametz tryingto watch that. Okay. Background noise, bleeding in. Like what you’re hearing a non-profit radio tony’s got more on youtube, you’ll find clips from stand up comedy tv spots and exclusive interviews catch guests like seth gordon. Craig newmark, the founder of craigslist marquis of eco enterprises, charles best from donors choose dot org’s aria finger, do something that worked. And naomi levine from new york universities heimans center on philantech tony tweets to, he finds the best content from the most knowledgeable, interesting people in and around non-profits to share on his stream. If you have valuable info, he wants to re tweet you during the show. You can join the conversation on twitter using hashtag non-profit radio twitter is an easy way to reach tony he’s at tony martignetti narasimhan t i g e n e t t i remember there’s a g before the end he hosts a podcast for the chronicle of philanthropy fund-raising fundamentals is a short monthly show devoted to getting over your fund-raising hartals just like non-profit radio, toni talks to leading thinkers, experts and cool people with great ideas. As one fan said, tony picks their brains and i don’t have to leave my office fund-raising fundamentals was recently dubbed the most helpful non-profit podcast you have ever heard. You can also join the conversation on facebook, where you can ask questions before or after the show. The guests were there, too. Get insider show alerts by email, tony tells you who’s on each week and always includes link so that you can contact guests directly. To sign up, visit the facebook page for tony martignetti dot com. If you have big dreams in a small budget tune into tony martignetti non-profit radio, i d’oh. I’m adam braun, founder of pencils of promise. When further thought i’d be interested in stacy’s perspective on this is i’m just getting to know her that comes to mind is, is that i’ve seen that the most committed philanthropists that really followed through on the long haul on and staying with with the, um, developing a strategy and then really staying through with an organization or an innovative non-profit leader that’s starting something new or social issues to address is is the ones who really do stay the course and have great impact and have patients for the outcomes, the right outcomes are those that have been introspective and been thought and taking a step back and not do something that’s trendy, but something that really means something to them or their families, but that takes a certain kind of investment and investors who are in for the long term and, you know, dan pill latto had a lot to say about that correct perfect example way all know that one of the things that goes wrong in philanthropy all the time is that people follow the trendy they want to start new organizations and get excited about the next new thing instead of staying for the long haul and in some ways, what we need to change the culture of philanthropy is to say, there are some of these organizations that are doing great work already if they just had more money and more support from their board members, they could do even more on and that’s not to say that you organised dilgence shouldn’t get started, but i think when people come into philanthropy, they just get excited about. I’ve got this innovative idea, please back me instead of saying, wait a minute, who’s already doing terrific work and how can i get involved in the board and that’s? One of the things that non-profits really need is committed born members who will get involved and do that kind of thing is, well, it’s not enough just to write a check there’s some sentiment that the that the passion takes over and are are you system allows people to start a non-profit as long as they could meet some some not very high threshold requirements from the irs and that we never end up with the proliferation of charities duplicating overlapping rather than the person going through an existing charity and saying, if you don’t have an opening for me on the board? Can we can i partner some other way with you exactly about this proliferation of ah non-profits means that you see that hurting us? Well, i think the stacey’s point at the beginning of this session that you know, mark zuckerberg and i added, you know, maura buffet to the mix and there’s more more that are saying, no, that isn’t the right thing, and i think they’re setting that example, um, that others are starting to take a step back and ask that question, which is a good trend, and i also think there’s some consulting firms that are starting to encourage non-profits that think about partnerships and merging and consolidating programs into one and gaining scale and leverage across that that’s starting to happen. It’s we need more of it, and some of it was by necessity and some in our great recessional, exactly the wayto nine crisis forced with lower funding and some issues that even someone doubt doubt organizations, you know, at poor performance on your operating budget suffered that that forced the issue, but it’s, it’s, it’s a trend that starting and what we need more of. It you know, no question, yeah, we have an op ed in our current issue that’s actually arguing for that and saying that, you know, really their needs be more of mergers and acquisitions business in the non-profit field thie incentives are totally different than in business, but we need to find ways to think about ways for strong organizations to work together, not just because the financial crisis caused it, but for reasons to extend the mission and to think about it that way. And sometimes, you know, we were just talking before about board members it’s often the board that gets in the way of a merger because they don’t want to give up their boardmember ship, we’ve got to find some other incentives for them because there’s plenty of roles for them to get involved. There are precious few consultants i’ve had one on sabrina lamb, i think sabrina lamb consultants doing what advising around merger, acquisition and or even just joint ventures, partnerships and not always for fund-raising purposes, but for longer term, you know, just mission, a mission achievement, there’s that that overlap is, uh, can be hurt can’t be hurting us. What other? Any other strategies around the the topics of listening i think one of the things that many fundraisers find challenging is that even if they are the ones who are doing the listening, getting the ceo, getting other people on the staff to do that, listening is much more of a culture shift on dh. So one of the messages i think well, while i talk about today, is how to engage the chief executive and other people in the organization to see that talking to what a donor cares about doesn’t mean sacrificing your ethics or, you know, getting in the way of letting the donor dictate the mission it’s just saying, how do you talk to them in a language that they understand and that appeals to them? And maybe they do actually have some good ideas about how you run your organization differently that were worth listening to, but i think you know so often that’s one of the challenges fundraisers have is they get it, but not everybody in the organization does corrected. On the flip side, you might be talking to a donor who is really it’s, a patriarchal nature, our or maybe even the son. Or daughter of a wealthy family on dh sometimes the whole family’s going to be part of the decision process. So it makes that dynamic and challenge a little bit more complicated, because sometimes family members they seemingly be on the same page, till the time comes for the check to be ripping and then there’s some some. Well, wait a minute, that’s ah, that doesn’t really have ah, is not in concert with the mission of our private foundation and one orders yes, and the other guard there’s no, and so look fundez that that’s why this is a profession i mean fund-raising is a huge challenge. You’ve gotto work the organization on the one hand and stuff, as stacy pointed out, on the other hand, sometimes the dynamics of the emotional dynamics of the one individual donor end or the family dynamics associated with that donor is makes it an interesting challenge. If we’re seriously interested in listening, then we have to be asking questions the answers to which we need to be willing to hear couldn’t and they’re often not, and they’re often not couldn’t have said it better. I mean, you know, that’s, why i mentioned the discovery process, if that’s not part of the question set, whose else involved in this decision process? I know you have a private foundation to have professionals on the part of the private foundation that are going to influence this. Do you have other family members of yours come to going to come and weigh in on the decision on dh should be leading with them and and so forth there was absolute a lot of times, you know, for smaller and maybe even midsize shops they you need often, i think, an outside adviser to help facilitate this thiss process and a lot of the smaller shops, you know, they don’t just don’t have the wherewithal to bring someone in to facilitate a conversation on the board or conversation among among donors down, you know that, and they and they’re so insular in their work that they’re not able to ask these these challenging questions. I think one of the things all non-profits no matter what size they are can seek out is professionals who want to give their time to facilitate something like that must be people would like to help in organization in various ways and you know, we don’t think about the sort of skilled volunteering enough in the ways that people can help out. So i would say, you know, an organization of any size can really reach out to people who can help in that process on dh should be creative and thinking about that rather than just asking for money because you’re right, sometimes you need more that kind of coaching and that sort of thing. Clint, i think one of the things you talked about in our call was thinking about mentors for people who so, you know, thinking about the way people in their profession want to meet other people in their profession and that that’s a good way for non-profits to think about how to find new donors and volunteers, you had a couple of a couple of things on that was, well, we believe wealth e-giving form we believe in pierre learning, so wait really existed encourage greater philanthropy, and in that regard oh, our sweet spot is emerging philanthropists, but we have other philanthropist comments tell their stories about how they developed their own form of forgiving and struggles and challenges. They asked themselves about how much to give and what’s the direction of my giving and how dowe i involve my family and how do i ensure that when i’m i’m not going to get dahna fatigue and so forth and so on? And it’s really, i think peer-to-peer learning in any field of endeavors hugely important. That’s why there’s a lot of, you know, organizations like young presidents organization for ceos and so forth and so on, but even for non-profit professionals, i mean, there’s a great couple of organizations that are just i don’t know if you’ve heard of catch a fire. Oh, sure, when stacey was talking about going to mention catch afire. Volunteermatch right, so in order to get, you know, if you need an accounting accounting or you need your having board challenges where you’re having, you know, they will find professionals who can help come in and advise non-profits on those issues and challenges, and one new one i just heard about was inspiring capital that i mean, really just organize this year to help non-profits think about in election schnoll capital and capabilities they developed that might be a source of revenue stream because they developed this expertise you know, i’ll give you one example a year up national, you know, organization that helped inner city youth find a pathway to self sustaining, you know, income and a great career, and, you know, they’re they’ve become very well known, but they’ve really developed over the past fifteen years a great capability to only train young adults in inner cities, but also to staff them properly and be on dso, you know, they have a model that’s that can compete with robert half, so they’re, you know, thinking about a revenue stream off of that that can help fund the organization, and i think more and more non-profits are gonna start doing the same thing. Stacy, we have just a minute or so left wanna leave? Ah, parting thought something we haven’t we haven’t talked about that you plan to share one of the things that is clear and giving trends overall is that the affluent are the ones that are powering givings growth in america. We just saw the giving us a report come out and were it not for the wealthy, i don’t think we would have seen the good numbers that we saw so making sure that every organization of every size reaches out to these individuals is really important, rather than focusing on things like special events and other kinds of things. I think almost every organization has the capacity to get what is for them a major gift, and there really should be thinking about that and important for them. For them, everybody doesn’t need to be going after seven, seven, eight, nine figure give exactly a ten thousand dollar gift might be a big gift for you. Go for it. Excellent. We’re gonna leave right there. Well, but i love that alright. Stacy palmer, editor of the chronicle of philanthropy, and glenn mcdonald, president of wealth and giving forum thank you both very much. Thank you for having us. Thank you, tony. My pleasure, tony martignetti non-profit radio coverage of fund-raising day two thousand fourteen. Thank you so much for being with us next week. It’ll be a good one. Is there another kind? If you missed any part of today’s show, find it on tony martignetti dot com. Where in the world else would you go? Responsive by pursuant online tools for small and midsize non-profits whatever type of work you do to improve our world pursuant dot com. Our creative producer is claire meyerhoff. Sam liebowitz is the line producer. Gavin doll is our am and fm outreach director. The show’s social media is by diner russell, while susan chavez is on maternity leave and our music is by scott’s dying. Be with me next week for non-profit radio. Big non-profit ideas for the other ninety five percent. Go out and be great. What’s not to love about non-profit radio tony gets the best guests check this out from seth godin this’s the first revolution since tv nineteen fifty and henry ford nineteen twenty it’s the revolution of our lifetime here’s a smart, simple idea from craigslist founder craig newmark yeah insights, orn presentation or anything people don’t really need the fancy stuff they need something which is simple and fast. When’s the best time to post on facebook facebook’s andrew noise nose at traffic is at an all time hyre on nine a m or eight pm so that’s when you should be posting your most meaningful post here’s aria finger ceo of do something dot or ge young people are not going to be involved in social change if it’s boring and they don’t see the impact of what they’re doing. So you got to make it fun and applicable to these young people look so otherwise a fifteen and sixteen year old they have better things to dio they have xbox, they have tv, they have their cell phones. Amador is the founder of idealised took two or three years for foundation staff sort of dane toe add an email. Address card. It was like it was phone. This email thing is right and that’s, why should i give it away? Charles best founded donors choose dot or ge. Somehow they’ve gotten in touch kind of off line as it were and, uh and no two exchanges of brownies and visits and physical gift mark echo is the founder and ceo of eco enterprises. You may be wearing his hoodies and shirts. Tony talked to him. Yeah, you know, i just i’m a big believer that’s not what you make in life. It sze, you know, tell you make people feel this is public radio host majora carter. Innovation is in the power of understanding that you don’t just do it. You put money on a situation expected to hell. You put money in a situation and invested and expected to grow and savvy advice for success from eric sacristan. What separates those who achieve from those who do not is in direct proportion to one’s ability to ask others for help. The smartest experts and leading thinkers air on tony martignetti non-profit radio big non-profit ideas for the other ninety five percent.

Nonprofit Radio for November 21, 2014: Ask When Not Asking & What Are The Wealthy Thinking?

Big Nonprofit Ideas for the Other 95%

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Marci Brenholz: Ask When Not Asking

Marcy Brenholz at Fundraising Day 2014
Marcy Brenholz at Fundraising Day 2014

Strong, real donor-centered programs will save you money because you’ll hold onto existing donors rather than having to find new ones. Marci Brenholz knows how. She is director of development at the Ralph Lauren Center for Cancer Care and Prevention.

 

 

 

Glen Macdonald & Stacy Palmer: What Are The Wealthy Thinking?

Glen Macdonald & Stacy Palmer at Fundraising Day 2014
Glen Macdonald & Stacy Palmer at Fundraising Day 2014

Stacy Palmer & Glen Macdonald dish on the changing landscape of philanthropy: what giving habits persist and what new trends are developing. Stacy is editor of The Chronicle of Philanthropy and Glen is president of Wealth & Giving Forum

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Hello and welcome to tony martignetti non-profit radio big non-profit ideas for the other ninety five percent, i’m your aptly named host. Oh, i’m glad you’re with me. I’d be forced to endure scleroderma if i had the itchy feeling that you missed today’s show ask when not asking strong riel donor-centric programs will save you money because you’ll hold onto existing donors rather than having to find new ones. Marcy brenholz knows how she is director of development at the ralph lauren center for cancer care and prevention that was recorded at fund-raising day two thousand fourteen this past june. And what are the wealthy thinking stacy palmer and glenn mcdonald dish on the changing landscape of philanthropy? What e-giving habits persist and what new trends are developing? Stacy is editor of the chronicle of philanthropy and glenn is president of wealth and giving forum that’s, also from fund-raising day on tony’s take two thank you, responsive by generosity. Siri’s hosting multi charity five k runs and walks here is my interview with marci marci brenholz on asked when you’re not asking. Welcome to tony martignetti non-profit radio coverage of fund-raising day two thousand fourteen, we’re at the marriott marquis hotel in times square, new york city with me now is marcy brenholz her seminar topic is howto ask when you aren’t asking. Morsi is director of development for the ralph lauren center for cancer care and prevention. Marcy brenholz welcome to the show. Thank you, tony. Good to be here. Thank you. What a pleasure to have you how teo latto asking. You aren’t asking what are what are non-profits not quite getting right about stewardship. Well, i think you know, in this day and age, we have a lot of focus on acquisition and acquisition is really expensive. So there’s direct costs like buying lists. If you’re doing direct mail there’s also staff costs for prospect research and things like that. It’s a lot less expensive toe hold onto the donors you already have. But it’s not the easiest thing to do. So in the seminar, i’m going to kind of break it down into two things that you can do. What is getting your house in order at your organization? So meaning your acknowledgement processes streamlined. You have a great way of recognizing staff might redo your cash reports, some kind of really boring things, like that make an assessment of what kind of stewardship each department is doing. If you’re a bigger organization on dh, then the more fun part of it is to think about what you have to offer to your donor’s that’s really special? Do you have access to celebrities? And that doesn’t necessarily mean, you know, beyonce and jay z. It could be an expert in the field where you work. It could be a great event that you do. You could add on opening session for special donors. There could be travel any number of things that you can do to make donors really feel like they’re part of your work. All right, so why don’t we start with the, uh, the more dry but still important? Yeah, right? You’ve got to get yourself in order before you could go outside. Yeah, we have a good amount of time together. So that’s, where should we start with assessing? I mean, how do we figure out where we’re what do we need to look at? You figure out where we are and then we’ll look at where we gotta go. Yeah, well, i think it depends on the size of your organization. So the case study that i’m going to use is from the u s fund for unicef, where i worked for about three and a half years. It’s a bigger organization, a bigger staff. So what we did is we put together a working group. I mean, people hear the word words working group and just generally roll their eyes, but sometimes they can be effective. We made sure we had representation from all of our departments. And during the first meeting, we just talked about what we thought would be challenging for donors. Attention, soda place. Like the us fund, for instance, we acquired a lot of donors to emergencies the indian ocean tsunami, the haiti earthquake, et cetera. And then we really struggled to have plans about holding on to those donors. Okay, so we talked a lot about whether we were being donor-centric as an organization. So on a two inch of you, you’re my second of you so far from the first one was all about donor-centric zm he was ceo of food for the poor in florida on concerned about donor-centric sametz well, but trying to make it true, not just not just a flash phrase that doesn’t really have a meaning behind it yeah, it’s kind of a buzz word, but you know, the way i think about being donor-centric and if it’s not kind of resonating for you, every fundraiser kind of has low moments, you know? Why did i why did i become a fundraiser? Why am i doing this on dh for me going back to being donor-centric can make you feel better in a way if you think about why donors are given to you and how much of their time and personal resource is there devoting because they believe in your cause, it makes you want to be donor-centric it makes you want to be a good friend in a way, you know, if you have a friend who’s, incredibly supportive and thoughtful, who remembers your birthday always asks you about important things in your life, you know, who shows up at your party with a great hostess gift every time, and then you do nothing in return, you’re not being a good friend, so that’s like being donor-centric if the donor is so generous to you, but you’re not respectful of his or her wishes, you know? You’re just not doing the right thing, there’s such a thing is doing the right thing so well, where should we look specifically to determine whether we are doing the right thing? Well, our marketing communications our, which includes the website print and, you know, let’s, let’s, drill down to some some of the things we should be looking at. Specifically, i think probably where to start is financial accountability that’s also kind of a buzz word these days, i think, but making sure that you’re letting your daughter so and this is the drier stuff again, this is the getting your house in order, making sure that your donor’s know where their money is going and making sure that you’re respecting where they told you they wanted it to go. You know, there’s some great donors who say here’s, some money, i don’t care what you do, it could be operating costs, it can be salaries, and then there are other donors who say no, i really wanted to go to the specific program and we have to make sure that we’re being a countable to the donors on and i liked your work too respectful, yeah, respectful of what their wishes when when they do don’t make a designation right back to the friendship example, you know, it’s just what’s the right thing in the friendship. In the exchange you mentioned website it’s a great point, you know, there are all of these charity rating organizations now, including charney navigator, who look at two things they look at your your finances so they’ll read through your audited financial statements in your nine nineties. They also want to see certain things posted on your website, and that includes your audits and your nine nineties on dure leadership staff. And you have to really be telling donors how you run your organization and not be afraid of letting them, and i think we’re often afraid that donors will find something out about us that they don’t like and that’s what marketing communications has forts it’s for telling the story, but you really do have to be pretty open with your donors. I think in the more sophisticated days where we live, so making sure that that stuff is up on your website is great for ratings on charity navigator, but again, it’s just the right thing to do. Also interesting. Parallel about not not fearing letting donors in. I think of a parallel with social media know what? Everybody’s got a facebook page now, but the early fear was what if donors post comments that we don’t like, right? And there haven’t been many instances of that, and when it does happen, it’s an open communication and if it’s, of course, if it’s blatant and doesn’t belong, that can always be eliminated. Deleted but but that’s that’s the that’s, the that’s, the rare rare exception yeah, no it’s it’s a conversation, right? It’s it’s a dialogue, and so we shouldn’t fear the openness. And now facebook pages are rampant but seven hundred wherever five or seven years ago probono heimans many, seven, five, four, five years ago, the fear was when we can’t let donors post on our our our new facebook page, they might say things we don’t like, right? Yeah, reputational risk is obviously huge and the problem with the google accessible world right? Is that you confined if there was a faux pas non-profits passed it’s just like any person it’s going to be on the internet? So if some risk to your effort, reputation occurs it. Lasts forever, so it makes a lot of sense that we’re apprehensive, but i think you’re making a great point if someone comes out, whether it’s on your facebook page or if they send you a private message and says i’m really worried about some aspect of your business practices, i’m really worried about your program design it’s a great opportunity to be able to say, you know what? This is how we really do it. Let’s, let’s have a conversation. So yeah, i mean, it’s a lot to manage its a lot more to manage than we’ve ever had, but i agree, it’s a good opportunity to be out there on that person who’s saying that to you cares about you? Yeah, if they didn’t care, they were just written you off and said they’re screwing it up, you know? I’m not gonna bother, but they do care enough to to learn and maybe and they’re even trying to help. Yeah, and just to bring it back to donor intention to kind of tar tar topic, if someone cares and they have a concern and you address it, you probably have that person for life, right? I mean, you if you’re honest, if you’re open, if you’re thoughtful about how you’re telling your story, you’re going to be able to hang onto two donors and it’s better in the long run for your business. What else should we be doing? Internal e-giving getting our own house in order? Welchlin look, so i think once you’re kind of clear they are out there that you’re financially accountable than a lot of what i encountered when i was looking at stewardship again, i’m using the us fundez and fundez an example, but there’s this’s applicability. Other places, too, is how motivated staff were to retain donors, so sometimes that way organisations put together their cash report or the way that they recognize fundraisers might recognize acquisition more than it recognizes retention. So just making sure that you’re you’re making sure that it’s really a priority for your staff and they’re being recognized and evaluated on the right, the right kind of metrics, right attention as well as acquisition? Yeah, exactly and internally, a lot of organizations have started to measure their retention, but they don’t necessarily measure upgrades or donorsearch atis faction and i’m just going to name check here because this is not something that i thought of this is actually from karen osborne of the osborne group, and these are her recommendations specifically to measure retention upgrades and donorsearch atis faction as a wayto make sure that you have a healthy stewardship for donor relations program going on, so some organizations are not even measuring retention necessarily. So that’s a great place to start, but measuring how often you’re moving, the donors up the pipeline that’s also really helpful, and then whether or not donors think that your mission is crucial whether they feel that you’re one of their top five organizations, how committed are they to you that reflects on how you’re communicating with them? How do you how do you judge these things? Well, if you have a donor database again, i’m talking about a little bit of a bigger organization. You can actually run reports on these kinds of things. You can set them up in an ornament. Sorry. That’s what i meant. Donors feel that your mission is critical. Are you one of their top five charities? That’s gotta be done by survey conversation. Yeah. So if you want to do, you can do a doner satisfaction survey with smaller donors, you can do it online, but you can also sit down when you’re talking about major donors are board members you, khun do individual interviews with them where you’re really not asking them? So why i called the session howto ask when you’re not asking, i hope everyone doesn’t show up and think, oh good, i don’t have to solicit anymore marcie’s going to tell me how it’s more, what are the moves that you’re doing in between? The asks that are making the donor feel really good and really invested in you? So sitting down and talking to them about what they think about the organization without asking them to write a check is could be a good move, you know that old saying if you want to ask for money, ask for advice, it’s like that? Yeah, so you would do it face to face or you could do, you know, an online survey or something like that and agree maybe to do it every two or three years, you know what i’m talking about really takes a lot of resource is and not every small organization, so now i’m a one. Person shop at my new job on dh. This kind of thing is probably going to be a little bit more challenging than it was when i had more research. Resource is at a bigger place, so there’s that, too. But you’re going, you’re going to find a way. You’re tuned to non-profit radio. Tony martignetti also hosts a podcast for the chronicle of philanthropy fund-raising fundamentals is a quick ten minute burst of fund-raising insights, published once a month. Tony’s guests are expert in crowdfunding, mobile giving event fund-raising direct mail and donor cultivation. Really, all the fund-raising issues that make you wonder, am i doing this right? Is there a better way there is? Find the fund-raising fundamentals archive it. Tony martignetti dot com that’s marketmesuite n e t t i remember there’s, a g before the end, thousands of listeners have subscribed on itunes. You can also learn maura, the chronicle website philanthropy dot com fund-raising fundamentals the better way. Now, so one person fund-raising shop, you are talking to donors a lot. Yeah, so? So some of these questions could weave their way into your daily conversations with donors. Maybe not everyone, right? But you can sample, right? Yeah. And one of the things that i’m doing so there was ah, one year gap between development directors at the ralph lauren center. So some of the things that i’m doing there are sort of resurrecting some relationships that we had before. And i’m making sure that there’s no stone unturned if you’ve given money to us before, if you cared about us before, i’m going to try to bring you back. You can’t be successful all the time. You’re gonna lose some donors. People’s circumstances change. It might have nothing to do with your organization. But it’s really important to make sure that you’re being very methodical about renewing let’s let’s, switch to the more fun the donor side of good donorsearch worship. Yeah, so i had a great experience again at the u s fund for unicef. Where i put together are a major donor e-giving society now abel he managed by another colleague at the us fund-raising donors we decided to talk to our board members about what they might like to see. So when you structure a major donor giving society, you’re basically putting together a list of tiered benefits and that’s also an important part of putting your house in order. What are you offering to donors? A different levels is a consistent who are the donors that your leadership and board members need to be involved with? And you have plans for howto steward those donors. So with us one farina’s have is lucky they have a lot of board members, so they have a national board and then seven regional board. So some people may say that’s very unlucky that’s true. Thankfully, it was thankfully was fortunate for the for the us fund. These board members are great. I’m a board relations person, so right, i think that’s great and some people think it’s a nightmare. Now i have an eight person board, so i’ve, you know, i’ve gone on, but they have about probably about one hundred twenty five port members between all those groups, and we did some surveying of them and i’m not saying that these air the answers you would get from every a group of board members, but this is the kind of thing that, like on your terrible worst day, you just think about it and feel good. These board members were like, i don’t care about recognition that’s fine, i just want to be more connected to the mission. I just want to talk, teo, the workers in the field and really understand what you do. They were looking for these really meaningful engagement opportunities. It wasn’t like, oh, yeah, i’d like a tote bag or i’d really like to meet beyonce when i’m named checking her, maybe she’ll call me, uh, you know, they really wanted more programmatic depth, and they also wanted to network and connect with each other, so we tried to build benefits that felt a little bit less transactional and more i’m kind of life affirming. Like what? What? What were a couple of examples? Well, you know, again, this is not something that everyone can offer, but travel to the field is an example at a certain ok, but a small organization, maybe maybe it’s not travel to on exotic country, but maybe welcome to the to our office. Yeah. To the place where we’re serving people that you’ve never seen yu know we internally take it for granted because it’s on the floor below us who’s down the hall, but our donors have never seen it however modest you may think it is. It might mean the world to the donor to be invited. Absolutely, i mean at the ralph lauren center. So i work on site at the cancer center it’s in harlem on one hundred twenty fourth and madison, i’ll be honest, a lot of donors don’t go up to that neighborhood very often because of the involvement of ralph lauren. The center is really beautiful looking, and i love walking in there every day and seeing the patients in the in the waiting room, not it’s, a very unhappy time for the patients, but i feel really connected to them into the mission, and we do a lot of site visits at the ralph lauren center. Before unicef, i worked at a education non-profit called learning leaders, and we did school volunteerism, so we used to do a lot of site visits to schools, and that was great. And whenever i was feeling kind of disconnected. Elearning leaders, i would get up and go to a school and be like, okay, this is why i’m doing this, so yeah, the travel with units of the little sexier right, every charity has got someplace that you can come. Yes, absolutely. Or some meeting that you can come to that you haven’t previously been invited too. Yeah, something is going on at your charity. I just went teo, a special events training session at robin hood. So the ralph lauren center is a robin, but grantee on the special event staff was sharing that their donors love to come to their office and just see where the work is done. So just just the administrative, like, ministerial type officers. Yeah, i mean, the stuff that the people who work there take for granted every day that has no interest. I mean, it has interested them, but it would never think of inviting an outsider. But you got it. We got stop thinking like that. They’re not outsiders, they’re insiders, and we want to welcome them. Welcome to the workplace. Yeah, you do it one day a month, who have a bunch of invite a bunch of people and have a breakfast and maybe you know that that half a day a month becomes mohr donor-centric yeah, then the other nineteen and a half workdays that you have in the book. Yeah, absolutely. And i think that’s why i found the responses from the board members of the u s funds so encouraging, they were saying exactly what you’re saying. We want to know how you do your work. We want to really drill down with you. We’re not necessarily looking for a lots of glitzy stuff we want we want the day to day and it kind of relates financial accountability also fixing your bike so it doesn’t fall off table, right? I’m i’m getting violent with my mike. I’m better that way. Yeah, although we’re close enough, you could. But if you should appreciate, you’re not breaking down that you haven’t done anything. Yeah, it’s been it’s been ok? Not feeling your mind myself across the line either of this relates back to financial accountability again, if we’re afraid to let donors in, then they’re not going to come closer to us and we want them to be closer. That’s not every single donor, but the important. Ones and the ones who care. So yeah. That’s. The interesting part that was so us fund for unicef. It was travel abroad. Make clear that it could be traveling to your administrative office. Yes. What else? What else did you do on the outside? It could be also in individualized reporting. So back to how donors want their money spent. You know, a lot of us do kind of ah, general operating support report, which is okay, but at certain levels, you really want to make sure that you’re doing an individualized report and, you know a lot, i think most of us do this, but that was included because unicef being such a big place, sometimes people were getting a more generalized report and not feeling like we were really drilling down into the program that they wanted to support. Then we did a couple of other things, like at the higher levels dinner hosted by a boardmember dinner hosted by the global unicef executive director. So that thing that i said about celebrities before a lot of people think that tony lake who’s, the executive director of unicef globally, is a celebrity in the world of you. Know, international charitable work people really want to meet mr lake and he’s more of an academic than he is anything else but that’s really interesting to donors. So we did travel to see unicef’s work in the field, and then unicef has some other interesting international properties to visit there’s, a research center in florence there’s a supply division in copenhagen, so travel to those places also, which is again inner workings. Okay, way covered travel. Yeah, but but your phone is ringing. I think it was beyonce. I heard a phone ringing. This is more important. I mean, i’ll get to her after i agree. You’re everything in the world in your life has brought you to this moment. Exactly don’t want to surrender it to be on no side. It might have been someone else’s phone. I heard that you could actually be calling. I always keep mine on site could be calling somebody else. I’m sorry, it’s. All right, you’re next on the list. I’m sure i’m sure i’m sure up. What else? Way put on there. So receptions before big events for having a gallery. You don’t spend a lot of money to add a small reception before you’ve already got the space, the caterer is already coming. Yeah, marginal cost of that before or after reception, especially when you’re putting on a bigger event on that gets to the donors wanting to network with each other and to know each other. They don’t always get to be in the same place either. And, you know, a boardmember meeting or another kind of meeting isn’t always the best place to network. So something like that, which is a lot of my my work is planned e-giving consulting way. Do a lot of those vips receptions before the larger event? Right? Another thing that doesn’t cost much is v i p seating at an event? Yeah, it costs nothing. It cost the couple strips of masking tape. Yeah, mask often area and and have vips seating for an event you’ve already paid for the tickets. For you’ve already got the seats rope off ten or twelve seats for vips. People feel like the world way because the i p c yeah, and, you know, what’s funny about that. We’re already doing it right when you think about it. When you’re doing your gallus eating, you are putting your most important people in the front, but they don’t know that we’re not revealing our methods. So if you make that a little more open and say by the way we’re going to, we’re gonna give you the best seats here this important, i think, you know, we’re continuing on that theme of tell your donors what you’re doing, and it might make them feel good, so yeah, great. Ok. Ok. What else? We still have a couple minutes left. Marcie. What? What else? What else can we talk about? Well, we could talk about volunteer opportunities. Maybe. I think that that is a big saying. That’s emerging volunteers helping with stewardship donors having volunteer opportunities to make you feel more engaged. Because i think it’s emerging as a theme because corporate supporters often are asking while how can my employees come for a day and do something and it’s a little bit difficult for some organizations to figure out how to do that? I had the luck. This is back. Tio. Sometimes stewardship moves are a little easier at one place or another. A little more obvious. When i worked at a volunteer organization, i got a lot of my donors and my board members through a pipeline of one particular volunteer program, which was an art program, and it just attracted the kind of volunteers who were also able to be donors. Not everybody has that. So ralph lauren center does a lot of stuff with our physical plants, having people come in and paint having people come in and plant flowers outside. You know, i just think it’s important to make sure that you have at least a couple just up your sleeve and ready to go a couple of volunteer opportunities in case either of corporate supporter asks or, you know, a group of boardmember xero group of donors say, i don’t really feel like writing another check. What can i do so that’s, you know, i think that’s big and a lot of donors also want to do things that involve their children and family. Family philanthropy is such a big emerging topic, so if you can think of a program or volunteer opportunity where people can bring their children that’s also huge, we have just a couple of minutes left. What about the board’s role in the stewardship? Yeah, that’s a really good question. Okay, we’ll come up with one. Twenty. Only took me about twenty four minutes. Well, i mean, this is like a house in order. It’s, you know, it’s, the more kind of the more boring stuff. So i had mentioned that bored hosted annual dinner could be an interesting big storage it move. Thank you calls. Thank you. Notes all those kinds of things. I hear that from a lot of guests. Just get the board together, do it for an hour before a meeting. Right? And they’re going to get a great feeling from it themselves. And you’re just right. Just calling to say thank you, thank you. Nothing else. Don’t do don’t do anything more, you know, we’re not asking for anything more. Just calling to say thank you. And and a donor has gotten a call from from a pipe and the organization it’s a boardmember it’s really big it’s big you people. A lot of people in the international world love teo support the carter center because the carter center does great work, but also jimmy carter calls you. I’ve had a bunch of donors like president carter called me. Okay? So not everybody. Has jimmy carter, but it’s still important to hear from, you know, a leadership voice if you much you mentioned the executive director? Yeah, who’s not not really thought of as a celebrity in in in way, popular media, but within the organization within that mission. He’s very well known. Yeah, so it could just be somebody in your office. Exactly. And also, i didn’t mention loyalty recognition. I think calling donors and thanking them for gift that they’ve just given is fantastic. Don’t take that off of your roster, but five years in a row, ten years in a row recalling their thing irrespective of the size of the raft. Is that kind of loyalty? Yeah. Recognition for for the history. Yeah, how gracious and thoughtful is that if you just say thank you for giving to us for five consecutive years, we really appreciate it. That’s it and we didn’t care how much it was. Marcie, thank you very much. We have to leave it there. Thank you. My pleasure. Marcie brenholz. She is director of development for the ralph lauren center for cancer care and prevention. Thank you very much. More. See again. Thank you. You’re listening. To tony martignetti non-profit radio coverage of fund-raising day two thousand fourteen. Live listener love we got fort lee, new jersey, brooklyn, new york, jersey city, new jersey hutchisson in new jersey might that’s when my dad was born and raised in greenville hospital and has to live on mcadoo have in jersey city, but you probably that’s old jersey city, new york, new york, washington, d c live listener love to everyone let’s, go abroad paris, france bourgeois iran is with us live listener love to you. So is toronto, ontario and king city, ontario in canada, of course, tokyo connie chua beijing and she on in china. Ni hao and seoul, korea on your haserot we have a couple of others too, and they’ll be later on generosity siri’s you know them because they host five k runs and walks and i talk about him often two weeks ago. I am seed. They’re new york city event. Last week they were in philadelphia. Nine charities in philadelphia came together, raised seventy five thousand dollars, had a very fun event. The key is none of the nine are big enough to have hosted their own five k run walk. It just wouldn’t have enough people participating, but when the community comes together, great things can happen. Seventy five thousand dollars raised that’s what generosity siri’s does puts charities together in these events, and they have them coming up in new jersey and miami. Devlin is the ceo. Please tell him you’re from non-profit radio you could talk to dave lynn it’s seven one eight five o six nine triple seven or generosity siri’s dot com i thank you very much for supporting non-profit radio. We’re almost at ten thousand listeners each week very close and i thank you very much for being with us. There isn’t a thanksgiving show next week, so i’m giving my thanks this week to you very much for your support. I have to give a special mention to our outstanding monthly contributors maria semple, jean takagi and amy sample ward. They are so generous with their expertise for the benefit of all of us very, very grateful for them as well. Again, no show next week. This week i thank you very, very much for your support of non-profit radio. And there is a thank you video at tony martignetti dot com that’s tony’s take two for friday twenty first of november forty sixth show of the year here’s my interview with stacy palmer and glenn mcdonald about what the wealthy are thinking. Welcome to tony martignetti non-profit radio coverage of fund-raising day two thousand fourteen we are at the marriott marquis hotel in times square, new york city with me now are stacy palmer and glenn mcdonald. Their workshop topic is whatthe wealthy. What are the wealthy thinking now? It’s a question, not a statement. We’re going to answer that question. Stacy palmer is editor of the chronicle of philanthropy and glenn mcdonald is president of wealth and giving forum stacy glen welcome. Thank you. Thank you for having us. Pleasure to have you, glenn let’s, start with you. What? What? What is this topical? About? What? What? What are the wealthy thinking now? Well, the first thing i want to say as a preface is that we like to categorize the wealthy as a homogenous group, but in fact, that’s really not fair of anybody are very diverse. I’m just like any cohort group that you would mention they spend this political spectrum young and old. You know that wealth can be minute very quickly, especially in silicon valley and and, interestingly enough with on that topic, you know, it is young generation that is spurring new trends. E-giving um, and the number one trend right now is thinking about their philanthropy across everything they do not just in the czechs, they write, meaning how they invest their portfolio and what sort of for-profit cos they invest in ones that they believed that they could be transformation on society. And i think that’s really the number one trend that i see on day are shifting the thinking of their parents and grand parents to be quite frank. And when you say the young, are we thinking of people in their thirties, you know, early, early twenties coming out of college and thinking about the business voices they make the careers, they want to be involved with, the types of companies they want to work for, they want their doing good and doing well and making money to be integrated into one it’s no longer separate, and i think that’s a trend that’s here to stay, and i’m sure we’ve read, you know, in the press in the chronicle philanthropy wall street journal that socially responsible investing and impact and interesting are considered alongside of the donations and grantmaking that foundations are making now. Right now. Stacey, what do you have to add? Early on, i agree that’s one of the big trends, the other thing that some people are starting to talk about is whether there’s a whole third wave of philanthropy coming among the young and whether mark zuckerberg really kick that off and he’s not even thirty yet. Ah, but by giving so much money to the silicon valley community foundation rather than setting up his own foundation, he said a model for the other ways of thinking about giving, not institution building, but really saying i want to do this differently and others may be following his model. So i think we are seeing a pretty big shift. Yeah, glen a third wave. I agree wholeheartedly, i think even before mark zuckerberg duitz warren buffett said, look, rather than build a new private foundation, i’m gonna give my money to bill gates. I respect him. I trust him. I like his work. I like his team he’s built. Why start over? I think, you know, station. I would probably agree that the proliferation of new foundations and new non-profits when a lot of great organizations have already been built, small and large, and everything in between already available to donors and in some respects, by giving to the community foundation what market burghdoff burgers saying, the staff is there, there’s, a lot of programs already in place, and we can be flexible because the community foundation structures allowed for flexibility, not only in the way they given the timing e-giving, but also in the number of programs that are available now. Those watching video will note that the room got darker, durney martignetti non-profit radio, a cz continuing. The overhead lights are flickering, a little bit of that coming on off, but it makes no difference. We persevere here non-profit radio, absolute. Nothing stops us earthquakes, bring them on. We will continue. We are not leaving this set until until we flush this out. Let’s see, let’s, talk a little more stacy about this this third wave, what else? What else characterizes this? You know, i think in addition to things like impact investing, we also see growing interest in merging political giving and philanthropic e-giving and thinking about the various ways that you can use your money to influence change. And of course, as came pain finance limits are basically going away. It’s easier for the wealthy to think about doing that when you think about the scale of their political giving compared to philanthropy, it’s so much smaller anyway, but they’re definitely looking at both ways to do things. I think that’s got good sides and bad sides. The good side is that they’re getting engaged to the bad side is people are starting to worry about whether the plutocrats are setting policy and are starting to hear more about that. I think that could kick back on philanthropy in some pretty serious way, so we have to talk about, you know, sort of are people going to be accused of of trying to sway public policy through their philanthropy and the wealthy, setting the setting, the agenda, setting the research research? Priorities indeed. But the flip side of that, of course, is that we all know that you can’t create change unless you change some systems with everybody influence if he’s been talking about that for so long, so in some ways you would think that they might be applauding the billion years for finally getting more engaged in public policy. But yet we don’t see that going to see you nodding a lot. Yes, absolutely agree, and i think that, you know, in some respects, there is some advocacy and political influence of the wealthy that are looking to take care of themselves by not having more taxes or limiting wreck regulations on businesses, and i think they’re the coke brothers are big example and tom style on the other side of the fence would say, well, yes, but i’m advocating on behalf of those who don’t have but you know that the challenge there is that while i think tom’s tires is well intentioned, that sometimes the billionaire’s advocating on behalf of those that are less fortunate don’t really see the issues at the depth that the underbelly really does and that they should be advocating for themselves and the only way to do that is, you know, frankly, this is getting bleeding out of philanthropy and into a political commentary is through true democracy. And so i think there is an issue and stacy’s spot on and saying, you know, by philanthropy and the ability to raise dot org’s toe, advocate and influence the political process, the challenges that will philanthropy get, you know, a little bit of a black spot when there’s so much goodness like in this room, you go upstairs, there’s a thousand organizations that are doing are wonderful things that nobody hears about it. And you don’t want the non-profit charitable sector and philanthropy world to be viewed as to to link tio, you know, just the wealthy influencing the way the political game happens because the real truth is it’s so much goes on underneath that’s. Wonderful. Yeah. Yeah. Stacy looked like you wanted to add. Well, and i also think part of it too is that there’s so much influenza b that doesn’t have anything to do with politics. And so that is we need to bear keep things in context. Yeah. What else? What else are you planning to your session? Is this afternoon, what else is on your minds for the for the audience? I think one of the things we’ll be talking about is the different ways to appeal to today’s donors and to talk about what kinds of things draw them in it’s not enough just to say that they’re motivated by a particular cause, but what kind of language do you use, teo, get them engaged, you know, do you need to talk about financial metrics when you’re appealing to an investor? Do you need to talk about how you’re fixing things when you’re talking to an entrepreneur? I was talking to a wealth advisor the other day who said she was advising an ophthalmologist, and he looks at everything through what people aren’t seeing because that’s what he does all day, you know, and so trying to think about donors in those ways, um, and what their professional obligations are, that that might shape what it is that they want to hear about how you draw them in and get them engaged. So we’ll talk about tips for doing that so segmenting absolute across your constituencies will want to share and share some of the some. Of those tips, but let’s not hold out on listeners. Well, again, i agree with stacy. You know, you know, the rail challenges that i say that that every individual who is a donor giver investor in for-profit solutions to social issues has his or her own own formula for wanting to give, and it involves the head and the heart and summer, morehead oriented and rational thinking about and they focus on outcomes and measurement more than the emotional joy of that comes sometimes from giving and everything in between. And i think that to stacey’s point and wealth advisers have the same challenge in managing money. They have to figure out what makes the person tick. And i think the most important thing and i think everybody in this room would agree, is what’s most important is the discovery processes, the listening and then the appeal khun b couched in the framework of the individual not in some standard way of of soliciting money asked the listening, listening whether that’s done through social media channels right at our one to one conversation with a survey. Yeah, i think that’s that’s something that i hear on the show often. Is that we’re not active listeners. And you love listeners. I have read of nine thousand of them. I do love them, and i listened to them. But they are sometimes not listening the way they need to be less exactly to their various constituents, whether that’s vendors on one hand or donors on the other. Yeah, someone’s trying to watch that. Okay. Background noise, bleeding in. Like what you’re hearing a non-profit radio tony’s got more on youtube, you’ll find clips from stand up comedy tv spots and exclusive interviews catch guests like seth gordon. Craig newmark, the founder of craigslist marquis of eco enterprises, charles best from donors choose dot org’s aria finger do something that worked. And naomi levine from new york universities heimans center on philanthropy tony tweets to he finds the best content from the most knowledgeable, interesting people in and around non-profits to share on his stream. If you have valuable info, he wants to re tweet you during the show. You can join the conversation on twitter using hashtag non-profit radio twitter is an easy way to reach tony he’s at tony martignetti narasimhan t i g e n e t t i remember there’s a g before the end he hosts a podcast for the chronicle of philanthropy fund-raising fundamentals is a short monthly show devoted to getting over your fund-raising hartals just like non-profit radio, toni talks to leading thinkers, experts and cool people with great ideas. As one fan said, tony picks their brains and i don’t have to leave my office fund-raising fundamentals was recently dubbed the most helpful non-profit podcast you have ever heard. You can also join the conversation on facebook, where you can ask questions before or after the show. The guests were there, too. Get insider show alerts by email, tony tells you who’s on each week and always includes link so that you can contact guests directly. To sign up, visit the facebook page for tony martignetti dot com. Duitz one further thought i’d be interested in stacy’s perspective on this is i’m just getting to know her. Um, that comes to mind is, is that i’ve seen that the most committed philanthropists that really followed through on a long haul on and staying with heimans developing a strategy and then really staying through with an organization or an innovative not-for-profits leader that’s starting something new or social issues to address is is the ones who really do stay the course and have great impact and have patients for the outcomes. The right outcomes are those that have been introspective and been thought and taking a step back and not do something that’s trendy, but something that really means something to them or their families, but that takes a certain kind of investment and investors who are in for the long term and damp latto had a lot to say about that correct perfect example. Stacey, wait, we all know that one of the things that goes wrong in philanthropy all the time is that people follow the trendy they want to start new organizations and get excited about the next new thing instead of staying for the long haul. And in some ways, what we need to change the culture of philanthropy is to say, there are some of these organizations that are doing great work already if they just had more money and more support from their board members, they could do even more on and that’s not to say that the organization shouldn’t get started, but i think when people come into philanthropy, they just get excited about i’ve got this innovative idea, please back me instead of saying, wait a minute, who’s already doing terrific work and how can i get involved in the board and that’s? One of the things that non-profits really need is committed born members who will get involved and do that kind of thing is, well, it’s not enough just to write a check there’s some sentiment that the, uh, the passion takes over and r r system allows people to start a non-profit as long as they could meet some some not very high threshold requirements from the irs and that we never end up with a proliferation of charities duplicating overlapping rather than the person going through an existing charity and saying if you don’t have an opening for me on the board? Can we can i partner some other way with you exactly about this proliferation of non-profits means that you see that hurting us? Well, i think the stacey’s point at the beginning of this session that, you know, mark zuckerberg and and i added, you know, maura buffet to the mix and there’s more and more that are saying no, that isn’t the right thing, and i think they’re setting that example altum that others are starting to take a step back and ask that question, which is a good trend, and i also think there’s some consulting firms that are starting to encourage non-profits to think about partnerships and merging and consolidating programs into one and gaining scale and leverage across that that’s starting to happen. It’s we need more of it, and some of it was by necessity and some in our great recessional that’s, exactly the wayto nine crisis forced with lower funding and some issues that even someone doubt doubt organizations, you know, that poor performance on their operating budget suffered that that forced the issue. But it’s, it’s, it’s, it’s a trend that starting and what we need more of it. You know, no question, yeah, we have an op ed in our current issue that’s actually arguing for that and saying that, you know, really there needs to be more of mergers and acquisitions business in the new non-profit field thie incentives are totally different than in business, but we need to find ways to think about ways for strong organizations to work together, not just because the financial crisis caused it, but for reasons to extend the mission and to think about it that way. And sometimes, you know, we were just talking before about board members it’s often the board that gets in the way of a merger because they don’t want to give up their boardmember ship, we’ve got to find some other incentives for them because there’s plenty of roles for them to get involved. There are precious few consultants i’ve had one on sabrina lamb, i think sabrina lamp consultant’s doing latto advising around merger, acquisition and or even just joint ventures, partnerships and not always for fund-raising purposes, but for a longer time, you know, just mission that mission achievement, there’s that that overlap is, uh, can be hurt can’t be hurting us. Back-up what other? Any other strategies around the the topics of listening? I think one of the things that many fundraisers find challenging is that even if they are the ones who are doing the listening, getting the ceo, getting other people on the staff, teo do that listening is much more of a culture shift home. And so one of the messages i think well osili talk about today is how to engage the chief executive and other people in the organization to see that talking to what it don’t cares about doesn’t mean sacrificing your ethics or, you know, getting in the way of letting the donor dictate the mission it’s just saying, how do you talk to them in a language that they understand and that appeals to them? And maybe they do actually have some good ideas about how you run your organization differently that were worth listening to, but i think you know so often, that’s one of the challenges fundraisers have is they get it, but not everybody in the organization corrected. On the flip side, you might be talking to a donor who is really it’s, a patriarchal matriarch, or maybe even the son. Of daughter of a wealthy family on dh sometimes the whole family’s going to be part of the decision process. So it makes that dynamic and challenge a little bit more complicated, because sometimes family members they seemingly be on the same page till the time comes for the check to be ripping and then there’s some symbol, wait a minute, that’s. Ah, that doesn’t really have it is not in concert with the mission of our private foundation and one orders yes, and the other going there’s no, and so look fundez that that’s why this is a profession i mean fund-raising is a huge challenge. You’ve gotto work the organization on the one hand and step, as stacy pointed out, on the other hand, sometimes the dynamics of the emotional dynamics of one individual donors end or the family dynamics associated with that donor is makes it a interesting challenge. If we’re seriously interested in listening, then we have to be asking questions the answers to which we need to be willing to hear couldn’t and they’re often not, and they’re often not couldn’t have said it better. I mean, you know, that’s why i mentioned the discovery process if that’s not part of the question set, whose else involved in this decision process? I know you have a private foundation to have professionals on the part of the private foundation that are going to influence this. Do you have other family members come teo going to come and weigh in on the decision? And should we be meeting with them and and so forth? There was absolute a lot of times, you know, for smaller and maybe even midsize shops they you need often, i think, an outside adviser to help facilitate this, this this process and a lot of the smaller shops, you know, they don’t just don’t have the wherewithal to bring someone in to facilitate a conversation on the board or conversation among among donors, you know that, and they and they’re so insular in their work that they’re not able to ask these these challenging questions. I think one of the things all non-profits no matter what size they are can seek out is professionals who want to give their time to facilitate something like that. Most people would like to help in organization in various ways, and, you know, we don’t think about the sort of skilled volunteering enough in the ways that people can help out. So i would say, you know, an organization of any size can really reach out to people who can help in that process on dh should be creative and thinking about that rather than just asking for money because you’re right, sometimes you need more that kind of coaching and that sort of thing. Clint, i think one of the things you talked about in our call was thinking about mentors for people who so, you know, thinking about the way people in their profession want to meet other people in their profession and that that’s a good way for non-profits to think about how to find new donors and volunteers, you had a couple of a couple of things on that was, well, we believe the weapon giving form we believe in pierre learning, so wait really exist to encourage greater philanthropy and in that regard now our sweet spot is emerging philanthropists. But we have other philanthropist comments tell their stories about how they developed their own form of forgiving and struggles and challenges. They asked themselves about how much to give and what’s the direction of my giving and howto i involve my family and how do i ensure that when i’m i’m not going to get dahna fatigue and so forth and so on? And it’s really? I think peer-to-peer learning in any field of endeavors is hugely important. That’s why there’s a lot of, you know, organizations like young presidents organization for ceos and so forth and so on, but even for non-profit professionals, i mean there’s a great a couple of organisations, they’re just i don’t if you heard of catch a fire. Oh, sure, back when stacey was talking about going to mention catch afire volunteermatch right, so in order to get, you know, if you need an accounting accounting or you need your having board challenges or you’re having, you know, they will find professionals who could help come in and advise non-profits on those issues and challenging than one new one i just heard about was inspiring capital that i mean, really just organize this year to help non-profits think about intellectual capital and capabilities they developed that might be a source of revenue stream because they developed this expertise, you know, i give you one. Example, a year up national, you know, organization that helped inner city youth find a pathway to self sustaining, you know, income and a great career and, you know, they become very well known, but they’ve really developed over the past fifteen years a great capability to only train young adults in inner cities, but also to stop thing properly and be on dso, you know, they have a model that’s that can compete with robert half, so they’re, you know, thinking about a revenue stream off of that that can help fund the organization, and i think more and more non-profits we’re gonna start doing the same thing, stacy, we have just a minute or so left one leave ah, parting thought something we haven’t we haven’t talked about that you plan to share one of the things that is clear and giving trends overall is that the affluent are the ones that are powering givings growth in america. We just saw e-giving yusa report come out and were it not for the wealthy, i don’t think we would have seen the good numbers that we saw so making sure that every organization of every size reaches out to these individuals is really important rather than focusing on things like special events and other kinds of things, i think almost every organization has the capacity to get what is for them a major gift, and there really should be thinking about that and important for them for then everybody doesn’t need to be going after seven, seven, eight, nine figure give exactly a ten thousand dollar gift might be a big gift for you. Go for it. Excellent. We’re gonna leave right there. Well, but i love that alright. Stacy palmer, editor of the chronicle of philanthropy, and glenn mcdonald, president of wealth and giving forum thank you both very much. Thank you for happiness. Thank you. Turning my pleasure it’s tony martignetti non-profit radio coverage of fund-raising day two thousand fourteen thank you so much for being with us. Thanks to everybody at fund-raising day two thousand fourteen next week happy thanksgiving. I hope you enjoy your time very much with loved ones and friends take the time. Enjoy take a nap over the long weekend. I’m a big fan of naps indulge no show next week if you missed any part of today’s show, find it on. Tony martignetti non-profit radio no finding on tony martignetti dot com non-profit radio just rolls off my tongue, it’s it’s in my sleeping. Then i’m saying it. You’ll find info at tony martignetti dot com generosity siri’s, good things happening when small charities work together. Generosity, siri’s, dot com. Our creative producer is claire meyerhoff. This week’s line producer is janice taylor. Shows social media is by julia campbell of jake campbell. Social marketing on the remote producer of tony martignetti non-profit video is john federico of the new rules. Our music is by scott stein. You will be next week for non-profit radio. Big non-profit ideas for the other ninety five percent. Go out and be great. Heimans what’s not to love about non-profit radio tony gets the best guests check this out from seth godin this’s the first revolution since tv nineteen fifty and henry ford nineteen twenty it’s the revolution of our lifetime here’s a smart, simple idea from craigslist founder craig newmark yeah insights, orn presentation or anything? People don’t really need the fancy stuff they need something which is simple and fast. When’s the best time to post on facebook facebook’s andrew noise nose at traffic is at an all time hyre on nine a, m or p m so that’s when you should be posting your most meaningful post here’s aria finger ceo of do something dot or ge young people are not going to be involved in social change if it’s boring and they don’t see the impact of what they’re doing. So you got to make it fun and applicable to these young people look so otherwise a fifteen and sixteen year old they have better things to dio they have xbox, they have tv, they have their cell phones. Hani door is the founder of idealist. I took two or three years for foundation staff sort of dane toe. Add an email address card. It was like it was phone. This email thing is right and that’s why should i give it away? Charles best founded donors choose dot or ge somehow they’ve gotten in touch kind of offline as it were and and no two exchanges of brownies and visits and physical gifts. Mark echo is the founder and ceo of eco enterprises. You may be wearing those hoodies and shirts. Tony talked to him. Yeah, you know, i just i’m a big believer that’s not what you make in life. It sze, you know, tell you make people feel this is public radio host majora carter. Innovation is in the power of understanding that you don’t just do it. You put money on a situation expected to hell. You put money in a situation and invested and expected to grow and savvy advice for success from eric sabiston. What separates those who achieve from those who do not is in direct proportion to one’s ability to ask others for help. The smartest experts and leading thinkers air on tony martignetti non-profit radio big non-profit ideas for the other ninety five percent.

Video: ALS After Ice Bucket Challenge

Last week on Nonprofit Radio I interviewed Barbara Newhouse, the ALS president and CEO.

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Don’t despair. Here it is. My takeaways are below.

Takeaways:

— Ice Bucket Challenge yielded $115 million and 2.4 million new donors

— roughly half the donors expressed interest in remaining engaged

— no spending and allocation plan until November

— there’s so much to tell, you really should watch the video

Next week on Nonprofit Radio:

Maria Semple, our monthly prospect research contributor and The Prospect Finder, returns to talk about finding in-kind gifts.

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Nonprofit Radio for October 3, 2014: ALS After Ice Bucket Challenge

Big Nonprofit Ideas for the Other 95%

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My Guest:

Barbara Newhouse: ALS After Ice Bucket Challenge

Barbara Newhouse

I’m excited to welcome ALS Association president & CEO Barbara Newhouse! She’ll share the thrills and demands of the Ice Bucket Challenge. How is the organization managing the huge spike in donors and dollars? What comes next? It’s a Google+ Hangout on Air and we’ll take your questions on Twitter – use hashtag #NonprofitRadio.

Watch below: 

Thanks to The Chronicle of Philanthropy for providing their studio and expertise!

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Top Trends. Sound Advice. Lively Conversation. You’re on the air and on target as I delve into the big issues facing your nonprofit—and your career. If you have big dreams but an average budget, tune in to Tony Martignetti Nonprofit Radio. I interview the best in the business on every topic from board relations, fundraising, social media and compliance, to technology, accounting, volunteer management, finance, marketing and beyond. Always with you in mind. Sign-up for show alerts! Sponsored by:

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Dahna hello and welcome to a special tony martignetti non-profit radio big non-profit ideas for the other ninety five percent. I’m your aptly named host oh, i’m glad you’re with me. I would suffer the embarrassment of score pubic ginger vitus if i had to say the words you missed today’s show l s after ice bucket challenge a less association president and ceo barbara new houses with me this’s her she’s right now, she’s here, she’s going to share the thrills and demands of the ice bucket challenge how is the organization managing that huge spike in donors and dollars? What comes next? We’re on a google plus hang out on air and we very much want your questions. If you are at tony martignetti dot com, then use twitter and use the hashtag non-profit radio if you’re on the chronicle of philanthropy, side used the comment section and if you’re on google plus usually discussion window my thanks to the chronicle of philanthropy for letting us use their studio in washington, d c also to the chronicle’s web editor cody swain, sir he’s today’s, producer on the other side of the camp but trust me, he’s here. Non-profit radio is sponsored by generosity. Siri’s they host multi charity five k runs and walks general city siri’s dot com. I am very excited to welcome for a new house to the show. She has led the less association since june. You really stepped in it. And it’s incredible. She has held a senior leadership positions at alzheimer’s association, autism society and arthritis foundation a l s is that a l s a dot or ge? And on twitter, they are at a less association. Welcome to the show. Well, thank you for having me time. What is next in your careers? It isn’t bea bea disease. You know? Everybody asks me. I’ll bring my career is grandchildren co-branded she was fired-up grandchildren. I aspired to have have grandchildren, your children a rare of your aspirations. Well, they’re not there, obviously, but they’re aware they’re away and made them well aware. Yes, i do very much aware, because that’s, where i’m actually headed, will be retired. But hopefully okay. The association does research funds. Research also does care for patients and support for families and nations. Uh, so let’s. Make sure everybody understands what having a future. Annual traffic lateral school roses is a muscular euro disease, which actually impacts all of the muscles throughout the body. Sometimes it starts in the limbs, sometimes a little more rare, but it starts in the throat muscles, but eventually the disease will take over the entire body. Ah, person who has a less will live anywhere from to find an average, although some people do live walker. But for the most part, once your diagnosis usually two to five years and it will eventually encompass you, you’re breathing and you’re building teo eat obvious. So it is fatal. It is fatal. The latest numbers from the ice bucket challenge what? What are those in terms of new donors and dollars raised? Well, as we wrapped up on the ice bucket challenge, we’re at one hundred fifteen million and that was that is two point four million donors to your world and your total fund-raising in twenty thirteen wass what? Nineteen twenty thirteen at the national level, we raised around twenty one million. And at the chapter level they raised another tronvig three way. Okay, enormous spike and two point four million donors you difference can’t new donors him from came from a challenge, right? What? What was that like in i would like to i’d like to feel the thrills and the fire and maybe even the fears early july, early august, mid august. What was that feeling? Let’s? Just let’s just put this in perspective to say that as a brand in person, you know, i was out in the field making my rounds to start meeting people and toward the end of july, at the very end of july action first week of august, um, i wass in atlanta and, uh, carrie monk, uh, our chief communications officer had got me on the phone, and she said, well, you know, this thing has taken off a bit from massive that started in massachusetts with the ice bucket challenge, and i sad something to the effect, you know, we’ll probably pick up a couple of million, you know, if that kind of thing, you know, someone well, then i call and that week i actually was in atlanta and i was sick, so then that week, and she said, oh, my gosh, she said, you’re being challenged all over. We’ve got to get you, you’ve got to do with, you know, we’ve got to get your eyesight can’t wait till i come back. Notes we’ve got to get a dime and, you know, so that’s where you’re at that’s, where we’re going to do it and i’m sick and i have my swor through and yes, and then i got sicker, but on by the same at the same time it was just voting and you know you’re you are you are like on your everyday wass are you kidding me? Andi just kept going, and we kept saying to ourselves, be because literally all hands are on deck all across the country and our chapters and at the national office and, you know, we’re like going, alright, you handle this will have, you know, this personal handle, this were kept going on like that, and we also kept thinking, well, after this weekend, we’ll then what we found where that as it started to look like it was going to plateau, you’d get to the weekend, and of course, everybody would be getting together with their friends. And the next thing you know is it started going up you get and so i was like, okay on dh finally, i said, teo said to carry and we were talking about it as a team and we all thought labor day would probably be then about the time that it would probably start to flood show and really that’s when it started to tell us, kids got back to school and there are other things to focus on, it came to a less organically, which i love it was not at all that there is not it wasn’t planned, you know, communications plan, marketing plan, still sufficient a stewardship plan? No, i did not walk in the door and say, today, we’re going to do i spoke a challenge that we’re going teo really up the awareness of a less and we’re going to really have the money. So you’re not leaving any less of you and sure you’re so marketable. Ao anywhere we’re taking a harpy your great look, but you’re not. But there are different stories about how it came to a less, uh, can you consider it so they’re three gentlemen with dallas i people rabies, quinn and tony center jia the three guys had been communicating with one another about how they could raise the level of awareness of a lawless and and your discussions and so forth, they, uh, started in and seeing somebody use an ice bucket on something else. That’s what they said. But you know, what we really need to do is it’s sort of like the ice bucket because you know what? People get up in the morning and they splash water on their face. It gives him sort of a wake up moment, and the guys decided that they needed to be on wake up call of sorts. And so they really started it. But then it was the freddy’s family of massachusetts that then took it real because there really was for any charity. Yeah. Do i think matt lauer did it on television for someone for hospice care. Something originally was for any charity you were close to. Yeah, i mean, and and so these guys just took it to another level. But then it was really p praising his family that they moved it to sort of the level of the viral nature of it, that it could go and it’s went all over the world. Yeah. George bush, derek jeter with his retirement it’s uh, of course, but you’re listening to the talking alternative network. This’s, the cook said, about way we’re hosting part of my french new york city guests come from all over the world, from mali to new caledonia. From paris to keep back. French is a common language. Yes, they all come from different cultures, background or countries, and it common desires to make new york they’re home. Listen to them. Share this story. Join us. Pardon my french new york city every monday from one to two p, m. Are you stuck in your business or career trying to take your business to the next level, and it keeps hitting a wall? This is sam liebowitz, the conscious consultant. I will help you get to the root cause of your abundance issues and help move you forward in your life. Call me now and let’s. Create the future you dream of. Two, one, two, seven, two, one, eight, one, eight, three, that’s to one to seven to one, eight one eight three. The conscious consultant helping conscious people. Be better business people. Dahna talking. Dahna oppcoll wei asked a bunch of wei asked listeners to give us questions in advance on got someone and again, if you’re viewing, please use twitter hashtag non-profit radio or use the comment section if you’re on the chronicle site or if you’re on google plus using discussion window on because we want it, we want your questions, so please participate with us. One of the questions came from fremery symbol, who is the show’s monthly prospect research contributor? What is a less doing to segment and cultivate the new growth in donorsearch new pool donors so that you can identify? Did you give prospects and cultivated and stuart eventually? So what we have done is, first of all, we are saying we segmented the new donors so that we knew who was out, what e-giving level on those people that have given ten thousand dollars or more, uh, are either receiving a call from me or from bill, though it who is our national board chair, or from larry barnett, who chairs are development committee. So the three of us have split those out there who are actually calling each of those individuals with ten thousand are over. You don’t. Have to thank them for their contributions. The folks that have generously given below ten thousand ofcourse they’ve already see it’s really? Everybody received an acknowledgement the moment they’re give kayman acknowledgement went out, but then from the hour blew the stuff there that was that mechanism didn’t need to be tweaked because of the volume. Well, we did have our site crash one one day but it got back-up ready very quickly, but a cz the whole thing started to kick, i think, because of the way that it went, even though it seems like away very fast, everyone, we had enough time in there that we were able to tweak our messaging and carry monk, our chief marketing officer mentioned character or a couple of teachers here was also running the camp. I can caress here twenty four seven. I swear that woman was talking, but we kept tweaking the messages so that we were ready to go and get those acknowledgements out because we didn’t want anybody to wait to be there. S o that’s happened now, it’s a matter of doing the cultivating of the donors that were ten thousand over then there is another cultivation. Level that involves some personalized letters from myself. Teo, the next level down of donors that would probably between the five and ten thousand are actually it’s the thousand dollars up. And i was ten thousand. Yeah, because with another’s personal letters from me and then below that we’ve got our team of folks along with our chapter network, we’re all working to make sure that all of the donors are, you know, thank those we also offered on online. You have the ability, teo, decide how much information wanted to continue to have from the association. S o we’re honoring those wishes. Some of them wanted to be connected with chapters, someone would want to be handled, you know, just be deal with research and so being at the national level, so all of that’s going on, we have, man, let me ask what, uh, how many people are roughly what proportion didn’t want any more information? Let see, i would say that it’s about about fifty percent. So one time you that’s it on dh, then the other fifty percent are taking a look at exactly what level of the multi levels. Yeah, yeah, that sort of goes. To this school activism question, which you don’t get to, but so roughly fifty percent that’s still one point, two million new right donors interested in some level of engagement, right? Okay, so but then what we’re also doing is we’re meeting with, uh, a couple of different consultants on some of the strategies that they would think would be appropriate in terms of continuing to move these donors along on, and certainly our board is taking a big interest in working on that, too, some involvement as well. So we’re looking at all those strategies and are determining how we best go forth with our new dollars, and we’re working with our chapters to do that as well. Yeah, the chapters were important and support for them and well, on the plus because, well, the reason that that becomes extremely important is because, you know, in a federated environment, you tend to knock heads with your national organization. We don’t want to do that with these new daughters, so what we do, what we want to do is create a strategy that will allow us to collaborate on together with our chapters on the stewardship, the cultivation and even the next task, and what is that strange book like you do? You know we’re still defining that’s still under under wraps in terms of how we’re defining you know, right now t be boldly honest, we’re at the point where i’ve got folks working out strategies for how we’re gonna deal with the new donors, but i have a large part of our team working to prepare for our necks are board meeting in october on taking all the recommendations that we’ve heard from across the country on how to best use these new dollars and that’s what we’re working, we’ll get there was just a press release thiss week yesterday, uh, do you foresee or have your done our wealth screening because of the one point, two million or or some sort of sense there the subset of obviously thousand dollars and up, we’re working on those wells strings just it takes a lot of time to get all this stuff down so coarse, and we’re trying to do it. We’re trying to do it as quickly as we can so that we can take advantage of opportunities while at the same time not hiring a bunch of new staff, because we know that way, you know, that we would be that that would not be viewed well by many if we’re hiring invention used so and the clusters future years that this unprecedented growth is not right. There’s, not anomaly, could be sustained, so that would yeah, that would be things difficult for future years. Um, let’s, talk a little about the any questions could be talking about that always called staff knew of one question from knightley who says there’s been some discussion after the challenge ended about how much of the donation will go to research versus operational expenses. If you dressed a little bit, you share what the breakdown is for them. They don’t have the breakdown yet. I can tell you this a significant percentage of the dollars we’ll go to research, but i can’t give you the breakdown of how much is going to research, how much to care services, how much the public policy and i would say when you look at that piece it’s going to be how much is mission? How much is going to impact mission on? We don’t have that told for city jet we know is significant on the research front, we’re still trying to sort through the other recommendations, but it’s, you know, it’s not our intention to take and turn our organization into a top heavy organization because of these dollars that would not that is not at all where we’re headed. We want to use these dollars, teo, find an effective treatment and ultimately a cure. And there was just the press release yesterday. Yes, that you’re spending over twenty one million dollars twenty one two twenty two million dollars on one and again that is looking at the system of mission impact. So if we start with the patient, the patient or the person with a less living with a less usually has seen by one of the less clinics oh, our centers, and so we announced yesterday, because what they learn in those centers then spends off as to what’s happening with clinical trials and drug therapies as well as other research. So where we announced yesterday that we would be spending on forty three, that each of the forty three centers will be receiving twenty five thousand dollars each, which is on increased from twelve thousand five hundred so then if you look at it in that system and you go from there, then we know that we’ve got several research projects that we’re looking at the city of new york genome center, where they’re looking at a pipeline on a less to study genes there. Secondly, is a project called project mind, which is actually working with global researchers on gene sequencing third is a neural collaborative out eyes just on the west coast involving see your sign, i and some other of the researchers there and that we’ll be looking at the drug therapy pipeline. Andi the fourth one is, um ah, bio therapy study that’s going on at n g h on es o again, what we did is we chose those four research projects because it tied into what we were hearing from the community. Yeah, les community and they were for projects that allowed us to leverage down with some with a couple of donors who wished to remain anonymous but who’s sad if you are all way, will match this so it’s going to make the dollars from the ice like a challenge go further so that’s that he’s, then another thing that its seeds and influences. Everything that we do with research, particularly on the drug therapy pipeline, is certainly fda. And so we are only one drug now, right? Right there’s only one friend for illustrating and it’s not well, anyway, there’s only one drop, but what we know is that even with the drug and the pipeline, it can get caught up in a while in fda processes. So modelling after what we saw with another organization who did something similar way, we’re now creating an fda consortium so that we can do everything we can to help prepare to help move that movement through more quickly through the fda process. And so again, that’s out of the advocacy in public policy arena that we’re doing that. So essentially, what that does is tie our system together. On it comes between twenty one two, twenty two million, and that will take take it from there. When we go meet with our board in october. A question that came from angela. See worth on the facebook page, how much will you reserve to invest in development and marketing over the next five years? Teo nasco i that’s a good question i wish. I had the answer to that today, actually, just before we came over here, we’ve met with our, uh, pr firm that we work with. Wait, we were talking about the strategies first of all, even before we get there, let ilsen move isn’t the one the backdoor, what we’ve gotta dio is we’ve got to define what the doomed or for the a l s association? Yes, you know, if you if you if you’re on a budget nationally of roughly twenty one million and you were spending roughly seven million of that and research now, we’ve got to take a look at what’s our new nor going to be so we’ve got to figure out some of these other parts in terms of looking at our door on dh, then it’s a matter of alright, what investments are we going if our new nor goes from twenty one billion to around forty million a year, what are the investments we need to make of the development side to keep to be able to keep that level and what we need to do on the marketing, the aware decide to continue on concern for a loss and awareness of the ayla’s association so is looking at those kinds of things, and right now we’re studying and we’re taking a look at a lot of different models so that as the decision making process moves forward and we develop with that new nor looks like that, we can then determine what we’re going to need in both development and marketing just sustainers don’t do an advisory panel excuse me that you’ve put together, i have to try to figure out how these different needs khun should be should be a man now, now that that’s not what that advisory panel i have a panel of a less advisors who has been working and talking with me around the recommendations as people with a less have you passed on the sign that i just referring, tio, we have a couple, a couple of different consultants that we’re using toe work with us and also, of course, our board is very much involved in this piece. What is the inn down? Is there a way we don’t have any endowment? And we’re not going to happen now, you know, you don’t that’s what i was gonna ask you, dear, for small start. With what you have in the way, we don’t have an endowment. And i don’t foresee us having an endowment because i believe, and i firmly believe this. That is a voluntary health agency. Our job is to solve the issue we need to solve at be done with it, and endowments have their place. But i don’t happen. It’s. My personal belief that it doesn’t belong in the disease face when you’re working hard to put yourself out of business. Kapin another question came from any sample ward, who is our monthly social media contributor, and she’s, also the ceo of and ten the non-profit technology network and so she’s getting to the chapter chapter support, knowing that donations weren’t made on ly to the national palace knowledge and systems readiness, maybe different. Chapter chapter zoho chapters have different capabilities, but they still need to be able to report and tell stories and cultivate donors. So what what’s in place or what would be in place to help support the local chapter in insurance follow-up with their donors, communications and detaining? Well, actually, you know, actually, i think our chapter networkers more sophisticated than what some people might think, but, you know, they’re doing a good job of following up with the donors that came directly to them out of the ice bucket challenge. Carrie and her team have been great in terms of providing additional support in terms of press releases f ake use things that they could use on the local front, teo answer questions to respond to media needs, but the chapters you know, we’ve we’ve had regular contact with the chapters all the way throughout this, so way sort of looked at it as a family. We’re in this together on dh, so i don’t believe that we’ve left any of our chapters hanging it now being able to respond, teo, even me, it is in their constituents with enormous growth. You feel there? Yeah, you know, we’re all looking at it together. And so right now, why were also in the middle of walk season and we’ve seen tremendous lift in our chapters walks through out the country thiss was the ice bucket challenge? I couldn’t have been a better precursor, teo teo, the walks that have come subsequently on dh so it’s it’s in all of that, they’re working, we’re working with them, they’re working with us on how they will handle the lift that they’ve each scene. Now we do know that some of their donors we’ll also want money to go to research, so they’re trying to determine and work that all out with us or working in tandem with us so that we make sure those dollars go a cz the donor intended that growth in the walks is is important to recognize because it does show that there’s there’s carry over. I’ll absolutely not. You have one point, two million people the half who say they like to be engaged, but now you’ve seen enormous growth in actual activity and their own individual fund-raising around, they’re walking right? I had the pleasure of attending our pittsburgh walk, which was taking place sort of like, right after labor day. I want to cry, you know, while expert to their great awesome anyway wedding suit. Just time for the i forget what wedding soup is them? It’s got the remember it, it’s got mean, remember hearing that rice balls or something? Well, sausage balls, i think it’s a sausage because i’ve got a low quality winning soup i thought was right. Ok, well, maybe it could be i don’t know her and just tasted good eso. Anyway, while i was there to attend the walk there walk a year ago, it was sixteen hundred people. Their work this year was over three thousand people great, so i mean it’s just and that that’s just one example of all across the country the way it’s been gotomeeting many year questions from the web and you are sources way have two questions last nufer ways. And both are about the big money donors. I think most people associate social media with a lot of small donations. They’re both one of you know what percentage of the overall better had fit into that large ten thousand plus group. That was a smaller percentage. You don’t think about it if we can, if we can divide these up to call, uh, you know, i would say we’re probably each making about i’m going to guess that, you know, somewhere around it’s, the average gift was forty five dollars carries holding up a little bit. So if he ever did, was forgive make-a-wish bourelly everybody with a camera change sheets, the cue cards to come up. But i t answer the question about the large donors. We probably had about one hundred very large donors the ten thousand above. Yeah, yeah, the question that was saying that’s for you. Okay, let’s go a little bit to the the critics that this is still activism. Marcis ism. What do you mean? I think the numbers bear out, but i think people interested in hearing your responsible i get asked about this and i’ll just tell you, i think that any other non-profit who was positioned in where we were at the same time that we were would have done the same thing, you know, it’s way sent out exactly scuse me one email to sixty thousand of our dollars, as always sent, and then from there, you know, again, we have no idea what was what this would do on and, you know, i yeah, i think what we’ve done is a good thing to raise the awareness, the concern for ayla’s as a disease raise the awareness level of, you know, not just our organization, there are a lot of ale esports organizations that support ellis and one way or another, eso you know, i just i don’t know that i for anybody who could sit and be very polly anna and say that they would they would have just shunned all the awareness and they were shunned the money, i don’t believe it on then some of the criticism is that there’s too much awareness now, and that will take money away from uther i don’t think that’s a worthy causes, and you know what? I didn’t tell musical causes. Donors are smarter than that people are. Going to support what they want to support. Uh, and if they got into the ice bucket challenge because they kept feeling like somebody kept challenging them, they would have been a small donation the average of forty five dollars, and that would have been it. So, you know, i think that i just think that the donor population is smarter than that. They’re going to give what they want to get to. And i am not objective. Even though we’re in their conical flandez be offices, which is a major journalistic institution. I posted a video on my site that said, you know, congratulations and let’s leave us alone. Conway here off. I called george there back let’s, see how they handle it. Maybe they’ll do very well may be it’ll mess something’s up, you know, but it let’s, let’s give you the chance, so i’m not, you know, but i think we should raise the critics voices. Uh, but i’m not objective. I thinkit’s man is just it’s. Incredible, right? And i you know, my goodness, i think the other thing teo just will say this. I think some of that played in something things are played into. Why did this take off the way that it did not only did it start organically, but i also think that the other thing is if you think about what was going on during the month of oddest in our country and in the world, i honestly believe people were looking for something that they could hang some hold on to remind us, um, there’s the ukraine way had all this stuff going on with the ukraine hey, hold it was starting to come about least, we’re starting to see hostages being beheaded and with the whole isis thing, so i think that there was a lot going on and sometimes people he sometimes just need a break from other things that are happening as well. So, you know, i don’t want to see any of that stuff going on in our world when it was happening. I think that that may have played a bit into, uh, why? Why did the media pay so much attention to it? Why did other people pay so much attention to i think it had to do that we’re looking for something else to report besides just always report such bad news. Then there was the stars to celebrities, didn’t george bush s o that helps that helps feed the momentum, of course. And, you know, so we follow-up we’re following up with we’re following up with high potential donors and, uh, and celebrities to find out what was the reason, i mean, and we have found some connections to a less in front in from some of them, as we have, you know? Sabelo so so, you know, in talking with a few of the celebrities and because they’re not ready to have to make some pretty cool course, right? Exactly, you know, we took your calls and and and actually they wanted to talk about a less because they had a family member, uh, who had a less and people that were close to that e remember, our celebrities actually do have a life outside of being a celebrity and that they have family members, they have friends, and they actually grew up from being little people, just like we did on dh so they have connections to diseases, and the analysis is no different korean here, anywhere, questions. You have one, okay. Um, question is understated. Forbade him here from a diversified fondle. Are there any plans for a lesson? Tate quote. Ownership of the ice bucket challenge. Um, well, as everybody knows, wait, did you mis stop during high spoke a challenge? You thought well, and we did it for the right reasons, even though it wasn’t this definitely pulled back because what was the misstep was as we attempted to trademark ice bucket challenge, we had filled out an application are reason for that, though i had to do with the fact that we were learning from families who were involved with a l s that there were some people out developing websites to scam, why away from the airless community for their own and so way of doing that when they turn out to be well, mister, the backlash from from people indicating that we were greedy and everything else we finally just said, look, we get good at it made a decision we should’ve made now as far as owning the ice bucket challenge, i know it’s gonna be left of people it’s gonna be, i don’t know started organically. Yeah, um, yeah, so we’ll see what happens. I don’t know about trying to replicate a mean like that. I think that i’ve been there’s office phony and not even sure it’s feasible there’s. Discussion and we’ll see where that goes, but, uh, you know, again way, pay tribute to the roots or yeah, i love i love that part of it, too. Any questions, twitter, twitter, if you’re on twitter or if you’re tony martignetti dot com watching, then use twitter. Just submit a question and use the hashtag non-profit radio if you’re on the chronicle site, used the comment section and if you are on the google plus page used the discussion windows coating everything you know we have one more and this is a very practical graft versus from this comes from the crime site, and this comes from emily so she’s, a great writer u c irvine you noticed on the site that the call for research abstracts hasn’t been updated for twenty fifteen yet they have a lot of researchers were curious to know when the call proposals to be up. Do you have to know when you will have a call for abstracts for the upcoming year? You know, i dr bruin’s lucy bruins, who is our chief scientist? She and iron and right now we’re in the throes of the plan that’s being developed to go to the board, i think their details to be worked out. Uh, you remember folks? I started in june one, so i’m not even sure what normal timing is. Carrie, do you know what terrible timing is? I’m not sure what normal tightening is for with those abstracts have been called for, uh, but what i will say is i would be looking for some announcements around the first of november about how the research dollars are planning to be allocated. Andi would come back to that is, i think, that’s important point, how their plan to the allocated. And then i think lucy, doctor, dr bones will be break releasing tight lines after that. Bob, i want to come back to the word allocated way. Yeah, laden water break. We have water and we’re not going to try to sneak it in. There’s no, there’s, no, no secrets here. And there’s, no ice here. We’re not pouring it on another. Yes, i think. Oppcoll thank you, thank you for indulging. So anyway, the word allocated is important as opposed to edward spent, uh, i’ve had some people who, you know, there are a lot of people because of the devastating nature veil less urgent in six who would like us to take all the money and just throw it at the research community? Well, the reality is this is emily knows when you’re applying for a grant, you don’t want to think that you’re funding sources going without money before your research is done. So when we allocate dollars will be allocating dollars so that if how how are we going to look at it is if we have a researcher that presents a grant, okay? And you want to be a grand that’s uh, three million dollars grant it’s likely going to be a three million dollar grant over three years, so we’re allocating dollars so that we will be able to hold a dollar there’s a research grant so that we know that it will be able to be spent over the course of the life of the grant s o that were allocated as opposed to spend is important and the other word. That’s important. His sustainability and it’s. Not about sustainability of my job or carries job, that kind of thing. I’m concerned about sustainability of the funds that are allocated for various research projects or projects that have a lifetime of over one year. And that’s. Why? We are doing the kind of very thoughtful planning that we’re doing so that we don’t find ourselves in a position of being in a new norm, perhaps, of a budget of forty million. And then within two years time having that new norm go back down to twenty one. We issued to the board a little bit bored always there is a hot topic for non-profits of all sizes, you did talk a little about the fact that they’re very involved in the planning process. How do you do you foresee an expansion of the board? Because of this at all? It’s, we’re not gonna be expanding the board, you know, we’ve got, you know, every year we have a certain number of people whose terms role and they were lost the board, i think probably what it’s done is it’s allowing us to look critically at some new key people to assess the level of involvement they want to have with our organization. Also, now that you’ve met some potential, do you remember? Scharpnick so, yeah, we’re looking at all of that, but, uh, you know, we’re not going to go in and take our board of right now twenty three, people interpret into a border fifty, because that doesn’t make any sense e-giving didn’t think the shooting getting dink, dink, dink, dink, you’re listening to the talking alternative network duitz to get you thinking. Dahna cubine have you ever decided to reinvent yourself? Are you navigating a new life’s journey? Are you an aspiring artist that’s looking for direction? This is kevin, barbara, ll and my new show, coffee talk three point, always your new best friend. Tune in live to hear successful professional artists and their inspiring real life adventures. Mondays at two p m eastern, right here at talking alternative dot com stand neo-sage no this’s, the cook said about wear hosting, part of my french new york city guests come from all over the world, from mali to new caledonia, from paris to keep back french is that common language. 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Interested simply email at info at talking alternative dot com dahna oppcoll could be anything from the web uh, one question from roger, who has what do you what do you think is the biggest challenge entertaining the one point two million donors who elected teo continue their when i say one point two million using the figure that is sort of what i’m looking as across the board in the country, you know, we know that we know that we have a consistent just so i can say this a consistent five hundred thousand new donors from the online stuff, looking at what we know, what we’re learning from our chapters in terms of donors who want to be engaged and that’s how it gets that one point two million just so clear, thie all right, now, what was the question? What is the what is the biggest challenge to retaining those donors? These challenge to retaining the donors is making sure that we understand their expectations on and they were able to meet their expectations and engagement engagement, but that’s part of expectations if they’re expecting to be engaged of certain level, we’re going to make sure that we’re meeting that, but if they’re expecting really to hear from us. Just a couple times a year, that expectation we need to meet. So it’s, it’s it’s looking at the expectations and then rising to the level of the expectation that they don’t have. How has social media planning changed or social media activity change? Well, social media has been not stop twitter, facebook, all of those that non stop it. So actually, we’ve got meetings on monday to really start taking a look at what our messaging strategy is going to be from this point going forward and what that looks like in the social media world is that stephanie who? Uh, stephanie isn’t tulani work-life to meet you? Yeah, stephanie should be sainted. I agree. She should be saying, saying stephanie yeah, very simple. Your outstanding e-giving getting me in touch with barbara working out the logistics. Thank you, stephanie, but she should be sainted because there’s, another person that worked truly twenty four seven, in fact, show that personal. Well, stephanie doctor, as are our social media princessa cubine person besides carrie. Yes. That’s what? My point? My point as though is carrie carrie was going to relieve stephanie. I’m gonna tell this funny story. She’s gonna relieve stephanie, over what? I want to hear the backstory on her back she says that she was gonna really stephanie one weekend in two hours into it she goes, i get a text or a phone call for carrie’s coz i don’t think i can’t take this anymore because it was just so intense, and stephanie has obviously just the right demeanor on handled it well handled it she’s a carrier, what was going on? What was going on then? Just answering a lot of questions and the volume there was the volume that was crushing your volume just people’s passions, their intensity there intently and are coming through. And i just you’re being responsive and respectful and just keeping up with e i think we learned i will also say this. I think we all learned a lot about human behavior during this period of time. Uh, you know, if you want the backstory, that story is a good stuff took one forty five minutes. All right, now, what did you learn about human behavior? Well, that behavior is to be honest with you, i found that people there were a lot of people the twitter and facebook that just were pretty rude and unkind and, you know, there’s a difference between being a critic and then being downright rude and offensive how style? Because you were doing so well, some of that some of that because we weren’t just getting money in and putting it out the door, and, you know, some of it, you know, because we didn’t couldn’t have immediate answers to questions. You know, when you take an organization that is a small organization at twenty one million and the national budget, and then you add the chapters in it were probably up to fifty million or so you take an organization like that and dump what he coming here, the way that it has. If you’re wise, you want to say that people were going to plan now, that would be the wisdom part of it that you would think is common sense. Well, what i’ve learned, his common sense is not common tio ever went and s o, you know, i stop kerry’s taken her shots, all accepting the shot, but i get, you know, i’ve had the luxury of being called all sorts of really on in-kind names from things that are just vile to things that just were so hurtful. And anybody who knows me knows that i have that i don’t process well and s so i went home and tears a few nights going, i don’t believe this, you know, you people would want to be nice there’s, a double side to social media and unlimited audience engagement, and you suffered something that part, but that was a small part. Yeah, it was a small part, but it was just those people become very vocal, even though their small numbers they’ve become very bold on social media because that’s their platform more questions, cody seven years e-giving you’re asking questions about four minutes left? Okay, do you have questions? Yeah, thiss questions from mike, do you think would have had more access to the potential donors that that the challenge on facebook and twitter if you had managed the engagement on a platform and i sued by that, he means a platform of your own? Ah that’s all that’s all speculation yeah, i’m not sure about that, you know, i’m not sure about that, but, you know, i think we’re engaged a lot with our donors, you know, somehow i feel like i’m losing some of a message here because i don’t want you all to think that we’re not engaged with our donors, the other new donors because we were very much engaged with them now, but if you’re asking for specific strategies on where we’re going to go and how we’re going to get there, i can’t give you that yet. Everything on coming back to take the weekend thank you. We’ll be looking on tuesday. Oh, yeah, you can report back to you. I mean, you know, it’s, what they’re dealing with enormous scale in or it was dumped on you within six weeks or so, right? And i’m brand new. I mean, i barely knew some of that. I didn’t know my boardmember snakes when this all started, barely some of them. I still will meet for the first time. Face-to-face enough. Thanks for doing this before. Not don’t want todo thank you. Anything else from the web now? Okay. Uh, just governments left. What is? Just since june it’s been what is it that you love about the work you’re doing? Oh, well, my favorite thing about the work i’m doing are all the people that i meet, i want them to have a less, but they have enriched my life as i need individuals with a less and i have to admit this, i’m a chapter girl, so i love the work. There are chapters d’oh, and i love getting out and seeing what they’re doing and being up right alongside them. I love going into our centers of excellence, seeing the good work that our research docks are doing there. So it’s, just i enjoy getting out among the people. I’m not very good, but i just have to sit in my office because i want number one it’s, always very busy, but i really like being out with people thirty eight chapters to support and be good to write, and they’re good to me. Metoo we’re wrapping up, uh, thank you for coming again they r a l s a dot or ge, and on twitter, the air the day less ideas at association next week, maria semple returns she’s, our monthly prospect research contributor and the prospect finder we’re gonna talk about in-kind gif ts how do you uncover them in your community? What are they? How did they get treated about in-kind part of today’s show find it at tony martignetti dot com fund-raising fundamentals at the chronicle of philanthropy that is, a monthly ten minute podcast, a burst of savvy information devoted to fund-raising always smart people on i am just a host of fund-raising fundamentals, i bring smart people, they talk about fund-raising basics in photos that philanthropy dot com and also at twenty martignetti dot com and also on high, too duitz thanks again to the chronicle of philanthropy for hosting us miree sweitzer, web editor thank you, non-profit radio is supported by generosity. Siri’s they host those multi-channel ity five runs and walks, they have a charity support team helps each of their charity partners their generosity siri’s dot com user code, jr creative producer is playing hyre off the show’s social media is by julia campbell of jane campbell. So today is the most traditional durney martignetti non-profit you is from spicer haserot stronghold blessing our music. By scott steiner. Roland hoping you will be next week non-profit radio. Big non-profit ideas for the other ninety five percent. Well, that’d be great. Talking alternative radio twenty four hours a day. Are you stuck in your business or career trying to take your business to the next level, and it keeps hitting a wall? This is sam liebowitz, the conscious consultant. I will help you get to the root cause of your abundance issues and help move you forward in your life. Call me now and let’s. Create the future you dream of. Two, one, two, seven, two, one, eight, one, eight, three, that’s to one to seven to one, eight one eight three. The conscious consultant helping huntress people be better business people. Buy-in have you ever decided to reinvent yourself? Are you navigating a new life’s journey? Are you an aspiring artist that’s looking for direction? This is kevin, barbara, ll and my new show, coffee talk three point oh, is your new best friend. Tune in live to hear successful professional artist and their inspiring real life adventures. Mondays at two p m eastern, right here at talking alternative dot com stand neo-sage. You’re listening to talking alt-right network at www. Dot talking alternative dot com, now broadcasting twenty four hours a day. Have you ever considered consulting a road map when you feel you need help getting to your destination when the normal path seems blocked? A little help can come in handy when choosing an alternate route. Your natal chart is a map of your potentials. 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