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Nonprofit Radio, January 4, 2013: The Future Of Planned Giving Marketing, & Free Radio & TV To Boost Online Ticket Sales

Big Nonprofit Ideas for the Other 95%

Listen live or archive:

Tony’s Guests:

Gregory Warner
Gregory Warner
Gregory Warner: The Future Of Planned Giving Marketing

Greg Warner, the founder of MarketSmart, shares his insights on multi-channel awareness building; generating and cultivating leads; and tracking what works.

 

 

 

Amy Spencer & Kevin Russell
With Kevin Russell & Amy Spencer
Amy Spencer & Kevin Russell: Free Radio & TV To Boost Online Ticket Sales

Amy Spencer, Market Manager for Blackbaud, and Kevin Russell, Professioinal Services Manager for Blackbaud, want you to recognize that you do have leverage with the media, and that sending press releases is no longer the way to get radio and TV exposure for your event.

 
 
 


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Hello and welcome to tony martignetti non-profit radio big non-profit ideas for the other ninety five percent. I’m your aptly named host. Welcome to the new year it’s january fourth of the new year. I hope you had lots of time for family and friends and good times over the holiday and time off from work. Oh, how i hope that you were with me long ago on december twenty first because i’d feel terrible if i had heard that you missed candidates for causes. Robert egger is the president of sea forward working to rally candidates around non-profit platforms, he and i talked about how to assess those in your local races, getting the non-profit agenda before them and how to support the candidates who step up. Also, it was computers crash. Scott koegler, the editor of non-profit technology news and our tech contributor, reminded us that technology can let us down imagine that your computer hardware will only last so long, and you should have a plan for replacing it to avoid a crisis. I talked to this former chief information officer about the hardware, life cycle, budgeting and planning this week the future of planned giving marketing greg warner, the founder of marketsmart, shares his insights on multi-channel awareness building, generating and cultivating leads and tracking what works and free radio and tv to boost online ticket sales. Amy spencer, market manager for blackbaud, and kevin russell, professional services manager for blackbaud i want you to recognize that you do have leverage with the media and that sending press releases is no longer the way to get radio and tv exposure for your event. This was pre recorded at the bb khan twenty twelve conference last october between the guests on tony’s take to my block is challenge the status quo, i heard you don’t be afraid to ask why i will talk about that. And after the bb con interview toward the end of the show, i’ll talk a bit about the just revived ira charitable rollover that’s getting a lot of talk in plant e-giving circles right now, it’s my very pleasure to ah, welcome greg warner. He is an experienced multi-channel marketing executive, he’s made tens of thousands of cold calls and closed thousands of deals, which give him a unique perspective into howto partner sales strategies with targeted marketing initiatives, his company marketsmart has helped lots of non-profits, including the american diabetes association, life matters, home health care, the association of the u s army and city of hope cancerous search center on twitter he’s at greg marketsmart he runs the linked in group smart planned giving marketers greg warner, welcome to the show. Hi, tony. Thank you. Happy new year. Thank you very much. Yeah. It’s. A good one. It’s going to be a good one. All right, we got it. We got the future of plan giving marketing to look forward to this is something to live for. Um, you want teo? See non-profits do broader prospecting around planned e-giving what? Your ideas around finding new prospects? Well, the first concept is a bit non donors and people that you may not find on your radar through predictive analytics or data modelling, uh, often will leave you gifts. And some of our clients tell us it’s more than fifty percent of their plan gift not all but that’s. A sizeable number. And you want to leave that on the table? Okay, so you need to broaden your approach, okay? And, uh, let’s talk about some of the waste to get doing. That ok? Well, it all depends on how much money you have, of course, and most folks don’t have a lot of money. So you want to look at the, uh, tools and channels that are available to you, uh, in order, teo, you broaden your reach, one of them, and i know a lot of people probably cringing the sound of the word facebook, but, you know, it’s a very simple thing when you think about the fact that people who engage with your organization on facebook they like you. Yeah, you know, we don’t cringe on this show. We don’t cringe around facebook way have any sample ward social media contributor she’s on every month talking about lots of social media networks, but facebook certainly among them. So we don’t. We don’t cringe when you talk about staying playing e-giving circles sometimes ah, cringe at that because it’s hard for folks in plan giving, understand how to connect the dots. Okay, well, let’s, let’s connect them for them. Why? Why should plan e-giving professionals be paying attention to facebook? Beyond the fact that a billion people are on facebook, but they’re concerned typically is age right playing, giving? You want to talk to people in their sixties, seventies eighties? The concern is that they’re not on facebook, but what? Where’s? The disconnect. Okay, so first you need to dispel the myth. So my mother in law come on. By the way, i got into all this because my wife’s a diabetic and i wanted to find a way to generate lots of money for the american diabetes association. Okay, my mother in law, of course, her mom is seventy two years old. I don’t think there’s too many people who are on facebook more than my mother in law. And again, she’s seventy two years old. Now what? God, god bless your mother in law. Of course i love all mothers in law, but even the ones that aren’t my own love them all but that’s, you know, people going well, that’s an anecdote. Okay, there’s one seventy two year old what do we know in aggregate? About sixty, seventy, eighty year olds prevalence on facebook. Well, i don’t have statistics on that, so i don’t know if i wantto start shooting off on that. But i will say that they have mor e i think it’s easy. To say that they probably have more time on their hands, right? Well, what what’s been the experience with your clients around facebook and planned e-giving well, here, here’s, just a basic example is that if those folks are there and let’s let’s, remember that younger donors forties and fifties air really when people are making their first will anyway, and if you want to get in there, will you should be planting the seeds of legacy gift because everyone at some point is going to contemplate their immortality, and they’re what ruffle james calls a symbolic immortality. So how can they live on after their lifetime? Okay, and if you start planting seeds just with basic awareness efforts, meaning if you get a gift, why not talk about it on facebook? How you say it, you have teo talk to your social media folks, make sure that you’re not overselling our overstating but it’s news, it’s information it’s something that’ll plant seeds in people’s minds. Okay, excellent there’s there’s an idea what else? What else should we be doing on facebook around planned e-giving well, if you have a comprehensive marketing plan and you have a lot of people who like your, um your page, then? It’s really important to realize that you can advertise on facebook so you can advertise to your like the people who like you? Yes, with, um, uh, little ads driving them to a landing page. The best offer is something like an offer free estate planning information or how to make a will. Okay, so this is buying facebook ads buying a facebook ad related to plan giving. Yeah, and you only pay for every time someone clicks on it. Or you can pay for impressions. But it’s very inexpensive. Really. Okay, what does that mean? Watch now, i haven’t had anybody in jargon jail for weeks and weeks, but you’re skating very close on since it’s been so long, i have a very itchy trigger finger to throw somebody in there. So what does that mean? Facebook, you can pay by the impression every time that your ad appears is considered an impression to a user versus paying by the click. Right? Okay, all right. We have just about two minutes before a break. Do you like to see greg non-profits have a devoted planned e-giving facebook page or you’re talking about the organizations overall presence in there on their own face and their facebook page. Without a doubt, i think it just should be something that implemented integrated into their overall presence and just it’s news it’s just sharing information with their friends. Okay, so so not necessarily a devoted planned e-giving facebook page for the charity. Okay, nobody well, i don’t think anyone will go to that, okay, what’s again, just about a minute before a break. What’s another, um, channel that you like to see exploited in planned e-giving that that people aren’t doing enough? Well, i think email has the most power when it comes to plan giving marketing, and we’ll have tto dig into that a little bit more when we come back. But it’s so inexpensive, but it can also be used the wrong way. It’s a hammer like you could break stuff with it, or you could build stuff with it. Okay, we want to build, right? Yep. Okay. As greg suggested, we will talk more about email and other channels and the future of e-giving marketing right now, i’ve got to send some live listener love. Oakland, california. Atlanta, georgia. Shanghai, china taipei, taiwan. Welcome. Live listener love to those four cities when we come back more with greg warner in the future of plan giving marketing. Talking alternative radio twenty four hours a day. Are you stuck in your business or career trying to take your business to the next level, and it keeps hitting a wall? This is sam liebowitz, the conscious consultant. I will help you get to the root cause of your abundance issues and help move you forward in your life. Call me now and let’s. Create the future you dream of. Two, one, two, seven, two, one, eight, one, eight, three, that’s to one to seven to one, eight one eight three. The conscious consultant helping huntress people be better business people. Are you concerned about the future of your business for career? Would you like it all to just be better? Well, the way to do that is to better communication, and the best way to do that is training from the team at improving communications. This is larry sharp, host of the ivory tower radio program and director at improving communications. Does your office need better leadership, customer service sales, or maybe better writing, are speaking skills? Could they be better at dealing with confrontation conflicts, touchy subjects all are covered here at improving communications. If you’re in the new york city area, stop by one of our public classes, or get your human resource is in touch with us. The website is improving communications, dot com, that’s, improving communications, dot com, improve your professional environment, be more effective, be happier, and make more money improving communications. That’s. The answer. Hey, all you crazy listeners looking to boost your business? Why not advertise on talking alternative with very reasonable rates? Interested simply email at info at talking alternative dot com welcome back to big non-profit ideas for the other ninety five percent more live listener love. Seoul, korea fukuoka, japan. You’re with us regularly. Soul and food, coco, thank you very much. New bern, north carolina, bethlehem, pennsylvania. Live listener, love all around the world, it’s. Incredible. All right, greg, whatever charity’s not doing with email, or why, what do you see them using it as a hammer? How are we misusing it? Well, a lot of times, especially for plan giving marketing. Email is used to sort of shout out at their prospective donors that you know, for instance, here’s a whole bunch of information about ways that you can make a plan gift here’s tax avoidance strategies. You know, um, shouting in the for-profit world, the private sector just like in the nonprofit world, it’s never a good idea to just blast and spray messages, but rather to generate leads and find people who want to hear from you and then cultivate those leads with highly relevant messages over a long period of time. Okay, let’s, break this down a little bit. How do we how do we get started in being more sophisticated with our email? Okay, well, again, first is starting with a good list and that’s what we’ll call a opt in list, and that begins with offering something in your awareness campaigns or your acquisition campaigns usually plan giving. Or i would say, a state planning information to get people to request that offer. You always need a good offer. Is that them? When they do, they go into the culture cultivation pool. Is that the opt in the acceptance of the offer? Is that what you mean, by opt in where you’re treading close again, you want teo, let them know that you’ll be sending them or information when you send them the first piece of information and okay. So after you send them what they’ve asked for a tte the same time, you send them that they would ask for your telling them that they will be getting mohr and you give them a chance to opt out of getting more exactly. Okay, all right, you better watch yourself in drug in jail. Your little your little risk taker? Uh, yeah. I want to be in jargon. No, i’m kidding. I don’t. I don’t get the first person i said don’t smack me around later. All right, well, don’t tease me. Um, let’s. See what? We have a good list. We haven’t opted in list. What’s next in being more sophisticated with email. Okay, if you’ve done your opt in, right and let me take one quick step backwards is that you’ll ask people what are their interest? What? You know, are they looking for ways teo get income for life that would kind of put them into the pool of possibly wanting message is that refer to charitable gift annuities. Okay, now, how do you how do you ask these questions? You know, in a poll by email or how you eliciting this information? Generally, before you give them the information that they want. Like if it’s a state planning information, you’ll want to ask them what topics are interesting to them. Ok, how do you ask that in an email with a pole or a link to a paul? How do you do that? Okay, good. It’s going generally part of the landing page. Okay. So where they request information that’s on a page that they lend to request that information, then the questions pop up. Okay. Do you want this information? Do you want this brochure or that one? Uh, you know what topics are you interested in? You can even ask a tw. What stage are you in? In the consideration process? Have you ever considered leaving a gift in your will? The number of questions that you could ask you should be. Keep it short, but you should try a new one. Okay, so you’re trying to get people to identify themselves as having interest in plant e-giving topics and specifically which one’s, right. Which dump and most important, why not throw in the question? Have you already left a gift? Yes. Okay, right. Critical physical because you’ll fight. Go find a lot of people. The next step is sending relevant information over time. If they’ve already left a gift, will first, of course, you’re going to want to thank them, hopefully personally, but at the very least, you’re going to want to put them on a cultivation or i’m sorry a stewardship track. You want to welcome them to your recognition society for planned e-giving or however it is, you do it to say thank you over the long term. Yes. Okay, okay. That was a little digression, but an important one. Very important. You don’t want to lose that gift. Remember, you can always lose a gift. Just is often just as much as you get one. If you’re not. If you’re not saying thank you enough and properly and for sure, after the person reveals that they’ve included you. Yes, absolutely so let’s. Go back now you have ah, you have your you’ve qualified your list and it’s it’s opted not only opt in, but, you know the topics that people are interested in each person’s interested in how do you continue to become more sophisticated with your email? Okay, now i’m going to try my best to stay out of jargon jail. You said you wanted to be there with your flapper somebody’s into flip flopping. He’s a flip flopper page. Okay, cookie can be placed on their computer. Yes, not only are they opting in for your messages, but if they didn’t fill out the form because they just decided not to. Because of that cookie, they could get ongoing banner ads for quite a while. As long as you decide throughout wherever they navigate on the internet, really and that’s called retargeting, so if they got interrupted, if they just decided not to fill it out, then you could have these ads driving them back to that page or a different page, maybe just sending them to maur, symbolic immortality messages or videos or something different that’s about legacy e-giving interesting. Now, i know this goes on because after i fill out our something or i go to a site somewhere, then you know from time to time i’ll see banner ads or pop. Up ads on a completely different sites related to the topic that that i was exploring a week earlier. So i know this nefarious stuff goes on. It’s a highly effective kind of marketing. It works, and again, you can pay for it per click or by impressions. Okay, thousands. Okay. And tell me, what is this marketing called again? That retargeting retargeting? Okay, because you’re re targeting the person’s advertising. Is that why it’s called that? Yeah. They already got halfway to making a decision to commit to something with you, but they didn’t go over the edge. So you want to read the this is most famous for shopping cart marketing? Like if you were on amazon dot com. But you didn’t buy that that that book? Yes. They’ll you ads for similar book, right? They know the amazon, of course. Very sophisticated. Okay, but no reason. Charity shouldn’t be equally sophisticated. Course. Okay. Is there more? What else can we say about email? This is very interesting. Okay, so once you get them to opt in and fill out their information so that you you know what they’re interested in and you’ve got that cookie, then you can start tracking them schnoll not only should they go on track that we call marketing automation tracks to get emails that are relevant to their interests, but you need to track where they click every time you send those e mails. And again because of this sophisticated tracking that i’m talking about in these cookies and, uh, i p address capturing i p address, by the way, is just the address of where their computer’s located. Thank you. Okay, by using those tracking tools, you can begin to capture who’s coming back specifically which individual person their name is coming back and visiting other pages that you are pushing them, too, with your ongoing marketing email. Okay, as they come back and as they engage more, the more they more they engage. They can then get lead scores, so if they stay online for a certain period of time, if they click on a certain number of pages, if they keep coming back three, four times, you can determine what kind of scores you want to give each individual person and program it, then based on where they go, how often they come back all those different things you can program different messages. You can slow down the number of messages that go out or increase the number of messages that go out each individual and again they need they should be relevant based on their interests. And this should break apart, sort of into into gosh, like a a flow chart, so that if they change their mind from the c g eight track for charitable gift annuities, then perhaps they moved to the bequest track because of where they’ve been clicking. Then they get different messages. I see. Let me remind listeners greg warner is the founder of marketsmart, which you’ll find at i marketsmart dot com either letter i so this email sophistication that you’re talking about can all be automated. You mentioned? Yeah, the the idea is to try and plan it all out as best as you can in the beginning. Okay, right. Okay. So you have your laying out these different tracks, but then you’re also tweaking as you get results back from all this tracking. Right, exactly. Takes time. And no, no everybody’s campaign is different. You have to make it. Look at all that. All the tracking and all the data. You’re collecting, review it and then tweak the messages. But all this tracking is valuable because you’re seeing people are not going to certain pages or you’re seeing an abundance of people clicking on different options so you can see the way people are moving through your through your whole system. Exactly. And i want to throw in the traditional marketing combined with this is very important because email is powerful and and you can do all this, but you can also signal to then send certain types of letters and brochures or whatever to these folks based on their interests. Okay? And that gives it an even bigger hit. Because, again, a cz you mentioned, a lot of these folks are older, and this is what i call an enterprise decision in the private sector. This is not donating. Five dollars or twenty five dollars, is creating a legacy for yourself and it’s. Usually a sizable gift. Okay. Okay. So we’re not cultivating these people for for small annual gifts or something like that? No, no. And and the idea is that for enterprise decisions, people usually want, uh, some kind of printed material. They want personalization they want. A hand signed letter. You know, i always, uh i look att helling plan gives similar toe selling cars. I mean, generally, the gift size is about what a car costs and, uh, it’s a long cultivation process on dh some people by mini coopers and some people buy bentleys, right? So there’s, plenty of room in plan giving space for all the people on that entire spectrum. Give me we have just a couple minutes, and i want to get into your some of your artist work also and how that relates to this. But you mentioned that email could be a hammer what’s one way that aside from to frequent that’s that’s an easy one we know to frequent emails could be bad. What’s another way that email could be abused and turn off your prospects well, if you’re shouting ill irrelevant information at them on dh often, uh, this can relate to tax avoidance strategies. There is a certain segment of the population and plan giving donor base that is very motivated by that. And i don’t wanna offend all the folks or my potential clients. But in plain giving there’s too much of a focus on taxes or i should say, death and taxes. Yeah, that’s really not. What motivates people? It’s no it’s love of the institution. So but with the with the targeted information that you have the specific information that you have prospect by prospect you can avoid sending tax avoidance information to someone who only wants to talk about a charitable request. And the reason that they’re interested in plan giving is that they love your institution. Exactly. Okay, i’m gonna i’m gonna neo-sage go into a different direction. You’re you’re very much an artist, oil painter, musician, singer and songwriter what’s the what’s, the relationship between the arts and marketing and sales. Wow, boy, i didn’t realize you did that kind of research on me. Thank you. Put it in your bottoms and research at all. I mean, i might have to think about that a little bit off the top of your head. What’s. The relationship was voted class artist when i was a kid in high school. But that’s not so i that’s not your credential. That’s not why it’s in your bio is because in high school you were voted class artist. Now you know it’s, just something. Women on morals if that’s the case he’s been awhile there, right brained people on their left brain people. And i think in business, in marketing, in anything you do, you’ve got to be creative and and open your mind to new ideas at any moment. You really have to just kind of keep, keep trying new things and be experimental and dahna whether you’re painting or writing a song or singing a song it’s all, uh, about experiments and changing things up, tio get that harmony to be better to get that color, to be better to get something to move people in an emotional way. Bilich outstanding and that’s and that’s what we just finish talking about in in plan giving marketing. Um, what is it you love about this work, greg? Wow. It’s interesting. I was talking to our account coordinator today. Uh, we were working on a new campaign for the navy marine corps relief society, which were just so excited about this and that hole at the end of it, we spent an hour and a half in front of a huge white board we have in our office and we go through everything. Everything. Everything, and then i looked at her at the end and i said, you know, what’s so great about this is that at the end of this, we’re gonna run. We’re going to raise so much money for sailors, marines and their families isn’t that awesome? And i just got this warm feeling inside. I’m like, isn’t this great? I mean, i get paid to do this and it’s just i’m gushing because that’s it’s so fantastic. Outstanding. Greg warner is the founder of market smart, which you’ll find it. I’m marketsmart dot com on twitter he’s at greg marketsmart and you can find him in the linked in group smart plan e-giving marketers lots of smart lots of smart going on. Greg warner, thank you very much for being a guest’s. Been a real pleasure. Thanks, tony. My pleasure. Right now we’re going to take a break. You know about that. And when we come back, uh, what the heck we’ll do, tony steak too, of course is tony’s take do and then we have free radio and tv to boost online ticket sales. So stay with me e-giving didn’t think dick tooting good ending things you’re listening to the talking alternate network. E-giving cubine hi, i’m donna and i’m done were certified mediators, and i am a family and couples licensed therapists and author of please don’t buy me ice cream are show new beginnings is about helping you and your family recover financially and emotionally and start the beginning of your life. We’ll answer your questions on divorce, family court, co parenting, personal development, new relationships, blending families and more dahna and i will bring you to a place of empowerment and belief that even though marriages may end, families are forever join us every monday, starting september tenth at ten a m on talking alternative dot com are you suffering from aches and pains? Has traditional medicine let you down? Are you tired of taking toxic medications? Then come to the double diamond wellness center and learn how our natural methods can help you to hell? Call us now at to one to seven to one eight one eight three that’s to one to seven to one eight one eight three or find us on the web at www dot double diamond wellness dot com. We look forward to serving you. You’re listening to the talking alternative network. Hi, i’m kate piela, executive director of dance, new amsterdam. And you’re listening to tony martignetti non-profit radio. Big non-profit ideas for the other ninety five percent. Welcome back time for tony’s take two at roughly thirty two minutes into the hour. My block this week is challenge the status quo from questioning the way you track prospect visits in your office. Teo revamping a newsletter concept maybe, or adding a theme too on annual dinner or lunch that seems to be kind of in a doldrum year after year. My urging is that you start to question, how come we do it this way? Why? Why did we do it this way and not not just accept tradition? Which, as as a ah boy scout leader told me when i was in my teens, is often a mistake made more than once? That was his definition of tradition, so i’m just charging you don’t be afraid to challenge why do we do things this way? Especially if you’re the one who’s in the trenches doing the work day after day, year after year? You have an outstanding perspective on which things aren’t working and how they might work better, and my suggestion is that you start asking questions. The ones who are crazy enough to think they can change the world are the ones who do. Oh, and in my block post there’s an apple video, which is a commercial around that exact that exact thought and the blah ge is called challenge the status quo, you’ll find it at tony martignetti dot com and that is tony’s take two for friday, january fourth, the first show of the year. I want to send some more live listener love kitakyushu, japan i hope i’m pronouncing it right we had a dispute in the in the in the studio here i went with tata kyushu, japan i hope that’s correct live listener love here’s one i know i can get laurel, maryland i hope i pronounced that right laurel marilyn live listener love and new york new york where are you? Where in new york, new york? I wish? Tweet us, use the hashtag non-profit radio and tell us where in new york, new york you are. We’re on west seventy second street right now, and i have now a pre recorded panel discussion to people from bb khan twenty twelve conference and they’re talking about how to use tv and radio for free. Teo, increase your online ticket sales amy spencer, amy spencer and kevin russell and here is that interview. Welcome to tony martignetti non-profit radio coverage of bb khan twenty twelve we’re outside washington, d c at the gaylord convention center with me now are amy spencer and kevin russell. Amy is market manager for arts and cultural at blackbaud and kevin russell is professional service. Is that’s a plural professional services manager at blackbaud he delivers multiple services professionally, maybe. Kevin welcome. Thank you for having it. It’s a pleasure to have you. Thanks for taking time on a very busy day. Problem you’re your seminar topic is pretty curious. Make your online ticket sales soar with television and radio for free. Amy, why don’t you acquaint us generally with what the possibilities are? I was sure. Well, i think the thing that people need to understand is that i have well have twelve years in background in tv, so i was the general sales manager of the tv station, so what i did was i actually set the pricing, and i’d look at thehe veils and i and i sold the inventory things like that and what people most often thought that they could come into the building and say, well, i know by law, you have to give me free advertising and you don’t they’re by n a be the national association of broadcasters, we do not have to sell to any certain group which covers non-profit so i think one of things that people need to understand is that they don’t owe you anything, however, a lot of times they would come in very entitled at times and say, here’s, what i need you to do and here’s my p s a and i want it on the air and i’d preferred in the news and if not primes, ok, well, that would get them nowhere. So the thing that i would always say is, first and foremost, you have to figure out what to leverage on the non-profit side that you could take to the tv stations, and there are a lot of different ways to do it, and i still have a few tips and tricks, but one of the things is to figure out who in the tv station you can get to know and one of them is your general manager, and one of them is your general sales manager, and you have to explain to them that you have brand equity, that they can leverage and also make money from so not unlike fund-raising this is we’re actually going build some relationships in theory. Yes. Ok. So for those organizations who picked up the phone and called me a sudden appointment, it was amazing how many of those actually got on the air and that was maybe before they even needed something from you or wanted something from her act. Oh, this relationship it is. It is one o one. So so a couple things is they need to figure out i think there are three different ways non-profits khun get on tv and or radio for free? Um one they need to look at their board. They need to figure out who was on the board and what cos those board members own and or are highly influential within. Okay, we’ll have time to go into detail. Why you took him off the other two now and then we’ll come back and teach sure three ways you can either have the board jump in and and pay for that tv time. Ok, not on your dime. The other one is to have the tv. Underwrite you and i’ll get more into the detail later, and then the other one is to work jointly with each other and bring in a sponsor on your own. Okay, kevin, you wantto you wantto say a little more about the first one working work-life king to you’re looking to your board, working with your board shorts. So as you mentioned, this is relationship building and we all know people who know people, i’m in the local market. It is likely that one of your board members does have a relationship with the television station, maybe economic relationship. Maybe they know someone who’s there, and if they’re already engaged in advertising, buys this more amy’s forte than mine, then you could piggyback on that relationship and they might make sabat in the station and you might leverage that and say what? We’re going to make this a five thousand dollar buy. But the non-profit is going to get advertising on top of that so it can maybe not a condition. But if i do this, then please help this organisation. Does everything we’re talking about today include radio also its all this and or either one cracked. Okay, okay. And if i could jump off of what kevin was saying, i, for example, if somebody on the board had a huge car dealership that the tv station was already gaining thirty, forty thousand dollars a month from, well, guess what i need to make that boardmember exceptionally happy, so when that boardmember calls me says, oh, by the way, i’m involved with his children’s charity. What i want you to do is help underwrite that in the tune of five thousand dollars. You better believe most times more often than not, that tv and radio station will figure out a way how to make that happen. Okay, therefore, that non-profit gets all the advertising for free, as you would also mentioned having the board pay for for for baez. Look at me. I’m already i feel like you guys are the guys you got, like my dad follow-up certified. Yeah. So the other thing what what you could do is you can have them leverage it. And with their media buy, for example, go back to the car dealer. I own a car dealership. I’m coming in. I’m spending thirty thousand dollars. Well, if i go ahead and guarantee you that i’m going to do that for let’s say five months, and i get a high percentage that share, then i will also say well, and in return for just handing you one hundred fifty thousand dollars, you’re going toe hand my non-profit of choice additional five thousand dollars on top of that at no charge, so you can lever to you have on your board and what they own and or have influence around. This is not unlike what we might do if we’re we’re doing our research for grantmaking we’re leveraging the board’s relationship exactly. We’re looking at the board members who are on the foundations that we’ve identified that are that air funding, the type of work we’re trying to fund, and we share that we share a list of board members of those foundations with our own board. Exactly. We’re just leveraging, okay? Um, amy, you had said something earlier about what? What the charity brings to the to the to the to the outlet, sure, beyond our relationship with boardmember in trying to create this relationship that we want to have on our own charity to out, too, to a media outlet, why don’t you say a little more about what, what we should be presenting, okay, so for example, there’s a tremendous amount of brand equity within each non-profit and you better believe that that tv and or radio station wants to partner with those non-profits for example, a stage company, they want access to their patrons, they want access to that brand equity they have in the market, and they also want access to those sponsoring that organization. So in a way that you can leverage or for example, eh? Well, let’s, let’s keep going with that stage company, for example, so so they can leverage that stage cos organization on and worked together on promotions, they also want to get their news anchors out in the market, so what they can do is they can say, okay, well, we’ll come in with a partnership with you, but our anchors are also going to open up every show they’re going to welcome the audience, see, they’re they’re looking for different ways to get out on the market as well and on that market, and so if you give them the ability to leverage their raid equity, they’re on top of okay, kevin. It sounds like the supplies in all sides, media markets, it certainly would and maybe even eat more easily in smaller markets where the community is more tight essentially and we have amy, i work primarily with cultural organization, so they have these physical places they’ve got space is their community centers where people congregate, so when the talent goes out, there might be the opening of a brand new show and it’s a big event in this small community. So the on air talent is a part that community, and they want to show their face and be there so it does scale pretty well, the larger markets, he’ll have large organizations, okay, but another point certainly related is we’re not going to the to the outlets humbly, right, men, we’re going confidently. Amy said, we have we have equity that we can leverage that’s for your benefit, right? I mean, we’re not asking hat in hand now and that’s the one thing that i found that if and when they did, some organizations actually pick up the phone, explain to me what their mission is, what they want to accomplish. It was almost in a it was not. In the way, probably, it should have been almost apologetic. It iss its goal is and i know you don’t have time and and you know why it doesn’t work so well, it doesn’t work that way don’t approach donors that way. I’m sorry to have to ask you, it probably doesn’t merit your time, but could you talk to me? You know, we don’t know what you’re in my spot at three o’clock in the morning. Please be grateful for that, but we don’t talk to funders that way. Way should be confident that we’ve got the equity as you described it. Okay? Tv underwriting. Kevin, can you can you say something about the actually metoo probably speak better than that. I can that’s that’s her background, not mine. Okay, i think you’re referencing probably the third point, which is sort of a a joint relationship between the non-profit and if you don’t have somebody on the board and organization that can help underwrite from the non-profit stand than what you can do is that if somebody came into my office is a general sales manager and said, hey, listen, ah, i don’t have five thousand dollars, i don’t have this, however, what i want to do is i have this kind of equity, teo give you and let’s use that together and go and find that sponsor and or donor together, so it is going to be the non-profit it’s going to be the tv station and then they go out, the tv station now has the ability to engage their anchors and the non-profit and you better believe that those tv and a radio stations want to look like a hero and want to have their involvement in that. So you you’ve provided that, and then the tv station also has a brand new advertisers, right? So if you go out and work together to teo, come up with us, it is no money out the non-profits dahna i mean, you know, budget whatsoever it’s out of the sponsors, and now you’ve created a throwing three pronged relationship that typically will go for years and sort of a side note for what we did at the tv station. They almost got a four to one return on investment. You hand me five thousand dollars, i’m going to give you back close to twenty just tell us what. Tv station you’re referring to, like it’s in the charleston, south carolina market. Let’s. Just put it that way. You’re listening to the talking alternative network. Are you stuck in your business or career trying to take your business to the next level, and it keeps hitting a wall? This is sam liebowitz, the conscious consultant. I will help you get to the root cause of your abundance issues and help move you forward in your life. Call me now and let’s. Create the future you dream of. Two, one, two, seven, two, one, eight, one, eight, three, that’s to one to seven to one, eight one eight three. The conscious consultant helping hunters. People be better business people. Have you ever considered consulting a road map when you feel you need help getting to your destination when the normal path seems blocked? A little help can come in handy when choosing an alternate route. Your natal chart is a map of your potentials. It addresses relationships, finance, business, health and, above all, creativity. Current planetary cycles can either support or challenge your objectives. I’m montgomery taylor. If you would like to explore the help of a private astrological reading, please contact me at monte at monty taylor dot. Com let’s, monte, m o nt y monty taylor. Dot com. Talking alternative radio twenty four hours a day. So i’m sorry i interrupted you anything more you want to say about that? This sort of working together, they will join you a sort of a little joint venture. Well, all i will say is that every single day we all sort of do the same. We’re trying to come up with revenue, we’re trying to meet our budgets, whether you’re non-profit or for-profit and if somebody walked in my door and said, hey, you know what i want to do? I want to help you make money and and and work with you in order to get new advertisers and sponsors, i’m gonna listen to you, and then because i control the inventory, i’m also going toe, then play with you in terms of getting you additional avails additional spots and things and some news coverage. Okay, so what now? I fear my notes from the top where are insufficient? I blended two things together, so there’s one more point, kevin wasn’t there there three things that that amy outlining the beginning and only two that we’ve talked about there through the amy outlined on the getting these basically ads for free, but part of it’s also what? We gonna do with it right? Being very strategic with how you use it was the other part of our session, which is what i’m going to do with his time. Um, in the cultural world, we’re suggesting that people should use this time that we get through any strategies to really promote ticket sales over other items and primarily pro those online. Why do you? Why do you select ticket sales over anything else that a charity might might convey? Cerini on television, we believe are really the ultimate one. Too many channel. When you’re on the internet, you can develop a relationship, you know, people sort of know who you are. You’re signing into things direct mail if you’re already in a not-for-profits database, they know who you are. But when where? On tv or radio it’s essentially an acquisition strategy or branding strategy. So these organizations, these local culture organizations, they may use these buys for branding it’s not going to do that? They’re an acquisition mode, and we want directing to buy tickets for our org’s the ticket really, is that entry into the organization we wouldn’t expect someone to hear and ad and go make a donation to a museum necessarily dahna relationship. They haven’t experienced that museum, but buying that first ticket getting through the door is what starts that process with the sorts of organizations so driving that ticket leverages the free items in acquisition, which generally has sort of with most trouble getting people for the door. Okay, maybe this is also the lowest cost entry point for for acquiring new that’s, right new donors noo noo, your supporters absolutely absolute that that single ticket might not be the ultimate lowest cost. Often, organizations have memberships that, over time would represent a better value, but in the moment it tends to be the lower cost, and some of these places are free and they’re just trying to encourage attendant so it could be a free entrance. We just need to know you’re out there. I know you want to come. Maybe you’re doing a lot of nodding. Did you want to act? No, i’m i’m for once agreeing everything what kevin is saying, okay. Dahna furtive, you work lee, charlotte area. Kevin says everything right, except the things i don’t want. We have a few more minutes left. What have i not ask you about regarding your topic that you want to share with arts and culture organization? So i don’t know there’s something even asked about. But we we just wanna let people know that there are ways to get your message out there on dh. We want our organizations to really think about what they want their customers to dio we get focused on fund-raising gonna focus on membership. We often forget that we need to recharge our donor base. Our member based with new people. We could do that for free and take advantage of it’s fantastic technology that everybody’s engaged in. We want people not to be afraid to go do it when they go to do it. Do it the right way. Use amy strategies. And it sounds like that’s sort of what motivates you around all this work? Absolutely. I explicitly asked, you know what? What do you love about the work that you’re doing? So i get to work with museums, culture organizations, people have fantastic art or, you know, help children learn every single day and my job is to bring software into these organizations so that they can use it to increase all that. So bringing in that first ticket by that first time ticket buyer is the end result of everything that i do, all of that on dh leveraging technology is, well, it’s fantastic to help the children’s touch museum that’s, right? Maybe. How about you share what you love about this work? Well, believe it or not, everything that kevin said, but what i want a message is, is there is an opportunity there, and i think automatically the non-profits think i don’t have the budget i can’t afford to be, i can’t afford a radio. Now, if you’re in the top five ten market, that may be the case. This is probably a mid market toe lower market strategy. However, there is opportunity there, and i have seen it. I’ve worked for twelve plus years with non-profits when i was at the tv station to help them do this, and i think i would just say, be bold, pick up the phone, get a relationship, explain your mission and work together, and you will absolutely reaped the rewards on this and it’s there to happen session that become is make your online ticket sales soar with television and radio for free? I think they’ve shared some outstanding ways of doing that really very simple, common sense, but things that people are not doing, certainly not doing and because they’re not aware. Amy spencer on dh kevin russell, thank you very much for being guest. Thank you, it’s. Been a real pleasure. Thanks. This is tony martignetti non-profit radio coverage of bb khan. Twenty twelve. Thanks very much for being with me and my thanks also to the people at blackbaud who helped me be there and do podcasting at their bb con conference. More live listener. Love it’s. Unbelievable. Mexico, sorocaba, brazil, beijing, china. Riverhead, new york. Right at the fork where the with the north and south fork split. Riverhead, new york. Hyattsville, maryland. La jolla, california. Live listener love tto all those cities. I want to spend a couple of minutes talking about the ira charitable roll over. This was just revived in the american taxpayer relief act of twenty twelve, which was passed by congress on january first of twenty thirteen. I love how they can play magic with the dates i actually read the act and on the title page it says legislative day, december thirty first, two thousand twelve so they just make up, you know, they were there on january first, but it was really december thirty first. I love how they could just do that. I wish i could time shift like that. This charitable rollover is really not a rollover. This is the last time i’m going to call it a roll over, right then that was the last time it’s actually a qualified charitable distribution that other word is a misnomer. So i’m not using that anymore and we shouldn’t be using it. But it’s popular it’s the vernacular and what it takes for your donors to do it is you have to be at least seventy and a half years old on the day they make their gift. The ira has to be a traditional aura roth. They have a one hundred thousand dollars per year maximum per person, not per ira that they might own, but per person and the distribution this qualified charitable distribution has to go directly from their ira to your charity. And i’m going to say a lot more about this on my block next week, which means that they’ll be more about it on tony’s take to next week and included in the block post next week eyes going to be a one pager that you can adapt for your own marketing and promotion of this of the qualified charitable distribution say, i’m avoiding saying that word, and so you’ll be able to download that and use that as well. So more about that next week. But just teo remind you, let you know that that ah specific distribution was was revived this week. All right, the rollover was revived next week. I’ll have another bb con interview leveraging your social media data to find advocates, team leaders and hidden vips with casey golden he’s, the ceo of small act, and mark davis, who worked a blackbaud also coming back with me will be our social media scientist, amy sample ward. I’m asking you again, please, pretty please, could you rate and review the showing itunes? I know, i know you don’t have to go back there. Nine thousand podcast listeners i know you don’t have to ever again if you don’t want to, but i’m asking you, please, i’m almost pleading. I am pleading, actually, i would say i’m pleading, would you make the special trip? Would you give me a one through five star rating and and maybe write a short review? But if you don’t want to write the review, just give us a rating so we can reflect the fact that there’s over nine thousand people listening, thank you very much for doing that, wishing you good luck the way performers do around the world. We have left poland were in poland for weeks now we’re in serbia, bosnia, bosnia herzegovina, montenegro and mathos because in serbian, the language of those countries break a leg is slow may nobu so for the week, i’m wittering wishing you slow me. Nobu break a leg in serbian our creative producer she’s embarrassed by it but it’s still clear meyerhoff sam liebowitz is our line producer, and this shows social media is by regina walton of organic social media, the remote producer of tony martignetti non-profit radio is john federico of the new rules, and i very much hope that you’ll be with me next friday one to two p m eastern on talking alternative broadcasting at talking alternative dot com i didn’t think they’d do you. Good ending to do. You’re listening to the talking alternate network. E-giving nothing. Cubine hi, i’m donna and i’m done were certified mediators, and i am a family and couples licensed therapists and author of please don’t buy me ice cream are show new beginnings is about helping you and your family recover financially and emotionally and start the beginning of your life will answer your questions on divorce, family court, co parenting, personal development, new relationships, blending families and more dahna and i will bring you to a place of empowerment and belief that even though marriages may end, families are forever join us every monday, starting september tenth at ten a m on talking alternative dot com are you suffering from aches and pains? Has traditional medicine let you down? Are you tired of taking toxic medications? Then come to the double diamond wellness center and learn how our natural methods can help you, too? He’ll call us now at to one to seven to one eight one eight three that’s two one two seven to one eight, one eight, three or find us on the web at www dot double diamond wellness dot com way look forward to serving you! Duitz you’re listening to talking on turn their network at www. Dot talking alternative dot com now broadcasting twenty four hours a day. This is tony martignetti aptly named host of tony martignetti non-profit radio. Big non-profit ideas for the other ninety five percent technology fund-raising compliance, social media, small and medium non-profits have needs in all these areas. My guests are expert in all these areas and mohr. Tony martignetti non-profit radio friday’s one to two eastern on talking alternative broadcasting are you fed up with talking points? Rhetoric everywhere you turn left or right spin ideology no reality, in fact, its ideology over in tow. No more it’s, time for the truth. Join me, larry shot a neo-sage tuesday nights nine to eleven easter for the ivory tower radio in the ivory tower will discuss what’s important to you society, politics, business and family. It’s provocative talk for the realist and the skeptic who want to know what’s. Really going on? What does it mean? What can be done about it? So gain special access to the ivory tower. Listen to me. Very sharp. Your neo-sage. Tuesday nights nine to eleven new york time go to ivory tower radio dot com for details. That’s, ivory tower radio dot com e every time i was a great place to visit for both. Entertainment and education. Listening tuesday nights nine to eleven. It will make you smarter. Talking dot com.

Nonprofit Radio, April 20, 2012: The Law Of Attraction & Doyenne Of The Day

Big Nonprofit Ideas for the Other 95%

Listen live or archive:

My Guests:

Melanie Schnoll Begun

Melanie Schnoll Begun: The Law Of Attraction

To attract major gift prospects and potential board members, you have to put your best foot forward to get what you’re seeking. Melanie Schnoll Begun is managing director at Morgan Stanley private wealth management. She helps her ultra high net worth clients make charitable gifts and get on boards, but she has practical and valuable advice that applies to any charity soliciting a major gift or recruiting a board member.


Melanie West: Doyenne Of The Day

Melanie West writes the Donor of the Day feature for the Wall Street Journal and covers philanthropy. She’ll explain how she likes to be pitched story ideas, giving you the best chance of getting major coverage for your donors. Also, what she sees trending.


Top Trends. Sound Advice. Lively Conversation.

You’re on the air and on target as I delve into the big issues facing your nonprofit—and your career.

If you have big dreams but a small budget, tune in to Tony Martignetti Nonprofit Radio.

I interview the best in the business on every topic from board relations, fundraising, social media and compliance, to technology, accounting, volunteer management, finance, marketing and beyond. Always with you in mind.

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“Like” the show’s Facebook page, and join us on LinkedIn too.

Make sure to tune in at 1pm ET on Friday and you can share your observations on Twitter by using the #NonprofitRadio hashtag on Twitter.

Here is the link to the audio podcast: 088: The Law of Attraction & Doyenne of the Day.
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Metoo hello and welcome to tony martignetti non-profit radio big non-profit ideas for the other ninety five percent. I’m your aptly named host. I very much hope you were with me last week. I’d be in shock if i learned that you had missed these two features. These two guests smart interviewing makes great hiring cheryl nufer, a founding partner in peredo consulting, explained why behavioral interviewing is superior to traditional methods and how any size non-profit khun get better hires through more sophisticated interviewing, whether you hyre once a year or many times a month and relationship mapping. Maria simple, the prospect finder and our regular monthly prospect research contributor helped you mind your data with tools that reveal relationships you didn’t know exist among your donors. As always, she shares about shared shared values last week. Who wrote this copy? I need an intern so i have somebody to blame it’s what situation is she shared? Valuable resource is many of them free. And if anyone wants to be an intern on the show and take blame every week, please send me your resume this week. The law of attraction it’s the melanie show i should say the law. Of attraction to attract major gift prospects and potential board members, you have to put your best foot forward to get what you are seeking. Melanie schnoll begun is managing director at morgan stanley private wealth management. She helps her ultra high net worth clients make charitable gif ts and get on boards, but she has practical and valuable advice that applies to any charity soliciting a major gift or recruiting a boardmember and diane of the day melanie west writes the donor of the day feature for the wall street journal and covers philanthropy. She’ll explain how she likes to be pitched story ideas, giving you the best chance of getting major coverage for your donors and also what she sees trending and finally there’s a buffet in the news. Melanie reported it yesterday, and we’re going to talk about it today on tony’s take two in between the guests. It is my block post this week take time to play pirates. A few weeks ago, i played pirates with my seven and nine year old nephew and niece, and it got me thinking, and i’ll tell you what i was thinking about that’s around thirty two minutes into the hour on tony’s, take two. Use hashtag non-profit radio to join the conversation on twitter. Join us there were monitoring it in the studio, right, sam, monitoring right now, okay, we are on dh when we take a break right now, and when we return, it is the law of attraction with melanie schnoll begun, so stay with me. You’re listening to the talking alternative network. Are you suffering from aches and pains? Has traditional medicine let you down? Are you tired of taking toxic medications, then come to the double diamond wellness center and learn how our natural methods can help you to hell? Call us now at to one to seven to one eight, one eight three that’s to one to seven to one eight one eight three or find us on the web at www dot double diamond wellness dot com way. Look forward to serving you. Is your marriage in trouble? Are you considering divorce? Hello, i’m lawrence bloom, a family law attorney in new york and new jersey. No one is happier than the day their divorce is final. My firm can help you. We take the nasty out of the divorce process and make people happy. Police call a set to one, two, nine six four three five zero two for a free consultation. That’s lawrence h bloom two, one two, nine, six, four, three five zero two. We make people happy. Bilich hey, all you crazy listeners looking to boost your business? Why not advertise on talking alternative with very reasonable rates? Interested simply email at info at talking alternative dot com welcome back to big non-profit ideas for the other ninety five percent on tony martignetti non-profit radio with me now is melanie schnoll begun. She is a managing director and head of morgan stanley private wealth, management’s philanthropic services. She serves as a philanthropic advisor to families, foundations and family offices, working with the firm’s, ultra high net worth clients. She’s, the incoming board, president of juvenile diabetes research, foundation of new york and board treasure of the partnership for philanthropic planning. My show has been a sponsor at there. National conference on philanthropic planning the past two years. I’m very pleased that her work and her expertise brings her to the show. Melanie schnoll begun welcome. Thank you so much, tony. Just one corrections. Why in the current oh, you are the kirk heard president of the board of juvenile diabetes research funding. I have to say that because the topic today that we’re gonna be talking about if i didn’t correct you about my particular officer position on a board, i wouldn’t be selling the reason why i said or or why i think it’s so important to serve for constance he believe in. So this is why i need an intern with you and i would both blame the intern and it wouldn’t have reflected on you badly at all. What is your work around with ultra high net worth individuals? What are you doing with them? Well, i think that my work is providing meaning in their life. Many of our clients come to us because they’re in the middle of a transition. Perhaps they’ve sold their business, maybe there’s some interesting event that’s happened in their life, perhaps even a very sad event. That’s happened their life, and we help them identify how to be very strategic, purposeful and planned in there, giving for many clients when they think about making a contribution, even a large contribution, they don’t put a tremendous amount of thought into it. It might be a cause that they’ve heard about maybe one that they’re associated with, but they’re not doing a deep dive into the background and the backdrop of what’s really going on in that non-profit organization or what else? There might be out there in the world. So we try and provide that professionalism and then along the way make our clients professionals themselves. What what? What? Do you find motivates ultra high net worth? And shortly i’m gonna ask you, what is ultra high net worth? But we’ll work our way to that. But what do you think motivates their giving? Well for some clients? It’s because someone sick in their family for other clients, it’s because their rights a little more about that someone sick where the e-giving in memory of the person, soon it’ll be in memory, will hopefully to find a cure. Hopefully the final usually clients witness a major change in their attitude. What they used to buy with their wealth no longer becomes important and that’s, because the second that someone has a diagnosis in their family of someone who’s ill the only thing they’re thinking about is identifying better treatment and perhaps secure. So we find often that we come to the film provoc table with someone who has just been given that diagnosis more and is looking for the solution where so many of us just our resource is, we go to the web and we learn as much as we can, but when we’re talking about people with extraordinarily extraordinary wealth that can actually invested in a possible cure that’s what? They want to buy it. They want to buy the cure. I think what’s shocking and disappointing in many instances is that clients, no matter how wealthy they are, find out that they can’t necessarily buy everything. So it is that deep investment for the long term, perhaps not even for the benefit of their family member who might be ill but for others to find a cure better treatment. Better resource is that might bring some of our clients to the table. Others are just deeply invested in their community. They want better cultural organizations. They want better education for their kids. Certainly in new york, that’s a very big issue about private school, public school. And as your children are going through that educational problem situation, where are there enough of fine schools in new york to send our kids to? In many instances, they find that they that there’s not so. Our clients are interested in identifying. How can they be the solution to the educational drama issue? We have just a couple minutes before a break. What? What what’s the definition of ultra high net worth. What is how much money are we? Talking about, well, a lot more money than i have. I’ve always said that i really hope to one day be able to be my own client. But for us, ultra high net worth is really defined as clients who have a net worth of twenty five million and more. The reality is that it’s, a very open span for those clients, though, with twenty five million and mohr, they usually have a significant out, a significant amount of money that they could do something incredibly impactful with their philantech. On how much i’m wondering how much does somebody who has that kind of wealth walk around within their wallet like like i have typically, like thirty or forty dollars in my wallet? But so i would probably not be confused for ultrahigh worth of net worth. If someone stole my wallet, i probably wouldn’t i probably couldn’t get away with that. But, you know, like, how much do you think they have? Just on an average day in there? Well, how much do you think that carry around? Probably probably no cash. I think that i think that most about very wealthy people typically put most their stuff on cards today. So you know what? Actually, i would go after your wallet if i knew that you were on the street. So just watch thirty or forty bucks, so i was ready. I was ready to go, like, three or four hundred in my wallet, and then it almost be worth it to lose that much if i could get two muggers to think that i’m ultra high net worth. Yeah, yeah. Now they would share the story of the ultra high net worth guy, you know, among their prison friends and i could, you know, get known that way, but i’m going about it the wrong way. You got to go down so well, no cash. Now we need to talk about prison reform as faras labbate, right? So so how can you make sure that those who come out of prison that are better off than when they went in and are telling the story of twenty martignetti being ultra? Yeah, absolutely. We have to take a break when we return. Of course, melanie schnoll begun stays with me, and we’ll continue talking about the law of attraction. So i hope you stay with us. You don’t think that shooting getting thinking, you’re listening to the talking alternate network. E-giving nothing. Good. Are you stuck in your business or career, trying to take your business to the next level, and it keeps hitting a wall? This is sam liebowitz, the conscious consultant. I will help you get to the root cause of your abundance issues and help move you forward in your life. Call me now and let’s. Create the future you dream of. Two, one, two, seven, two, one, eight, one, eight, three, that’s to one to seven to one, eight one eight three. The conscious consultant helping huntress people be better business people. Oppcoll hi, this is psychic medium. Betsy cohen, host of the show. The power of intuition. Join me at talking alternative dot com mondays at eleven a. M call in for a free psychic reading. Learn how to tune into your intuition to feel better and to create your optimum life. I’m here to guide you and to assist you in creating life that you deserve. Listen every monday at eleven a, m on talking alternative dot com. Are you feeling overwhelmed in the current chaos of our changing times? A deeper understanding of authentic astrology can uncover solutions in every area of life. After all, metaphysics is just quantum physics, politically expressed, i and montgomery taylor and i offer lectures, seminars and private consultations. For more information, contact me at monte m o nt y at r l j media. Dot com talking alternative radio twenty four hours a day. I’m leslie goldman with the us fund for unicef, and i’m casey rotter with us fun for unison. You’re listening to tony martignetti non-profit radio big non-profit ideas for the other ninety five percent. Welcome back to tony martignetti non-profit radio. My guest is melanie schnoll begun and melanie let’s talk about. When charity’s air trying to solicit gif ts you have your clients who are ultra high net worth, but you have, i think, very valuable advice for any charity that’s trying to solicit any major gift, which maybe five hundred dollars or thousand dollars for some charities. What what’s your you see sort of faulty proposals a lot, don’t you? Yeah, i think that non-profits believe they understand who the donor is, and they prepare something in advance. That’s a critical error, you never know who that donor is, the famous saying. If you’ve met one philanthropist, you’ve met one philanthropist, so we try and tiki non-profits to perform a radical listening, and that means spending the time to really understand why a donor may want to be a donor to their organization. The time will be incredibly valuable both for the non-profit but even more importantly for the donor, when the donor has the opportunity to talk about what they care about why they care about the organization’s mission, you hear things you really hear things inside of that conversation inside the conversation in the donor’s hat so radical listening is a skill that we teach non-profits to practice. And that skill is something that serves both board members. It serves the staff of non-profit organizations, and at the end, you’re really giving a service to a donor. I think that most of my clients find that no one listens to them well enough. Yeah, but but a charity that’s that’s soliciting a major gift. However they define that might feel that they’re not going to get another meeting with this person. They go one shot. We finally got the meeting. We got forty five minutes. Way better. We’ve got to lay it all out because we may never get a second meeting that’s, right? So you walk into every meeting with the idea that if i really listened to this donor, i’m going to get the second meeting. If you walk in with a proposal thinking that you know who this person is and what they want to offer your organization, you’re probably guaranteeing yourself that you’re not going to see that donor again. So does it always work? It may not always work if you begin practicing it. Well, if you spend so much time performing discovery on that donor both in the dance of the meeting and then, while you’re sitting at that meeting, i think over time you’ll find that your practice as a fundraiser will dramatically improve. So you’re suggesting that if you can move the donor while while radically listening, then you’ll get a follow-up meeting brightstep my suggestion is, if you are performing radical listening, you will move the donor, okay, okay, even without introducing your mission and your work in the first in the first meeting, right? Because you’re going to hear from the donor what the donor wants to dio instead of telling the donor with a non-profit wants the donor and you do know there’s a threshold interest, otherwise you wouldn’t have gotten the first meeting would have gotten the meeting would have gotten the meeting. So it’s, it’s, it’s, it’s an important skill it’s something that has been written about andi, i think that we can’t live in that fear fundraisers can’t live in that fear that this is joan, or will not be interested in talking to me again. In fact, most of the conversation is not a conversation most of the conversation is letting that ultra high network donor talked to you, and you’re just there. To listen or again, it could be any level donor, and i’ve had where we have a regular prospect. Research contributor maria simple is on, and she and i have talked about the value of the face to face meetings, and she’s a professional prospect researcher who knows all the web webb resource is, you know, but she still recognizes that the greatest prospect research comes from a good, good conversation, absolutely, and and and and he’s absolutely right face-to-face looking a donor in their eyes. In many instances, i think being on the donor’s being in the donor’s territory so ah place where they’re comfortable, where it’s an environment either their office, they’re home, maybe somewhere where they’ve recommended that they like to go for coffee. Usually i recommend going for a glass of wine because, you know, does it doesn’t hurt, but her loosen up? Yeah, exactly. I’ve tried to get sam lee boards to have wine here, but he’s not doing it now you’re not really radical listening, right? I just radically demand. Thanks, you know, but i’m not a charity, so i think i’m exactly you only have thirty example. Everything was for you only have thirty dollars. You’re well, you’re our charity ticket. You can’t get a decent bottle of wine for thirty bucks. So then the careful listening radical listening is goingto inform your valuable proposal when that when it’s the right time, that’s, right sametz writer and the valuable proposal some hints that we give to non-profits as they’re preparing that that proposal brief three points know what are the key issues that you’ve heard? The donor has said to you, the areas where they’re really interested in supporting on ly talk about those areas, right? Putting in a proposal for stuff that you haven’t heard because the organization needs it, but the donor doesn’t want it what’s the likelihood of that getting funded so three typically are the most that we suggested a proposal going backto a donor that you know what they’re interested in, you’re going to get a much better response, okay, other tips for the for the proposal itself, for the written document, you brief couple pages, right? A couple of pages in fact, most of our clients today, they don’t want to read stuff, right? And they fear that if the non-profit is spending so much time and resource is preparing proposals, then they may not be spending the money that i’m giving to the organization i’m doing the work so in many instances, is it brief short? In fact, non-profit should ask the donor. How would you like me to prevent to present a proposal? Is it isn’t even something that you want in writing? Or should we just have another conversation? I would welcome that second conversation so that now the second meeting, the donor’s prepared to do their own radical listening. Is there a problem? Sometimes when a donor gets sort of passed off from somebody who knows the work very well to the fund-raising professional who’s goingto the closer it’s like it’s, like in a in a car dealership going to which i have very bad memories of a child. Buying my first car was awful, but at a car dealership going from the salesmen to the finance manager exactly going that office and the door gets closed off, you know, but being passed from the maybe the executive director or someone who knows the work well to the closer the fundraiser doesn’t something get lost there sometimes. Yeah. What? What gets lost is the gift. So no one wants to be handed off everyone in that non-profit organization, both from voluntary leadership. To professional staff should be able to talk about programming if the executive director is the one who has contact with that donor. If it’s a boardmember who has the contact with that donor, or if it is the professional fundraiser that has the contact with that donor, the conversation should be between those two people bringing others include others in the conversation. But don’t hand a donor off. I have a a client’s situation that happened with a large university hospital incredible organization doing tremendous work. And this client’s unfortunately this this medical institution was not able to save the life of our client’s husband. But he wanted to honor him. She wants to memorialize him. And the doctor who was treating her husband was the individual that he wanted to leave a contribution for so that he could continue doing the great work that he began with her clothes with her with her husband. Many of the conversations happened between her and the doctor. It was intimate. She could see clearly what she wanted to accomplish. And then when it came down to the clothes she was handed to a development director. Ah, fine development director. Someone who? Spent years in the business, but it was so disconnected and she felt that were there. Were you there for the meeting? So i was there after the fact also, i came in to help save the gift. Okay? And we this this donor-centric working with us after he felt that brush off from the doctor and it was completely unintentional. So totally unintentional. Just protocol just about innocuous handing off it’s the way things are done, he wasn’t supposed to close that’s someone else’s responsibility. So what? I teach both boards as well as professional staff. It’s everyone’s, responsibility close. If you’re the one who has the relationship, you need to be confident enough to make the ask. And you need to be prepared enough too close. And if it’s i guess if it’s a really technical gift which it could be a at large dollar amounts, then at least include the in your case, the doctor, but generally the program, the work expert in the conversations don’t leave him or her out in the hall while now the professional closer you know, goes through his is her stick that’s, right? And you know it. Theatre knees, the accountants. All the financial advisers, all of those professionals, need to play a role in the process. I’m if the donor wants him to be included in the conversations about the specifics of the gift that’s great, but there’s the technical aspects of giving and then there’s the emotional aspects of giving and what i see getting lost. It’s, it’s, it’s never technique, right? You could draft a perfect trust. It could be absolutely accurate. The document itself could get an a plus plus in any fine law school. But if the donor is not connected emotionally to the gift, it doesn’t matter what the document says. Melanie schnoll begun is managing director, head of morgan stanley, private wealth, management’s philanthropic services and we’re talking about the law of attraction basically had a look good when you’re either soliciting a gift or soliciting someone for boardmember ship, which is what i’d like tio transition to now, okay. Appealing to a board appealing to a potential boardmember, um since you’re working with ultra high net worth people, i’m going to guess that sometimes there approached because they’re very wealthy. And how do they feel about that? Yeah, so in the law of attraction, it’s it’s rarely because they’re really good looking. Damn many of them might be hot tonight, but it’s usually because they’re wealthy, so similar to the idea of marriage. Right? So when i got married, i married for love. I married for looks there’s, you know there’s a little bit of money to that’s. All so that’s, always wonderful when you think that before you can say sex on the show is this the part where you were this sick? It’s coming, it’s coming, it’s coming, it’s coming sex is you have to have a little foreplay before sex. So it’s getting there russia you’re like that’s been my problem. You’re russian in europe. Well, among others, but let’s keep it let’s. Keep it focused on alt-right work-life let’s, take this conversation on the bed here. Right? Right, right. So the opportunity of creating a marriage between potential boardmember and an organization it’s. Incredibly important. So the the reason donors believe that serving a non-profit is an appropriate step for them is because they’ve been courted well, it’s, because they find the organization incredibly attractive and good looking it’s because they want to spend a lot of time with that organization because they want to see that organism they grow and really achieve incredible impact very similar to marriage alive know the problem with marriage is is half the men in divorce, so the same is true with non-profit port service, you’re excited at the beginning, right? You can’t wait for that next kiss can’t wait for the next date and then quickly within the first year, if the non-profit doesn’t really know how to work well, play well, dine the donor well doesn’t understand where they like to go to how they like to vacation. If the non-profit doesn’t know how to use the donor to his or her maximum capacity, they get bored, they get disenchanted and the worst thing is donors cheats like just like what happens in many families that fall apart, they begin looking at other opportunities that really do want them thinking that it’s better on the other side there feeling remorse about having joined this board, everything was great in the beginning, the right the honeymoon stage, but about exactly right. Exactly right. So spend your time non-profit should spend their time thinking about whether or not this is a person they want to marry. Is this a person that will bring value to this relation? Can we grow together? And what do we each bring to the relationship? It has to be more than just money again. Just like many families, right? If all you’re going after is the wealth than a marriage for many, many years will fall apart. You know the boardmember potential boardmember wants to know that they’re going to be used effectively. That’s right? Utilized way. Don’t use board members. We usually large numbers. Okay. Okay. Um, taking over the show? No. Uh, let’s see, so but a lot of times, board charities need an expertise. We need an accountant or we feel we need an attorney. And in some deshele t real estate, maybe or something. So they’re seeking that profession. But that is contrary to what you’re recommending, right? So i think what boardmember sze need to be on? What boards need to do to get the right people on their team is, they have to look for people different than themselves. What happens with most non-profit boards is you look around the board table and everyone’s the same right, because it’s a friend introducing another friend. They come from similar backgrounds, specially smaller charity it’s, a friend of the executive director of the founder, absolutely especially small non-profits and specifically, when they’re getting off the ground, right. So it’s, the founder, it’s, the founders best friend, its founder, sister, and perhaps someone who worked for them at one point time or an intern so non-profits really need to think about how can we bring true diversity to our board? Professionalizing aboard must include accountants, financial advisors, lawyers, but you can’t just look at them as a lawyer, you need to look at them as a lawyer that has a mission that there interest must be tethered, if not tied to the nonprofit organization, that they’re a lawyer that’s their skill set. But ultimately we know that even if they warrant a lawyer that they really support the work of that organization. I wantto have you bring something out that we had talked about that very wealthy people are not un interested in working for smaller midsize working among being utilized by small and midsize charities. Is that right? Absolutely. I think that many very wealthy clients believe that they can be better utilised in a small nonprofit organization. In fact, that’s where most of the money came from. So the majority of our client base started their own closely held businesses. And they realise what it means to rule up their sleeves to get dirty. They love on that kind of opportunity and nonprofit organizations. So when you come into these large non-profit organizations very bureaucratic, very political. So many individuals that look like them. So it is even mohr attractive for wealthy people to see that you know, my gift. We’ll make a significant difference here. But my time may even be more valuable. Tulani schnoll begun is a managing director and head of morgan stanley. Private wealth, management’s philanthropic services. Melanie, thanks very much for being in the studio. Being a guest, tony. Thanks for having me. It’s. Been a pleasure right now. We take a break when he returns. Tony’s, take two. And then, after that die, end of the day. Melanie west. Stay with me. Hyre you’re listening to the talking alternative network. Are you feeling overwhelmed in the current chaos of our changing times? A deeper understanding of authentic astrology can uncover solutions in every area of life. After all, metaphysics is just quantum physics, politically expressed, i and montgomery taylor and i offer lectures, seminars and private consultations. For more information, contact me at monte m o nt y at r l j media. Dot com are you stuck in your business or career trying to take your business to the next level, and it keeps hitting a wall? This is sam liebowitz, the conscious consultant. I will help you get to the roof, cause of your abundance issues and help move you forward in your life. Call me now and let’s. Create the future you dream of. Two, one, two, seven, two, one, eight, one, eight, three, that’s to one to seven to one, eight one eight three. The conscious consultant helping conscious people. Be better business people. Hey, all you crazy listeners looking to boost your business? Why not advertise on talking alternative with very reasonable rates? Interested simply email at info at talking alternative dot com welcome back, it’s, time for tony’s take two at roughly thirty two minutes into the hour. My block this week is take time to play pirates. A couple of weeks ago, i played pirates with my seven year old nephew and my nine year old niece, and it got me thinking about the value of taking time for play, whether that’s play with kids or play with adults, it’s a chance to rest your mind and think about things on dh ideas completely unrelated to what your work may be day to day, it could be mindless play, and that could be even mindless play with adults you might have fund-raising yourself mindless with adults and then and then playing, you know, talk politics without any restraint that we have in our day to day lives. All i think makes you at least i feel this makes me feel more refreshed makes me more focused at work. I think when i take time off and i return, i’m just i’m just performing better and i’m hoping that you’ll get some of those same result it’s from taking time, tio play could be pirates could be something else and that’s what’s. My blogged this week, my blog’s is tony martignetti dot com. I also want you to know that we have a linked in group for the show. If you have a suggestion of guests or topics for the show again, just go to the blogged tony martignetti dot com and there’s, a very prominent link to all my social media properties presences, including the new linking group for the show and that is tony’s take two for friday, april twentieth, twenty twelve. The sixteenth show of the year with me now is melanie west. She writes for the greater new york section of the wall street journal. She writes the donor of the day column and covers the philanthropy beat. Before that, she wrote for the weekend journal aboutthe wine industry and wine travel. She joined the journal in two thousand six graduate of cornell and the columbia university graduate school of journalism. Melanie west lives in manhattan with her husband, and i’m very glad that her work brings her to the studio. Melanie welcome. Thank you. Pleasure to have you. Thank you. Um, let’s talk about donorsearch that day. What’s the what’s. The purpose there. Well, as you know, we’ve had a long commitment at the journal to report on the philanthropic interests of of our readership, and for many years we had a column that was gift of the week. And during the economic downturn, we how do i put it? Sunset that column in favor of resurrecting it with the greater new york section, which is our city section in the wall street journal, available in new jersey and connecticut, and certainly manhattan and the boroughs. And ah, the decision there was to create a column that was daily and looked at all kinds of philanthropy be at a forty million dollars gift or a gift from a teenager who does something that’s incredibly not charitable. So that’s what? The column is runs most every day in the paper. Assuming that we have news, we have room for it on dh it’s a pleasure to do and they they preferred the alliteration. Clearly, i like a little rations on my show. Gift of the week doesn’t sound snazzy donor the day sounds pretty cool, i guess die end of the day you’re doi end of the day, i’m doubling urges w w end of the day i think and you just surpassed five hundred columns. I know not you personally. Yes, we’ve done five hundred of them wasn’t just last month, i think, yep, ok. And that’s, you know, it’s been a great opportunity to speak with e, you know, diverse group of people here in the city and to learn about their passions. And i won’t say that it isn’t a challenge. Teo, create that column every day or lose five days a week. It is so you know, i hope your readers, your listeners, have some ideas for me, and they could certainly reach out to me, and we’re going to talk about that. How long have you been doing the column over a year now, okay, i’ve written the majority of that five hundred. Oh, you have, yeah, okay. And your predecessor was surely banjo. Correct, right? Who’s now on the connecticut westchester beat, i think something connecticut westchester, correct. Okay. You sometimes do a mention of the day what’s that about well, said someone who’s ah do gooder on dh it’s for people who have extraordinary passions and do unusual things. So for example, we’ve had a gentleman who ran for three days straight who’s raising money for multiple myeloma cancer research. We’ve had a teenager who, you know, collected a bunch of money through unicef, trick or treat they’re unisex trick or treat program. They had raised the most amount of money of any kids in the country, and that was up in connecticut. Um, these are for, you know, those air areas to talk about people’s philanthropic gifts without them being huge gifts and make for an unusual story and certainly a very charming story. So how do you like to be pitched? Email over phone what’s, your what’s, your preference about being pitched for doner of the day? I get pitches in all kinds of different forms, really off difference. Is there a way people? I’m sure people would rather give it to you in the form that you prefer. Um, actually don’t have a form that i prefer. What i really need to know is that the individual who is to be profiled is comfortable talking about the size of their gift. The quantity of their gift dollar value is always included, right? It’s a critical fact in the story. We are a paper that reports on transactions and these air philanthropy transactions. And so the amount of the gift is critical. Of course, it needs to be in a recent gift, and it needs to be news. Most of the stories that i do, in fact, ninety nine percent of the stories that i do our exclusive. So the story needs to come to us first. People need to be. The donor needs to be compelling. It needs to be someone who’s generous. Someone who deeply cares about what they’re giving to those are the best stories. Okay, do you take into consideration that for some charities ah, twenty five thousand dollar gift or forty thousand dollar gift, maybe very large. These they have to be, of course, gift in the millions. And, well, i mean, i think a twenty five thousand dollar gift to a major university is maybe not is proportionate gift. But to answer the question more broadly know there’s, not a threshold. Okay, it’s, really a question of is that it? Is that a meaningful gift to the organization? Okay, and what would you like to see in the in the pitch? What do you need to know? Initially, tio to determine whether you’d like to go ahead. Well, i need a sense of time if they want to do it tomorrow, then on di doo doo stories that, you know, happen tomorrow. There’s a story that i had to run today that will run on monday and it’s a very quick turnaround, so i don’t need a sense of time certainly need a sense of the amount of the gift, and i need a sense of who the person is. Okay? Oftentimes i’ll get a email where someone will say, well, i have this idea of someone who might want to do something and is usually nine times out of ten doesn’t come to fruition, so needs it pretty to be a pretty solid, okay, let’s, get the incumbent ones that air so kind of vague, right? What about the the idea of follow-up phone calling of some of somebody emails you a pitch and then follows up with a phone call to say, i just wanna make sure you got my email does that? There are some journalists who gets very turned off by that on don’t appreciate the double double contact. How do you feel about that? I tried to be friendly to everyone that calls very thoughtful. Okay. Okay. Okay. Calls a reasonable number of times a reasonable number. Okay. All right. Anything else you want to say about pitching? You know, just reach out to me by e mails at the bottom of every story online. So it should be pretty easy to get me, and they’re very easy to find just google melanie west or melanie grace west correct, g r a y, c and donor of the day and you’ll find many many columns donorsearch day. So since you’ve written the majority of the five hundred, you see some trends, no doubt what what’s what’s, something that you’re seeing happening more often seems my good trends, i think ok, you know, i’m seeing a lot more people acknowledging the need to give locally, um, people who have made their wealth in new york and in the region and who feel it’s their responsibility to support the city. Either they’re they’ve come here, they’ve come from here. There are many of them have been born in brooklyn, but they have a very good awareness that the need is great close to home. That isn’t to suggest that there aren’t a tremendous number. Of people who are giving to their alma mater, zand states away what it is to say that there’s this awareness that there is a need in the city and i think that we can partially thank mayor bloomberg for setting that trend and making that awareness known, especially among his friends and colleagues. Now should we point out that is going back to stories that are appropriate? That needs to be some metrical area connection once you make sure that’s clear well, the donor of the organization needs stay in the area, okay, new york, new jersey and connecticut correct nasco some connection with the charity or the donor, right? Well, the column runs in the greater new york sections, so we’re not reporting on what happened the california but the show’s hyre worldwide, so i just wantto make make sure that people know there’s got to be that new york, new jersey connecticut connection. Okay, aside from local giving, what else? What else you’re seeing it’s great for me again. People i think are choosing not to give anonymously. They’re choosing to set an example. They’re choosing teo, encourage their colleagues as well. I had a gentleman, who’s. A donor a couple months ago, and he gave a two million dollar gift to bridgeport hospital, which is in connecticut. And he said one of the reasons why he gave the gift is because he wanted to make, you know, set the example for for other people and basically, he said, if you know people look at me and say, hey, he could give two million i can do at least that much, um, and in this particular gift, the gentleman’s joel smile oh, ah, he had the cardiac unit named for him. And so i think naming gifts are also, you know, compelling to people. Come, you know, in so few words, he said that effectively, if i could have a named gift for two million prison that many of my neighbors can also have a similar gift. And that’s that’s pretty well known in fund-raising circles that we can get somebody to stand up at a gala let’s, say or identify themselves somehow and say i did it in fact, in board meetings. It’s sometimes used to i did it, and i’m challenging all of you to do it. Sounds like something similar to what? What? That? Gentleman, what jules was doing, joel and then jules kroll he’s a gentleman. Who’s made his his his million’s in global consulting and search of corporate security. Right hey gave a two million dollar gift to john jay college and he again wanted that to be a very public gift to inspire others to give to John jay and 2 other city university established. You know, the college is to grow their fund-raising profile as a place where, yes, you khun give gifts here. There’s another gentleman. I did a story on very recently. His name is henry van amorin. Gin it’s quite well known in the gay, lesbian and bisexual transgender community. He funds a lot of causes, and he gave a million dollars a million dollars to in the life media. And he never gives a name gift. He on lee it’s anonymously and the reason why he gave this gift it to your point is he wanted to inspire others to give. And it was a matching gift or a challenge gift. And do you find that is usually the charity that encourages the person to step out of anonymity? Or is it the donor thinking of it on their own. I don’t think the charity concert i don’t think the charity could be persuasive enough teo, to get someone who would give anonymously to suddenly put their name to it. I think the individual wants to do it, you know? Arika dahna i mean, i could see a charity trying push because they’d like to motivate the same similar gift, and we have just about a minute before a break, you have your seeing something in terms of gift being split up, split gift. Yeah, i think this is a good idea. Trend there. Some donors that i’ve spoken with have decided, especially for college endowments, to give a gift that, you know, may endow a chair but also to give a gift a tte the same time. Two scholarships. So something that could be used in some in the president in something that is a future gift that the university can drawn. Okay, so seeing okay current and then planned gifts or deferred endowment type gif ts corrects here together. Right? Right. Okay. All right. Well, we’ll take it. We’ll take a break there and when we return, melanie west will stay with me. Doi end of the day. Andi. I hope you do, too. Talking alternative radio twenty four hours a day. Hi, this is psychic medium. Betsy cohen, host of the show. The power of intuition. Join me at talking alternative dot com mondays at eleven a. M call in for a free second reading. Learn how to tune into your intuition to feel better and to create your optimum life. I’m here to guide you and to assist you in creating life that you deserve. Listen every monday at eleven a, m on talking alternative dot com. Hi, i’m carol ward from the body mind wellness program. Listen to my show for ideas and information to help you live a healthier life in body, mind and spirit, you’ll hear from terrific guests who are experts in the areas of health, wellness and creativity. So join me every thursday at eleven a, m eastern standard time on talking alternative dot com professionals serving community oppcoll. Hi, this is nancy taito from speaks. Been radio speaks. Been. Radio is an exploration of the world of communication, how it happens in how to make it better, because the quality of your communication has a direct impact on the quality of your life. Tune in monday’s at two pm on talking alternative dot com, where i’ll be interviewing experts from business, academia, the arts and new thought. Join me mondays at two p m and get all your communications questions answered on speaks been radio. This is tony martignetti, aptly named host of tony martignetti non-profit radio. Big non-profit ideas for the other ninety five percent. Technology fund-raising compliance. Social media, small and medium non-profits have needs in all these areas. My guests are expert in all these areas and mohr. Tony martignetti non-profit radio friday’s one to two eastern on talking alternative broadcasting. Talking. Oppcoll welcome back to big non-profit ideas for the other ninety five percent. Melanie west writes the donor of the day column for the wall street journal she’s with us, but she doesn’t only write the donor of the day column. Just yesterday, she had a piece on howard buffett, son of the very well known philanthropist and billionaire what’s what’s happening in the buffet family melanie that you covered yesterday? Well, i had the great opportunity to visit mr buffett on his farm in the middle of illinois beautiful part of the country and ride in his tractor as we work the fields for a little bit. All right already. I have to stop you. I’m sorry, but his his tractor has gps e well, i mean, this isn’t just your regular old puffing plaque smoke tractor, though they did start out with that was a pretty sophisticated piece of equipment, it’s, more like what i would call like a robot, a giant farm robot, but i read gps in a tractor and initially wondered why you need gps isn’t is an attractive, pretty much just up and down the rows. Why is there a gps in attractive it’s harder? Than you think. My over our new yorker is oversimplifying. Don’t you need gps when you travel out of the city? I do. But how far does he think his tractor he’s got quite a bit of land and it actually speeds to process out. So it’s yeah, we got it back and forth, it’s more than just back and forth. There is some technicality to it, and you want to plant a rose straight if you don’t, you’re gonna have a messed up crop. Okay? I just envisioned a lot of turn left. No, no, no, no. It does it on its own. Oh, gods the tractor? Yes. Oh, oh, it sze more than just telling you how to go. Oh, absolutely. No, no, no, it’s. Not that kind of thing. It’s gps operated in the sense where it’s like not off by an inch. Oh, excellent. Okay. All right. That was a digression. Okay? Important one that didn’t come out this in detail. It did not come out in a story with sophistication of his gps. Actually drive. The tractor doesn’t just say turn left. Turn right. And it plots exactly where each seed gets dropped. I mean it’s really? Quite amazing. Okay, okay. So in the last few years, mr buffett has turned his attention to domestic hunger. As you know, his foundation. It’s, about a two hundred twenty five million dollar foundation, has primarily funded work in international developments. Howard buffett correct foundation correct. This’s, the middle son of the billionaire investor. Okay? And he in recent years decided that there was more he could do closer to home. For many years, he has supported things throughout decatur and illinois and nebraska local charities. But he has become more aware that hunger has a different look than what we might think of it. And in rural areas. It’s really quite quite an issue feeding america, the charity that mr buffett has partnered with reports that, you know, the greatest levels of food insecurity in the country are primarily in rural areas, not in urban areas. They’re statistic is fifty five percent. So with this, he looked closer to home, began doing more research he funded with feeding america giant map called i think it’s called bridge the meal gap for the meal gap. And it basically takes a county by county approach of where hunger is. In america, and he funded that project with some other partners based on that, he decided he could do more. And for the last few years, he’s been thinking about a project that would directly get farmers invested in hunger in their community. Now, in rural areas, you have to think about it, you know, who are the who are the leaders in rural areas and is very much the farmers on dh. So if they got together and they work together, how could they raise money to give closer to home? And this was his problem and something that he solved. And so on thursday of this week, he announced a plan in partnership with adm. Archer daniel with daniels midland to create a program where farmers give a portion of their crop to feeding america. Archer daniels midland very big agribusiness, correct company. So what a farmer does is he has nine hundred fifty bushels in a semi tractor trailer. They roll up into archer daniels midland. The company asked, how much of that do you want to give to charity? We can give a bushel. They could give no bushels. They can give a hundred fifty bushels. And what happens is the amount of money for that bushel goes back to the organization, so so we’re not donating. There were some comments to your yeah, that suggested that the raw corn was being donated to food hunger program, yeah, hungry people provoc corn no it’s very bad for the teeth for everybody unless you’re gonna pop it. But it’s not a balanced meal, so the proceeds of the amount that they designate that was in the article. Okay, so but i can’t help it if people didn’t read carefully, it is a confusing idea because i think people think that there’s going to be farmers who are giving food, and that is actually a secondary portion of it which was not covered in the article is he wants to encourage those people, too. If you’re going to give money and you’re going to donate some of the proceeds from your crop, why not within the gardens and lands that you have grow a little food and donate that to the food bank as well? So he in one of his plots of land is actually growing corn for the food bank indicator and he’s gonna, you know at harvest time, roll up with a bunch of sweet corn. And the, um the money is going to be donated to the peach farmers. Local correct local food program say little about that. Right? So feeding america has about has two hundred to food banks in the country. Fifty three of those food banks directly service rural populations. So the gift in what the farmers air donating will benefit those fifty three food banks. So it is staying in their community and that’s very, very compelling for the farmers. That is a key component to getting them to donate stays local. Correct. Not unlike what melanie schnoll begun. My first guy? Yes. I was talking about that there’s. An interest in giving people are interested in giving locally. They want to see local impact on this is called invest in acre co-branded. Okay. And so all of the programme materials should be live now and online. And i believe it’s, invest in acre dot or ge ah it’s being primarily funded and driven by the howard g buffett foundation. Okay. And there again that you are always invest an acre dot org’s, i believe. All right. Melanie melanie west. Thank you very much for being a guest. Thank you very much. It’s been a pleasure. Melanie west writes the donor of a column for the wall street journal and covers the philanthropy beat there. My thanks also to melanie schnoll begun for being with me and her assistant saraya for all her help next week, get monthly givers. Bob wesolowski, the president of caring habits, helps you get habitual monthly donors through electronic funds. Transfer ft for those in the in the in the business and strategic organizations raised more money starita ansari is president and chief change officer at m s b philanthropy advisors. She wants you to organize thoughtfully around your mission, looking strategically at your inputs, outputs and outcomes to boost your fund-raising revenue keep up with what’s coming up. Sign up farming satur email alerts on the facebook page like that page! If you like the show, you’d always know that you can listen live or archive to catch us archive, go to non-profit radio dot net non-profit radio dot net that will take you to our itunes paige and my thanks again. To those who raided the show on itunes on twitter, follow me follow the show’s hashtag used the show’s hashtag non-profit radio use it unabashedly our creative producers, claire meyerhoff. Sam liebowitz is our line producer. Janice taylor is our assistant producer. Shows social media is by regina walton of organic social media and the remote producer of tony martignetti non-profit radio is john federico of the new rules. I sincerely hope you will be with me next week. Friday, one to two p, m eastern. You always find us at talking alternative dot com, which is the home of talking alternative broadcasting. Dahna good thing. The shooting. Good ending. You’re listening to the talking alternative network, waiting to get me anything. E-giving cubine how’s your game want to improve your performance, focus and motivation than you need? Aspire, athletic consulting stop second guessing yourself move your game to the next level, bring back the fun of the sport, help your child build confidence and self esteem through sports, contact dale it aspire athletic consulting for a free fifteen minute power session to get unstuck. 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Nonprofit Radio for August 13, 2010: Exploting Traditional Media: What is your nonprofit story?

Big Nonprofit Ideas for the Other 95%

You can subscribe on iTunes and listen anytime, anyplace on the device of your choice.

Tony’s Guests:

Peter Panepento, web editor, The Chronicle of Philanthropy and Sara Dunaj, account executive, CRT/tanaka PR agency.

Topic: Exploting Traditional Media: What is your nonprofit story? How to get yours told

There will be a link to the podcast posted here after the show.

This Friday from 1-2pm this week and every week!
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Durney durney dahna hello and welcome to tony martignetti non-profit radio big non-profit ideas for the other ninety five percent, i’m your aptly named host tony martignetti last week, we looked at traditional sari last week, we looked at social media using social media, building community networks, online community, using online fund-raising the person to person fund-raising this week, we’re looking at traditional media, my guests are going to be peter panepento, whose web editor for the chronicle of philanthropy, so he’s got on interesting mix of traditional media but doing it in the non traditional sense he’s, their web editor, and we’ll talk about the non-profit story. How that’s been changing what he sees it becoming and what’s interesting to the chronicle how the chronicle is a resource for small and medium non-profits our audience and at the bottom of the hour i’ll be joined by sarah din, eh? Sarah is account executive for tanaka agency and does public relations for non-profits and has a non-profit background herself. So this week, it’s traditional media howthe story is evolving and how you can get involved where pre recorded this week so i won’t be able to take your calls will be live. Next week, though, on the twenty third, but there is a contest name the number i want to find a way to name our calling number, which is, um eight seven seven for eight xero for one to zero again, we can’t take calls this week. We will be taking calls next week, but go to our facebook page, the facebook fan page at tony martignetti non-profit radio and joined the contest name the number to find a way to remember that number. Using the letters that correspond to those numbers, please go to the facebook page. Tony martignetti non-profit radio beacon so search on facebook just search for non-profit radio you don’t have to remember how to spell my name. Start searching for non-profit radio and the fan page will come up. I’d be grateful if you’d like us, join us as a fan on the fan page, click like we’re going to take a break now and after the break, my guest peter panepento, will join us. This is tony martignetti non-profit radio co-branding dick dick tooting getting ding, ding, ding ding you’re listening to the talking alternate network you waiting to get you thinking? Cubine are you stuck in your business or career trying to take your business to the next level, and it keeps hitting a wall? This is sam lebowitz, the conscious consultant. I will help you get to the root cause of your abundance issues and help move you forward in your life. Call me now and let’s. Create the future you dream of. Two, one, two, seven, two, one, eight, one, eight, three, that’s to one to seven to one, eight one eight three. The conscious consultant helping conscious people. Be better business people. I’m tony martignetti, the aptly named host of the tony martignetti show. Big non-profit ideas for the other ninety five percent. You’re non-profit is ignored because you’re smaller medium size. But you still need expertise and help with technology fund-raising compliance, finance and accounting will look at all of these areas on the tony martignetti show. Big non-profit ideas for the other ninety five percent on talking alternative dot com fridays one, too. Talking. With a little. And something heinous way. Boedecker we’re rather a mess. Well, a little. And some money. I’m tony martignetti you’re listening to tony martignetti non-profit radio on talking alternative broadcasting, talking, alternative, dot com small and medium non-profits have a home here if you feel you’re ignored, perhaps by the media, and we’re going to talk about how the chronicle of philanthropy doesn’t want to ignore you and want you wants to reach out to you, but if you feel you’re ignored by maybe consultants or just the non-profit community, because you’re a smaller organization, small and medium size, you have a home here. Tony martignetti non-profit radio big non-profit ideas for the other ninety five percent sent i’m going, i’m joined now by peter panepento, web editor for the chronicle of philanthropy. Peter welcome, thanks for having me on tony. My pleasure. Welcome to the show, peter, why don’t you tell the listeners a little bit about your background in journalism and and you’re interesting non-profits sure i’ve been with the chronicle of philanthropy as a full time staff member for about four years now. I came here as a senior reporter who covered fund-raising and later irs issues, and when we, when we really committed off full board to the web about three years. Ago, i took the title of web editor, where my role has been to really rethink the way we present news online and expand what we dio to prevent to present what we d’oh to the non-profit world in some new and really community oriented ways. So i’ve been working over the last few years, both teo kind of re imagine the website, but also to expand our content. We’ve started a number of podcasts and blog’s and video siri’s and and other features that are aimed at really taking what we’ve been doing for print for more than twenty years and really blowing it out and opening it up and making it more accessible to the non-profit world online, your role then is to bring traditional media online, and i know the chronicle has done that in a lot of ways that you touched on let’s start just what do you see as the non-profit story? What interests you as web editor? What interests the chronicle about the non-profit community? Well, what we’re really trying to do is is the non-profit community is so large and so diverse, we’re really trying to serve much bigger piece of it than we’ve ever, ever been able to do in print before. What what’s happening online is it’s giving us the opportunity, thio more people, a voice and create a lot more conversations online, and by doing that, we’re able to not only report and deliver the news, but we’re also able to get a lot more people having input in in in what we’re talking about, able to ask a lot more questions and able to share a lot more information with each other and what stories specifically or what angles are interest you and the chronicle. Well, we’re interested in a number of things, probably the biggest thing is is we are really interested in trends and and looking at information and what’s happening in the world that that somebody who works in the nonprofit world can then turn around and apply to what they do every day unlike, you know, your local newspaper tv station, which is really aimed at delivering news to the to the to the whole community and the whole consumer. We really we focus on what is of interest to people who work in the nonprofit world. So we tell our stories in that way. Instead of instead of reporting something, too uh, you know, to ah, you know, a wide audience we really try to focus in on information and in a language and in a delivery way that, um, if you’re working for a small, medium or large non-profit group, you know, we’re talking to you and we’re delivering information to you. So really what interests you as a reader as somebody who works in the field and who cares about the field is what interests us and how that interest can be used and benefit and the larger community can benefit from it the larger non-profit community competitive, absolutely so you know it, we’re not necessarily interested in the fund-raising event that you dio on its own in the same way that you would be telling that story, too. Ah, local newspaper editor, for instance, you’re probably trying to get publicity for the event itself. What we’d be interested in is what’s unique about that an event and what could somebody else you know, who works in the field? Learn from it? Are you doing something different with it? Or is there a tactic or a technique that you’re using that? Ah colleague halfway across the country might be ableto read about or or or listen to samen formacion about and then turn around, defy it. What they dio you mentioned accessibility, making the chronicle accessible, and what i think is remarkable is people can follow you, for instance, on twitter. Absolutely, absolutely, um, you know, for many years what we were was a pass around publication, we were a newspaper that have delivered it, delivered to your office every two weeks probably do your executive director, your development director, and then got passed around the office, and by the time i got to you, if you were depending on where you were on the totem pole, you might ah, you might be reading it of, you know, three or four weeks after it came out. Uh, now the level of communication with us is so much more personal and rial time. Like you said, we’re on twitter, we were under the handle at philanthropy, and i’m on there throughout the day, answering people’s questions, posting links to our stories and communicating with people through there we have ah, facebook group actually have to facebook groups one called philanthropy dot com and one called the chronicle of philanthropy, and we were talking to people there where i’m linked in now we’re on youtube. Um, and we’re also on the website really were trying to respond to people were opening up, uh, sections of the site for people to submit their stories and their ideas. Oh, and and really start communications and conversations that way. Um, one example of how that’s changing is is a feature we’re doing right now called fund-raising videos that work and what it really is it’s not us doing the reporting it’s you doing the reporting? If if you work for a nonprofit organization and you’ve done a pretty cool fund-raising video that you think others can learn from, you submit the embed cup code and some backstory on our prospecting block, and we we put it out there so people can can watch it and critique it and learn from it. Peter, we’re going toe dive more into some of the the ways that the conical is is reaching out. You’re listening to tony martignetti non-profit radio big non-profit ideas for the other ninety five percent. My guest is peter panepento with the chronicle of philanthropy peter is the chronicle’s web editor peter? How is you started talking about video? Let’s talk about some of the ways that methods of getting the chronicles attention of submitting a picture or a story to the chronicle has has changed? Absolutely well, all the all the avenues i’ve talked about in the last few minutes are actually ways that people are pitching us stories. Now i get i get messages from people on twitter almost daily, with ideas and links to things that they’re doing, that they think are of interest to us and and often that leads to stories if somebody is is has something unique and creative, and they reach out to us in any one of these social network it’s getting my attention typically and or, um or, um, passing it on to another reporter editor here tto vetted and see if it’s something that’s of interest. Peter, is this limited to what we’d consider large? Non-profits oh, absolutely not at all on drily what we’re hoping to do is is make a lot of what we do accessible to the smaller and medium group, because those are the groups that really need the information the most. Um and and again, before you know that the newspaper was something that you you had a subscribe to and pay for, and we still hope people do have because that’s what keeps us in business, but ah lot of what we do now is is free online, and hopefully those are things that are that are useful resource is two people and become gateways for us to engage with us in other ways, too, i think there’s a lingering perception about the chronicle and clearly you’re describing ways that you’re trying to defeat that perception. But i think the lingering perception is that the chronicle is just as you said, something that you subscribe to and it’s really only for the largest organisations, right, right? And that and that, i think, is a perception we’ve had for a long time eyes that you know, where the were the pay paper for the large organization or were the paper that your ceo reads. But you know what we’ve always had and what i think we are doing now in more ways than ever before is providing information that really anybody in the field can can benefit from and learn from. And apply to what they do each day. Let’s talk about some of the ways that organizations can sort of get your attention can submit you started to talk about video fund-raising videos that work, why don’t you flush that out for us? Sure, it started out is basically something that sprang out of a feature we did for the paper on some effective fund-raising strategies, and one of them was a college that it self created its own video as junior at a college in pennsylvania had created a video in house that that ended up raising quite a bit of money for the organization. And rather than just putting that example out there, we decided that it would be interesting, too. Um, i put a call for other organizations that have produced videos on, you know, and almost on a shoestring budget, teo, you know, give us an example of the video show us what it looked like and what you were able, tio, what you were able to do to promote it and how much money you raised, and we’ve been getting a number of responses from that. I just i just attach my email address to a basically and said, if you have a great video that you think others can learn from, you know, send me a note, explain what you did and send me the embed code and we’ll you know, we’ll promote some of these on the web site we’ve been doing that on our fund-raising log, which is called prospecting, and we’ve gotten a number of submissions one was from a small charity in new york called youth renewal fund, where their communications person basically used nothing but stock images from, uh, from, uh, from a photo sharing website called i stock photo uh, and she produced this video with music and text for a few thousand dollars, and ultimately, um, the video itself has raised many multiples of that since then, just by showing it to their supporters. And what we’ve been able to do with the blogger is share stories like this talk about how they put the video together, how they marketed the video, who they showed it, teo and what the results were and what they’ve learned from it, and we’ve been able to get some rich conversations going that way we’ve done the same thing with, um with direct mail fund-raising letters. In that case, people are submitting their draft letters to us, and we’re posting them and we’re you know, we’re asking for a critique from the larger non-profit world. So you, khun, uh, submit ah letter that you’re working on or struggling with and get really almost a committee of your peers from around the country, too. Submit ideas for how you can improve it. Peter will talk more about the sort of a peer-to-peer analysis after the break. What strikes me is that the video submission started with juniata college, not columbia university or stanford, and you use as an example on organization called youth renewal, not american cancer or american lung small and medium sized non-profits benefiting from the resource is at the chronicle. This is tony martignetti non-profit radio. Peter panepento, web editor of the chronicle of philanthropy, will stay with us after this break. You’re listening to talking on their network at www dot talking alternative dot com now broadcasting twenty four hours a day. Are you suffering from aches and pains? Has traditional medicine let you down? Are you tired of taking toxic medications, then come to the double diamond wellness center and learn how our natural methods can help you to hell? Call us now at to one to seven to one eight, one eight three that’s two one two, seven to one eight one eight three or find us on the web at www dot double diamond wellness dot com. 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Dahna arika hey, all you crazy listeners looking to boost your business? Why not advertise on talking alternative with very reasonable rates? Interested simply email at info at talking alternative dot com. Duitz you’re listening to tony martignetti non-profit radio i’m your host, tony martignetti. My guest is peter panepento, web editor at the chronicle of philanthropy. You know, it’s important that you not think that this is an infomercial for the chronicle of philanthropy. The reason i invited peter is that all the resources were talking about our free and on the web and accessible to small and medium non-profits and that’s, you that’s our audience. You have a home here. I want you to understand that this is all very accessible to you, as peter has said, and it was my idea to bring peter so that you could get a sense of how the chronicle of philanthropy website can help you at small and medium size non-profits peter, you’ve been covering fund-raising and non-profits for some time. How do you see the substance of stories having changed over the time that you’ve been covering this beat? That’s an interesting question i think we are and and others are really because of the number of people that are out there now writing about these things. I think it’s really raised everybody’s game. The internet has really made it possible for people. Who, uh, work in the fund-raising field to really have their own voice and, you know, have their own blog’s or have their own twitter accounts where they can dispense advice and share ideas. And i think what that’s done is really created a more of ah, sharing culture than that existed before, where is in the past? There were a few voices who are writing about these things, and they were, you know, they were really ritually reported and and put out there now there’s there’s a lot more information available, and i think that’s that’s really pushing everybody to make sure they’re creating much more useful information for people and that’s what they’re putting out there is unique and different. Are you seeing a shift in terms of substance related teo compliance issues for non-profits you know what i think that there are, you know, there aren’t a whole lot of venues out there that really pay that a whole lot of attention of that we are one, and we we have ah, couple of channels on the site that really pay specifically ah, specific attention to, uh what what the irs is doing what state regulators air doing, um, and there are there’ve been a few blog’s out there that have really done a good job with that, too. So i think there’s a lot more information out there, but i don’t necessarily think it’s it’s, you know, mainstream what? Uh, you know, being put out there on the mainstream case in point is the fact that the irs has is still having a hard time reaching out to millions of charities that that now have to fill out the postcard form, you know, there’s, a ninety nine year old, they don’t know about it, and, you know, i wonder i wonder if there are are even better ways to get information out to those who really need it. You know, i i asked because i see ah, shift in terms of treating non-profits mohr like for-profit corporations in terms of compliance, and i i’ve i’ve seen that since sarbanes oxley past, which did not apply in ninety nine percent of it did not apply toe non-profits there were a couple of small provision that did, but but i see that trickling down to non-profits slowly, a cz you mentioned through the irs onda also through state. Regulators either secretaries of state or or attorneys general? Absolutely, absolutely. And the irs certainly, i mean, the mere fact that they are looking to collect information from those charities that that don’t raise a whole lot of money in here or, you know, the local, you know, soccer club and those type of things, it really shows that there is much more attention being paid to compliance, even up for the small groups the nine, ninety so heavily revised about eighteen months or two, years ago, so much more detail required to fill it out. It’s signed under penalty of perjury, and the the non-profits that are required to file it is an expanding population each year the threshold at which a non-profit is required to file that nine ninety is coming down over the next couple of years through two thousand, two thousand eleven or two thousand twelve. So there’s going to be a larger population of non-profits required to file the nine, ninety absolutely and there’s going to be as a result of that there’s going to be a lot more information that’s available to the public about how non-profits operate, of course, uh, that deluge of information has to get sorted through, and people have to put it together. I know we’re really excited to be ableto learn more about the audience we cover and find out some more things about it through these forms. So there’s going to be actually a lot more information available on a lot more to compare yourself to down the line too. Let’s, let’s look back to the chronicles, sort of a peer to peer review of fund-raising letters? How does someone submit? What exactly can they expect? Well, and this is something we’ve been doing on and off for a couple of years now, actually, and basically what they’ve done is they’ve sent me an email, i’ve put my email on the on the prospecting blogged, and maybe we can share that on the website later, people do want to connect with well, and since we’re talking about it, why don’t you give us your email right now? Okay, it’s, peter dot panepento p a kenny p nto at philanthropy dot com um and an easier address and things get get sorted around and kind of given to the appropriate editor is if you send a une male editor. At philanthropy dot com that will get seen by an editor here and given to the appropriate person here, too, and so they can use that email to submit their fund-raising letters let’s talk about how that works. Yeah, what they do is typically what happens if somebody has a letter that they’re working on and then you know, they have a draft of it, but they are not necessarily sure ifit’s it has the right messaging if they’ve taken the right approach, if they’ve done all the right things with their letter, so what they do is they send us, you know, a copy of the letter and a little description of what, what they’re hoping to accomplish with that, what type of campaign is that? Four who are they hoping to reach? And they email it to us and what what i do or another editor here will do is is that the letter? Make sure it’s, you know, it’s something that bye, you know, we’re providing the right level of information about and we’ll post it to our prospecting blawg with a little background on you know what its goals are and how it works? And then we invite readers to post comments teo teo offer critiques of the letter, offer suggestions on things they could do better what’s working what doesn’t work with it and almost universally, the folks who have submitted the letters have have gotten great feedback from, you know, anywhere from ah handful of readers to dozens of readers and, uh, what what’s really amazed me is the amount of respect that people have for each other and the the constructive nous of the critiques they’ve all been really above board, and folks have really done a great job of offering, you know, really constructive advice to each other on this, and i think it’s it’s really provided a great service to the to the non-profit world and what i’m hoping to do very soon as is create a page that collect the letters that we’ve gotten and, uh, and the comments that have come in so that folks can can really see, you know, and pull some information out of those things for their own work in the minute or so we have left. Peter, you mentioned earlier live discussions, how do those were? Where can people want what? Every week we invite on on expert or two on a specific topic to come in and take questions from our readers and that you can find information out about those that philanthropy dot com slash live on well, on that we announce the upcoming discussions, and we also have ah, full archive of all the past one. So the the discussion i’m doing today, which will actually happen, you know, before this goes live is is on corporate giving, and we have the head of the foundation and the walmart foundation on to take reader questions on howto get the attention of corporate philanthropist, and you can now after the, you know, after the event, you can go on and read the transcript of that, you could see all the questions that that we published and what folks answered and again, this is a resource for small and medium non-profits as much as anybody else really get some high level advice from folks on a weekly basis on a a really wide range of topics that relate how they operate. My guest has been peter panepento, web editor for the chronicle of philanthropy. You can follow peter on twitter the handle there. Is at philanthropy. Peter, i want to thank you very much for being on tony martignetti non-profit radio. Tony, thanks for letting me come on and talk about what we dio. I appreciate it. My pleasure. Joining me after this break will be sarah din a and we’re going toe. Continue the discussion about traditional media. How to get yourself in front of traditional media in some of the more traditional ways after this break. Talking alternative radio twenty four hours a day. Are you suffering from aches and pains? Has traditional medicine let you down? Are you tired of taking toxic medications, then come to the double diamond wellness center and learn how our natural methods can help you to hell? Call us now at to one to seven to one eight, one eight three that’s to one to seven to one eight one eight three or find us on the web at www dot double diamond wellness dot com way. Look forward to serving you. I’m tony martignetti, the aptly named host of the tony martignetti show. Big non-profit ideas for the other ninety five percent. You’re non-profit is ignored because you’re smaller medium size, but you still need expertise and help with technology fund-raising compliance, finance and accounting will look at all of these areas on the tony martignetti show. Big non-profit ideas for the other ninety five percent on talking alternative dot com fridays. One, too hyre you’re listening to the talking alternative network. Oppcoll hyre oppcoll! Duitz! Bilich! Buy-in! Dahna well, in a way, around the world, are you ready? Co-branding this’s tony martignetti i’m the host of tony martignetti non-profit radio big non-profit ideas for the other ninety five percent in a moment, i’ll be joined by sarah done a who is with a large pr agency, and we’re going to talk about getting your voice heard in the media. I’m thinking about be quests and planned giving this week because my guide star article for about starting a planned giving program using charitable bequests as the foundation of that program came out this week. I’m writing a one year siri’s every other month, and this was the fourth article in the in the six article siri’s siri’s is called make two thousand ten the year you start planned giving and it’s for the guide star newsletter, and i want to spend a moment explaining that planned giving is not something that is only for large organizations, large fund-raising shops that’s, not the case. You can have a very respectable planned giving program at a small and medium size development shop or non-profit, and that would start with bequests encouraging your donors to remember your organization in their will or in their larger estate plan. Typically, we start with the will, because everyone needs one and it’s something that’s very simple for your donors to understand and simple for them to do when they do their first will, or when they revise their existing will, they can think about including you as part of that. So alongside a bequest to there spouse, children, grandchildren, there is a request for your organization. These are very simple to market and promote we use for our clients direct mail a lot. You can’t have a presence on your website, but probably the most valuable method of marketing is talking to people, either at events where it’s appropriate to mention that they can include your organization in their will or in your one to one face to face meetings with donors. If you’re talking about a larger gift plan, you might include a part of that plan to be a charitable bequests in there will not that it would replace other giving that you’re encouraging them to do but be a supplement to whatever it is you’re asking them to do on sort of a more outright basis. You need those current dollars. I recognize that and you never want planned giving to supplant. Those but to be an adjunct, and when it’s explained in that way, people understand. So i encourage you to think about planned giving in your small and medium sized non-profit not to ignore it and think that it’s only for the big guys, you can have a very respectable planned e-giving program and start and maybe even finish with a bequest marketing program, because for all non-profits, irrespective of size, regardless of their mission, charitable bequests are always the most popular type of planned gift. So it makes sense to make that the beginning of your program. And as i said, you might stop there based on your size and the number of donors that you have look a planned e-giving look att charitable bequests, and you might find my guide star siri’s helpful to you. The siri’s again is called make two thousand ten the year you start planned giving and that’s at guidestar dot org’s as part of the guide star newsletter. I’m joined now by sarah din, a sarah is an account executive at c r t tanaka, which is a public relations agency. Her work includes non-profit public relations, which is important for us, and her background includes work in non-profits tanaka is a national public relations agency. Sarah is calling us from los angeles, and prior to joining the agency, she worked for one of the regional offices of the juvenile diabetes research foundation, doing communications and public relations. Sarah, welcome to the show. Hi, tony, thanks for having me on this morning. It’s my pleasure. Why is public relations important for small and medium sized non-profits public relations is a great tool for small and medium sized non-profits because it’s a great alternative advertising that can be done on the small budgets that we had smaller non-profits air just so used to, and what are some of the sort of first thoughts that someone should have about about their goals on objectives for public relations initiative? Well, first, i think someone needs to sit down and think about what they want to see about their non-profit in the media, i think there are two key goals for most non-profits when it comes to media relations, one is awareness and the other is fund-raising so with awareness it’s always great to get the non-profits name out there and their mission out there, regardless of what that mission is so they might be interested in pitching cem human interest stories about the non-profits work, or perhaps pitching their employees as an expert in key stories and when it comes to fund-raising being cognizant of our low budgets and our high fund-raising goals, it’s always important to find new ways to generate revenue and simple things like getting your events posted on a newspaper’s calendar or getting in the society pages for a gala fund-raising event can be a great tool e-giving revenue awareness and fund-raising as your goals, those air really going to be long term goals, right? That’s, you expect to see some measurable difference in in a longer term? Yes, absolutely. When it comes to media relations, i think the effects are definitely long term on the organization and its the long term impact of lots of different media coverage over the years that’s going to really resonate with the non-profit community is there, ah, length of time that we can share with our listeners as a guideline? Or does it really vary based on what they’re doing and who they are? I think it definitely varies based on what the coverage in the media is and also based on which non-profit is involved for some non-profit simply getting a mention in the society pages for a local fund-raising event could be enough to improve attendance and last boost fund-raising for other non-profit they might be looking for longer term awareness, which would require some repeated mentioned in the press. Is there any non-profit profile that you think makes an organization inappropriate for these types of fund-raising and awareness initiatives through public relations? They certainly think public relations is appropriate for any non-profit i i think the scale might be different from non-profits non-profit but it definitely holds universal value and what would be ah, first step if if an organization wants to now now has its goals, wants increased coverage would like to expand awareness and maybe even fund-raising what? What’s really the first thing that they should be thinking about? Well, the first thing they should do is sit back and think about exactly what story they want to read about their non-profit in the practice, so if they’re thinking they want to see maybe a heartwarming story about affecting a local child in the community than they they can then move on and pitch that exact story. The first step is usually writing out a quick email to whatever media contact you’re interested in reaching out to and being clear and concise is most important. They’re journalists are just as busy as non-profit professionals, so it’s important to be respectful of their time. You don’t need flowery hooks, you don’t necessarily need a formal press release just simply state what your story is. Make sure you give plenty of contact information and shoot over an email and then the next day it’s always essential follow-up with a phone call, the journalists that we reach out to often get hundreds of pitches a day, and when you get that many emails it’s easy for some to slip through the cracks so often it’s the folks who go the extra mile and pick up the phone to have a personal conversation with the journalist about their story, who are able to see their story in print. I just want to emphasize something that you said the first thought after your goal setting is really teo sort of define what your ideal story is. What what what’s the ideal exactly. Well, you need to think about what you want before you can get it, so it really depends from non-profits non-profit what that story is going to be if your goal is awareness thie ideal story is going to be different from fund-raising but it’s always important to have a positive message and connected back to the non-profits mission. My guest is sarah din, a account exec with tanaka. You’re listening to tony martignetti non-profit radio sarah let’s talk about maybe some of the outlet’s what what where should people be looking for placement of their story? And and what outlets should they be looking at? Emailing well, when you’re looking for outlets first, think about what you read and what you watch. Chances are what you and others people in your non-profit reader watch are going to be the right places for you to pitch your story because those air simply the places where the people in your community are looking, it doesn’t necessarily have to be reaching out to something as big as the new york times or fox news. You can think more regional and locally in orderto have a better chance of getting coverage, so a smaller regional non-profit can focus on relationships in their market. If you’re in cincinnati, go for this matty’s, a local paper if you’re in connecticut, go for maybe the connecticut tv news there, and this works just as well for non-profits who are national also because a national non-profit can have their regional staff reach out and make local relationships as well. It’s usually the smaller places, the smaller papers, the smaller tv shows where you’ll have the best chance of seeing you’re non-profit covered. Yes, you don’t want to ignore very local coverage, especially if you’re a smaller organization all your fund-raising maybe very local. All your events are very local. You don’t want to ignore the local coverage, absolutely. If you’re based in a smaller city, the best coverage for you that might have the biggest impact on your organization may just be in a city paper or in a city tv show or city radio show. It might even be better than if you’ve gotten your message on yusa today. You’ve been talking about tv and and newspapers are sort of the i think is the the outlets were focusing on so far. What about blog’s? I think blobs are a great way for organizations to dip their feet into media relations starting with some smaller blog’s can be a great way to get some initial coverage and get some initial messaging out for your organization, in part because the smallest blog’s aren’t often pitched by any organizations or companies, so chances are your odds put good there, so the so the smaller blog’s might actually be grateful to get some pitches from you? Absolutely and that’s always great to have somebody who’s very excited to receive information about your organization and show that enthusiasm when they’re writing. They’re block post and couldn’t an organization find the appropriate blog’s just through a simple google search? Absolutely, when it comes to block it’s, easy to do a quick google search on your non-profit missions and key focuses, and you can also think about what blog’s you read if you’re working for, say, a diabetes non-profit and you read diabetes blog’s, those are the first places where you should pitch when reaching out with a story. So your your suggestion really this’s interesting i’m seeing ah trend to mean, you want to think about your ideal story and you think about placing it in media that you read buy-in blog’s that you read so that’s, where you expect your your constituents to be? Absolutely, i think staff at non-profits tend to be so connected to their missions that even in their personal time, their personal reading tends to focus a lot around the mission of their non-profit i know that when i was working at the juvenile diabetes research foundation and still today, i was so passionate about the work that we did that i would often lead those outlets where it would be great to place a story and different news cycles. I mean, you’d be more likely to get a blog’s attention and coverage within maybe days or a week versus perhaps, ah magazine, definitely we consider media like blog’s and newspapers to be shortly media. Those are places where you could email a member of the media and then a few days later see your messaging and print, whereas it comes to something like a magazine it’s long lead because it takes them so long to go through the press cycle so it might take months before you’re able to see that story in print. So if your story is time sensitive it’s often best to go to the newspaper or to go to online resource is where you can see that story come up very quickly, sarah, in the forty five seconds or so we have before the break, why don’t you tell people how they can contact you? Well, people can contact me through the sierra t tanaka website, which is www dot see artie, hyphen, tanaka, t a n a dot com. My guest is sarah din, a account executive at that agency. C r t, tanaka and sarah will stay with us after this break, you’re listening to tony martignetti non-profit radio. You’re listening to the talking alternative network. I really need to take better care of myself. If only i had someone to help me with my lifestyle. I feel like giving up. Is this you mind over matter, health and fitness can help. If you’re expecting an epiphany, chances are it’s not happening. Mind over matter, health and fitness could help you get back on track or start a new life and fitness. Join joshua margolis, fitness expert two one two eight sixty five nine to nine xero. Or visit w w w died mind over matter, i see dot com. Bilich oppcoll are you suffering from aches and pains? Has traditional medicine let you down? Are you tired of taking toxic medications, then come to the double diamond wellness center and learn how our natural methods can help you to hell? Call us now at to one to seven to one eight, one eight three that’s to one to seven to one eight one eight three or find us on the web at www dot double diamond wellness dot com way. Look forward to serving you. Is your marriage in trouble? Are you considering divorce? Hello, i’m lawrence bloom, a family law attorney in new york and new jersey. No one is happier than the day their divorce is final. My firm can help you. We take the nasty out of the divorce process and make people happy. Police call a set two one, two nine six, four, three, five zero two for a free consultation. That’s lawrence h bloom two, one two, nine, six, four, three five zero two. We make people happy. Dahna zoho talking. This is tony martignetti non-profit radio, i’m your host, tony martignetti my guest, this segment is sarah din, a account executive for the agency. C r t tanaka, sarah let’s, talk a little about methodology you started to get into it. The email is best then you said follow-up phone call the next day, what do we do? Make sure i have that right and then what’s the next step, when your phone call message isn’t answered? Well, i think repetition is key when it comes to phone calls, i know that they’re certainly days when i think that the press simply has turned off their phones because i’m getting so few answers. So what happens even if it happens, even to the professional public relations agency account executive? Oh, absolutely, all the time there so many times where i just hear the phone ring and ring, but never get the journalist on the other end of the line and that’s simply part of the game here. When it comes to media relations journalists, they’re so busy and often on deadline that there are many times in the week when they simply aren’t able to pick up the phone and listen to what you have to say about your story and we really have no way to call and call again try calling for a few days try calling at different times to see what works. Chances are you make it through, but if not, you can always leave a message and be sure to be clear, concise a state exactly what the key point of your story is and always leave contact information. Can i also suggest that we would you want to be upbeat so that if you’ve made a dozen of these calls in a row and you’re on number twelve, you don’t wantto make it sound like you’ve called eleven people before the message you’re leaving now? Absolutely attitude is everything, and if you were enthusiastic about your message, then that’s going to carry across to the reporter and if you never get a callback, should you? I hope i’m sure you shouldn’t. You shouldn’t be discouraged. Try again! Absolutely not again. Given that journal lists received so much information each day, sometimes that’s simply not a feasible so it’s a matter of coming back whenever you have another story and if you get in front. Of a journalist’s enough! They’re going to remember you and they’re going to remember your organization’s mission. So even if they can’t place a story about what you have currently going on, they may have something down the line where you would be a great fit. We’ve been talking about you relying on media if you have something newsworthy, you want to get that ideal story out? What if you have experts in your organization that can serve as experts in that field? For a journalist? Do you need to wrap a story around that to propose your your agency experts as experts when it comes to positioning one of your employees as an expert, you don’t actually need tohave a specific story in mind, although sometimes that can be helpful simply reaching out to a journalist and letting them know that you do have an expert in your organization who can speak to a certain topic can be enough to get your name in front of them and also make sure that that journalists puts your name in the role of decks for whenever they have a story coming up on that topic and sarah in the thirty seconds. Or so that we have left. What about trying to develop a relationship on ongoing relationship with maybe one or two key journalists in local media? How how could someone try to do that when in between their story ideas, but they’d like to have a relationship, obviously a professional relationship with the journalist. Repeat communication is key, so making sure that you always send them any story ideas you might have any news that your organization or story ideas that might not necessarily relate to you but might interest the journalists are great ways to keep in touch with them. Long term sort of trends that you’re seeing that the journalist might be very interested in. Absolutely if you’re an asset to the journalist seldman member and they’ll keep going back to you for information time after time. My guest has been sarah din, a account executive for cr t tanaka, a large public relations agency. Nationwide. Sarah called us from los angeles. Sarah, thank you so much for being on tony martignetti non-profit radio. Thanks, tony. We’ve come to the clothes and i want to thank my guests, peter panepento, web editor for the chronicle of philanthropy, and sarah dahna, account executive at c r t tanaka we have a facebook page, go to facebook and search for you don’t have to remember how to spell my name just search for non-profit radio and the facebook fan page will come up like us there, join the contest, their name, the number. I’m trying to get a way of remembering our call in number sorry, we couldn’t take calls this week, but we will be taking calls next week will be live next week on august twenty third let’s name that number. Find a catchy way to remember the calling number eight seven seven for eight xero for one to zero, you’ll find information about that contest on our facebook fan page and please like us over there, click like and become a fan. I want to thank claire meyerhoff she’s, our creative producer oneof thanks, sam liebowitz he’s, our line producer and the owner of talking alternative broadcasting. You’ve been listening to tony martignetti non-profit radio big non-profit ideas for the other ninety five percent on talking alternative broadcasting at talking alternative dot com. Look forward to having you as a guest as ah, as a listener on august twenty third. Next friday, when we will be taking your calls live. Please join us then. Until then, have a good week. E-giving you’re listening to the talking alternate network. Duitz to get into thinking. Take it. Cubine are you stuck in your business or career trying to take your business to the next level, and it keeps hitting a wall? This is sam lebowitz, the conscious consultant. I will help you get to the root cause of your abundance issues and help move you forward in your life. Call me now and let’s. Create the future you dream of. Two, one, two, seven, two, one, eight, one, eight, three, that’s to one to seven to one, eight one eight three. The conscious consultant helping conscious people. Be better business people. Is your marriage in trouble? Are you considering divorce? Hello, i’m lawrence bloom, a family law attorney in new york and new jersey. No one is happier than the day their divorce is final. My firm can help you. We take the nasty out of the divorce process and make people happy. Police call a set two one two, nine six, four, three, five zero two for a free consultation. That’s lawrence h bloom at two one two nine six four three five zero two. We make people happy. I really need to take better care of myself if only i had someone to help me with my lifestyle. I feel like giving up eyes thisyou, mind over matter, health and fitness can help. If you’re expecting an epiphany, chances are it’s not happening. Mind over matter, health and fitness could help you get back on track or start a new life and fitness. Join Joshua margolis, fitness expert at 2 one two eight six five nine to nine xero or visit www. Died mind over matter. Y si dot com. Cerini i’m tony martignetti, the aptly named host of the tony martignetti show. Big non-profit ideas for the other ninety five percent. You’re non-profit is ignored because you’re smaller medium size. But you still need expertise and help with technology fund-raising compliance, finance and accounting will look at all of these areas on the tony martignetti show. Big non-profit ideas for the other ninety five percent on talking alternative dot com fridays one, too. Talking. Hyre