Nonprofit Radio for August 13, 2010: Exploting Traditional Media: What is your nonprofit story?

Big Nonprofit Ideas for the Other 95%

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Tony’s Guests:

Peter Panepento, web editor, The Chronicle of Philanthropy and Sara Dunaj, account executive, CRT/tanaka PR agency.

Topic: Exploting Traditional Media: What is your nonprofit story? How to get yours told

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Durney durney dahna hello and welcome to tony martignetti non-profit radio big non-profit ideas for the other ninety five percent, i’m your aptly named host tony martignetti last week, we looked at traditional sari last week, we looked at social media using social media, building community networks, online community, using online fund-raising the person to person fund-raising this week, we’re looking at traditional media, my guests are going to be peter panepento, whose web editor for the chronicle of philanthropy, so he’s got on interesting mix of traditional media but doing it in the non traditional sense he’s, their web editor, and we’ll talk about the non-profit story. How that’s been changing what he sees it becoming and what’s interesting to the chronicle how the chronicle is a resource for small and medium non-profits our audience and at the bottom of the hour i’ll be joined by sarah din, eh? Sarah is account executive for tanaka agency and does public relations for non-profits and has a non-profit background herself. So this week, it’s traditional media howthe story is evolving and how you can get involved where pre recorded this week so i won’t be able to take your calls will be live. Next week, though, on the twenty third, but there is a contest name the number i want to find a way to name our calling number, which is, um eight seven seven for eight xero for one to zero again, we can’t take calls this week. We will be taking calls next week, but go to our facebook page, the facebook fan page at tony martignetti non-profit radio and joined the contest name the number to find a way to remember that number. Using the letters that correspond to those numbers, please go to the facebook page. Tony martignetti non-profit radio beacon so search on facebook just search for non-profit radio you don’t have to remember how to spell my name. Start searching for non-profit radio and the fan page will come up. I’d be grateful if you’d like us, join us as a fan on the fan page, click like we’re going to take a break now and after the break, my guest peter panepento, will join us. This is tony martignetti non-profit radio co-branding dick dick tooting getting ding, ding, ding ding you’re listening to the talking alternate network you waiting to get you thinking? Cubine are you stuck in your business or career trying to take your business to the next level, and it keeps hitting a wall? This is sam lebowitz, the conscious consultant. I will help you get to the root cause of your abundance issues and help move you forward in your life. Call me now and let’s. Create the future you dream of. Two, one, two, seven, two, one, eight, one, eight, three, that’s to one to seven to one, eight one eight three. The conscious consultant helping conscious people. Be better business people. I’m tony martignetti, the aptly named host of the tony martignetti show. Big non-profit ideas for the other ninety five percent. You’re non-profit is ignored because you’re smaller medium size. But you still need expertise and help with technology fund-raising compliance, finance and accounting will look at all of these areas on the tony martignetti show. Big non-profit ideas for the other ninety five percent on talking alternative dot com fridays one, too. Talking. With a little. And something heinous way. Boedecker we’re rather a mess. Well, a little. And some money. I’m tony martignetti you’re listening to tony martignetti non-profit radio on talking alternative broadcasting, talking, alternative, dot com small and medium non-profits have a home here if you feel you’re ignored, perhaps by the media, and we’re going to talk about how the chronicle of philanthropy doesn’t want to ignore you and want you wants to reach out to you, but if you feel you’re ignored by maybe consultants or just the non-profit community, because you’re a smaller organization, small and medium size, you have a home here. Tony martignetti non-profit radio big non-profit ideas for the other ninety five percent sent i’m going, i’m joined now by peter panepento, web editor for the chronicle of philanthropy. Peter welcome, thanks for having me on tony. My pleasure. Welcome to the show, peter, why don’t you tell the listeners a little bit about your background in journalism and and you’re interesting non-profits sure i’ve been with the chronicle of philanthropy as a full time staff member for about four years now. I came here as a senior reporter who covered fund-raising and later irs issues, and when we, when we really committed off full board to the web about three years. Ago, i took the title of web editor, where my role has been to really rethink the way we present news online and expand what we dio to prevent to present what we d’oh to the non-profit world in some new and really community oriented ways. So i’ve been working over the last few years, both teo kind of re imagine the website, but also to expand our content. We’ve started a number of podcasts and blog’s and video siri’s and and other features that are aimed at really taking what we’ve been doing for print for more than twenty years and really blowing it out and opening it up and making it more accessible to the non-profit world online, your role then is to bring traditional media online, and i know the chronicle has done that in a lot of ways that you touched on let’s start just what do you see as the non-profit story? What interests you as web editor? What interests the chronicle about the non-profit community? Well, what we’re really trying to do is is the non-profit community is so large and so diverse, we’re really trying to serve much bigger piece of it than we’ve ever, ever been able to do in print before. What what’s happening online is it’s giving us the opportunity, thio more people, a voice and create a lot more conversations online, and by doing that, we’re able to not only report and deliver the news, but we’re also able to get a lot more people having input in in in what we’re talking about, able to ask a lot more questions and able to share a lot more information with each other and what stories specifically or what angles are interest you and the chronicle. Well, we’re interested in a number of things, probably the biggest thing is is we are really interested in trends and and looking at information and what’s happening in the world that that somebody who works in the nonprofit world can then turn around and apply to what they do every day unlike, you know, your local newspaper tv station, which is really aimed at delivering news to the to the to the whole community and the whole consumer. We really we focus on what is of interest to people who work in the nonprofit world. So we tell our stories in that way. Instead of instead of reporting something, too uh, you know, to ah, you know, a wide audience we really try to focus in on information and in a language and in a delivery way that, um, if you’re working for a small, medium or large non-profit group, you know, we’re talking to you and we’re delivering information to you. So really what interests you as a reader as somebody who works in the field and who cares about the field is what interests us and how that interest can be used and benefit and the larger community can benefit from it the larger non-profit community competitive, absolutely so you know it, we’re not necessarily interested in the fund-raising event that you dio on its own in the same way that you would be telling that story, too. Ah, local newspaper editor, for instance, you’re probably trying to get publicity for the event itself. What we’d be interested in is what’s unique about that an event and what could somebody else you know, who works in the field? Learn from it? Are you doing something different with it? Or is there a tactic or a technique that you’re using that? Ah colleague halfway across the country might be ableto read about or or or listen to samen formacion about and then turn around, defy it. What they dio you mentioned accessibility, making the chronicle accessible, and what i think is remarkable is people can follow you, for instance, on twitter. Absolutely, absolutely, um, you know, for many years what we were was a pass around publication, we were a newspaper that have delivered it, delivered to your office every two weeks probably do your executive director, your development director, and then got passed around the office, and by the time i got to you, if you were depending on where you were on the totem pole, you might ah, you might be reading it of, you know, three or four weeks after it came out. Uh, now the level of communication with us is so much more personal and rial time. Like you said, we’re on twitter, we were under the handle at philanthropy, and i’m on there throughout the day, answering people’s questions, posting links to our stories and communicating with people through there we have ah, facebook group actually have to facebook groups one called philanthropy dot com and one called the chronicle of philanthropy, and we were talking to people there where i’m linked in now we’re on youtube. Um, and we’re also on the website really were trying to respond to people were opening up, uh, sections of the site for people to submit their stories and their ideas. Oh, and and really start communications and conversations that way. Um, one example of how that’s changing is is a feature we’re doing right now called fund-raising videos that work and what it really is it’s not us doing the reporting it’s you doing the reporting? If if you work for a nonprofit organization and you’ve done a pretty cool fund-raising video that you think others can learn from, you submit the embed cup code and some backstory on our prospecting block, and we we put it out there so people can can watch it and critique it and learn from it. Peter, we’re going toe dive more into some of the the ways that the conical is is reaching out. You’re listening to tony martignetti non-profit radio big non-profit ideas for the other ninety five percent. My guest is peter panepento with the chronicle of philanthropy peter is the chronicle’s web editor peter? How is you started talking about video? Let’s talk about some of the ways that methods of getting the chronicles attention of submitting a picture or a story to the chronicle has has changed? Absolutely well, all the all the avenues i’ve talked about in the last few minutes are actually ways that people are pitching us stories. Now i get i get messages from people on twitter almost daily, with ideas and links to things that they’re doing, that they think are of interest to us and and often that leads to stories if somebody is is has something unique and creative, and they reach out to us in any one of these social network it’s getting my attention typically and or, um or, um, passing it on to another reporter editor here tto vetted and see if it’s something that’s of interest. Peter, is this limited to what we’d consider large? Non-profits oh, absolutely not at all on drily what we’re hoping to do is is make a lot of what we do accessible to the smaller and medium group, because those are the groups that really need the information the most. Um and and again, before you know that the newspaper was something that you you had a subscribe to and pay for, and we still hope people do have because that’s what keeps us in business, but ah lot of what we do now is is free online, and hopefully those are things that are that are useful resource is two people and become gateways for us to engage with us in other ways, too, i think there’s a lingering perception about the chronicle and clearly you’re describing ways that you’re trying to defeat that perception. But i think the lingering perception is that the chronicle is just as you said, something that you subscribe to and it’s really only for the largest organisations, right, right? And that and that, i think, is a perception we’ve had for a long time eyes that you know, where the were the pay paper for the large organization or were the paper that your ceo reads. But you know what we’ve always had and what i think we are doing now in more ways than ever before is providing information that really anybody in the field can can benefit from and learn from. And apply to what they do each day. Let’s talk about some of the ways that organizations can sort of get your attention can submit you started to talk about video fund-raising videos that work, why don’t you flush that out for us? Sure, it started out is basically something that sprang out of a feature we did for the paper on some effective fund-raising strategies, and one of them was a college that it self created its own video as junior at a college in pennsylvania had created a video in house that that ended up raising quite a bit of money for the organization. And rather than just putting that example out there, we decided that it would be interesting, too. Um, i put a call for other organizations that have produced videos on, you know, and almost on a shoestring budget, teo, you know, give us an example of the video show us what it looked like and what you were able, tio, what you were able to do to promote it and how much money you raised, and we’ve been getting a number of responses from that. I just i just attach my email address to a basically and said, if you have a great video that you think others can learn from, you know, send me a note, explain what you did and send me the embed code and we’ll you know, we’ll promote some of these on the web site we’ve been doing that on our fund-raising log, which is called prospecting, and we’ve gotten a number of submissions one was from a small charity in new york called youth renewal fund, where their communications person basically used nothing but stock images from, uh, from, uh, from a photo sharing website called i stock photo uh, and she produced this video with music and text for a few thousand dollars, and ultimately, um, the video itself has raised many multiples of that since then, just by showing it to their supporters. And what we’ve been able to do with the blogger is share stories like this talk about how they put the video together, how they marketed the video, who they showed it, teo and what the results were and what they’ve learned from it, and we’ve been able to get some rich conversations going that way we’ve done the same thing with, um with direct mail fund-raising letters. In that case, people are submitting their draft letters to us, and we’re posting them and we’re you know, we’re asking for a critique from the larger non-profit world. So you, khun, uh, submit ah letter that you’re working on or struggling with and get really almost a committee of your peers from around the country, too. Submit ideas for how you can improve it. Peter will talk more about the sort of a peer-to-peer analysis after the break. What strikes me is that the video submission started with juniata college, not columbia university or stanford, and you use as an example on organization called youth renewal, not american cancer or american lung small and medium sized non-profits benefiting from the resource is at the chronicle. This is tony martignetti non-profit radio. Peter panepento, web editor of the chronicle of philanthropy, will stay with us after this break. You’re listening to talking on their network at www dot talking alternative dot com now broadcasting twenty four hours a day. Are you suffering from aches and pains? Has traditional medicine let you down? Are you tired of taking toxic medications, then come to the double diamond wellness center and learn how our natural methods can help you to hell? Call us now at to one to seven to one eight, one eight three that’s two one two, seven to one eight one eight three or find us on the web at www dot double diamond wellness dot com. 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Dahna arika hey, all you crazy listeners looking to boost your business? Why not advertise on talking alternative with very reasonable rates? Interested simply email at info at talking alternative dot com. Duitz you’re listening to tony martignetti non-profit radio i’m your host, tony martignetti. My guest is peter panepento, web editor at the chronicle of philanthropy. You know, it’s important that you not think that this is an infomercial for the chronicle of philanthropy. The reason i invited peter is that all the resources were talking about our free and on the web and accessible to small and medium non-profits and that’s, you that’s our audience. You have a home here. I want you to understand that this is all very accessible to you, as peter has said, and it was my idea to bring peter so that you could get a sense of how the chronicle of philanthropy website can help you at small and medium size non-profits peter, you’ve been covering fund-raising and non-profits for some time. How do you see the substance of stories having changed over the time that you’ve been covering this beat? That’s an interesting question i think we are and and others are really because of the number of people that are out there now writing about these things. I think it’s really raised everybody’s game. The internet has really made it possible for people. Who, uh, work in the fund-raising field to really have their own voice and, you know, have their own blog’s or have their own twitter accounts where they can dispense advice and share ideas. And i think what that’s done is really created a more of ah, sharing culture than that existed before, where is in the past? There were a few voices who are writing about these things, and they were, you know, they were really ritually reported and and put out there now there’s there’s a lot more information available, and i think that’s that’s really pushing everybody to make sure they’re creating much more useful information for people and that’s what they’re putting out there is unique and different. Are you seeing a shift in terms of substance related teo compliance issues for non-profits you know what i think that there are, you know, there aren’t a whole lot of venues out there that really pay that a whole lot of attention of that we are one, and we we have ah, couple of channels on the site that really pay specifically ah, specific attention to, uh what what the irs is doing what state regulators air doing, um, and there are there’ve been a few blog’s out there that have really done a good job with that, too. So i think there’s a lot more information out there, but i don’t necessarily think it’s it’s, you know, mainstream what? Uh, you know, being put out there on the mainstream case in point is the fact that the irs has is still having a hard time reaching out to millions of charities that that now have to fill out the postcard form, you know, there’s, a ninety nine year old, they don’t know about it, and, you know, i wonder i wonder if there are are even better ways to get information out to those who really need it. You know, i i asked because i see ah, shift in terms of treating non-profits mohr like for-profit corporations in terms of compliance, and i i’ve i’ve seen that since sarbanes oxley past, which did not apply in ninety nine percent of it did not apply toe non-profits there were a couple of small provision that did, but but i see that trickling down to non-profits slowly, a cz you mentioned through the irs onda also through state. Regulators either secretaries of state or or attorneys general? Absolutely, absolutely. And the irs certainly, i mean, the mere fact that they are looking to collect information from those charities that that don’t raise a whole lot of money in here or, you know, the local, you know, soccer club and those type of things, it really shows that there is much more attention being paid to compliance, even up for the small groups the nine, ninety so heavily revised about eighteen months or two, years ago, so much more detail required to fill it out. It’s signed under penalty of perjury, and the the non-profits that are required to file it is an expanding population each year the threshold at which a non-profit is required to file that nine ninety is coming down over the next couple of years through two thousand, two thousand eleven or two thousand twelve. So there’s going to be a larger population of non-profits required to file the nine, ninety absolutely and there’s going to be as a result of that there’s going to be a lot more information that’s available to the public about how non-profits operate, of course, uh, that deluge of information has to get sorted through, and people have to put it together. I know we’re really excited to be ableto learn more about the audience we cover and find out some more things about it through these forms. So there’s going to be actually a lot more information available on a lot more to compare yourself to down the line too. Let’s, let’s look back to the chronicles, sort of a peer to peer review of fund-raising letters? How does someone submit? What exactly can they expect? Well, and this is something we’ve been doing on and off for a couple of years now, actually, and basically what they’ve done is they’ve sent me an email, i’ve put my email on the on the prospecting blogged, and maybe we can share that on the website later, people do want to connect with well, and since we’re talking about it, why don’t you give us your email right now? Okay, it’s, peter dot panepento p a kenny p nto at philanthropy dot com um and an easier address and things get get sorted around and kind of given to the appropriate editor is if you send a une male editor. At philanthropy dot com that will get seen by an editor here and given to the appropriate person here, too, and so they can use that email to submit their fund-raising letters let’s talk about how that works. Yeah, what they do is typically what happens if somebody has a letter that they’re working on and then you know, they have a draft of it, but they are not necessarily sure ifit’s it has the right messaging if they’ve taken the right approach, if they’ve done all the right things with their letter, so what they do is they send us, you know, a copy of the letter and a little description of what, what they’re hoping to accomplish with that, what type of campaign is that? Four who are they hoping to reach? And they email it to us and what what i do or another editor here will do is is that the letter? Make sure it’s, you know, it’s something that bye, you know, we’re providing the right level of information about and we’ll post it to our prospecting blawg with a little background on you know what its goals are and how it works? And then we invite readers to post comments teo teo offer critiques of the letter, offer suggestions on things they could do better what’s working what doesn’t work with it and almost universally, the folks who have submitted the letters have have gotten great feedback from, you know, anywhere from ah handful of readers to dozens of readers and, uh, what what’s really amazed me is the amount of respect that people have for each other and the the constructive nous of the critiques they’ve all been really above board, and folks have really done a great job of offering, you know, really constructive advice to each other on this, and i think it’s it’s really provided a great service to the to the non-profit world and what i’m hoping to do very soon as is create a page that collect the letters that we’ve gotten and, uh, and the comments that have come in so that folks can can really see, you know, and pull some information out of those things for their own work in the minute or so we have left. Peter, you mentioned earlier live discussions, how do those were? Where can people want what? Every week we invite on on expert or two on a specific topic to come in and take questions from our readers and that you can find information out about those that philanthropy dot com slash live on well, on that we announce the upcoming discussions, and we also have ah, full archive of all the past one. So the the discussion i’m doing today, which will actually happen, you know, before this goes live is is on corporate giving, and we have the head of the foundation and the walmart foundation on to take reader questions on howto get the attention of corporate philanthropist, and you can now after the, you know, after the event, you can go on and read the transcript of that, you could see all the questions that that we published and what folks answered and again, this is a resource for small and medium non-profits as much as anybody else really get some high level advice from folks on a weekly basis on a a really wide range of topics that relate how they operate. My guest has been peter panepento, web editor for the chronicle of philanthropy. You can follow peter on twitter the handle there. Is at philanthropy. Peter, i want to thank you very much for being on tony martignetti non-profit radio. Tony, thanks for letting me come on and talk about what we dio. I appreciate it. My pleasure. Joining me after this break will be sarah din a and we’re going toe. Continue the discussion about traditional media. How to get yourself in front of traditional media in some of the more traditional ways after this break. Talking alternative radio twenty four hours a day. Are you suffering from aches and pains? Has traditional medicine let you down? Are you tired of taking toxic medications, then come to the double diamond wellness center and learn how our natural methods can help you to hell? Call us now at to one to seven to one eight, one eight three that’s to one to seven to one eight one eight three or find us on the web at www dot double diamond wellness dot com way. Look forward to serving you. I’m tony martignetti, the aptly named host of the tony martignetti show. Big non-profit ideas for the other ninety five percent. You’re non-profit is ignored because you’re smaller medium size, but you still need expertise and help with technology fund-raising compliance, finance and accounting will look at all of these areas on the tony martignetti show. Big non-profit ideas for the other ninety five percent on talking alternative dot com fridays. One, too hyre you’re listening to the talking alternative network. Oppcoll hyre oppcoll! Duitz! Bilich! Buy-in! Dahna well, in a way, around the world, are you ready? Co-branding this’s tony martignetti i’m the host of tony martignetti non-profit radio big non-profit ideas for the other ninety five percent in a moment, i’ll be joined by sarah done a who is with a large pr agency, and we’re going to talk about getting your voice heard in the media. I’m thinking about be quests and planned giving this week because my guide star article for about starting a planned giving program using charitable bequests as the foundation of that program came out this week. I’m writing a one year siri’s every other month, and this was the fourth article in the in the six article siri’s siri’s is called make two thousand ten the year you start planned giving and it’s for the guide star newsletter, and i want to spend a moment explaining that planned giving is not something that is only for large organizations, large fund-raising shops that’s, not the case. You can have a very respectable planned giving program at a small and medium size development shop or non-profit, and that would start with bequests encouraging your donors to remember your organization in their will or in their larger estate plan. Typically, we start with the will, because everyone needs one and it’s something that’s very simple for your donors to understand and simple for them to do when they do their first will, or when they revise their existing will, they can think about including you as part of that. So alongside a bequest to there spouse, children, grandchildren, there is a request for your organization. These are very simple to market and promote we use for our clients direct mail a lot. You can’t have a presence on your website, but probably the most valuable method of marketing is talking to people, either at events where it’s appropriate to mention that they can include your organization in their will or in your one to one face to face meetings with donors. If you’re talking about a larger gift plan, you might include a part of that plan to be a charitable bequests in there will not that it would replace other giving that you’re encouraging them to do but be a supplement to whatever it is you’re asking them to do on sort of a more outright basis. You need those current dollars. I recognize that and you never want planned giving to supplant. Those but to be an adjunct, and when it’s explained in that way, people understand. So i encourage you to think about planned giving in your small and medium sized non-profit not to ignore it and think that it’s only for the big guys, you can have a very respectable planned e-giving program and start and maybe even finish with a bequest marketing program, because for all non-profits, irrespective of size, regardless of their mission, charitable bequests are always the most popular type of planned gift. So it makes sense to make that the beginning of your program. And as i said, you might stop there based on your size and the number of donors that you have look a planned e-giving look att charitable bequests, and you might find my guide star siri’s helpful to you. The siri’s again is called make two thousand ten the year you start planned giving and that’s at guidestar dot org’s as part of the guide star newsletter. I’m joined now by sarah din, a sarah is an account executive at c r t tanaka, which is a public relations agency. Her work includes non-profit public relations, which is important for us, and her background includes work in non-profits tanaka is a national public relations agency. Sarah is calling us from los angeles, and prior to joining the agency, she worked for one of the regional offices of the juvenile diabetes research foundation, doing communications and public relations. Sarah, welcome to the show. Hi, tony, thanks for having me on this morning. It’s my pleasure. Why is public relations important for small and medium sized non-profits public relations is a great tool for small and medium sized non-profits because it’s a great alternative advertising that can be done on the small budgets that we had smaller non-profits air just so used to, and what are some of the sort of first thoughts that someone should have about about their goals on objectives for public relations initiative? Well, first, i think someone needs to sit down and think about what they want to see about their non-profit in the media, i think there are two key goals for most non-profits when it comes to media relations, one is awareness and the other is fund-raising so with awareness it’s always great to get the non-profits name out there and their mission out there, regardless of what that mission is so they might be interested in pitching cem human interest stories about the non-profits work, or perhaps pitching their employees as an expert in key stories and when it comes to fund-raising being cognizant of our low budgets and our high fund-raising goals, it’s always important to find new ways to generate revenue and simple things like getting your events posted on a newspaper’s calendar or getting in the society pages for a gala fund-raising event can be a great tool e-giving revenue awareness and fund-raising as your goals, those air really going to be long term goals, right? That’s, you expect to see some measurable difference in in a longer term? Yes, absolutely. When it comes to media relations, i think the effects are definitely long term on the organization and its the long term impact of lots of different media coverage over the years that’s going to really resonate with the non-profit community is there, ah, length of time that we can share with our listeners as a guideline? Or does it really vary based on what they’re doing and who they are? I think it definitely varies based on what the coverage in the media is and also based on which non-profit is involved for some non-profit simply getting a mention in the society pages for a local fund-raising event could be enough to improve attendance and last boost fund-raising for other non-profit they might be looking for longer term awareness, which would require some repeated mentioned in the press. Is there any non-profit profile that you think makes an organization inappropriate for these types of fund-raising and awareness initiatives through public relations? They certainly think public relations is appropriate for any non-profit i i think the scale might be different from non-profits non-profit but it definitely holds universal value and what would be ah, first step if if an organization wants to now now has its goals, wants increased coverage would like to expand awareness and maybe even fund-raising what? What’s really the first thing that they should be thinking about? Well, the first thing they should do is sit back and think about exactly what story they want to read about their non-profit in the practice, so if they’re thinking they want to see maybe a heartwarming story about affecting a local child in the community than they they can then move on and pitch that exact story. The first step is usually writing out a quick email to whatever media contact you’re interested in reaching out to and being clear and concise is most important. They’re journalists are just as busy as non-profit professionals, so it’s important to be respectful of their time. You don’t need flowery hooks, you don’t necessarily need a formal press release just simply state what your story is. Make sure you give plenty of contact information and shoot over an email and then the next day it’s always essential follow-up with a phone call, the journalists that we reach out to often get hundreds of pitches a day, and when you get that many emails it’s easy for some to slip through the cracks so often it’s the folks who go the extra mile and pick up the phone to have a personal conversation with the journalist about their story, who are able to see their story in print. I just want to emphasize something that you said the first thought after your goal setting is really teo sort of define what your ideal story is. What what what’s the ideal exactly. Well, you need to think about what you want before you can get it, so it really depends from non-profits non-profit what that story is going to be if your goal is awareness thie ideal story is going to be different from fund-raising but it’s always important to have a positive message and connected back to the non-profits mission. My guest is sarah din, a account exec with tanaka. You’re listening to tony martignetti non-profit radio sarah let’s talk about maybe some of the outlet’s what what where should people be looking for placement of their story? And and what outlets should they be looking at? Emailing well, when you’re looking for outlets first, think about what you read and what you watch. Chances are what you and others people in your non-profit reader watch are going to be the right places for you to pitch your story because those air simply the places where the people in your community are looking, it doesn’t necessarily have to be reaching out to something as big as the new york times or fox news. You can think more regional and locally in orderto have a better chance of getting coverage, so a smaller regional non-profit can focus on relationships in their market. If you’re in cincinnati, go for this matty’s, a local paper if you’re in connecticut, go for maybe the connecticut tv news there, and this works just as well for non-profits who are national also because a national non-profit can have their regional staff reach out and make local relationships as well. It’s usually the smaller places, the smaller papers, the smaller tv shows where you’ll have the best chance of seeing you’re non-profit covered. Yes, you don’t want to ignore very local coverage, especially if you’re a smaller organization all your fund-raising maybe very local. All your events are very local. You don’t want to ignore the local coverage, absolutely. If you’re based in a smaller city, the best coverage for you that might have the biggest impact on your organization may just be in a city paper or in a city tv show or city radio show. It might even be better than if you’ve gotten your message on yusa today. You’ve been talking about tv and and newspapers are sort of the i think is the the outlets were focusing on so far. What about blog’s? I think blobs are a great way for organizations to dip their feet into media relations starting with some smaller blog’s can be a great way to get some initial coverage and get some initial messaging out for your organization, in part because the smallest blog’s aren’t often pitched by any organizations or companies, so chances are your odds put good there, so the so the smaller blog’s might actually be grateful to get some pitches from you? Absolutely and that’s always great to have somebody who’s very excited to receive information about your organization and show that enthusiasm when they’re writing. They’re block post and couldn’t an organization find the appropriate blog’s just through a simple google search? Absolutely, when it comes to block it’s, easy to do a quick google search on your non-profit missions and key focuses, and you can also think about what blog’s you read if you’re working for, say, a diabetes non-profit and you read diabetes blog’s, those are the first places where you should pitch when reaching out with a story. So your your suggestion really this’s interesting i’m seeing ah trend to mean, you want to think about your ideal story and you think about placing it in media that you read buy-in blog’s that you read so that’s, where you expect your your constituents to be? Absolutely, i think staff at non-profits tend to be so connected to their missions that even in their personal time, their personal reading tends to focus a lot around the mission of their non-profit i know that when i was working at the juvenile diabetes research foundation and still today, i was so passionate about the work that we did that i would often lead those outlets where it would be great to place a story and different news cycles. I mean, you’d be more likely to get a blog’s attention and coverage within maybe days or a week versus perhaps, ah magazine, definitely we consider media like blog’s and newspapers to be shortly media. Those are places where you could email a member of the media and then a few days later see your messaging and print, whereas it comes to something like a magazine it’s long lead because it takes them so long to go through the press cycle so it might take months before you’re able to see that story in print. So if your story is time sensitive it’s often best to go to the newspaper or to go to online resource is where you can see that story come up very quickly, sarah, in the forty five seconds or so we have before the break, why don’t you tell people how they can contact you? Well, people can contact me through the sierra t tanaka website, which is www dot see artie, hyphen, tanaka, t a n a dot com. My guest is sarah din, a account executive at that agency. C r t, tanaka and sarah will stay with us after this break, you’re listening to tony martignetti non-profit radio. You’re listening to the talking alternative network. I really need to take better care of myself. If only i had someone to help me with my lifestyle. I feel like giving up. Is this you mind over matter, health and fitness can help. If you’re expecting an epiphany, chances are it’s not happening. Mind over matter, health and fitness could help you get back on track or start a new life and fitness. Join joshua margolis, fitness expert two one two eight sixty five nine to nine xero. Or visit w w w died mind over matter, i see dot com. Bilich oppcoll are you suffering from aches and pains? Has traditional medicine let you down? Are you tired of taking toxic medications, then come to the double diamond wellness center and learn how our natural methods can help you to hell? Call us now at to one to seven to one eight, one eight three that’s to one to seven to one eight one eight three or find us on the web at www dot double diamond wellness dot com way. Look forward to serving you. Is your marriage in trouble? Are you considering divorce? Hello, i’m lawrence bloom, a family law attorney in new york and new jersey. No one is happier than the day their divorce is final. My firm can help you. We take the nasty out of the divorce process and make people happy. Police call a set two one, two nine six, four, three, five zero two for a free consultation. That’s lawrence h bloom two, one two, nine, six, four, three five zero two. We make people happy. Dahna zoho talking. This is tony martignetti non-profit radio, i’m your host, tony martignetti my guest, this segment is sarah din, a account executive for the agency. C r t tanaka, sarah let’s, talk a little about methodology you started to get into it. The email is best then you said follow-up phone call the next day, what do we do? Make sure i have that right and then what’s the next step, when your phone call message isn’t answered? Well, i think repetition is key when it comes to phone calls, i know that they’re certainly days when i think that the press simply has turned off their phones because i’m getting so few answers. So what happens even if it happens, even to the professional public relations agency account executive? Oh, absolutely, all the time there so many times where i just hear the phone ring and ring, but never get the journalist on the other end of the line and that’s simply part of the game here. When it comes to media relations journalists, they’re so busy and often on deadline that there are many times in the week when they simply aren’t able to pick up the phone and listen to what you have to say about your story and we really have no way to call and call again try calling for a few days try calling at different times to see what works. Chances are you make it through, but if not, you can always leave a message and be sure to be clear, concise a state exactly what the key point of your story is and always leave contact information. Can i also suggest that we would you want to be upbeat so that if you’ve made a dozen of these calls in a row and you’re on number twelve, you don’t wantto make it sound like you’ve called eleven people before the message you’re leaving now? Absolutely attitude is everything, and if you were enthusiastic about your message, then that’s going to carry across to the reporter and if you never get a callback, should you? I hope i’m sure you shouldn’t. You shouldn’t be discouraged. Try again! Absolutely not again. Given that journal lists received so much information each day, sometimes that’s simply not a feasible so it’s a matter of coming back whenever you have another story and if you get in front. Of a journalist’s enough! They’re going to remember you and they’re going to remember your organization’s mission. So even if they can’t place a story about what you have currently going on, they may have something down the line where you would be a great fit. We’ve been talking about you relying on media if you have something newsworthy, you want to get that ideal story out? What if you have experts in your organization that can serve as experts in that field? For a journalist? Do you need to wrap a story around that to propose your your agency experts as experts when it comes to positioning one of your employees as an expert, you don’t actually need tohave a specific story in mind, although sometimes that can be helpful simply reaching out to a journalist and letting them know that you do have an expert in your organization who can speak to a certain topic can be enough to get your name in front of them and also make sure that that journalists puts your name in the role of decks for whenever they have a story coming up on that topic and sarah in the thirty seconds. Or so that we have left. What about trying to develop a relationship on ongoing relationship with maybe one or two key journalists in local media? How how could someone try to do that when in between their story ideas, but they’d like to have a relationship, obviously a professional relationship with the journalist. Repeat communication is key, so making sure that you always send them any story ideas you might have any news that your organization or story ideas that might not necessarily relate to you but might interest the journalists are great ways to keep in touch with them. Long term sort of trends that you’re seeing that the journalist might be very interested in. Absolutely if you’re an asset to the journalist seldman member and they’ll keep going back to you for information time after time. My guest has been sarah din, a account executive for cr t tanaka, a large public relations agency. Nationwide. Sarah called us from los angeles. Sarah, thank you so much for being on tony martignetti non-profit radio. Thanks, tony. We’ve come to the clothes and i want to thank my guests, peter panepento, web editor for the chronicle of philanthropy, and sarah dahna, account executive at c r t tanaka we have a facebook page, go to facebook and search for you don’t have to remember how to spell my name just search for non-profit radio and the facebook fan page will come up like us there, join the contest, their name, the number. I’m trying to get a way of remembering our call in number sorry, we couldn’t take calls this week, but we will be taking calls next week will be live next week on august twenty third let’s name that number. Find a catchy way to remember the calling number eight seven seven for eight xero for one to zero, you’ll find information about that contest on our facebook fan page and please like us over there, click like and become a fan. I want to thank claire meyerhoff she’s, our creative producer oneof thanks, sam liebowitz he’s, our line producer and the owner of talking alternative broadcasting. You’ve been listening to tony martignetti non-profit radio big non-profit ideas for the other ninety five percent on talking alternative broadcasting at talking alternative dot com. Look forward to having you as a guest as ah, as a listener on august twenty third. Next friday, when we will be taking your calls live. Please join us then. Until then, have a good week. E-giving you’re listening to the talking alternate network. Duitz to get into thinking. Take it. Cubine are you stuck in your business or career trying to take your business to the next level, and it keeps hitting a wall? This is sam lebowitz, the conscious consultant. I will help you get to the root cause of your abundance issues and help move you forward in your life. Call me now and let’s. Create the future you dream of. Two, one, two, seven, two, one, eight, one, eight, three, that’s to one to seven to one, eight one eight three. The conscious consultant helping conscious people. Be better business people. Is your marriage in trouble? Are you considering divorce? Hello, i’m lawrence bloom, a family law attorney in new york and new jersey. No one is happier than the day their divorce is final. My firm can help you. We take the nasty out of the divorce process and make people happy. Police call a set two one two, nine six, four, three, five zero two for a free consultation. That’s lawrence h bloom at two one two nine six four three five zero two. We make people happy. I really need to take better care of myself if only i had someone to help me with my lifestyle. I feel like giving up eyes thisyou, mind over matter, health and fitness can help. If you’re expecting an epiphany, chances are it’s not happening. Mind over matter, health and fitness could help you get back on track or start a new life and fitness. Join Joshua margolis, fitness expert at 2 one two eight six five nine to nine xero or visit www. Died mind over matter. Y si dot com. Cerini i’m tony martignetti, the aptly named host of the tony martignetti show. Big non-profit ideas for the other ninety five percent. You’re non-profit is ignored because you’re smaller medium size. But you still need expertise and help with technology fund-raising compliance, finance and accounting will look at all of these areas on the tony martignetti show. Big non-profit ideas for the other ninety five percent on talking alternative dot com fridays one, too. Talking. Hyre

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