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Nonprofit Radio for May 3, 2019: Reducing Donor Abandonment & Welcome Your Donors The Right Way

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Matt Scott & David DeParolesa: Reducing Donor Abandonment
From Amazon to Zappos, there’s a lot you can learn from e-retailers to keep your donors in the checkout stream as they make their online gifts. Our 19NTC panel, Matt Scott and David DeParolesa, reveal proven e-commerce strategies to increase online gift completion. Matt is from CauseMic and David is at Give Lively.





Brenna Holmes & Chrissy Hyre: Welcome Your Donors The Right Way
Your donors now complete their online gifts at record rates. Have you got in place a multichannel welcome and nurture series to receive and steward your new donors? Our panel will get you started. They’re Brenna Holmes with CCAH and Chrissy Hyre from Innovation. (Also recorded at 19NTC)





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Hello and welcome to Tony martignetti non-profit Radio. Big non-profit ideas for the other ninety five percent of your aptly named host. Oh, I’m glad you’re with me. I’d grow on Odo polyp ous if I heard that you missed today’s show. Reducing donors Abandonment From Amazon to Zappos There’s a lot you can learn from e retailers to keep your donors in the checkout stream as they make their online GIF ts Our nineteen anti seat panel Matt Scott and David de Para Lisa reveal proven e commerce strategies to increase online gift completion. Matt is from cause *** and David is at Give lively and welcome your donors the right way. Your donors now complete their online GIF ts at record rates. Have you got an in? Have you got in place? A multi-channel welcome and nurture Siri’s to receive and steward these new donors. Our panel will get you started. They’re brenholz is with C ch and Chrissy hyre from innovation that’s also recorded at nineteen and TC. I’m Tony Steak to be the one we’re sponsored by pursuant full service fund-raising data driven and technology enabled. Tony Dad, I’m a slash pursuing by weather CPAs guiding you beyond the numbers. Wagner cps dot com and by text to give mobile donations made easy text NPR to four four four nine nine nine Here is reducing donor Welcome to Tony martignetti non-profit radio coverage of nineteen ninety si. You know what that is? It’s a non-profit technology conference coming to you from the convention center in Portland, Oregon. This interview, like all are nineteen ntcdinosaur views is brought to you by our partners at Act Blue Free fund-raising Tools to help non-profits make an impact. My guests now are Matt Scott sitting closest to me. He’s CEO of Cosmic and David De Para Lisa, CEO of Give Lively Welcome Welcome mat. Welcome, David. Thank you. Thanks, Tony. Pleasure. Pleasure to have you on DH mascot. Welcome back to non-profit Radio. Thank you. It’s good to be back. All right. Your topic here today is reducing donor. What’s a copy from e retailers? David, why don’t you get us started? What? Give us the Give us the headline in the lead. Sure. So this session is intended to help non-profits think about the full life cycle of thie experience of making a donation and all of the elements that could result in someone dropping off from completing a donation way. Want to, you know, bring in expertise from the consumer world. The world that most everyone lives in on apply it to this non-profit space. Okay. And just so in case there’s any question want you define abandonment for us. So someone starts a starts to donate two or starts thie intent, or has the intent to donate to your cause and then leaves in the middle of it. Right? Okay. Yeah. Okay, Matt, anything you want to add to the overview of our session? Yeah. I mean, I think when we’ve had a lot of conversations, one of the thing that I really enjoy about David’s perspective is you No way. Think about Amazon. One click check out. Right. We think about Netflix in terms of, you know, the user experience that we’re all used. Teo and I think that if we can copy some of those things and move them over to the non-profit space, we’re going to be a head as an industry. But if we’re thinking on ly about competing against other non-profits from a donor experience, we’re going to find ourselves in a lot of trouble because you’re starting setting the bar too low. You’re setting Well, yeah, you’re absolutely setting the bar too low, because we, as consumers, are also the people who are donating to charities, right? And if our expectation is for it to be a seamless process to collect a little information as possible to have unique, engaging content delivered to us if we’re not thinking like that as a nonprofit organization, we’re missing out on consumer behavior, which are the e retailers, that you want us to learn from that really broad base. So you know, we’re inspired by Amazon Zappos to some degree you thie experience at an Apple store, which, you know, in a way, is a kind of hybrid retail experience and generally taking best practices from that space broadly, even if it is in a specific retailer, it’s It’s some of the elements of what makes Annie retail experience common. For example, a simple donation, a simple check out flow a a checkup, though that doesn’t ask many questions but lets you get through it as fast as possible. A one click check out a digital wallet capability, the’s air, things that have worked for the for-profit sector and non-profit sector is catching up and we hope to help them get there. Yeah, why? What’s the What’s the problem? Why so slow? I mean, we’re all experiencing these things on the e commerce side. Why were we not recognizing that? Uh, the analogy between our our donors and ourselves as consumers? What’s the disconnect? I would say that there’s an access issue. There’s an access to technology that brings the retail style practices to the non-profit. Sectarian give Lively is a response to that problem, which is looking at the world of non-profit tech and seeing that elements like digital wallets are not common, that something that isn’t available in the A lot of other platforms but that is available on the give lively platform. So it’s those types of things that have kept non-profits behind. I mean, unfortunately, platforms or not innovating as fast as they can. And they’re not innovating with the consumer mindset that that us in just a few other players are. Okay. All right, so I started to add to that one of the things that I think is really interesting working with established non-profits, You know, you you look at these behemoths and they are their worst own worst enemy When it comes to technology, you look at the younger, more rapidly growing organizations, and those are the ones that are really out there able to adopt new technologies quickly. They’re not constrained by existing say, CR M systems or their, you know, existing, you know, ways of doing things. And and when you when you take a tool like give lively and you put it out there and you integrate with the C R m like sales force, you unlock that potential. And I’ve seen it time and time again, where established non-profits in particular they are their own biggest hurdle when it comes to getting getting in line with e commerce. Best practice? No. All right, all right. So why don’t you kick us off, Matt? What? Uh, let’s get kicked off with what we should what we should be learning. Where do we start? Yeah, I mean, I think David brought up a lot of really good points in terms of Amazon, and you’ve got, you know, a donor experience. But then what I’m really interested in and I think where we complement one another is on the content side. And so I like to always start with you know who is your target audience? What is the unique user experience that that person or persons wants tohave with your brand? And how can you make sure from the moment that they interact with your brand and are brought to your page to your checkout form that they understand you’re unique market position? And so I think that that’s really important to have a singular content strategy that’s very user focused. And, uh, if it’s okay handing it over to David because I feel like that’s where he picks up in terms of the e commerce checkout process and where that’s really critical in terms of the transition from content to check out. OK, yeah, I noticed matter-ness were on Mike, you’re more deferential than, uh Well, then all this *** that you were giving me before before. Before I turn the mike on, why don’t we talk about monthly giving, for God’s sake? But all of a sudden, my cousin, he’s like, uh, if you don’t mind, I’d like to pass it over to David. Very interesting. There can only be one New York around like you’re dominating. Yeah, you multiple turned. You know, talk about talk about best. I’m gonna start the guest personas start start creating that that is surrounded by New Yorkers right now. Yeah. You know, you’re only here. He’s being into forced deference. A submission sametz Alright, yes. Well, I’ll take your suggestion. The matter very politely requested It’s time for a break Pursuing the art of first impressions how to combine strategy analytics and creative to captivate new donors and keep them coming back. That’s their e book on donor acquisition and had to make a smashing first impression with your potential donors. You will find it on the listener landing page at Tony that I may slash pursuing capital P for please. Now back to reducing donor-centric. Share your expertise. You did tick off a bunch of things. I wallet went one click, check out seamless, but we got we got a lot more time together that way. Gotta go into some detail. Yeah, and so you know, at first I think it be helpful too. Acknowledge what Matt mentioned in terms of thinking about storm the content, right? And the thing that keys in for me there is thinking about how the experience starts at the level of the ask and then the level of the intent of the donor. So to reduce abandonment, you want to get the right person to the checkout flow, right? So you want to start with the right people who respond to that message. And so you know what that’s doing It cosmic is creating messages that resonate at a very granular level with different constituencies in such a way that when they get to the checkout flow, they finished the check out great. And I think that okay, that thread is a thread that involves technology because it’s not only the channels in which that message is being sent, but then it’s how that story is represented on the donation page and through the check outflow and even after the checkout float. Okay, we’LL come back to that. I understand ITT’s all of spectrum. Yes. Ah, movement a process, Matt. What? The different how we identify the different constituencies for these granular messages. Yeah, No, you’re you’re getting at is like, what are the technical steps that need to be put in place? So let’s just take acquisition is a great example, right? So you’re you’re going to post up a variety of ads like paid social. And if you set up separate landing pages with separate checkout forms, that’s one way of identifying. You know, this ad directly relates to this check out page, and there is a continuum of content once you arrive there at that page and you know they arrived from there because you’ve set up different ones. The content can then be dynamic essentially for that constituents. And that’s where David talks a lot about stealing your thunder here. But you know, you you have you have that check out for him. That’s asking for his little information as possible. So capturing that email address in that zip code and getting right into the payment and and you’re getting right down to the nitty gritty then you’re worrying about Okay, now that I’ve already got this information, what additional information do I need to provide? But I’ve already processed the donation. That’s right, Yeah, So it’s thinking about what is Germaine to the donation experience as the only things that you should be asking a donor before the payment is actually made. You want to capture the dollars, so every affair to say, like with his few distractions, is possible. There’s no need to have AH on issue video on your or issue photos on your on your checkout page for donation. The person has already moved by your issues. Well, it depends in their different ways that that can be implemented. One way would be to have a page that’s both telling the story and allows you to make that seamless donation in the same view. Okay, and there’s some that do the jump, right? So there’s a storytelling page, and then you jumped to a donation form that’s on a different page, and I’ve seen it done both ways and, you know, way See it work both ways really depends heavily, though, upon how they get there, right? Like if they’re coming to your they’re experiencing your brand for the first time, where they haven’t, you know they need to be informed, right? And so another best practice is having called toe actions throughout your page. Right? So you’re not just one. So you’ve got big, strong, powerful image or something that draws that user in from a content perspective in a high c t es of donations and I think Sita Way got drug in jail on non-profit radio. A cz a previous guest Disappointed you didn’t know that lock myself away is a call to action, right? And to that point, I mean, I think that’s that’s another best practices. Give lively donation check out form can be embedded into your existing site so you can have this microsite like, let’s say, taken unbound page right. And you know that you’ve set up this unique page and you’ve got the both the story there and the narrative there, and then you’ve got a call to actions throughout the page. That’s best practice, because as they move down the content, there’s lots of opportunities to make that contribution. Okay, what’s an unbound page they’re not paying me to talk about on? I’m just kidding. Way were, It’s a wonder. Anything anyone think it’s a tool. You keep this up, I’m shutting your Michael Fair Fair. It’s a it’s a landing page tool that is really easy to use in turn end of setting up unique content on DH. Then you Khun, track that you know someone lands on that page and you contract that they came into your database specific to that content. Okay. Okay. So this is we’re getting to our segmentation of constituencies. Okay, Okay. All right. So now let’s go back to David. What more can you say about place? Things you need to have in place? Sure. So you know one thing that this let’s start at the very kind of high level, which is that a donation form should work if you’re going to reduce it. Abandonment of your donation form one. Someone’s in it. It better work on a mobile device, but it’s kind of a simple statement, but we’ve got to be passed out by now. I mean, everything should be mobile, but that’s not a body. But that’s not always the case. And they’re still donation forms out there that are asking for. I like to joke. It’s there asking for everything but your blood type. You know, it’s a it’s a twenty eighty step form that. Then at the end, you have a credit card entry field. Maybe, and maybe there’s an error in that process. Just over what kind of stuff? They all asking. But I don’t dare ask me. Study this So they’re asking for. You often will see full mailing address, even if that person has no is a digital savvy your digital only person. They’LL ask questions about, perhaps, how they got to our learned about the cause, which is a good question asked. But maybe not before the dollar is captured and can be inferred by some of the tracking that’s occurring. That brought them to the patient was That’s right, pages, etcetera. Okay, um, you know there are even in how the payment information is presented is an element that can be very confusing. So for some donation forms, they make you type or choose whether it’s a Visa card instead of just detecting. Yeah, why did he do that? I know it. And I can tell by the first digit they could tell that the battery ditches first for Justin. It’s welcome. And that’s not even that’s not unique to non-profits Know that. Was there e commerce mary-jo just to say that? I said, That’s laziness on behalf of those building those forms, okay, or that’s lack of capacity. Shoes is a diner’s club or MasterCard or visa or markets. It’s laziness. I mean, it’s easy to detect. It should be present on every single page is interesting. All right. So I don’t know if listeners were interested, but I am well, but it’s, you know, but the channel there are there’s data that shows that every, you know, hub spot ran a study and show that when you increase the amount of fields that you ask a person to complete, you end up over about two to three fields total. You get a fifty percent drop off. Oh, so it’s that high so And once you get to eight, which is many of what he’s talking about, right, you’re down to its well under single digits of conversion rate, which is a dismal. If you think about like you have a really strong contents from the person was into it, they made their way to your donation return until you ask them for their blood type. Yeah, I I also will say one of my pet peeves that, you know, non-profits continuously asked people for the same information over and over and over and over again. Right? So you know who this constituent is? You’ve sent them this email communication. You already know who they are there in your database, and you ask them to re identify all that information again. For what? Like why? You know, when you go to Netflix and you have your subscription to Netflix, they’re not asking you. Or if you’re in Dollar Shave Club and you decide to get shaving cream on top of your razor, no one’s asking you. By the way, could you tell us like what you’re you are in? Yeah. Like right? No, we know. Okay, save it and stop asking for repetition. All right? Yeah. Consolidate. I mean, consolidate fields as much as possible. Don’t ask for the same inspiration twice. What’s essential? I mean, I’m all right, so I’m thinking of the quintessential, you know, the Amazon checkout. It’s been so long since I did. My first time was on a purchase like everybody else. I obviously can’t remember that, but what? What, What? What, what? What’s actually essential. So I mean so in my view and the view that informed to give lively donation platform when we first launched it, it was nothing more than identifying information about that donor. First name last. Actually, in the very early days, not even first name and last name email address, payment information. That was it. You know, now there’s a little bit more in terms of full name, just enough to make sure that we’re doing receding the right way and all of the all of the tax deductible benefits, by the way. So payment information that includes the billing address You have to have the billing and not include Okay, so rate. So let’s get really specific. So it’s It is literally first name, last name, email address and credit card information, meaning nothing more than the number, the expiration date and the CVC code so you can process the donation without without telling you that’s not required. That’s right. And, uh, you know, one of our favorite partners that cosmic is another organization called touchpoint, which is amazing. You give them just too little little tip bits of information like about Tony. We’d find out what kind of bagel heeds you know on Wednesday because they can pull back all that information for for only thirty cents per constituent and give you everything about them. What property they own, what, what non-profits They give to their address everything, and so that’s One of the reasons why we like to give lively platform is you can take as little information as possible, get that donation and then just pay thirty cents. Because if you have drop off, that goes, you know, down fifty percent. When you’ve asked more than three questions, why not ask just as few questions as possible and go pay thirty cents for that information somewhere else? Yeah, yeah. I mean, you cannot go, and that’s getting into very sophisticated strategies in terms of augmenting date. Instead of asking for things up front, find other ways to get at it. You know, there are social networks that have advertising networks that have ways to link. For example, email address is back, too. Uh, that social, so that you don’t necessarily need to ask them. So then you learn more about that donor to those networks through your own work, rather than asking and risking the abandonment. That’s right, just the frustration do of it. Okay, um, go ahead, go ahead. I was going to say I think David should speak a little bit about, you know, the digital wallets, and that’s that is absolutely game changing when it comes to best practice. So take it from here. Thanks. So and we’LL get a mascot non-profit radio things there latto longest running part kapin most listen to podcasts. It’s also in order Mobile off deferential and generous welchlin the mike is on. Yeah, yeah, B b cut. Well, good to have Tony back on the show. I just like so we, you know, hear Give life. So that another session, actually that that I’m leading called digital while it’s so hot right now and in that session will talk about digital wallets. The concept. I mean, digital arts have been around for a long time, but in examples of them are PayPal. Apple pay, Google pay the’s are one click payment options that have in them a variety of security protections and data that gets easily shared without having to ask that door faster. Just talking about All right, so there’s no entry. What? You’ve entered a credit card once you’ve entered your address once, and you’re just using it over and over again in in this example of donation form on. They’re incredibly powerful, and they are people use them. The level of, you know, penetration of mobile wallets. is increasing increasing at all age groups, but particularly with younger foe. But in non-profits well, very few have actually have ever had access to it. So our platform has digital wall So you’LL see See it in. For example, If you go to malala dot org’s that’s one of our partners right on their home page You’LL see if you have a wallet on apple pear Groupe browser that you’re on you’LL see those buttons right there and you can make that donation very quickly If you’re on your phone, you’LL see it there. But most other platforms are not offering that service or they’re just now offering that service eso And but this is a service that we’re used to write. So think about buying a cup of coffee at a on using square and tapping with apple pay. You’re not. I also think like it would be it would be troubling if we didn’t at least mention this best practice for me. Commerce, which is the classic upsell, right? So I think one of the areas that I’ve seen the wall it works so well is when you’ve got you’ve got a recurring donorsearch, right, you’ve got this person who’s a member of your tribe, right? And one of our client team, Rubicon, stands out. Our mercy corps stands out where you have these sustaining donors who give monthly right. Then you have this urgent appeal that comes up. And because you have a really robots content strategy and your quantifying the impact of their recurring gift, you send them a text message that is a simple is them putting their thumbprint on to authorize an additional one time contribution for a wildfire in, you know, Northern California or whatever. It is incredibly effective for up selling for those who are on a subscription model a CZ. Well, as you know, you attend an event or whatever it is, it’s an easy way to take that best practice for me. Commerce, which is your existing customers, are your best potential you know, customers for for an additional service. Yeah, yeah, and those you know, those buttons should be front and center. So no ineffective donation form to reduce abandonment shows you easy ways to pay up front and suggests the best way to pay right on, right on that first screen. So, you know, looking at a donation from that works. Well, is one that may say you’re making a twenty five dollar donation monthly. Tap this one button and you’re done. You’re you’ve not even moved beyond that first page. You’ve really not even asked any additional questions of the user because the answer’s air embedded inside of a digital wallet payment s o very low friction. Easy to make donations much more secure. One of the objections of her, uh, from’s arounds streamlining like we’re talking about is the preservation of credit credit card information. Because then that then you’re implicated with Peace PCL complaining PC exactly that So that an acronym fell? No, not when I do it. Ok, ok. Thank you. Thank you. It’s personal. Personal credit information watching your mike is going down. It’s already been slowed down. You hear yourself? But no one else will. Yeah, I notice you’re only asking David questions. You know, I don’t not only get to speak. He says, Can I say something? I, uh, thought I should mention here is because Tony is not going to ask me. All right, so now you’re now you’re in your you’re implicating PC I compliance requirements, But if you’re accepting, you use digital wallets, you’re not. You’re not personally. You think the organization is not preserving the the information right? It’s the I don’t know what it’s called the host of the host of the wallet. Yeah, exactly what they were getting into the payment process. Non-profit. The payment process apparently doesn’t have to save the Yeah, I mean, I hope. And if I I hope no one listening to this who’s who is working for a nonprofit is ever dealing directly with PC high compliance like they should be using a vendor who is shielding them from that level of risk because that’s incredibly risky and a lot of a bureaucratic burden in order to get PC I compliant. So the payment processors under the give lively platform are stripe papal. Those air both PC I complaint writers in the case and in all cases platform like you’ve lively, never has access to a person’s donor-centric our information directly and through a wallet. What’s really smart about wallets is how they hide. Even they create one time use credit card numbers. Essentially, that’s an easy way to think about it. One time use numbers that he used every time you make a purchase so that there’s no one number goes down or gets, you know, used inappropriately, and it’s not affecting any other element of your credit history. So it’s secure on hidden from both the payment provider themselves as well as a platform for writer. No, certainly the non-profit. Okay, man, I’m gonna give you a break, actually, and I feel bad. I don’t really feel bad, but I’ll say I feel bad about the way I’ve treated you. So I’m going to give you the going to give you the wrap up because we just have, like, a twenty or thirty seconds or so let you clue how generous cosmic from clolery Thank you. Uh, I would say for any non profit organization who is out there, think about to yourself. What is the experience that you did? You really just turn? No. Okay. So paranoid. I don’t take my word for it, I guess. Think about the experience that you have with the brands that you love and think about how you feel when you’re asked lots of questions that are unnecessary and and try and channel that when you’re setting up your your donation form or when you’re selecting your vendor toe work with to process your donations because it’s that that’s the standard. The standard is not other non-profits. The standard is not your system that you’ve been using for three decades, and it works because it’s what we always used. The standard is how we interact with brands on a daily basis and how we spend our money on a daily basis, and it’s really important to think about that. Those brands have raised the bar your donors are experiencing that that high level of, of, of, of purchase flood. He’s he’s thank you, and they’re coming to expect it from you. That’s right, Yeah, Unless unless they abandon the process, that’s right and, you know, and then give Lively’s case, just plug us for a second. You know, we don’t charge money for our for access to our platform, so we’re enabling non-profits use digital wallet type technology and have that access and not have to pay for it. And I think that’s something unique, and I hope people take advantage of that. All right. It was shameless self promotion, but allowed with bilich thinking, I feel like I’m with the two Smart through smart promoter from cookies. Permit me to say Young Young Seo’s fifty six. I can’t say that. Alright on DH They are Matt Scott’s Yo of Cosmic and David de Para Lisa, CEO of Give Lively, and this is Tony martignetti non-profit Radio coverage of nineteen ntcdinosaur non-profit Technology Conference This interview Like all our nineteen ninety seon reviews brought to you by our partners at Act Blue Free fund-raising tools to help non-profits make an impact. Thanks so much for being with us. Thank you. We need to take a break. Wagner, CPS. They’re free. Webinar came and went. It was tips and tricks for your nine. Ninety. You missed it. No problem. Watch the archive. Yes, the archive learned how to use your nine ninety as a marketing tool. The thing is so widely available from GuideStar Charity Navigator Attorneys general, Probably your own website. Let the nine ninety promote your work. That’s what the webinar helps you with. Wagner cps dot com Quick seminars, Then go to April. Now, time for Tony’s Take two be the one. This was inspired by a re union that I attended and had a hand in Ah of Air Force of former Air Force missile ears. We were all working in the Reagan years on Minuteman. Two nuclear missiles were all missile operators at Whiteman Air Force Base in Missouri, and we got together way left there in the late eighties. We’ve been together a couple times, but only eyes our third time. So ah, lot of people haven’t been seen for years, and some even never even came to their other reunions. But the idea of everyone coming together, um, sharing old stories coming together like like it had been just a week. And for some, it’s been thirty years since we’ve seen them, but that common bond. So I encourage youto get people together from the different phases of your life, whether it’s elementary school, high school, college, whatever. Grad school, military neighborhood. If you’ve got ah, if you’ve got this, I don’t know. Affinity group sounds kind of formal, but if you’ve got these group of people, these folks who know each other and shared something, it’s such fun to get them together. It’s rewarding. It’s gratifying. It’s just it feels like being a kid again. Do it, do it. That’s what the video is about and you’LL find that video at tony martignetti dot com That is Tony’s Take two Now that a hundred percent of your donors complete their online gif ts u want to welcome them the right way? Here’s that from twenty nineteen non-profit Technology Conference Welcome to Tony martignetti non-profit Radio coverage of nineteen NTC non-profit Technology conference coming to you from the convention center in Portland, Oregon. This nineteen ninety si interview, like all of ours, is brought to you by our partners at ActBlue Free fund-raising Tools to help non-profits make an impact with me are brenholz homes and Chrissy hyre. They’re both with Chapman, cubine and Husi. Brenna, seated next to me is vice president for digital services and Chrissy is vice president Innovation Welcome back. Welcome back. Welcome back to each of you. You, you and Brenna has disclosed that thes these interviews have a secondary purpose for her. Chrissy, I’m sorry. Kinda married. That’s not Christy. Christy has disclosed there’s they have a dating. They have dating power. They do so definitely. Come on the show. Yeah, because your your dates will google you. They will find your non-profit radio interview. Yeah, and when they do that? I want you to inquire about the host. I’m really not interested in what they thought of your performance, What they think about the host and then let me know if it’s positive on Lee was not positive. It’s not positive. Silence is best. Just carry on with your date after that ostomel of that. That’s it. But we’re not talking about dating. We’re talking about making them well, we are actually making love you. Yeah, welcoming donors the right way is your your session topic. Um so, Chrissy, what a zoho overview. What are non-profits not getting quite right about welcoming? Let’s start with first time donors and will evolve in the conversation from there. But what we’re not doing quite right. Yeah, So I mean, you know, Brenna says this really Well, actually, but you really only get one chance to make a first impression. And so one of the things that a lot of organizations don’t do particularly well is showing folks exactly how much they care about the gift that folks are giving to them. And so, you know, one of the things that we really focused on our session today was thinking through. What are the ways that you connect people back to your mission back to the work that you’re doing, making them really understand the impact of the gift that they’ve just given and building that connection in that relationship so that they’re ready to take that to the next level, so to speak and give you another gift? Okay, on Brenda, how do we get started thinking about this process that we have for for donors? Yeah, think about everything from multi-channel perspective very much, not just the channel they gave the gift in, but really talking to them in multitude of ways. Because, as you know, everybody’s over saturated in lots and lots of media on DH non-profits have to do more and more to stay top of mind, get keep that good feeling moving forward to maintain that share of wallet as well. So the first thing that you start with, like especially for online donors, very appropriate here for Auntie Si is making sure that you’re customizing the confirmation page and the auto respond or email to that donation. A lot of it is just like the default setting. Non-profits never remembered a change on just updating that can go very long way customizing the confirmation page and the acknowledgement letter that yeah latto respondent your mail going a little bit further and adding direct mail into the mix by sending your online donors direct mail. Acknowledgement letter goes even more like We love that wonderful. Now I did have a panel just maybe an hour or so ago. I want half ago. That said, you know you want to keep your donation process streamlined, Ask a few questions possible now, in order to get the the direct mail address. That’s going to be another level of questions you have to ask. Well, no, You mean you pretty much can’t make a credit card donation without putting in the billing address anyways, so it’s already part of the foreign fields to process again. OK, well, not according to those two guys. I guess it depends on the platform. Two friends on your processor, I guess. Sure, right? Yeah, they were saying they were pretty clear that you do not have to ask for address. You can, but you don’t have to. The majority of non-profit websites today do they do rice. But their point was, that’s not the best idea. Right, But But now so well. But this is not in conflict, right? We gotta bring this tio black and white. Everything not so clear. So, you know, I mean, you’re saying that’s a lycan ideal process. Ideal practice. Acknowledging an online gift, I’LL find through the mail offline. Okay, there could be another way of acknowledging that online gift could be through phone. A phone number could be another way. Okay, uh, Wes life calls. Auto House. Okay. Latto caught was latto calls. Yes, was a pre recorded call very inexpensive that, like the executive director of the organization, can record. And you send that to all of your new donors to welcome them to the organism. Thank them and welcome them. Yep. Okay. Interesting. Um, okay, Uh, I’m not sure. So we’re way. Start with audit of our current process. Always a place to start. Okay. What are we looking for? What? Some common sticking points and bad practices that we want to be conscious. Seldman are loaded. So we’re looking at, like, what already goes out, right? What’s the default? So again, for online donors, there is the default confirmation page. That’s usually very receipt transactional basis that has all of the semi critical information from the processors point of view. But it’s not very donor-centric on DH. It certainly doesn’t show the impact that the gift is going to make for the non-profit who’s receiving the donation. Same thing with that otter responder email. It’s generally plain text, very receipt based. Well, we want to do is build out stewardship touches like turned these receipts into nurtured opportunities so that people are bonding with the organization and moving past that transactional relationship. Same thing with their direct mail receipts. You know, most organizations send them out, at least to their direct male donors, if not also to their online donors. But you can improve upon the look and feel of that package, make it really stand out in the mailbox so that it doesn’t look like one of your fund-raising appeals. Or it doesn’t look like a bill from, you know, your health insurance company or anything else right on DH. Just show that love right up front. No one has ever said, Stop thanking me like in the history of effort, So that’s something that we’re constantly trying to reinforce with that, and then the newer, like the newer channels, all of the innovation with SMS and auto calls, or even live calling like those air usually add on so they wouldn’t show up in your audit. But they’re nice iterations to go above and beyond on DK and be done with volunteers and things like that out of my Mahler’s remembers. I love a working board. Yeah, put him to work, Christie. What you wantto I mean, I think that that’s exactly right. Everything Brenna said. I think the one thing to consider and your audit as well is making sure is, Brennan noted, at the top of our conversation about that multi-channel experience. So just because someone is giving online, don’t assume they don’t want to hear from you offline. You know, a lot of us almost all of our media interactions are happening in on a screen. And so to actually get that piece of paper is something that people really remember really means a lot to them, and it’s significant. The other thing is, don’t be afraid to reach people on their phone to think them. You know, a lot of people have sort of a bad taste in their mouth about what telemarketing is. Nobody’s gonna be upset if you call them to say thank you. And nobody’s gonna be upset if you text them to say thank you. And if you text them to say thank you, they’re definitely gonna see and they’re definitely gonna remember it. Okay, Um, so after we have our audit, what’s our next step? We got it. We got to start improving improving our practices. Copy. Maybe a little bit of time. Couple steps in time. Your creative Seymour Brennan. Yeah. So it’s, you know, it is about building up the that content into both being relevant for that specific donorsearch for Don’t hurt I ppe Did they make a one time gift at what dollar value did that dollar value kicked them into e-giving circle of some level. And then you need to acknowledge that in a separate way, you can also use the type of appeal that they responded Teo to enforce. Thank you. Copy as well. So like, did they respond to something about puppy mills versus something about horse meat? Like having that content flow through into the acknowledgement program and into the welcome Siri’s afterwards to keep them going tohave a next action opportunity eyes A fantastic way to start. Is it right that our first time donorsearch retention read? Uh, non-profit wide is like around twenty five percent. We typically see closer to a third to being healthy, but oh, I’m going down. I’m citing how bad it is. Yeah, it has been going down is going down. It is going on the wrong direction we got. And that’s honestly, like a lot of that data is coming out around the last few quarters of twenty twenty eighteen. So there’s a lot of reasons right now as we kick off year to start really thinking about how you’re bonding people to the organizations that you’re fund-raising for. All right. All right. Um, we’ll also talk about designing a multi-channel welcome and nurture nurture. Siri’s is that Is that basically what we’re talking about? Our nurture. Siri’s a little bit. I mean, I think I think the acknowledgement process should be part of that nurture mint, right. It’s the first interaction for a lot of organizations post that gift. The first outbound communications and a lot of ways s oh, it’s a natural bridge to the welcome Siri’s and kind of steward that stewarding them throughout that relationship. So longfield we should not be setting anything and forgetting about it. Everything needs to be very conscious decisions about what copy we’re sending to who, what content they’re getting when on the touchpoint. I mean, all of the data that we have shows that the more of those pieces of touch our personally identifiable information right, like whether it’s postal address or email address or phone number, the more of those contact point that we have on for a constituent hyre their retention will be and the hyre their value will be to the organization on a lifetime level. So, like while it might be easier to not get that postal address, I want that postal address. There’s so much more value. Okay? Yeah, You know what? There there are other Point was don’t do it in the donation. All right, that’s in the donation on the donation pages. Waken ask for that later on that they may be right after the gift is made. Would you like to share your your mail? Now that makes it option over. Okay, Right. But then it raises the question of why, right? You which you have to have a good answer, would like to be able to think we’d like to be able to send you something. I don’t know. All right, but, you know, incentive based. Thank you. They’re always like people love swag. So you could do that. That’s definitely an office sticker and done in Dustin. Yeah, okay. What they done Injustice e. Did you get dates with the kind of lines like that? This’s kind of witty banter like that. Future dates or watching? Amazing. Oh, my God. You’re turning right there. Okay, so I just realized I just put two and two together. You that’s gonna happen in the future, too, is not only in the past. Oh, my God. And this is going to be more relevant. More, more. It’s a more recent about making love you. So in other words, what do you think of the host? That’s what I want to know. Okay. Uh, Christy date. What do you think of the host? Keep which it’s Tony. As tony martignetti dot com is the best way. Or you can use the contact page at tony martignetti dot com from and I never hear from you again. I think the time you said I think, think of the time I’m saving you. Thank you so much if they come, if they beating you up, I feel about you know if if they make it through over this threshold, right and you know that it’s it’s really more than yeah, it’s more than superficial thinking past this. They say they watch the whole video like we haven’t gotten into a ton of things, but I can try to learn more. We’LL see Next time just roughly halfway in thistle happened roughly twelve minute mark. So? So if they hear this, they making twelve minute mark. You know, I think there’s potential definitely beyond the average. Definitely all right time for our last break text to give. Get their five part email. Many course to dispel myths around mobile giving. You know donations don’t have to go through the donors phone company that puts a cap on GIF ts. There’s a smarter way with no cap. Mobile giving does not have to be limited to single or double digit gif ts. To get the email. Many course. Dispel the myths you text NPR to four, four, four, nine, nine, nine. We’ve got lots more time for welcome your donors the right way. Okay, so we’re, like only halfway in. So what else do we need to talk about if you don’t? Your panel yet? We did it. So one third, seventy five minutes. Talking about what else? What else? On Let’s broaden it a little bit now. So not on ly first time donors, but volunteermatch comes a donor. Small, small gift donorsearch a mid level or higher level donor. What do we need to do to make them love us? Chrissy? Yeah. So I think this is actually really great question. So thank you for asking. It s o. You know, essentially, I think that there are ways Tio Tio integrate people into new parts of our organization. I think one of the easiest things for folks to understand is upgrading folks to monthly giving. And how do you start to think those people in a way that feels really special and bonds them to that program you already know? They’re exceptionally bonded to the work that you’re doing. And so how do you start to think them in a way that makes them feel like, Oh, my gosh. Now we’re part of an even more special piece of this community, right? So, you know, in our session, we talked a lot about you know, when you, for example, are thinking a monthly donor. Often do you want to thank them? Do you wantto Brenda calls it waking the bear. You know, where you kind of like your calling out to them? Do you want to tell them? Every month you’re giving me a monthly gift, and then, you know, where do you want? Oh, yeah. You know, you want to take him every month. I mean, so there we were talking about it also talked about splitting the baby there because there are philosophical differences and conversations there. I think the that standard used to be Don’t wake the bear, right? Don’t remind them that they’re giving every month they will leave. Oh, my gosh, that can’t be it anymore. We all have so many subscriptions in our life, whether it’s Netflix or Lulu or you know, all of these things, that if they don’t feel good about it, then when the card expires or is stolen or core compromised not going to bother and I drop them might drop it, right? So So we had some people in this action that we’re talking about quarterly, right? Maybe kind of following up in a different way, a different time period. So it’s not every month, but I think you can do monthly as long as you are using it as a nurture touchpoint. It’s not just a receipt like you don’t want anything you give to your donors to just be a throwaway effort. If you’re taking the time to send it, you wanted to actually mean something to them. So if it’s literally just a receipt, how much value does that really provide? Like not a lot. OK, so something impactful for that month. Way reached. Yeah, I don’t know. Nothing’s coming to mind, but that’s why you’re the consultants in that. And I’m the consultant plan e-giving. Yeah, you know, one of the go ahead. You know, I’m just flushing out why I don’t have an answer. I don’t no more. No more detailed needed on that. I don’t have a suggestion, I should say, Well, one of the things that you know could be a really impactful way to leverage that Thank you. Moment is to kind of look at your sustainers file in winter, people the most likely to fall off of your file and then take that opportunity to do, like an exceptional thankyou. So we see you lose a lot after between one, three and four, right? Exactly. So maybe that’s the month where you send that hand written note. That’s like we know you are. We love you. We see you right? If you already you’re sending tote bags or calendars in your acquisition or something like that. Leveraging that with a special note two two sustainers at the quarter mark for the six month mark way have clients that do, like all out at your anniversary. Your thank you for being here for one year with us, you know, making it about them. There was miles so now and then again, tying it to the impact and, like people want to make impact and they want to feel important. And that’s true whether this is their first ten dollars gift or their thousand dollar gift or their one million dollar gift. And so figuring out the way that you say thank you that feels like they’re making that difference, that that matters. That’s part of a good donor experience, you know, And I think that carries through whether it’s sustainers or like an event volunteer who’s becoming a donor for the first time. That’s a different level of engagement with the organization and the fact that they have that history already with you eyes very powerful. And so, if you can reference that relationship in the content as well, that will go much further and building strengthening that relationship in the long term. Um, a lot of this subsumed in what we’re talking about is having these systems systems in place on DH, constantly tweaking them. Voice just cracked like I’m a fourteen year old is coming twelve fourteen. You gotta have these systems in place and somebody will be monitoring them. Christie, to your point, you know you can’t just set it and forget it. Or one of you said that I’m sorry, whose you bring up, but, um okay, so who’s responsible for these systems? Is this is this is in the development to Development department depends on the non-profit. It’s definitely a collaboration between, like some level and development marketing each non-profit is configured in a different, slightly different way. So, like, who owns things would change, But yeah, the data is really important on and having a two directional or multidirectional sink of key data components so that you can condition allies content based on those relationships from other channels. In other words, like sinking between your cr m and your email Exactly. Your texture responded. Yep. Yeah, and vice versa to write. If we are sending those offline acknowledgements toe online donors, you need that level of information. Ideally, there’s some source codes in there. So you know what sort of relationship they had with you before Andi, you know what sort of appeal? Our issue they came in on. So again, Was it dog me? Are you know, brovey meals are? Yeah, exactly. So yeah, that’s all very important. You don’t have the infrastructure setting that I always like. You know, you got to get your house in order before you invite people over, right? And that’s more about acquisition costs. But data is also super important. Like you can’t. You can start and then build and have a plan to scale because everybody can’t do everything right away. But you got to start with clean data. So can I ask a question? Is that not OK in this setting? Okay, So beat you up so much. How could I possibly say no to im those now, everyone? Yeah, Kristie hyre non-profit. So, like, what would you say about, like, not letting am not letting great be the enemy of good. So, like, invokes air. Just like we we don’t have the bandwidth for all of the data collection or all of the data sank. Like, where? Where is that starting point? Yeah, well, I mean, I think it depends on where you’re getting most of your gifts into, Like, what channel? You want to start with the focus on right, Because bang for the buck. If you’re If most of your gifts are checks in the mail, let’s focus on those confirmation acknowledgement letters, the receives and and the welcome kit direct mail package kind of offline pieces. So you don’t have to worry about the email side of the world if the date is not playing nicely right away. Vice versa. Obviously, here at ntcdinosaur mary-jo online focused, you start on the online site and Luckily with the online stuff you usually have the the thinks like you don’t need to sing because your email marketing system is in the same system. Is your donation processing system doesn’t have to be right plugging You could have a husband spoke solutions at that point, too. But for most of them, they are most of our clients, especially so you can excuse me. You can live also going over, yeah, latto happening at this table. A lot of personal latto personal, something momentous person and not a cheap hormones. So you can. You can create a somewhat cohesive donor experience with siloed channels. It is possible it just takes a lot more like work on an ongoing basis. In Official, it’s very inefficient. So I get out. You know, we talk about how much work it takes to set up the process in the beginning, to get a multi-channel like really integrated surround sound campaign happening. But if you’re not doing that, you’re putting in the leg work all the time to make sure that you don’t sound like two different organizations. An email indirectly, that’s very bad practice. Yeah, have some of the questions were some of the questions you got in your session that you thought were particularly interesting or I don’t know if they could be provocative, but interesting is good. Yeah. WeII did get questions about, like, just testing. What tide of creative treatments. People should focus their time on to test on DH. Tarsem. It depends, obviously, depends on the channel, but I think a lot of it for anything that will email and direct mail. Specifically, it’s trying to get people into the content in the first place. So whether it’s your subject line and send her name and email or your teaser on your outer envelope in the mail, both of those air very similar from a user experience standpoint on their very low bar. Easy tweak tests. Teammate teasers on outer envelopes. They work. Oh, they’re so important. They do? Yeah, that’s a good one example of a couple of good ones. I mean, for our for acknowledgements. Thank you. Gift receipt and close. Like, very clear. Okay, this is not an appeal, right? All right, we’ve got for acquisition. Oh, God, we’re off. We’re off on your own time. But I’ve always wondered about this, because when I see these things, and it’s not at all what I do know. What’s a good Christy? What’s a good acquisition? Uh, what do you call these on? The outer sabelo Theo. Good acquisition. What kind of depends on what’s inside or the organization. But anything that talks about matching gift urgent. Well, urgent. Open immediately that work. Sure, people respond to that Second notice reminder. Special gift enclosed for free gift. Yeah, free gift and clothes. I could notice that I didn’t notice. We’Ll stamp like reminders. They have the stamp it rough. It looks like it was damned. Yeah, Looks like it was a hand written. Oh, anything. Anything that looks like a human touched it. We call it the power of the paper clip because like, you can’t machine that. So if it anything that feels like humans have touched it will automatically get more attention. But it is a machine printing that Oh, yeah, but it looks like you’re just trying to create the experience of life came off their desk. But you people believe that mean yes, we’re not wear not I do believe this stuff like a human actually wrote that or somebody’s coming. Somebody had a stamp on ink pad and a stamp. I think it depends on the size of the organization. Like somebody’s probably not going to believe it as easily from AARP, but they will believe it from their local U S P c A. Well, so it just depends. Yeah. Alright. I’m really surprised that second notice open open urgently. Renewal is a very powerful word as well. So having renew does well yeah, renew your membership right on the teeth. Er, something like that. Okay, we’re hearing everything. You’re turning those. The winner was the other one Free. Free? Yeah. Just just a word. Free Well attached to something so free. Some very powerful words. Just free. Just wait. Just wait, OK? We got another, like, two minute and a half or so two minutes. What? What else? What else? Questions. Other question. They were good. Oh, gosh. You know, I feel like a lot of people had questions. Agent about sort of what it meant to take their online. Thank you. Experience offline. Dahna Few. There was a lot of questions about printing and paper. Yeah, favorite. Everyone’s favorite. Well, cause some of its first. So some organizations like conservation organizations are very paper free on DH. So but having the numbers that actually show that people who give to receive packages to acknowledgment gifts are better donors than people who don’t can make the case to the board members or to your CFO or whoever else that, like we really should think about this at some level. Maybe we’re not mailing every online donor. Maybe it’s not five dollar donors or ten dollar donors, but maybe at the fifty dollar donors level, those folks are like, worth that added investment. So having that numbers to back it up is really helpful, and any time you could decrease the time to second gift is huge on. Typically, most non-profits see one gift a year on average, whatever time of year that is. If it’s not sustainers. If you khun, change that twelve months between first and second gift to two months between first and second gift because people you have a greater lifetime value and hyre retention we’re seeing, I mean, especially with new donors, because they’re giving habits haven’t been cemented. Get we’re seeing anywhere from forty five to sixty five percent hyre retention rates across the board and hyre values. So it’s amazing. Okay. Okay. Christy, I’m gonna give you last words, like, fifteen seconds of motivation about, you know, making them love you. Oh, gosh. Well, that’s a lot of pressure. I know. You know, I think that if you don’t know where to start, just say thank you. Say thank you every way you can say it sincerely and say in a way that really means a lot to the folks who have given you their time, their money, their actions, whatever that looks like. It really goes a long way to improve your donor’s experience. All right, that was Chrissy hyre. She’s vice president of Innovation, Chapman, cubine and Husky. And sitting next to me is Brenda Homes, Vice president, Digital services Also at Chapman cubine, Cassie. And you are with Tony martignetti non-profit radio coverage of nineteen Auntie Si twenty nineteen non-profit Technology Conference. This interview, Like all of ours this year brought to you by our partners at Act Blue Free fund-raising tools to help non-profits make an impact. Come see. Ch is in sponsoring brovey radio. That is a great question to bring them when you bring that back to back to back to the main office way. We’LL do that. Thanks so much for being with us. Thank you. Next week, Google grants with the head of Google. Add grants Michelle her Tato, also from nineteen. Auntie Si. If you missed any part of today’s show, I beseech you, find it on tony. Martignetti dot com were sponsored by Pursuant online Tools for small and midsize non-profits. Data driven technology enabled Tony dahna em a slash pursuing capital P. Wagner CP is guiding you beyond the numbers weinger cps dot com and by text to give mobile donations made Easy text. NPR to four four four nine nine nine A Creative producers. Claire Meyerhoff Sam Liebowitz is the line producer. Producer shows Social Media is by Susan Chavez. Mark Silverman is our Web guy, and this music is by Scott Stein with me next week for non-profit radio. Big non-profit Ideas for the other ninety five percent go out and be great. You’re listening to the Talking Alternate network e-giving Wait, you’re listening to the Talking Alternative Network? Are you stuck in a rut? Negative thoughts, feelings and conversations got you down. Hi, I’m nor in Sumpter potentially ater tune in every Tuesday at nine to ten p. M. Eastern time and listen for new ideas on my show yawned Potential Live life your way on talk radio dot N Y c Hey, all you crazy listeners looking to boost your business. 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Nonprofit Radio for February 19, 2016: Innovation in Mississippi & Successful Giving Days

Big Nonprofit Ideas for the Other 95%

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Aisha Nyandoro & Cassandra Overton-Welchlin: Innovation in Mississippi

There are lots of stereotypes about social change in the deep South. We look at what’s really going on in one state. What are the challenges? What are the opportunities? Who’s doing the work? Aisha Nyandoro is executive director of Springboard to Opportunities and Cassandra Overton-Welchlin is a director at Mississippi Low-Income Child Care Initiative.

Aisha Nyandoro
Aisha Nyandoro

Cassandra Overton-Welchlin
Cassandra Overton-Welchlin

Caryn Stein: Successful Giving Days

Caryn Stein

What is key to make your giving day successful? How do you activate your community to make them super fundraisers? Which technologies are critical? Caryn Stein is vice president of communications and content at Network For Good. (Recorded at the 2015 Nonprofit Technology Conference, hosted by NTEN, the Nonprofit Technology Network.)

 


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Hello and welcome to tony martignetti non-profit radio big non-profit ideas for the other ninety five percent on your aptly named host we’ve got to listeners of the week first beth and lock in vancouver, british columbia, she’s at a fundraiser, beth and she tweeted, i quote, getting ready for work and listening to the-whiny-donor and tony martignetti i just love her exclamation excuse me, i gave the-whiny-donor life. Yeah, if it wasn’t for me, she’d be like a collection of one dimensional characters on your screen. I breathe life into her and gave her one dimensional audio. S o you know, can i get something? You know, besides listening to tony martignetti death? Thank you very much. Okay, lets try the next one. Professor brian mittendorf he teaches accounting at our hyre state university. He listens in his car and he tweeted a picture of my name on his audios screen on the car. And i just love knowing that he’s driving around ohio with my name on his screen. I just something very comforting about that. But then included in the picture was the avatar for the show and it’s a guy who’s in his seventies and wearing a bow tie and i don’t know what you think of my looks, but i have never worn a bow tie. So, brian, your toyota bluetooth is screwed up worse than the airbags, so drive carefully and you’re going around with the wrong picture on your car and that professor brian mittendorf is at counting charity. I don’t know too lacklustre listeners of the week i know who picks these people nonetheless, i’m glad you’re with me. I’d suffer the embarrassment of keratosis polaris if you rubbed against me with the notion that you missed today’s show innovation in mississippi, there are lots of stereotypes about social change in the deep south. We look at what’s really going on in one state what the challenge is one of the opportunities who’s doing the work monisha nyandoro is executive director of springboard to opportunities and cassandra overton welchlin is director of mississippi women’s economic security initiative, a project of mississippi low income child care initiative and successful giving days. What is key to make your e-giving day successful? How do you activate your community to make them super fundraisers? Which technologies are critical? Karen stein is vice president of communications and content at network for good and that was recorded at the twenty fifteen non-profit technology conference hosted by our friends and ten non-profit technology network on tony’s take two charity registration we’re sponsored by pursuant full service fund-raising data driven and technology enabled, you’ll raise more money pursuant dot com also by crowdster online and mobile fund-raising software for non-profits now with apple pay mobile donation feature crowdster dot com my pleasure to welcome first aisha nyandoro she’s, executive director of springboard to opportunities providing strategic direct support to residents of affordable housing. She’s been an academic evaluator philanthropist now and non-profit executive she’s been a fellow of the w k koala kellogg foundation community leadership network and ascend at the aspen institute springboard is springboard to dot or ge that’s t o and she is at nyandoro s t o r you sure? Welcome to the show. Hi, tony. Thank you so much for having me. Pleasure. Welcome. Also cassandra overton welchlin she’s, a licensed social worker. In addition to being director of the mississippi women’s economic security initiative, she worked with organizations from local to national to address the social, political, economic and ecological injustices in low wealth. Communities of color that grow out of racial inequities in public policy and she’s at sea welchlin cassandra welcome. Thank you for having me, it’s. A pleasure, ladies. Welcome from mississippi. Um, cassandra, why don’t you start by just saying a little more about the work that you’re doing at the mississippi women’s economic security initiative? What’s that work about cassandra we still have our kind of grew out of, um, a need to really hear more from women about what it is. They need to be able to take care of their families, and for so long, our organization has been working around getting low income working women access to child care so they can go toe work. We know that long come working, women don’t make a whole lot of money, and this child has subsidy really does add to that income so that they’ll be able to pay for that child care subsidy program our child care so that they’ll be able to go to work. Child care can be as expensive as college tuition, but if a woman has a child cast subsidy, then she’s able to, um, use less of her income for child care, more to go towards other things. And so we heard from women about what is that they needed, and so we wanted to put together, and jenna that responded to that. And so we developed the mississippi women’s economic security agenda to really try to put together a policy agenda that would improve the economic well being a women looking at child care, access to health care, access to equal pay and higher wages. And so ah women’s economic security agenda is there to promote those kinds of policies and put women’s voices front and center into the policy debate. And we’re the only ones in the south that’s doing this women’s economic security agenda and so it’s very important and that’s some of the work that we’re doing okay now did i have it as women’s economic security initiative? Is there a difference between an initiative and an agenda? It’s not the agenda is the policy piece. Okay, so the agendas policy. Okay, so what’s the initiative. So the initiative, um, it’s really kind of our overall work where we are doing coalition building. We are working to build, um, consensus among women legislators across the state. And so there’s several steps to that. And we’re doing movement building work within the state of mississippi inside of communities. And so the initiative fans across coalition building policy making and and really doing the civic engagement. Okay, cool policy level work. Excellent. Let’s bring ah, aisha and i should tell us about springboard to opportunities we just have about a minute and a half or so before break. Ok, great, well springbox opportunity works directly with families that live in a setting of affordable rental housing. We know that affordable housing is a critical step towards breaking the cycle of poverty, but in and of itself, it’s not enough on his own residents living in federally subsidized housing also needed part of services social capital, if you say so, to have overcome some of the challenges that they need to achieve and secure a more hopeful feature. This is where springboards opportunities comes in. We are built on the premise that affordable housing combined which strategic resident engaged services can provide a platform for low income families to advance themselves in life schooling work. We do this bite-sized serving is the connector between residents in the bradrick committee using strategic community partners, system programming to address the unique needs of our families were unique because we are one hundred percent resident driven, which means that we’ve listened. We’d listen, listen and made we act and we engage where the only entity in the mississippi doing the work on the ground, specifically with families that live in federally subsidized frontal housing. So, it’s, all things innovative in mississippi? Yeah, no coal, no kidding. Got two organizations that are unique in the south, right? Right, yeah, i know exactly where you, you know, unique in the fact that it’s a lot of overlay and there’s, a lot of overlap in the work that our two organizations are able to do to really help move not only mississippi ford, but the south. Florida’s well, okay, we’re going to go out for a break and when we come back buy-in cassandra, we’re going to keep talking about the work in mississippi, the challenges, the opportunity, the challenges, the opportunities stay with us. You’re tuned to non-profit radio tony martignetti also hosts a podcast for the chronicle of philanthropy fund-raising fundamentals is a quick ten minute burst of fund-raising insights published once a month. Tony’s guests are expert in crowdfunding mobile giving event fund-raising direct mail and donor cultivation. Really all the fund-raising issues that make you wonder am i doing this right? Is there a better way there is? Find the fund-raising fundamentals archive it. Tony martignetti dot com that’s marketmesuite n e t t i remember there’s a g before the end thousands of listeners have subscribed on itunes. You can also learn maura, the chronicle website. Philanthropy dot com fund-raising fundamentals the better way. Welcome back to big non-profit ideas for the other ninety five percent that other ninety five percent small and midsize non-profits that’s who we’re about it’s time for live listen, love, where are we? We got listeners chapel hill, north carolina and new bern, north carolina. Do you know each other? New bern in chapel hill? I’m going to be spending quite a bit more time there very shortly st louis, missouri, philadelphia, pennsylvania and there’s others, but let’s go abroad. Jakarta, indonesia is with us, seoul, south korea. Always so so consistent soul, thank you very much. Annual haserot mexico city, mexico when a star days, jakarta, indonesia i said jakarta and federal argentina we have argentina’s well, that’s a new one can’t do live listener love without doing a podcast pleasantries over ten thousand listeners, whatever you’re doing, whether you’re driving in the car with the the wrong picture of a wrong man on your screen, on that ah, wherever you are going to work over ten thousand listeners, thank you so much. Podcast listeners on whatever device you’re on whenever you listen and affiliate affections are am and fm listeners throughout the country, on those am and fm stations affections to our affiliate listeners and worry about toe. I think in the next few weeks we will be announcing a fume or new ah am and fm station affiliates. Okay, ladies, isha what’s the you know, we want to talk about the culture in mississippi, but i think we i feel like we can’t understand if we don’t know like the history of you know what? What’s what’s some of the history there that you feel impacts the current and impact your work, you know? Definitely. Well, you know, mississippi has a really unique in british history. I’m from mississippi, a comics of home grown goodness. So i love all things mississippi. But, you know, we do have a history of segregation, discrimination, jim crow. All of those things are really president part of our current reality, you know, unfortunately, we have one of the largest poverty rate in this country, and it’s also know blends over into childhood poverty one in three mrs to be children live in poverty. That’s, you know, sixty four, sixty four percent of these households are headed that single women. And so when you have that narrative shaping a community currently that believes and so what’s available if they released a future opportunities, and so that both of the realities that were working in but even though those are our realities of the people in this state love this state. We live here were working here that choice both could sandra and myself. You are from this area and we both chose tto go away to school and come back home to do the work and be grounded in the work. Because we understand the history of the space. We understand the uniqueness of the space. But we also understand the beautiful opportunities that are in this space. This well, we are a community rich in a loudly cultural in history. And by knowing that his three, we were able to move forward and write a brighter script in a new tomorrow. Okay, um, cool. Cassandra, do you wantto amplify anything or add to it, you know, just about about the history and what it creates for the for the present for your work? Yes. So i i’ll just agree with everything i usually says. And it makes the work. And as she says, she called herself, you know? Home what? Do you call yourself home home grounded in this? And i call myself the daughter of the south, a daughter of the south and it’s so important that we did come back home too, engaged in the work and try to improve our communities, poverty harms the life and the well being of our women and our children, and it also slams the opportunity. I mean, the doors of opportunity shut for them, no, and also diminishes the economic health of the entire state and saying that when mississippi annex policies and make, um, legislation that harms are disproportionately impacts community of color here it also impact the entire state not just that population in an impact, all of us, and so, as a result of that, um, we do have these deep, deep pockets of poverty that exists here, but yet we also have this resiliency that exists in our community. I mean, we are rooted in the civil rights struggle on the civil rights movement, and so a lot of that richness still exists here, where people continue to move forward and push through the heart hard walls, that, um, that have continually been built. But we continue. To push that down so that we can get hr families, make our families more economically secure and prosper, and so that our children can have these sustainable communities for generations to come. Cassandra is rich history and culture that is negative, but also we build upon that to move our community’s forward so that we can get more opportunities to our communities. And so so it’s it’s, good work, you know that being that’s being done, but yet there are some challenges that exist. Cassandra, why did you return to mississippi? I didn’t want to at first me just be clear about that. I didn’t want to because of what i’ve seen growing up in my own way in my own family, but there is a commitment to that family and commitment to my communities and one thing about me as a leader it’s important that i surround myself with other people who can hold me accountable to the values that were instilled inside of me. And so those communities came the other that people those people came together and say, cassandra, we need you back here because we need what you have to invest in those communities and so i came back and i came back, and i’m glad i did, because what i have is what my community needs and i didn’t want to be. And this is me personally be this trader where i’m going in other places e-giving and, um and and not giving back to the communities that invested in me, and so there’s this real value their of wanting to put back into my community what was given unto me, and so that’s a real value there. And i say, all the time when god made me, he really gave me a triple dose of from justice and what better place the ground that is here in this fifty? And so i wanted to return, and my family story is rooted in this place of, um, of grace of service on and also a poverty, and i wanted to be a voice for my family in that. Are you sure your work would be so much easier in some other part of the country? What brought you back to mississippi? You know, i don’t know it’s, not work, will be so much easier in other parts of the country, you know? I don’t know if my work would be is needed and other parts of the country, you know, you know. So even though doing its work in this is to be it’s difficult, i think the work of social change and community building it’s difficult in any context, does something cubine mississippi where this work it’s really hard. I think we as the country sometimes did not want teo deal with the injustices that exists that keep people paralyzed in the systems that keep people paralyzed and that’s just not unique to mississippi that’s the narrative, you know, throughout our country, in some places that so much to me. I really think my work would be much more difficult because i would not be ableto be the immediate menace stations of the work in action, and i would not i feel it, so i were living my purpose out loud and so the work will be difficult because i won’t be as committed. I want being grounded in it. The work that i am doing as the leader of springboard opportunities is particularly the work that i was called to do. I was built to do this. I was built to move. These community for teo implement this innovation that on lee as a model here in mississippi, but a model of how do you engage families in affordable housing system that can be, you know, replicated throughout the country for the work, i wouldn’t be any easier, it will be different. It would not be fulfilling, but, you know, it wouldn’t be me being in mississippi being here, it makes me ground it and in being ground it’s the only way that you can do this work because it is difficult, we are on the ground trying to change the narrative, changed lives in power, people. And that is not something that happens overnight. Andi the reason i said would be easier, i guess maybe i made it sound too pollyannish, but easier elsewhere. I was i was thinking of the i mean, i’m thinking of the challenges like around education being no solo funded and and recently, just within the past, like month or so, there was there were headlines about the failures of the child welfare system. You know, there’s just especially, you know, working in a population with with children, asia that’s argast thing i mean, you there’s. Just a lot of theirs just seems like there’s more challenges in mississippi now that you know that it’s not that is true. There are a lot of policies in mississippi that are unfortunately ineffective, but that’s why we have the innovation of programming and policy coming together on the ground. So cassandra the ram that she works in it’s really policy around that i work in this really grasses organizing in programming, and we’re able to bring the two together to really move the needle and change the narrative. So you’re right. The work would probably be easier in some places that were a little more liberal because we would have educational poverty policies worked for policies, childcare policies, transportation, all of the things that we all of the challenges that our families deal with. Those may not be as heavy a mountain to move, but yeah. Okay. Cassandra, let sze shift over to some of the opportunities. What do you see as being advantageous there? I mean, what do you what can you grasp onto toe advance the agenda. So ben jealous did an excellent report that was published by the center for american progress called truth south. And a couple of things he brought out in that and that we see manifested quite a lot. And i work is there’s some unique opportunities that we have right now. One of things that he brought up is this changing demographics that that’s happening but twenty forty three way will be a majority people of color state our country, and so as a result of that and that and even in mississippi and twenty, anna senses that show that, you know, white children were a minority here in mississippi. So we have some interesting opportunities where, you know, more people of color will be, um, a majority in our in our country saying that that has unique opportunities to do a couple of things. We know that people of color vote more progressively in their voting patterns, they vote for more progressive leaders, and they also, um, they and we also know that they get out and vote, so that creates a unique opportunity as we began to talk about how do we change the landscape and the leadership in our country, in our state houses at the local level as well, even at the national level. And so we have these unique opportunities, i think another thing is building because in the south, particularly in the south, we’ve had thes very conservative and x dreams leaders who post policies around on an attack on women’s rights, and as a result of that, they isolated white women. And so we found that if we can hold and bring along these white women as a part of a new voting block, then we can really shift an example. In four years ago, mississippi had an amid a ballot initiative, proposition twenty six, the personhood amendment where we’re going to completely limit how women were completed limit women’s rights around abortion and what happened, wass christian white women joined together with interface women of color to say i am pro life, but i’m also port port pro choice. My body is my body, so that presents some unique opportunities. The other thing is that the vote of the youth with black lives matter taking the country by storm it’s happening in every pocket of our community where young, bold young people are saying, you know, enough is enough my black skin is gold my black skin on my brown skin is important. And i’m not gonna let you do do this. And so you have these movements arising, but we can trace them back here in mississippi to the civil rights, civil rights, right, free family. Right. So these are some things that we could begin to build a bond too. Build these unusual alliances, alliances and these multi racial and interject generational voter coalitions so that we can transform the political power here in mississippi, but also in the deep south. Alicia are incredible opportunities that we have here to really move the things that we issue and i care about around our women and around, aren’t you? Yeah, i want to turn toe aisha aisha opportunities that you see in your work with with the the families, you know, you know everything next sandra has said, but i also see a lot of opportunities and the work is that there’s a changing tide. So you actually now have a a lot of individuals moving back home. So you have a lot of progressives and a lot of, you know, people going out to get educated but then doing like, the sand you and i have done, which are really moving back to mrs, being really growing, where you, you know, growing where your planet and getting e-giving back to your community and being more and still than involved within your community. So there’s a lot of opportunity there, but then also there’s a lot of philanthropy here in mississippi and in the deep south that we really don’t talk about there’s a lot of there was a lot of homegrown philanthropy was far individuals. E-giving but there’s also a lot of big philantech ity and individuals are really beginning to look at what we need in the region to change the narrative and really began to be the author of our own narrative and not letting the north or the east there other places really defined what this region is because we know what it is that we are beginning to work in conjunction more with the lance therapy toe really elevate the true story of mississippi? Okay, okay, are you sure? What about the special challenges of being a black woman doing this social change work in mississippi? So that’s, interesting question. I don’t see any challenges being a black woman doing this work, i think being a actually, i see no challenges with c it is nothing but opportunity. I am a black woman and eleven mississippi, and but with that, i understand what that narrative, maybe others other strike right to say what that perception, maybe two other than my perception of my reality in my abilities, but by that being the perception of others have made me a really hard worker. I work harder than most people that i know, but i work hard and i’m grounded, and i give all that i have to give. So being a woman of color doing this work in mississippi, it’s a beautiful thing, because because i’m grounded in community, i’m grounded in my history and branded in my narrative, i’m grounded in the elders, and itjust presents tremendous opportunity for me to lift up the challenges that i know you know, our present within my community and working on behalf of my community. Cool, cool. Cassandra wants the same question doing that doing that work as a black woman in mississippi. What was it like? Some of the things that i found on doing the work is so i ran for elected office. Oh, yeah, three years. Ago, i ran for state senate and one of things that i’ve found and it’s not just me, but other black women who have run for office and and this is really across the country is that you have, again, these gender inequities that exist, and it was hard for me to get the money to do what i wanted to do. It was very difficult to do that most people will. R r it is more eager to give money to i mean, to do this work more eager to give to me and to run for office to start a business we found, i found that also found that right? But so as a result of that, we’re having to build the strong coalitions and relationships among each other to reach across like i should say, we have these individuals that are engaging and more of this philanthropic community, and so we’re having to pull together some of these folks, some of our friends that have access to those resource is so we haven’t to think smarter about how do we get more of our blackbaud folks and black women into these elected positions? The other thing is that i use dahna doing our work, we also found i have found that it’s hard to elevate the voices of the people whom we care about. L’m the national platform, particularly in the media, it’s been very difficult to do that and to try to do it in a way that will change. As aisha says, the narrative of our communities and so being able to form these relationships with the feeling about the community and other people who may have access to resource is has been sochi. It goes back to this building, you know, these unusual alliances so that we can segway are in segway, away and through those platt forms so that we can elevate the voices of the communities that we care about. So i found that black women’s voices aren’t at the national level, the way it needs to be, and the communities in which we care about there’s a, um, they’re cassandra, but we’re moving towards that. And so, you know, those are some of the things that i found it, okay, we have just about thirty seconds left or so, and now you show i’m going to leave it with you, there’s. A saying that as the south goes, the nation goes, um what do you think that what you think the future of the nation is? I think the future of the nation looks bright, you know, the south is full of passionate, committed, innovative individuals who are connected to the space that were called to work in we understand working across sectors, we understand the importance of collaboration, but we also understand the importance of i’m making sure that all individuals just not the haves but all individuals, though that we proceeded to have nuts as well have a seat at the table, so we understand unusual alliances and create a partnership, and we understand the need of policy and effective programming, and we’re good stewards of our resources and were innovative, beautiful people, you know, the blues came from mississippi catfish colorings, all those beautiful things that you think about in the south, so i think the nation good, we have our challenges, but we recognize those challenges and despite that we’re moving for were being committed, and we’re going to do the good work. That’s asian nyandoro you’ll find her on twitter at nyandoro s teo and also cassandra overton welchlin at sea welchlin ladies, thank you so much. Thanks for sharing. Thank you. Real pleasure, right? Successful giving days with karen stein at the networks for good is coming up first pursuant and crowdster i’ve talked to their ceos, both of them. I know that these companies can help you in small and midsize non-profits they understand your challenge is they understand what your needs are, and they both have companies and products that have ah, that are designed to meet those needs. That’s ah, it’s trent recur at pursuant and crowdster that’s ah it’s, joe ferraro, their sponsors of the show because their products can help you raise more money. They both have terrific backgrounds in non-profit duitz and in corporate work, so they’re playing corporate solutions to the challenges that they understand that that you’ve gotten in joe ferraro att crowdster actually runs a non-profit so that’s pursuing dot com and crowdster dot com now tony’s, take two. Are you properly registered in each state where you solicit donations? If that question makes you cringe, then we should talk. And if you have no idea what i’m talking about, we should talk, you’re non-profit needs. To be in compliance with the state laws in each state where you solicit and that includes paper, mail and email, text text to donate if you have a donate now button on your website. That button is a solicitation when it goes live doesn’t really doesn’t matter if anybody ever clicks on it in any individual state or anywhere but when it goes live, that’s the solicitation and that triggers registration in at least half the states i can help on dh getyou into compliance. If we need to talk, you can get me at tony at tony martignetti dot com or the contact page at tony martignetti dot com and that’s tony’s take two here is karen stein from the march twenty seven twenty fifteen show and originally recorded at and t c twenty fifteen welcome to tony martignetti non-profit radio coverage of the non-profit technology conference twenty fifteen our hosts are intend the non-profit technology network. We’re in austin, texas, at the convention center, i guess now is karen stein. Karen is vice president for communications and content at network for good, and her workshop topic is the secret formula for successful giving days. Karen stein, welcome to the show. Thanks so much, tony it’s. Great to be here. It’s. A pleasure. Thank you very much. Thanks for taking time on a busy conference day. Yeah. It’s definitely exciting to be here at at the anti cia and see lots of old friends and make lots of new way. And so it’s it’s, always in one of our favorite events. Excellent. This is my second year here doing interviews on dh believe this is your second my second year here. And, of course, network for good has been here for many, many years. So since around two thousand seven, i think right for yeah, i believe so. First, long before amy sample ward was ceo. Definitely definitely. And i think it’s it’s growing into i think one of the premier non-profit events teo, be at i think so. I mean, that’s always what? You know, there are many conferences to go, teo. If for both attendees and exhibitors. But this is when we definitely make a point to always, always be out there. All right, so i’ll see you again next year. Definitely looks like a date. All right, all right. We’ll set you up with an interview for twenty sixteen um, successful giving days. So now i think the biggest probably most popular, is giving tuesday what are some examples of other ones? Yeah, so different types of giving days, they could be based around the time of year they khun b based around a region or an affinity group. So there are things like giving tuesday, of course, which is really the kickoff now for urine giving, and then you have things like give local america, which is focused more on regional giving in other community foundation states have their own giving days. We actually helped maryland due e-giving day for their state, and it wasn’t a maryland, yes, for their non profit organizations to the maryland non-profit association did e-giving day on and then you have ah, non-profits who want to come together and do giving days around affinity groups so things like give out day, which was really kind of focused around issues affecting gay, lesbian, transgendered folks and have those organizations come together not just to raise funds but also to think about how to raise awareness and use those social networks as a zit means to get their message out, i had henry teams as a guest about a month ago or so roughly talking about the success of e-giving tuesday generally and how what a huge spike there was for twenty fourteen he certainly emphasizes the decentralisation of it and all the sharing tools that are available is that common across the successful e-giving days definitely, i think that the reason why e-giving days have become so popular is because online fund-raising has become so popular, and it really has decentralized and and decouple the idea of fund-raising an advocacy from just not just the organizations, but it’s really something that everyone khun d’oh, and to think about how you can couple that technology with the idea that we have these large social networks, it’s really allowed that to take off in a very viral way, and we often talk about things going viral. This definitely has for sure, and i think it’s great on dh. So what are some other, you know, common traits, important components of a successful e-giving yeah, well, the thing is that that makes giving dae so unique, and i guess so effective is that it’s really using that sense of urgency? And we know that a sense of urgency, especially in fund-raising campaigns can really motivate people to act when they otherwise would not. And so having that limited window of time really gets people excited and it’s very focused, you have a lot of energy, kind of compressed in tow one day, twenty four hours, and it really gets people excited. And so i think, that’s one piece of it, right? I think it’s that urgency and to take that and then really empower people with a message and some fun sharing tools. So i think you hit the nail on the head there were thinking about how do you not just use social media as a promotion promotional tool, but to use it in creative ways with images, with videos with, you know, some kind of contests that could really encourage that excitement, right? Because that’s one thing that you definitely need forgiving day, you need something had to be fun, and you needed to be interesting, and you needed to be exciting because that’s, really what is going to get people to pay attention to you and be motivated to share that with their friends and their family? And so we think that that’s really one of the things that’s, that’s really important? So it’s, that sense of urgency, the idea that you’re having fun but it’s also this idea of specificity, how do you become very specific about what you’re going to be raising funds for in that day? And we find that the most successful e-giving dave gold gold, if you can’t really just be about general giving, it needs to have something else to it. It needs to have something specific, so maybe that’s a specific program that you’re working on, maybe that’s ah specific goal that you’re working tour, but it needs to be something, you know, maybe you’re trying to open a new soup kitchen and that’s the particular thing that you’re built, you’re raising funds for its not just about your your cause it’s about that one particular thing, because having that tangible thing again helps you be more creative and be very specific, and i think it gives people something to really grab onto and share and understand exactly where their money is going. Okay, interesting the specificity. So do you find that organizations that are just more general say on giving tuesday, you help us out today, it’s giving tuesday, they’re not being a successful is the other right? I think that there is if you’re not specific, you’re not going to be as successful. And i think that it’s not enough to say it’s giving tuesday, so give it’s the same thing as if you were saying now, it’s time for our annual campaign so you should give to us that’s not compelling for a donor, and so i think that, you know, if you can get very specific about the cause that you’re raising funds for maybe it’s a special, specific project, we see that that’s really makes a big difference because it also helps the non-profit get really clear about what their marketing materials are and what that message is, and it could help you stand out, especially on e-giving day we’re in so many people are actually putting out those fund-raising appeals having something unique can help you stand out above the rest. And so it’s really important for you to be specific about that ask because we know that that’s what donors are looking for, and that really does play into that idea of a e-giving day of really coming together to fund one particular thing that people care about. What should you be thinking about if you’re trying to decide whether e-giving day makes sense for your affinity group, not let’s let’s put aside participating in something national, like give local o r or giving tuesday if you try to think about it for your own, like university, for instance, you know, how would you what do you need to think through? Yeah, i think that what you really need to think about a couple different things. I think you need this the internal staff to be able to do it. It doesn’t have to be a large debt, but you do have to have someone dedicated to being the champion of that giving day for your organization. Because it’s really just like any other campaign, you need to have a plan you need to have. Ah, you know, one who’s going to man those marketing channels. So you need to have somebody dedicated to that. You need to really be able teo leverage social media. I mean, you could do e-giving day without social media, but i think it’s a lot more difficult. So you need to have we’re already started thinking about how do you build that up for your organization to use that as a lever? So you need to have some type of social media presence and you need tohave ah, fairly decent following, and that could mean different things for different organizations. A larger organization is going have probably many more followers. A smaller organization may not have as many, but the followers they do have maybe just his passionate so you need those people to amplify your message, and then you need a really easy way for people to activate, right? You’re sending out those messages through social media? How do you actually get those people to take action and make it very easy for them to do so in terms of donating all mine? Or if you’re called to action could be signing a petition? Most giving days are about giving funds and making a donation, but some organ it doesn’t have to be, but it doesn’t have to be at a lot of people use that as an opportunity to raise funds, but also to get people on their email lists he really expand their social network so some of those different asks that you could give to your supporters are yes, we would love for you to support the mission with a monetary gift, but you can also support the mission by sharing this this message with your followers and help us expand that network, and that could be really powerful, especially as we see millennials take hold that’s one way where they really i feel like they can make a big difference is being an advocate for that cause and that in some cases, especially for smaller organizations, can be a big win because they don’t necessarily have that built in base to communicate. Tio way assumed that most people know what e-giving tuesday is but give local america when i wanted to explain what that one is about because i don’t, i don’t think a cz widely known but it’s still very, very interesting. Yeah, it is, and i think it taps into this idea where so give local america is actually done through a lot of the local community foundations and it’s really all about giving local to your own local charity. So if you are living in austin and i think the us who actually, austin is having an event this week called amplify austin and it’s all about giving back teo to those charities and those organizations in the austin community. So it’s really focused on making sure that your charitable donations are staying within the community. I’m really getting people excited about what good is happening in their own backyard. So that’s really the premise of give local america’s toe leverage the networks and the non-profits through the local community foundations and created giving dae that way. So it is a national day devoted to giving, but it’s, the action is actually happening at the local level. We talk some about the technologies that you should be employing in your you’re now that you’ve decided to to embark on a given day, definitely so the great thing is that technology is really democratizing fund-raising and it allows that to happen at many different levels by really anyone, and so what we would would recommend is that you have a really strong online giving presents it should also allow your donors to make a donation online very quickly, but it’s also about mobile because we know that a great majority of people are now, reading messages on mobile email messages as well as the primary use of many social network it’s actually coming through mobile, and so that experience needs to be very mobile friendly so people could quickly take action, get that done and feel good about giving that gift rather than it being a long drawn out process. So that’s really critical. The other thing that you need to think about with your online giving platform is, is there an option for people to raise funds on your behalf? So is there an option for someone to come in and not just make a donation but actually amplify your fund-raising by becoming a fundraiser for you, so appear fund-raising functionality is also very important for that and then having some integrated social sharing tools. So we talked a lot about this idea of social media and leveraging networks has really allowed these giving days to take off so that’s one things that non-profits really need to think about is how are they going to then enable and empower those donors and those fundraisers to share their message with tools right on that page, right on their their facebook page on their web site just making sure that they’re making it as easy as possible to find those ways to share that message. And so i think those were really the things that are critically important. There are many other things that you could do. I mean, having a great email marketing tool, of course, is one and all these things are typically what you would find for any successful campaign, but particularly the mobile in the social and the pier fund-raising are extremely critical, forgiving days because you need to be able to activate as many people as possible within a very limited amount of time. I imagine there’s there’s lead time to this and, well, there’s, obviously lead time. That’s silly, but terms of getting some early adopters, maybe, you know, you got some key people lined up way in advance so e-giving day, what about some of the ground working s o u need t be planning ahead, so we would say if you’re if you’re thinking about giving tuesday and now it’s only march, but you need to be thinking about that now we would say that ideally, you would have about three to six months lead time. If you are thinking of of give local america, which is just in may, so that’s not too far away, you still have time to plan that. But those far ahead as you can get you, is going to be more. You’re gonna have more success oppcoll campaign and one of the things that you need to be thinking about when you’re planning that is being able to identify who are your most passionate supporters, whether those air people within your staff or your volunteer group, or maybe donorsearch one outside your organization, you need to be able to get those people on board are early, get their input, make sure they’re aware of what’s happening, and then equipped them with the right messages in the right tools to be able to really amplify that message for you. So that’s, really important to think about. Like what you’re hearing a non-profit radio tony’s got more on youtube, you’ll find clips from stand up comedy tv spots and exclusive interviews catch guests like seth gordon. Craig newmark, the founder of craigslist marquis of eco enterprises, charles best from donors choose dot org’s aria finger do something that worked. And naomi levine from new york universities heimans center on philanthropy tony tweets to he finds the best content from the most knowledgeable, interesting people in and around non-profits to share on his stream. If you have valuable info, he wants to re tweet you during the show. You can join the conversation on twitter using hashtag non-profit radio twitter is an easy way to reach tony he’s at tony martignetti narasimhan t i g e n e t t i remember there’s a g before the end he hosts a podcast for the chronicle of philanthropy fund-raising fundamentals is a short monthly show devoted to getting over your fund-raising hartals just like non-profit radio, toni talks to leading thinkers, experts and cool people with great ideas. As one fan said, tony picks their brains and i don’t have to leave my office fund-raising fundamentals was recently dubbed the most helpful non-profit podcast you have ever heard. You can also join the conversation on facebook, where you can ask questions before or after the show. The guests were there, too. Get insider show alerts by email, tony tells you who’s on each week and always includes link so that you can contact guess directly. To sign up, visit the facebook page for tony martignetti dot com. Duitz if you have big dreams in a small budget tune into tony martignetti non-profit radio, i d’oh. I’m adam braun, founder of pencils of promise. What more are we looking for? We’re in these people that we’re going to recruit early on long before the early the early adopter. Yeah, i think what you need to think about our, you know, our what is their story? Why do they support you? And i think that’s a really compelling question to start asking those people because that story you can use yourself, tio really inspire other donors, but you need to understand what motivates them. Why do they give to the organization? Why do they care about your cause? I really understand that i think what you’re also looking for frankly, are people that have large networks, you know, and influence yeah, i think i think he want at least two to three people on your, you know, group of supporters that can reach out to the media, maybe they have connections, you know, your board members are actually great people to get involved in this process because they are typically people that do have influence in your community or have connections, and that could be a great way to use them t get involved, get excited about what you’re doing and really, you know, kind. Of make give them something to feel proud about when they’re reaching out to their friends, family and colleagues about why your cause is so important. So those are some groups that you could look to you. But i think volunteers, board members, people that are recurring givers, you know, we’re really talking a lot about recurring giving it that network for good, because we know that those people are the most loyal in the most passionate people. They’re committed to your organization, and often times they will want to do more for your organization. So that’s, another group that you can look teo, you have excellent way of explaining this very concisely. Thank you, really. Oh, it’s, zvilli, oppcoll. Let’s think about trying to make the case in our organization if we believe it’s, right? And we’ve got the tools in place and we have staff that can support it and wear confident we’ve got some people in our networks who will take it on right? But, uh, maybe the board is reluctant or the orjust my immediate boss is reluctant with ceo, how do we start to make they bring these people? Yeah, i think there’s a couple of things that you can do, i think you can point to the larger success of these giving days there’s a ton of examples out they’re both from the hyre ed space, but also from from non-profits in general, that are raising a lot of money this way, and so i think you can use that as a springboard for having this conversation at your organization. I think you have to be realistic. You have to think about what is the investment that you’re making in this giving day because you do need to two planning to have some marketing dollars to put behind it. What we would typically say is that you should plan to spend about ten percent of what you hope to raise. And so i think, it’s important to be really clear on what that goal is for your organization, but it could be a way for you to expand your audience and raise more funds. And so i think it’s ah, this investment that’s well spent. I think the other thing to think about is a network for good. We’ve seen that this type of fund-raising so far has been additive for organizations. A lot of people are concerned. Well, zishe is cannibalizing other giving it actually is very additive, and it could be another way to not only grow your day donations, but it could be a way to grow that donor base, which is a critically important for so many non-profits especially those small to midsize folks that are really looking to build their lists. And so i think, that’s another way, it’s a it’s an opportunity, really, for those people to meet several goals at once and i think that’s a great investment of dollars. How do you assuage the people who do say it’s just going to cannibalize our annual giving? We’re just going to shift shift time of year that they give? Yeah. I mean, what we’ve seen in the data is that that’s not actually the case. And so, you know, we we do a lot of analys snusz on on your in giving. And what we typically find is that we see about ten percent of our animal volume for the entire year. Come in at the last three days of the year and that’s been pretty constant. And so this year we really interested to see what? How did this really big giving tuesday, if influence that. And so we saw that on giving tuesday. I think we are. Volume was about one hundred and forty eight percent. An increase over twenty thirteen on giving tuesday. I was like, okay, that’s that’s nice. But what happened later? Right? Because that’s really where more people are giving what we actually saw is that this past year in twenty fourteen, those last three days accounted for twelve percent of our annual bowling, and that volume actually went up those days got larger. So it’s really interesting. Now i can’t necessarily attribute that cause, but it was just interesting for us to see that happen because there was, you know, we were thinking like, well, maybe that is shifting, i think what it is is starting to just accelerate the way that people are giving at the end of the year, but what we saw is that people are giving both in both cases, right? They may not big be giving large amounts on giving tuesday as they will on december thirty first, but what we do see is that the largest average donation comes in on december thirty first and the second largest comes in on giving tuesday. And so it is and and that’s a bigger gift than what happened at any other time of the year outside of december first. All right, can we still have a few minutes left together? What? What more do you want share that that i haven’t asked you about? Wow, that’s a great question. Well, i think that the thing that we would really encourage people to think about is just start thinking about it, i think it’s a great way for you to think about how to message organization in a new way if you haven’t tried it yet. It’s a great way to activate younger supporters if you’re kind of looking for a way to get new people in the door get younger donors involved it’s a good way to activate them, right? Because they really take to this because it incorporates a lot of the behaviours and the technology that there’s so comfortable with using. And so i think, that’s another thing to think about if you’re looking to tap into a new demographic, i think that giving days are way to do that, and there are so many great examples out there that you can kind of look, teo, to see how people are doing this and it’s really, you know about being creative and about, you know, thinking about maybe a new way to spend your cause to people that haven’t heard about it before. Are there other national ones besides e-giving tuesday give local america others that we could participating before we start thinking about creating our own? Yeah, i mean, i think that the big too, you mentioned i think i believe there are there are other giving days don’t haven’t for some reason, i’m drawn, drawing a blank on that, but i think you know, the interesting thing is that we would really recommend that you participate in one that has maybe a bigger following. First, because a lot of those organizations, especially the folks, that giving tuesday, have a set of resource, is for you to take advantage of. And that could be really powerful for folks that are just getting started. And not quite sure now. Or forget also provides a toolkit for folks that outlines exactly what you need to do and when. And so, i think, it’s really important if you’re just starting out to try to go in on e-giving day, that’s already in existence, like one of these national days, or even a regional event before you think about maybe creating your own event, because i think you’ll learn a lot by doing that. Yeah, they’re sharing tools, a critical on dh there already set up. Exactly, you know. Want to reinvent the wheel your first time out. You wanna leave us with one one tip that you haven’t mentioned yet he’s going to think of something that just in the last minute, but yeah, definitely i wouldn’t say that on giving days, you know, just like any other day of the year, any other campaign it’s all about being very compelling and drawing in that emotion from the donor, so don’t leave that behind like we said, it’s, not just about the giving day it’s, about what you’re empowering that donor to make possible. So you really need to be able to think about tapping into emotion when you’re thinking about that fundraiser and thinking about that appeal letter or that social media post that you’re doing really leverage the powerful work that you’re doing and, you know, send that message out and draw all those emotions because that’s, what really is going to get people in the door? Thank you very much. Thank you so much, tony. My pleasure. Karen stein, vice president for communications and content at network for good, and you’re with tony martignetti non-profit radio coverage of the non-profit technology conference twenty fifteen thanks so much for being with us, i’m going to be an ntc twenty sixteen march twenty third, twenty fourth and twenty fifth in san jose, california. I hope you can go check it out. Info was at in ten dot or ge next week. Communicate with your communicators with kivi, larue miller and your event pipeline. If you missed any part of today’s show, i urge you find it on tony martignetti dot com. Where in the world else would you go? I’m still not sure about that. We got some last minute live listener love jin on china ni hao, new york, new york hey what’s up buenos aires, argentina bueno star days responsive by pursuant online tools for small and midsize non-profits data driven and technology enabled pursuant dot com and by crowdster online and mobile fund-raising software for non-profits now with apple pay mobile donation crowdster dot com our creative producer is clad meyerhoff sam liebowitz is the line producer gavin dollars are am and fm outreach director, and the show’s social media is by dina russell. This music is by scott stein be with me next week for non-profit radio big non-profit ideas for the other ninety five percent go out and be great what’s not to love about non-profit radio tony gets the best guests check this out from seth godin this’s the first revolution since tv nineteen fifty and henry ford nineteen twenty it’s the revolution of our lifetime here’s a smart, simple idea from craigslist founder craig newmark insights orn presentation or anything? People don’t really need the fancy stuff they need something which is simple and fast. When’s the best time to post on facebook facebook’s andrew noise nose at traffic is at an all time hyre on nine a, m or eight pm so that’s, when you should be posting your most meaningful post here’s aria finger ceo of do something dot or ge young people are not going to be involved in social change if it’s boring and they don’t see the impact of what they’re doing. So you got to make it fun and applicable to these young people look so otherwise a fifteen and sixteen year old they have better things to do if they have xbox, they have tv, they have their cell phones me dar is the founder of idealist took two or three years for foundation staff to sort of dane toe add an email address their card it was like it was phone. This email thing is fired-up that’s why should i give it away? Charles best founded donors choose dot or ge somehow they’ve gotten in touch kind of off line as it were and and no two exchanges of brownies and visits and physical gift. Mark echo is the founder and ceo of eco enterprises. You may be wearing his hoodies and shirts. Tony, talk to him. Yeah, you know, i just i’m a big believer that’s not what you make in life. It sze, you know, tell you make people feel this is public radio host majora carter. Innovation is in the power of understanding that you don’t just do it. You put money on a situation expected to hell. You put money in a situation and invested and expect it to grow and savvy advice for success from eric sabiston. What separates those who achieve from those who do not is in direct proportion to one’s ability to ask others for help. The smartest experts and leading thinkers air on tony martignetti non-profit radio big non-profit ideas for the other ninety five percent.

Challenge The Status Quo

"Change" courtesy of busy.pochi on Flickr
courtesy of busy.pochi on Flickr

“We can’t.”

“Why not?”

Lots of times there isn’t a good reason. Or even an articulable reason.

(Happy New Year! You have my good wishes for 2013! This has nothing to do with that, though I suppose you could adopt “challenge the status quo” as a resolution.)

From questioning the way you track prospect visits to revamping a newsletter concept to adding a theme to an annual dull event, don’t accept that which can be changed–and should be.

Have the courage to question to find out what can be done differently.

There’s just no need to live with that which you can make better. And no one more qualified to call the question than you if you’re in the trenches, on the ground, doing the work, suffering the stupidity.

Question. Challenge. Reject. Revolt.

The people who are crazy enough to think they can change the world, are the only ones who do.

Change doesn’t come in enormous, monumental shifts. It comes from incremental steps.

Take the first step. Ask why.

Nothing is perfect when it first arrives, so don’t let fear of imperfection hold you back. Be willing to make the change, then learn, improve and hone.

A boy scout leader wisely admonished me in my teens: tradition is often a mistake made more than once.

Don’t fear change. Don’t fear the unknown.

Challenge the status quo.

Nonprofit Radio for April 22, 2011: A Conversation with Hildy Gottlieb

Big Nonprofit Ideas for the Other 95%

You can subscribe on iTunes and listen anytime, anyplace on the device of your choice.

Tony’s Guest:

A Conversation with Hildy Gottlieb:

Hildy Gottlieb is the author of “The Pollyanna Principles“.

She will share her transformative ideas for nonprofits to create monumental change in themselves, their communities and the world.

Listen in while she shares her ideas. This is going to be exciting.

Top Trends. Sound Advice. Lively Conversation.

You’re on the air and on target as I delve into the big issues facing your nonprofit—and your career.

If you have big dreams but an average budget, tune in to Tony Martignetti Nonprofit Radio.

I interview the best in the business on every topic from board relations, fundraising, social media and compliance, to technology, accounting, volunteer management, finance, marketing and beyond. Always with you in mind.

When and where: Talking Alternative Radio, Fridays, 1-2PM Eastern

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Don’t forget to subscribe to the show’s podcast on iTunes. Download and listen whenever and wherever you want.

Here is a link to the podcast: 038: A Conversation with Hildy Gottlieb.

Hospitals Barter Care for Artist Talent

Blank canvas on easel

Two New York City public, nonprofit hospitals allow artists without health insurance (is there another kind of artist?), to barter their talent for medical care. The Artist Access Program is a brilliant, clever idea, and it could go further.

In the midst of our recession and high unemployment, all kinds of professionals are without insurance, while public hospitals are suffering short budgets and hiring freezes from cash-strapped states. Let’s expand the smart thinking at Bellevue and Woodhull hospitals to other professionals: attorneys; accountants; investment managers; social workers; the manual trades; nursing; technicians; human resources; and others.

Of course, there are hurdles, but with an attitude of “How can we do this?” rather than, “Here’s why we can’t,” there are considerable opportunities for hospitals with hiring freezes and Americans without health insurance.

I’d love to hear from hospital folks: how could your facility get this done?