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Nonprofit Radio for June 10, 2016: Your Little Brand That Can & The Future of Email

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Julia Reich & Stuart Pompel: Your Little Brand That Can

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Julia Reich & Stuart Pompel at 16NTC

Control your brand. Respect your brand. Consistently message your brand. Recruit strong ambassadors for your brand. Julia Reich is branding consultant at Stone Soup Creative and Stuart Pompel is executive director of Pacific Crest Youth Arts Organization. This is from the Nonprofit Technology Conference, NTC.

 

 

Sarah Driscoll: The Future of Email

With Sarah Driscoll at 16NTC

Email still rules and it will for a long time. Sarah Driscoll urges you to be multichannel, mobile and rapid responding. She’s email director and vice president at 270 Strategies. This is also from NTC.

 

 

 


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Oppcoll hello and welcome to tony martignetti non-profit radio big non-profit ideas for the other ninety five percent. I’m your aptly named host. Oh, i’m glad you’re with me. I’d suffer the effects of a non mia if i got a whiff of the idea that you missed today’s, show your little brand that can control your brand respect your brand consistently message your brand recruit strong ambassadors for your brand julia rice is branding consultant at stone soup, creative and start pompel is executive director of the pacific crest youth arts organization. This is from the non-profit technology conference and tc and the future of email email still rules and it will for a long time sabat driscoll urges you to be multi-channel mobile and rapid responding she’s email director and vice president at two seventy strategies that’s also from tony steak too be an insider. We’re sponsored by pursuing full service fund-raising data driven and technology enabled, you’ll raise more money pursuant dot com also by crowdster online and global fund-raising software for non-profits with apple pay for mobile donations crowdster dot com here are julia rice and stuart pompel welcome to tony martignetti non-profit radio coverage of sixteen ntc the twenty sixteen non-profit technology conference we’re hosted by n ten the non-profit technology network, we’re in the san jose convention center san jose, california with me now is julia rice and stuart pompel they’re topic is the little brand that could multi-channel approach for the small non-profit julia is branding consultant at stone super creative and stuart pompel is executive director, pacific crest youth arts organization. Julia stuart welcome. Thank you. Pleasure. Pleasure to have you both. Julia. Welcome back. Thank you from lester’s ntc we are highlighting a swag item at each interview. And it’s, i think it’s only appropriate to start with oh, and ten non-profit technology network score and which i love the reverse side of as zeros and ones. You have your bits and bits and bytes. I believe that anyway. Zeros and ones swag item number one goes into the swag pile. There’s more to come. All right, julian stuart let’s. Talk about the little brandraise multi-channel approach. Small non-profit tell us about about the organization, please. Stuart okay. Pacific crest is a drum and bugle corps and a drum and bugle corps is an elite marching band and it’s made up of students who audition maxes out of one hundred fifty members. And this is a group that performs on field competitions and civic events. But primarily the unique aspect is a tour that our students go on for two months during the summer. Based where so we’re based in something california headquarters in the city of diamond bar. But we have kids from one hundred cities across the state, and we actually have some kids from other countries as well. My, my father was a percussion major, taut drum while taught elementary school music, but his major was percussion. And i, his son, was a failure of a drum. Then i must a clarinet. I tried violin. I practice. So you went from the easiest instrument to the most difficult. I yes. Yeah. My progress showed this, and i was just i was a bad student. I didn’t practice. You only go to lesson once a week. You’re not gonna learn. You have to practice it’s. Very true. What is your background in music? So i was a musician growing up. I didn’t. Major in music in college, but one of the founders of pacific crest on when i first started. I was the percussion instructor, but the group is made up of brass, percussion and dancers. And then a show is created very intricate blend of music and movement. And then we take that show on the road, as i said earlier. Oh, and the unique aspect of it is a two month tour where the kids leave the comfort of their homes and we travel by bus and stay at schools and performed four, five times a week. And just how old are the kids? Sixteen to twenty one. Okay. All right. Julia let’s give you a shout. What does it tell us about stone? Super creative? Well, i’m a branding consultant, and i work mostly with non-profits and hyre ed and i help them to find and communicate their authentic brands to help them maximize mission impact. Okay, very concerned, wei need to be multi-channel right? Because our constituents are in all different channels. And of course, we want to meet our constituents where they are. So we need to emphasized multi-channel ism. Is that true? Multi-channel is, um yes. Okay. It’s like, not discrimination, not we’re not discriminating cross channels. Uh, how do we know where which? Channels we should be focused on because there are so many. How do we know where to be and where to place emphasis? Wow, it really depends on the organization. It depends on the organization’s audiences. I’m sorry. Well, there’s, a broad. How do we know where our organization’s, how do we assess where our organization ought to be? I think that’s a better question for stewart to ask t answer in terms of his organization. Okay, all right, well, all right, where is where is? Where is pacific crest? So way have we have a number of channels, but the website obviously is the first communication place, but on social media, we’re where we limit ourselves to instagram, facebook and twitter and youtube as well we’ve not moved to any others and there’s some philosophical reasons, for example, snapchat is not one that we’re going to move towards of, but we know that the demographics of our organization are trending, you know, in terms of people who are fans and kids who are interested in being apart it’s going to be in that younger age group, and so we know that twitter is becoming more popular with that age group, and so we’re going to do a little bit more there to attract that age group. We also know that facebook is trending mohr a little bit older now, and so there are certain things that we do on facebook that we’re not going to do on twitter. Sorry or vice versa. That’s ok, wei have a small set here they’re squeezed into ten by ten so don’t worry if you knock the night might not mike’s okay? And so that’s how we make some of our decisions. You know, we start with what’s out there a lot of times the kids bring it to us, we should have a snapchat, you know, or we should have a facebook page, or we should have a facebook page for the trumpet section and a facebook page for the you know, and so we have to, you know, we had to be mindful of which ones of the official ones and which ones of the unofficial ones and how are we using social media to communicate? We may be using the facebook page to communicate to the outside world, but we also use social media to communicate within the organization because students, by and large, do not read email that’s for old people. I’ve been hearing that. Yeah, okay, okay. And so so were communicating to our members. Of course i’m going to send email to them in their parents, but we’re also going to follow-up with did you check your email on facebook? Okay, uh now i think it’s important people to know that you do not have any full time employees, we do not pay anybody full time, so we have people who work. Ah, lot of ours, yeah, say that jokingly, but no, we do not have full time employees. Most of the money goes right back into the program. Okay, back-up what’s the philosophical objection, teo snapchat i think for us, the fact that a picture could be taken and or a comment could be made and then it khun disappear and the fact that it doesn’t necessarily disappear because it can be forwarded on, we lose control over it. And so for us, it’s, not something that we’re comfortable with right now. Snapchat is not a bad thing in and of itself, but when it comes to having kids in the group in the organization, we just felt that we’re not ready to do that at this point. Okay, you’re tuned to non-profit radio tony martignetti also hosts a podcast for the chronicle of philanthropy fund-raising fundamentals is a quick ten minute burst of fund-raising insights published once a month. Tony’s guests are expert in crowdfunding, mobile giving event fund-raising direct mail and donor cultivation. Really, all the fund-raising issues that make you wonder, am i doing this right? Is there a better way there is? Find the fund-raising fundamentals archive it. Tony martignetti dot com that’s marketmesuite n e t t i remember there’s, a g before the end, thousands of listeners have subscribed on itunes. You can also learn maura, the chronicle website, philanthropy dot com fund-raising fundamentals, the better way. Dahna julia anything you want to add, teo building a a fiercely loyal group of supporters? Well, i would just add to what stuart was saying in terms of controlling the brand, you know, that’s something that’s important to consider and something we talked about in our session has one of the differences between the for-profit sector and the non profit sector is that we want to take control of our brands so that, you know, we’re in control and people aren’t just making up our brand for us, but at the same time, you know, i think traditionally for-profit sorr yeah, the for-profit sector and, you know, they kind of tightly policed their brands or at least they have, i think that’s changing, but i think with non-profits it’s more there’s, more flexibility built into the brand. So, you know, snapchat i can understand, you know, that’s not gonna work but it’s not it’s more about, like guiding your brands across the channels and, you know, there’s more of ah, sense of collaboration, i think inflexibility with with guiding your brand across the channels, there’s more of an interaction with your audience rather than tightly policing it. Okay, stuart, especially. The age group that you’re dealing with there has to be a degree of flexibility absolutely right? Yeah. That’s. Why, when if the kid comes to me with an idea than you know, that’s, we listen to those ideas because especially now they know how they want to communicate. And sometimes where we come in from the management side is that’s great information. Thank you so much. But you need to understand that there’s a larger picture here. So when a kid comes to me and says, i think we should have different facebook pages for different sections, you know, and we should have a brass facebook page, and we should have ah, regular facebook page and a percussion facebook page. My question back to that student in this case, a nineteen year old kid just asked me that who’s, a member of the corps for three years, i said, can you please explain to me in your mind what’s the marketing reason for that? What is the marketing benefit of having so many different channels that essentially say the same? And so then we get a conversation going to help the students understand that while he may be seeing a small piece of this there’s a larger piece to consider who becomes a teachable moment in that way, but it also then opens up the question of, well, if you want to communicate that way within sections that’s a great idea, let’s, go ahead and make those pages, make sure that i’m an administrator on them so i can see what’s going on and then that’s and that’s how we kind of grew the internal facebook and the i guess, the official facebook okay, you knocking mike twice now? That’s enough! I’m going to stop using my there’s just we’re so excited, we’re just just stick yah late ing wildly teo convey their passionate we are. Thank you so much, stuart. Thank you. Also let’s say julia that’s every file of something something stuart said, not little listening, listening he’s listening to the nineteen year old who want to do something that probably isn’t isn’t in the best interest of organisation, but there’s still a conversation about it listening and all your channels way amplify how that gets done effectively and really, you know, really exgagement well, i think it’s about knowing who your audience is, um, you know, you don’t want to just put your brand out to every single channel in the hopes that it sticks somewhere, you know? I think, it’s what stewart saying is really important, he’s listening to his audience, he knows exactly who is audience is on and he, you know, he’s he’s lucky in that sense, because it’s kind of a built in audience and he’s able to listen to them closely and know, you know, where they want to learn their information, where they want to get engaged, and i think, you know, ultimately all of this leads to trust and trust in the brand, you know, if they feel like they’re being listened to, they’re going to trust the brand, and once they trust the brand, they’re going to support the brand, become advocates, let’s spend a minute defining the brand way you mentioned a few times. I want people to recognize that it’s more than just logo and mission statement amplify that, would you? For us that the brand? Sure. Well, you know, i present the definition of brandon my session, and it was, you know, generally accepted for for-profit sector definition, which is that it’s your reputation and you know, it is your reputation. I agree with that, but it’s your reputation in order to gain a competitive advantage, so that doesn’t really work with non-profits. It is about your reputation, it is about your sense of identity, but you’re not really looking for a competitive advantage, per se. I think what you’re trying to do is clarify what your values are, what your mission is in order you fit in the community, right, and then ultimately, i think, it’s about collaboration, you know, that’s where non-profits do the best work and make the most of their impact. Their mission impact is by collaborating, okay. How do you think about you’re the brand? Stuart, a cz you’re dealing with, a lot of young people are exclusively young people well know their parents also how do you how do you think through this that’s? A good question, because we’ve we’ve had to come to terms with that a number of times because especially with the youth group, the thing that you’re doing is not necessarily what you’re doing, okay? So this producing a show and going on the road and performing that is what we’re doing in terms of the actual product. I guess you could say that we’re creating the program we’re putting together for the kids, but when you’re dealing with students or young people in general, you have to go beyond that. You have to go beyond the we say, you got to go beyond the music, you’ve got to go beyond the choreography and the competition. There’s gotta be a larger reason there’s got to be a so what? To this whole thing and for us, it’s the unique aspect of leaving on tour for two months and something really transformative happens to a kid when he is forced to take responsibility. For himself or herself for sixty days of lock down? Yeah, and for us, it’s maturation, maturation requires coping skills, and as adults, we cope with challenges throughout the day wouldn’t even realize it anymore, but there is an issue in this country, and the issue is that students don’t have the coping skills that are past generation tad there’s a variety of reasons for that that i don’t want to get into, but we create that a pacific crest when you go on tour and you’re living on a bus and you’re driving through the night and not getting as much sleep is, maybe you want to and it’s still hot, but you still have to rehearse and we have a show tonight and people are depending on you. The coping skills get developed quite quickly and learning how to cope and learning how to deal with those challenges leads to maturity. Maturation is a forced condition isn’t come from an easy life, and how does your use of multi-channel strategies online contribute to this maturation process? Right? So they don’t necessarily contribute to the maturation process, but when we communicate what we do, it’s always about the life. Changing experience, even we’re recruiting. We’re recruiting kids and we’re saying we want you to do pacific crest or come check us out because this is going to change your life. It’s not about performing in front of the audience is they already know that’s what they do, they already know they’re going to get into that we want to explain to them and their parents. This is why you’re doing this. You could be in the claremont, you symphony you, khun b in your local high school marching band, you can play little league, you go to the beach, you can do any of these things. But if you want an experience where people are going to applaud for you and it’s going to change your life were the place to go. Julia, how do you translate what stuart is saying, too? Fulwider cem cem strategies for actually achieving this online in the in the network’s. Uh, well, you know, stuart and i met because we were working together. I was helping him with his rebranding a few years ago on dh as part of the process of re branding. You know, there were several questions that i posed. To him, gee, i don’t have those questions in front of me right now, but, you know, it was it was pretty much about, like, you know, who are you? What do you dio and most importantly, why do you do it on also, you know, what is it about what you’re doing is different than what other organizations are doing? What makes you unique, you know, and then ultimately that lead tio three different what i would call brand messages that piss off across has been able to use in one form or another, you know, across their channels in their promotion of their brand, i don’t know, stuart, do you know the brand messages off the top of your head? And we could maybe give an example of how those have been used, okay, what are they? So the first one and these air paraphrased is to bring together a group of kids who are like minded and and want to be in a very high quality, superior quality performance group that pushes them right, okay, the second brand messages that were here to develop your performance skills, okay, which is an obvious one, but needs to be stated, and the third one is the life skills that i mentioned earlier, where we’re going to create an experience that changes your life because of the unique aspect of the tour. And so we hit those super hard in all the channels and all of our communications. So when you mentioned, how else does this manifest itself in communication when we’re talking to people about i’m donating to the civic krauz we’re not talking about donating so we could make beautiful music we’re talking about donating so that they can change a kid’s life through music so that the drum corps becomes the way we change lives, not the thing we do in another cell vehicle, right method rights and it’s about consistency in promoting those brand messages in some form or another, you know, distilled down to their essence. And i think that that is really important when you’re talking about brands. But how do you achieve this? Uh, but this consistency multi-channel some channels, very brief messages. How do you how do you do this, julia? Well, we gave several examples of what you have to think about. Like you know what should be in your mind? Well, i think with every type of marketing communications thatyou dio you want to think back to what the brand represents, you know? So, you know, let’s say your values are, you know, integrity and education, you know, when your personality is fun, you know you can think about while is every message that i’m putting out there. Is it fun? Is it promoting this idea of integrity of educating the child? You know, that’s, those are just examples. But i mean, you can kind of use those as benchmarks. It’s. Almost like the brand is your i like your north star pointing the way, way not a very good that’s. Excellent metaphor. Maybe an analogy. No, i think it’s okay, stuart, who at pacific crest is is producing our managing the channels? Is that all? You? No, we have a social media manager. Okay? And what he does is he uses a nap location called duitz sweet to queue up her posts, but he’s also, we also use him as an internal manager. Two that doesn’t make sense. We use him to monitor what the students facebook pages, because students might say all kinds of things about the organization. And once in a while, there might be something that gets said or posted that is not reflective of what we are, who we are, and then i can always count on brandon to send me an email saying saw this on the kids site and i’ll i’ll contact the kid and say, we need to have a conversation about this post and that’s, so so we kind of do it both ways, we manage it internally, a cz well, as externally, so i don’t know if that answers your question completely, but i’m i’m not in every box of the orc char, but when it comes to communication, i’ve got my finger on that pretty, pretty tightly. Julia hyre maybe how can i be a larger organization, but not huge? But, you know, just a five person organization, i mean, how can they manage this the same way stewart is trying way stewart is doing? But on, you know, smaller scale organisation, how do you sort of manage the integrity and without it being controlling, right? That’s a great question eso when i work with clients, i make sure that if we’re going to go into a branding process that there’s a branding team that really represents all levels of the organization and its not just the marketing people or it’s, not just the executive director, i think it needs to be the executive management team, but i also think it needs to be, you know, everybody, not every staff person, but just every level represented, you know, at the organization, you know, the admin person, maybe it’s a programme, people, i think it could even be bored members, beneficiaries of your services, you know, on some level, i think that they need to be involved in that branding process, and then what happens is that the end? You know, everybody has kind of bought into this idea they’ve contributed, they’ve been heard and they become your brand ambassadors. So you’ve got internally, you’ve got people who are being consistent and engaging in conversation in the same way externally, you know, it’s it’s kind of this marriage of internally, the brand identity is matching with the brand image externally, so it’s, you know, it’s, you are who you say you are, you’re walking the walk and people people get that yeah, i’d like to add to that because julia said something that i hadn’t really considered. We were even talking in our session today. We have a very disagreeable love that we have a session idea for a new session. So we have ah, what i call a disaggregated staff of people. So, you know, we have a few full time or sorry full full time focused on admin, like myself and our operations person and are finance person book keeper, right? But we also have all the people who teach the kids and these folks have to be ambassadors for the brand as well. So when our program director hires a new person to be in charge of all the brass instructors are all the percussion instructors. And we have a team of forty people who work with these kids. So the person in charge of the brass section we call the caption head he and i are gonna have a conversation and we’re going to talk about what the goals are. Pacific crest. And the first thing that he’s going to realize is competition is not part of the goals because it’s not part of the brand. Okay, it’s, it’s. Definitely something we do. But when i talked to him or or her, anybody who’s going to be in charge of the staff, they need to understand what pacific crest is all about, what we’re trying to do and that, yes, i expect you to make helped develop the best brass program that we can have so that the kids have an amazing experience and we can represent ourselves. But there’s a larger reason for that because i want these kids to learn howto work hard. I want them to learn the coping skills, to mature, to feel responsible for themselves and to each other, those air, the outcomes, you’re exactly not not a prize at the company, right? And then and and i and i have jokingly say that every single person on the staff is part of our retention team, you know, and part of our fund-raising team like as good a job as they do of instilling that brand all the way through the organization through the death of the organization is what helps tell her tell her story. More importantly, if i’m in charge of the brass program and now i’ve been told by the director that this is what we’re looking for. Now, when i go find my trumpet instructor and my french horn instructor and my tuba instructor, i have to make sure that they also believe in that same philosophy. And so the nice part for me is once the caption had buy into it, then i’m pretty confident that the people they hyre are also going to buy into that, and so it flows all the way through the organization. Okay, yeah, essentially grand ambassadors, yes, julia and ambassadors, he’s recruiting brand ambassador, random brassieres, duitz a new head of of the percussion section or the right. Yeah, because i mean, the way i used to do it is i would go and i would meet with, you know, the executive director or the marketing director or whatever in your dork, right? Right, right. And, you know, and then we would talk and, you know, then i would, you know, go back to my studio and, you know, work my magic behind the curtain and come back and present them with their brand. And guess what? That doesn’t work at all. You know, because that it’s, you know, either like it or you don’t like it. Collaborative, right? You haven’t been part of the process, right? So it’s harder for you to become an ambassador for it. Buy to get that buy-in right. Right? I mean, have the buy-in yeah. Now, it’s just really about facilitation, making sure that everybody’s heard and, you know, getting everyone on board so that they can own the brand. When it’s, when we’ve come to the end of the process, okay, that seems like a cool place to wrap it up. Okay? I like the idea of the brand ambassadors. Thank you very much. All right. Julia. Right. Branding consultant with stone soup. Creative on stuart pompel executive director, pacific crest youth arts organization. Julian stuart. Thank you so much for sharing. Thanks for having us. Thank you. Thank you. Thank you. Tony martignetti non-profit radio coverage of sixteen ntcdinosaur non-profit technology conference san jose, california. Thanks so much for being with us. The future of email coming up first. Pursuant and crowdster you know them velocity is pursuance fund-raising management tool. This is something that was created to help the pursuant consultants internally manage. Their client campaigns, and it was so successful for the company that they rolled it out so that you can use it for your campaign. Without a consultant, you use it on your own it’s your tool to keep you on task, managing time against goal that’s critical whether you have just one person doing fund-raising or you are a team of fundraisers and you have a director of development or vice president, they’d be using the dashboard in the management tools and the fund-raising team, the individual fundraisers will be managing their activities, their priorities, their time against goal with their dashboards, the tools velocity it’s at pursuant dot com helps you raise more money crowdster peer-to-peer fund-raising what kind of events do you have coming up that you may want to crowd source? Have you’re volunteers and your networks out bringing their networks into your event, whether it is ah, gala or a five k run? Or you have an anniversary coming up, maybe it’s, even next year or something? Not too soon to be planning, especially for anniversaries. Crowdster sets you up with the tools that you need the micro sites for each of your volunteers all the social sharing tools, video capability pictures, of course, and the management administration dashboards that you need to oversee the whole campaign you talk to ceo, where else is that gonna happen? Joe ferraro, joe dot ferraro at crowdster dot com where else can you talk to the ceo? Tell him you’re from non-profit radio now tony’s, take two, i urge you to be a non-profit radio insider i hit this last week and i want to do one more time. If you want to know in advance who the guests are going to be, what the video is for the weak also includes takeaways from the previous show. Go to tony martignetti dot com the e mail icon in the upper right and you’ll get a weekly insider alert. Email from me that’s, tony’s take two live listener love got us in the love now is the time now is the time for the live list, their love so grateful to everyone who is listening live i can’t shut you out by city state country because we’re pre recorded today, but you know the love goes out. It doesn’t matter whether it’s pre recorded love or it’s live love. It’s live listener love and you are listening live you get the love how much simpler can i make it live? Listeners love thank you for being there podcast pleasantries, whatever device, whatever time schedule, whatever time shift you got us in i’m very glad you’re listening pleasantries to our pod cast audience and the affiliate affections always last, but never, ever released affiliate affections to our i am an fm station listeners throughout the country so glad you are with us. Thank you for being here. Am and fm affiliate station listeners affections to you here are, uh, sara driscoll also from ntcdinosaur on the future of email. Welcome to tony martignetti non-profit radio coverage of sixteen ntc the non-profit technology conference this is also part of ntc conversations. We’re in san jose at the convention center. My guest now is sara driscoll. Sarah is the email director and vice president at two seventy strategies. We’re gonna get to sarah in a moment talking about the future of email for the next ten years. First, i have to do our swag item for this interview and it is some locally sourced coconut thing. Crackers from crowdster crowdster non-profit radio. Sponsor actually. Crowdster and local crackers. The crowdster crackers. Thank you very much. Crowdster way had these two the swag pile for today. Okay? Sara driscoll, the future of email for the next ten years. Twenty sixteen to twenty twenty six. You’re pretty confident. You know what this is going to look like? Absolutely. Absolutely. You’re not just pretty calm. You’re absolutely confident. No qualification. Okay, um, how do we know what? Well, how do you know what’s going on what’s gonna happen in ten years? Well, i should say i don’t know exactly what’s going to happen, but what we do know is that email isn’t going anywhere. So there’s a lot of debate right now in the tech and non-profit space about, you know, is email still a resource that my organization should be investing in, you know who even check their email anymore? No one reads them everyone’s getting way too much of it all the, you know, millennials are on snapchat and twitter what’s the point of, you know, really investing my email list anymore and the truth is, email is still stronger than ever. I actually just came from another panel where email revenue was up twenty five percent in twenty fifteen the year before, so people are still reading their e mail there’s still donating it’s still one of the most powerful ways to reach people online, we just have to get smarter and more strategic about it. Okay, now maybe there is some age variability, so if your if your constituents he happens to be exclusively sixteen to twenty five year old, maybe email is not the best channel for you. Ah mei is still maybe a channel, but maybe that’s not what your priority should be that’s ah, great point and something that where we’re definitely looking at in terms of you know you not only want to just you don’t want to just rely on one tool for everyone multi-channel write. The most important thing is to look at who your supporters are, what your goals are and make sure you’re meeting your people where they are and so that’s kind of the biggest piece that we talked about yesterday i had folks from the sierra club and act blue join me to talk about their current email, listen, what they’re seeing and the number one theme was yes email still. Alive and well, but it’s no longer king, the most important thing is to make sure you’re going not just with email but really integrating it with all of your digital tools, so making sure supporters are seeing you not just on email but also on social media and just using email as one of the tools in your toolbox, not the only one and consistency across these messages, right? Absolutely we actually to seventy. Our digital ads team recently has been playing around with testing facebook ads that correspond with email. So is someone who reads an email, maybe clicks away from it, then goes on facebook and season ad with the same ask, are they more likely to then go back and don’t have that email on dh it’s across the board? We’re definitely seeing lift there. So with so much of all human so many touchpoint thes days and people having such for attention spans, the more you can get in front of them, the more you can get into their brain, the more likely they are to take the actions that you want them. Tio okay, um, a lot of lessons came out of the obama campaign four years ago now, since so center in a presidential cycle again want to refresh our recollection about how groundbreaking a lot of their work was? Absolutely yeah, and that’s something that, you know, we are three xero everything about this now is, you know, the obama campaign was four years ago email is absolutely huge then is it as huge now as it was back then? The answer is yes, you’re seeing it with hillary and bernie raising tons of tons of money on line, and and it was that same back in in twenty twelve, we raised more than half a billion dollars online over email alone, and i think to really key things came away with from that campaign one was that you should not be afraid of sending maury male ah lot of people, you know, probably complain, and when i tell them today that i was on the obama joint brovey multi and they say, oh, god, they were sending you yeah, yeah, and so they say so it was you who sent me all those e mails, but we tested it thoroughly and we saw no, really no effective sending more email, not everyone’s going to read every single one of your e mails that people who are really, really, really upset about it are might unsubscribes but they’re not the people who you want to reach anyway, they’re not going to be your your top online advocates and supporters if they’re not willing tto gett many male and and you didn’t see large rates of unsubscribes onda well, especially in terms of the people who we want to hit those online donors people. We had one group of people that we segmented out and sent maury mail every single day, so we sent them one or two additional messages. So we’re talking now for five, six emails a day those people actually gave more than the other group because again, it’s about, you know, people have so much email in their in box that you want to just make sure you’re getting in front of them. A lot of people won’t even notice how many you send, and you want to make sure that you’re hitting them with the messages that they were going to respond. Teo but i think more importantly, the reason why are our strategy of sending maury mail? Worked was because every single email felt really personal and really relevant. So, you know, this is your other take away, yeah, yeah, yeah. So we spent so much time crafting the messaging, developing really, really unique center voices that the most felt like they were coming from the president from the first lady from rufus gifford, the national finance director on dh that’s, the philosophy would take a two, seventy two is making every making email personal, so, um, it doesn’t feel like more email or too much email if the email that you’re reading is really strategically targeted to you and feels really personal and timeline relevant what’s happening in the world, it doesn’t feel like, oh, they’re just sending me another email. It’s oh, they’re sending me an email right now because they need my help to achieve this, and if we if i don’t step up and help right now, there’s going, we’re not i’m not gonna help solve this really urgent problem, and and one really clear indicator of that twenty twelve was when we sent the last email from the national finance director rufus gifford, and he said, you know, it was election day. Or the day before like, this is going to be the last time here for me on this campaign, you know, it’s been a wild ride sort of thing. Twitter actually kind of exploded and people were legitimately sad to see rufus go there like we’re going to miss burnam is your proof is i’m gonna miss seeing you in my in box every day, and that was someone who had sent them hundreds of emails, so it just shows that if you take the time to craft really personal messaging that really treats your email subscribers as human beings, they’re most of them will respond really, positively. All right, you gotta tell me what it was like to be just part of the obama campaign and specifically in the in the email team when when you were breaking ground yeah, it was breaking out like i’m a fourteen year old cause i’m so excited, what was that like? It was incredible is definitely one of the best experiences of my life. How’d you get that job? Honestly, i i actually just applied through ah, an online form. One of my friend sent me a list servant said the job. Posting was writers and editors for the obama campaign needed and weinger actually fording that to a friend and saying, ha, like you talk about dream job, i’ll never i’ll never get it, and i didn’t expect to hear back, but i did and you know, the leadership there, it shows that they really were looking for people who are committed and also just great at what they do. It wasn’t about who you knew. They were biggest one to find people from outside the normal realm of politics, and i was working in a really small non-profit at the time, and they saw me and they they liked my rank simple, and here i am today, that’s outstanding, so they didn’t. They didn’t want the the established direct mail on email consultants for inside the beltway, they truly wanted really good writers and on dh that’s something that that i talk about all the time now my current Job at 2:70 whenever i’m hiring, i always say i want great writers first, whether it’s for email, whether it’s for digital, anywhere because digital is all about storytelling and that’s how you move people to take action is by telling them a story that they were gonna feel andi want teo to respond to. And so it all comes back to the words, even in this tech age, around a tech conference, but i’m still, you know, the tools and tech is really important, too. But it will only take you as far as the words that you write twice yesterday came up in interviews that a logical appeal causes a conclusion, but an emotional appeal causes inaction on the action is volunteer, sign forward, share, give, you know, whatever that is, but it’s, the emotional appeal that it creates the action that we want. Absolutely. People are goingto take the time out of their busy days. Toh ah, volunteer, or, you know, give any their hard earned money unless they really feel, and they really believe in it. Okay, all right, so let’s, uh, all right, so let’s, dive into this now, a little more detail. The future. Mobile now we already know that email needs to be mobile responsive is that i hope they’re way past that stage or people still not providing mobile response of emails right now. We actually said that on the panel yesterday, when when we when i introduce the question the panel it was, you know, whether or not my e mail needs to be mobile optimized shouldn’t be a question anymore. It’s more you know, how can i continue innovating and continue optimizing for mobile? Something like my julia rosen for mac blues on my panel said that tamora around forty percent of all donations they processed this last year were from mobile, and they brought in. They just celebrated their billion dollar. So you think about, you know, how i consume email in digital content these days. It’s mostly it’s on the bus when i’m goingto work, you know, it’s when i’m on my couch, watching tv on and it’s almost exclusively on my phone, so on and it’s, not just about making sure it looks pretty on a phone the most important piece now and where where i think especially non-profits can continue to push is making the entire user experience really optimized and really easy, so that goes to saved payment information platforms like act blue and quick donate, making sure you’re capturing people’s information so they don’t have to pull out their credit card on the bus and type in their numbers if they’ve given before you should have it and they nowadays people can click, you know, with single click of the button, and their donation goes through the same thing with the advocacy messages and it’s things like making sure that your, you know, landing page load times are really fast on that they aren’t being slow down with too many forms or too many images. You want people able to hit your donate link on get there immediately or whatever action you want them to take because you’re gonna lose people if they have to sit there on the you know again on the bus forever waiting for your page to load and it’s the more barriers that you can remove, the more likely people are going to follow through. Should we be thinking mobile? First, designing the email for mobile first rather than as the as the add on? Absolutely jesse thomas, who? Is that crowd pack was also on our panel yesterday, and he said that he which i thought was brilliant, he now has his designers and developers do their previews on on a phone. So usually when you’re previewing a new website, you know, it’s up on a big screen, but that no one is going to be looking at it on a big monitor. So he literally has the developers pull up a phone and say, you know, here’s where we’re at in staging so they can, you know, make edits and go from there, okay, okay. Okay. Um, mobile acquisition. You have ideas about acquiring donors and or volunteers or whatever constituents, supporters? Absolutely. Eso from now until twenty twenty six? Yeah, i think it’s just going to get harder and harder. We’re noticing, you know, the quality of of names are going down more and more people want a piece of the pie and i think it’s. So it shows just how strong a male is because people are still are trying to grow their less, which they should and the traditional platforms like care too and change it order still great, but again with mohr and maura organizations rightfully looking to grow their list, we need to start figuring out how else we can get people in the door, so i don’t have the answer. I think this is one of these places that the industry really needs toe latto innovate in i i think that one area that non-profit especially can really ah, investing maura’s peer-to-peer on, but also their people are constant, asking me, how do we get you gnome or more teens for millennials onboard and just going back to like we’re talking about the emotional appeal, people are much more likely to do something if, if asked, comes from their friend or family member esso, i think the more we can get people to reach out to their own networks and bring people onto email list into the these communities on their own, those people are going to be so much more high quality to than any donor that you, you know, that you buy or any listen let’s build that you do that way, so i’m just gonna ask, is a state of acquisitions still buying or sharing lists with maybe buying from a broker or or sharing or somewhat with a similarly situated organization means that still where we are yeah, it’s definitely still worth it to investing list acquisition i always say you have to spend money to make money, but it also goes backto, you know, quality over quantity. I would never recommend an organization going out just buying swaths of names just to say they have ah, big list, you only want a big leslie, you can go to those people when you need that truly yeah, yeah, i do think one area that the industry has grown a ton lately, and i just really going to continue to is in digital advertising, so in the past used to be that you would never you wouldn’t think that you could acquire donors, you know, through facebook ads or that sort of thing and that you didn’t want to ask money over advertising, but in the last year, we’ve really seen that change, and people are really starting to respond more to direct ass over advertising and there’s so much more that we can do there, and in general, the non-profit industry really lags behind corporate marketers, so i think about, you know, my own online experience and i’m constantly being followed around by that those boots that i wanted to buy, but i didn’t, and things like that and, um, the corporate spaces so good at really targeting people with exactly what they want booty just glanced at exactly, but then they’re there and then suddenly they’re in my head and i’m like, oh, maybe i do want them, and more often than not, i buy them, which i shouldn’t. But i think that’s where the organization’s really need to go is really highly targeted, highly personalised messaging that responds tio people’s previous actions are they bun hyre kayman having been on your site for exactly, you know, it’s the most simple exactly just let people tell you the messaging that they want to receive and the type of types of actions that they’re interested in and yes, you can in that digital advertising is going is a huge, huge space for that. But, you know, not every non-profit has a butt huge budget, but you can still look at your own data and figure out okay, who are my people who seem to really like social actions or people who are on ly about advocacy petitions? And target your messaging that way. Let your own data show you the types of emails you should be sent there. Okay, so you so you have a lot of the intelligence. You just have to mind it. Yeah, you have to know what to look for, and you have to take the time, which i know, having worked in non-profits time is your biggest scarcity. So but it’s, so worth it. Really make sure you’re looking at your data and tailoring your messaging that way. Like what you’re hearing a non-profit radio tony’s got more on youtube, you’ll find clips from a standup comedy, tv spots and exclusive interviews catch guests like seth gordon, craig newmark, the founder of craigslist marquis of eco enterprises, charles best from donors choose dot org’s aria finger do something that worked and they only levine from new york universities heimans center on philantech tony tweets to, he finds the best content from the most knowledgeable, interesting people in and around non-profits to share on his stream. If you have valuable info, he wants to re tweet you during the show. You can join the conversation on twitter using hashtag non-profit radio twitter is an easy way to reach tony he’s at tony martignetti narasimhan t g n e t t i remember there’s a g before the end, he hosts a podcast for the chronicle of philanthropy fund-raising fundamentals is a short monthly show devoted to getting over your fund-raising hartals just like non-profit radio, toni talks to leading thinkers, experts and cool people with great ideas. As one fan said, tony picks their brains and i don’t have to leave my office fund-raising fundamentals was recently dubbed the most helpful non-profit podcast you have ever heard. You can also join the conversation on facebook, where you can ask questions before or after the show. The guests are there, too. Get insider show alerts by email, tony tells you who’s on each week and always includes link so that you can contact guess directly. To sign up, visit the facebook page for tony martignetti dot com. Lively conversation. Top trends and sound advice. That’s. Tony martignetti non-profit radio. And i’m lawrence paige, no knee author off the non-profit fund-raising solution. You have ah, advice around rapid response. Yeah, i love rap response so way. Talking about after a donation or, well, after some action has been taken by that we mean no wrappers. One’s mohr is just respond to something that happens out in the world. Okay, yeah. So event that’s topical? Absolutely, yes. So on. And this is a struggle that we had in twenty twelve, and i think every aa lot my clients have and that every organization has is where you spend so much time cal injuring and planning and designing these amazing campaigns, as you should. And then, you know, something happens, and every single time i’ll tell people you want to respond to what’s actually happening in the world doesn’t matter how how much you love the campaign you had planned for may be this day. People are going to respond much more to what they’re seeing and hearing and feeling rather than what you’re, you know, the committee’s trying to crack for them from you. So and i think, there’s ways that organizations can set themselves up for success with rapid response. So first, is this having a process for it? So, you know anyone who works in email knows that you can spend a lot. You get bogged down approvals processes and getting emails actually set up and out the door. Make sure you have a plan for if something happens that you need to react, tio, that you’ll be able to turn something around quickly expedited approval, absolutely put out the layers that we don’t really need you to get this out within hours. Really, we’re talking about our absolute, the quicker you want to be the first person in their in box and that’s, you know and and and also you don’t wantto on lee, send the one email, though, and then walk away and say, we did our operas, rapid response. We’re done it’s a big enough moment. Keep it going. You should, you know, make sure you’re following up with people who took the action with different actions to take and just keep the keep the drum beat up for as long as its people are paying attention to it. Okay, okay. Let’s see are their automated tools that weaken, weaken you can recommend around rapid response that that help i would say automation is actually that is is great and i think is a huge space that non-profits and grown as well. So again, corporate marketing so much of what you see, those drip campaigns, the re targeting you get is automated esso they have a lot more time tio, you know, think of the next creative thing to dio rather than just manually setting up the next email to send you know, an hour after someone visit their website, but it’s, when you’re playing with automation, it’s really important to not just set it and forget it because of moments like rapper response. So if you have ah triggered welcome siri’s set out for new people who join your list, don’t just let it go for a year and not updated with what’s actually current and relevant, same thing if you if you know that you’re going to be having automated message and going out and then something happens, you want to make sure that you’re going back in and either advising or pausing it, especially if it’s unfortunately never. Want this? But if it’s a tragedy or something out in the world, you also really don’t want to seem tone deaf. So automation is great, but and we actually talked yesterday about, you know, if we’re all going to be replaced by robots one day robots can do all of the automation take a lot of the work off your hands, but they don’t have the brains and the heart to think about. Okay, wait, what? What does a user really want to be hearing right now? Be sensitive exactly sensitive to what people are feeling? Yep, reading okay, okay, fund-raising have ideas around fund-raising lots of ideas about fund-raising i think about it way too much. I mean, this could bea, you know, you talk about fund-raising for hours, i think the interesting thing right now that people are seeing is we saw we saw this huge boost in email on online fund-raising, you know, around twenty twelve and with all of the ground that we broke their and things like quick donate all these new technologies appearing, making it easier for people to give online, so we saw a huge boost around then and now and also my clients and organizations i’ve been hearing around here are kind of seeing a plateau effect, so let’s say you’ve done all the optimization. Sze yu have the tools, but and so you probably saw some huge a huge boost in your numbers, but now you know, what do you d’oh and so and with and it’s also like the cat’s out of the bag with the male fund-raising right, like people know that it works so now everyone’s doing it and that gets back to the volume issue where how do you break through the noise? That’s? Why, i think it’s super important oh, really? Look, at first we’ll continue toe investing your list, get those new people on board, but also look at the people that you currently have and make sure that you’re you’re targeting them effectively so things like making sure that you’re sending the right ass amounts for people segmenting by previous action taker. So if someone’s dahna someone who is an offline volunteer but probably be a wonderful online fundraiser for you two and too often organizations treat they’re people in silo, so they’re volunteers are out in one area and digital isn’t really touched them? Their direct mail people are in a whole other area, then they’re online givers are also treated differently and it’s so important to look at each user individually as a whole person and making sure that you’re there recognized that there recognized for their relationship with the organization. Surveys could help. Here is really simple where we had someone on the show yesterday talking about just like five or six questions surveys? How many times do you want me to do? Do you want to hear from us? What channel do you want to hear? When should we ask you for for your your gift? If they’re assuming they’re in annual about a sustainers but, you know, so simple, like survey and listen yep, yeah, and then adhere to what they asked, absolutely so again, because there’s so much volume the more personally khun make your messaging, the more like the people are to respond. Another thing i’d say is there’s also, people often ask what the magic number of fund-raising emails is a year, but i think it’s so much more important toe to make sure that you’re developing really creative and interesting and timely campaigns, so look at your entire year and you really do have to start a year back and figure out what’s, you know, if they’re big moments that you know of that you can create fund-raising campaigns around. So, you know, giving tuesday is a great example of it that’s when it’s really blown up in recent years because it’s such end organic fund-raising opportunity that people are listening to in paying attention and they want to be a part of, and now the challenge is figure out how to create those moments your own moments, right? Because so many people are now involved in giving tuesday it’s hard tto tto break through the noise. So look at your calendar. Figure out what your giving day could be, where khun, you drum up noise around your organization and the more that you can tie it to a specific date so you can then have a deadline and a goal and ramp up your volume towards it. The more likely people are toe to pay attention, you know it’s all about crafting that urgency in a really authentic way. Okay, we’ll leave it there. Sara driscoll. Okay, great. Thanks so much. You’re loaded. With information, talk about enough for our how did you get this into ninety minutes are over long. Okay. Sara driscoll she’s, the email director and vice president at two seventy strategies and this is tony martignetti non-profit radio coverage of sixteen ntc the non-profit technology conference. Thank you so much for being with us next week. Stephen meyers with his book personalized philanthropy if you missed any part of today’s show, i press you find it on tony martignetti dot com. Where in the world else would you go? I’m starting to see some clarity about whether to continue this lucid lucidity is approaching. We’re sponsored by pursuing online tools for small and midsize non-profits data driven and technology enabled pursuant dot com and by crowdster online and mobile fund-raising software for non-profits now with apple pay crowdster dot com our creative producers claire meyerhoff sam liebowitz is the line producer gavin dollars are am and fm outreach director to show social media is by susan chavez, and our music is by scott stein be with me next week for non-profit radio big non-profit ideas for the other ninety five percent go out and be great xero what’s not to love about non-profit radio tony gets the best guests check this out from seth godin this’s the first revolution since tv nineteen fifty and henry ford nineteen twenty it’s the revolution of our lifetime here’s a smart, simple idea from craigslist founder craig newmark yeah insights, orn presentation or anything? People don’t really need the fancy stuff they need something which is simple and fast. When’s the best time to post on facebook facebook’s andrew noise nose at traffic is at an all time hyre on nine a m or eight pm so that’s, when you should be posting your most meaningful post here’s aria finger ceo of do something dot or ge young people are not going to be involved in social change if it’s boring and they don’t see the impact of what they’re doing so you gotta make it fun and applicable to these young people look so otherwise a fifteen and sixteen year old they have better things to dio they have xbox, they have tv, they have their cell phones. Me dar is the founder of idealist took two or three years for foundation staff to sort of dane toe add an email address card. It was like it was phone. This email thing is right and that’s why should i give it away? Charles best founded donors choose dot or ge somehow they’ve gotten in touch kind of offline as it were on dh and no two exchanges of brownies and visits and physical gifts. Mark echo is the founder and ceo of eco enterprises. You may be wearing his hoodies and shirts. Tony talked to him. Yeah, you know, i just i’m a big believer that’s not what you make in life. It sze, you know, tell you make people feel this is public radio host majora carter. Innovation is in the power of understanding that you don’t just do it. You put money on a situation expected to hell. You put money in a situation and invested and expect it to grow and savvy advice for success from eric sacristan. What separates those who achieve from those who do not is in direct proportion to one’s ability to ask others for help. The smartest experts and leading thinkers air on tony martignetti non-profit radio big non-profit ideas for the other ninety five percent.

Nonprofit Radio for August 29, 2014: Your Personal Brand

Big Nonprofit Ideas for the Other 95%

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Dorie Clark: Your Personal Brand

Dorie Clark
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Think about going out on your own? Are you already? You should meet Dorie Clark. Employee? You still should meet her. She’s the author of “Reinventing You: Define Your Brand, Imagine Your Future” and she’s with me for the hour.

 

 

 

 

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Oppcoll hello and welcome to tony martignetti non-profit radio big non-profit ideas for the other ninety five percent. I’m your aptly named host. Oh, i’m glad you’re with me. I’d come down with booty news fever if it came to my attention that you had missed today’s, show your personal brand are you thinking about going out on your own? Are you out already? You should meet story clark she’s, the author of reinventing you define your brand imagine your future and she’s with me for the hour on tony’s take two. I’ve got time away this week. Did you get yours? We’re sponsored by generosity, siri’s hosting multi charity five k runs and walks i’m really joyed to ah, welcome dori clark here to the studio. She’s, a marketing strategy consultant, professional speaker and frequent contributor to harvard business review and forbes, associated press and fortune, have dubbed her a branding expert. Her book is reinventing you define your brand, imagine your future and it’s being translated into russian, chinese, french, polish and tie out of time she consultant speaks for the ford foundation, yale university, mount sinai medical centre, google, the world bank, microsoft, morgan stanley and the national park service you’ll find her at dori clark dot com on twitter she’s at dori clark dorie, welcome to studio tony, thank you for having me, it’s. My pleasure. I’m glad you’re here alive in person and, uh for the full hour to real pleasure. Um, the personal brand. What what is the personal brand? Well, your personal brand is really a synonym for your reputation at a very basic level. The term personal brand came into popular use starting in nineteen ninety seven, when there was a well known cover story in fast company magazine by management guru named tom peters called the brand called you and so people began throwing around that term personal brand, but really what? It’s, what it’s talking about something it’s referring to has been happening for millennia, which is what is your reputation? What people think of you? And is it what you might wish them to? You have? Ah, very interesting journey that brought you here. You’ve done a lot of diverse things about different things in your background share it’s true it’s true writing, the book reinventing you really initially stemmed from my own personal experience because i’ve had to reinvent myself. Many times i after graduate school, i got a master’s degree in theology. Very young. Yes. You were very young student. Yeah, yeah. Harvard divinity school, right. It’s true. I went to college when i was fourteen. Graduated. One is eighteen, so i got the i got the master’s degree at twenty that’s. Remarkable. Yeah. You know, just kind of kind of what? You now in college. You were in college of fourteen. That’s, right? That is really something. And where was that? Where’d you go to college? They haven’t early entrance program at mary baldwin college in virginia. So i did that for two years, and then i transferred to smith, where i finished it up, but i was from a small town in north carolina. It was very boring, so i needed to do something. We’re in. We’re in north carolina. I grew up in pinehurst, which is famous for its golf resorts. I am going to pinehurst this afternoon. That’s. Really impressive. I own a home there. I’m not kidding you. Yeah, i didn’t know you’re from pine er’s. Yes, jane. What street did you grow up? My grip on linden road, if you know what. I don’t think that’s a pretty big road it iss my home is on thunderbird circle wow, darryl woods. Oh, my goodness. I’m going there this afternoon to see my bags. We came in studio c. Them there. I’m going this afternoon. Awesome! What? You can say hi to my mom. I’ll hook you up. It’ll be fan. You are not from that small a town. Pinehearst is very well known for golf. I don’t play golf. Do you play golf? No, that was my that was my teenage rebellion. You know, i could have smoked crack, but instead i said no. I am not going to play golf. That is how i’m going to rebel xero did smoke crack? No. Okay. That’s. Not the path you chose. No. I mean, the u s open was just there. You know, it was world. It was world renowned just just in june. That’s, right? Usopen, men’s and women’s was just there. Absolutely. What a remarkable coincidence that i did not know. I’m glad. Well, when you said north carolina always asked what town finer and your mom’s still in on linden boulevard? She has moved. She’s moved to southern pines. Now but she is vicinity? Yes, i might have dinner in southern pines. A chef warren’s. All right, well, we’ll make sure to connect you she’s fun. Holy cow. Alright, pinehurst, north carolina that’s, right. So the first person i met from there, but go ahead. So you were brilliant because you were doing very well in the pinehearst. The school’s? No, no doubt. Well, i had i had to flee pinehurst because it’s very small. And, you know, aside from the gulf is, you know, so so yeah, that sort of propelled me teo to move on and go to college early. But when i want to finish college, i got my first job. That i got was as a reporter, and i loved it thought it was great. But about a year into it, i get laid off because i had unfortunately chosen a bad time to get into journalism because the industry was starting to collapse. So i needed to do something different. I managed to get a job doing press on a political campaign on a gubernatorial race in massachusetts where i was living. And then my candidate lost. And so then i had my sights trained. On working on the next presidential election. This was two thousand for and so i did manage to get a job doing press on this presidential campaign. I became a spokesperson, and unfortunately, i can that it lost. So this presidential campaign bradrick arrack who’s worked for howard dean. Okay, yeah. So exciting. Campaign that was not successful. What was the what was the year? It was two thousand for two thousand four, i was behind. Okay, yeah. And so after that, i got a job. Like like many of your listeners in the nonprofit sector, i decided that i would metoo two major things that i wanted to do it either wanted to do communications at a large non-profit or i wanted to run my own small non-profit and so i ended up doing the latter. I get hired as the executive director of an organization called the massachusetts bicycle coalition, which was the statewide advocacy group for biking in massachusetts. We had thie robust budget of one hundred fifty thousand dollars a year. And from that, we managed teo squeak out about two point five staffers. And we ran a really tight bootstrapped operation which many of the people listening here can probably relate to know for sure that come for some one hundred fifty thousand dollars is what they’re aspiring to that’s, right, exactly. And and so then i did that for two years and then launched my own consulting practice, which have been doing for the past eight years, and so is part of that. I write books, i give talks, i do marketing consulting, and i also teach for a number of business schools, including duke’s, fuckwit school of business. Which brings me back to north carolina quite a bit interesting. Maybe we’ll hook up in north carolina sometime that’s, right way are here, both in new york, too, so it’s that is considerably easier, but we have a world of options, tony. We could do it here in north carolina, but i don’t play golf either, so we don’t have to worry about gulf. Uh, i don’t really care for it, and i don’t know, i watch it. My house is on one of the courses, but it’s a good thing. It’s, a quiet sport, it’s, very noninvasive sport, that’s, right? When now i think we should we should say that i’m gonna approach this with dori, sort of as if you’re for people who are on their own or maybe they’re in a non-profit, you know, and they’re and they’re thinking about going off on their own, as you did. But this our conversation certainly applies to people who are employees and intend to remain employees, right? I mean, they also have and should be fostering their personal brand absolutely it’s ah it’s increasingly essential. I mean, one of the things that i realized in the course of writing reinventing you is that, you know, perhaps for self evident reasons. If you are an entrepreneur, consultant, things like that, you need to have a strong personal brand because it’s, part of your marketing, you’ve gotto attract clients to you and things like that, but having a strong personal brand is equally important if you were inside an organization because really, fundamentally what it is is a form of career insurance. Too many people don’t think about it, they just, you know, do their job. They’re busy people, and they don’t really spend a lot of time thinking about what their reputation is and unfortunately, if you are not aware of it, i mean doesn’t mean that you have to be thinking about it twenty four seven but if you don’t think about it, sometimes it means that other people may be getting not the full picture and not the correct picture about who you are and what you’re capable of, and if their vision of you is stuck in the past, it means you’re probably missing out on opportunities because things that you might really want to do opportunities you might really want to have your not going to be on people’s radar screen for that. You, uh, you break the branding process into into three very nice phases, which we’re gonna have plenty of time to talk about before go out for a break. Why don’t you just introduce us to the two or three phases? Absolutely, tony, as i describe in reinventing you, there are three fundamental stages to personal branding that people need to go through the first is getting getting a sense of what your current brand is, because people think something about you, nobody is a blank slate and you can’t make good decisions about how you want to move your brand forward unless you know where you’re starting so that’s number one number two is formulating that proactive vision of how you do want to be perceived. What would you like people to say about you when you leave the room? And how do you create your own narrative so that other people can get it? And then third and finally it’s about living your brand because your brand is about a lot more than just what you say about yourself, it’s about everything you do it’s about how you live your life, and so we need to make sure that you are manifesting that in a consistent way and in an authentic way outstanding that’s great set up, we’ll go out for our first break, and when we come back door and i’m going to keep talking, we’re going toe go through the three stages of branding, so i know you’re going to stay with us don’t even have to ask you to. You didn’t think that shooting getting dink, dink, dink, dink, you’re listening to the talking alternative network waiting to get a drink. Nothing. Cubine this’s. The same way we’re hosting part of my french new york city, or guests come from all over the world, from mali to new caledonia, from paris to keep back french is that common language? Yes, they all come from different cultures, background or countries, and it comes desires to make new york they’re home. Listen to them, shed this story. Join us, part of my french new york city. Every monday from one to two p, m. Are you stuck in your business or career trying to take your business to the next level, and it keeps hitting a wall? This is sam liebowitz, the conscious consultant. I will help you get to the root cause of your abundance issues and help move you forward in your life. Call me now and let’s. Create the future you dream of. Two, one, two, seven, two, one, eight, one, eight, three, that’s to one to seven to one, eight one eight three. The conscious consultant helping conscious people. Be better business people. Buy-in you’re listening to the talking alternative network. Dahna welcome back to big non-profit ideas for the other ninety five percent. I wish i could send live listen, love, but i can’t today, of course, like live love live listener love out to everybody who is listening, but i can’t give the states and cities, as i routinely do were pre recorded today, but you know who you are, whether you’re new to the show live or one of our regular live listeners live listener love out to you and, of course, those were sitting in the time shift podcast. Pleasantries, too, are over ninety five hundred listeners listening wherever you may be. Treadmill car, subway, airplane, wherever you are. Podcast pleasantries, okay, dorri um, yes, people perceive us that we have a brand, whether we know it or not, whether we like it or not. How do we find out what where we stand? Well, one of the first starting points tony is turning to other people, which i think you know, for some people, for most people, actually, they assume that they already know what their brand is. Oh, i’ve got that covered. Yeah, i know, but the truth is, most people don’t. We have blind spots. And so there are things that were really just not aware of. And so one simple exercise that i often suggest in the course of reinventing you is starting out with a very basic exercise go to about half a dozen people that, you know, you know, coworkers, friends, whoever and ask them if you only had three words to be able to describe me, what would they say? This is not a very taxing exercise. Someone can think of it in two minutes, but it’s incredibly illustrative because number one most people never ask that question. And number two, you are very rapidly, probably by the third, third or fourth person going to start to see patterns in what they say and the words that they use and that can be helpful because what this is doing is showing people what comes through the loudest we know too much about ourselves, that’s the problem, and so we can’t really tell what is most unique or what is most significant other people and so on asking a few people, you’re going to begin to see what really seems meaningful to other folks and can give you a sense of what? Your what your strengths are that you’re operating from if you’re fortunate enough to work with a neg zakat of coach, they will often do that for you, absolutely. But can we count on people being honest in those three words? If i’m asking face-to-face can i? Can i? Can i count on honest feedback? Great question you can count on mostly honest feedback, and that is actually good enough, so number one people are not gonna lie to you there. You know, if you’re a really gregarious person, they’re not going to say, oh, well, you’re so quiet, tony, or, you know, whatever, they’re going to mostly tell you the truth, i see mostly because your absolute right, they’re not going to say, oh, well, you are, you know, way too whatever, they’re probably going to pick the positive qualities and so the exercise that, you know, the discipline that we need to go through is you take these three qualities, which indeed are probably good positive qualities, and we need to go through them and ask, you know, just mentally ask ourselves. Is it possible that i am too much of these things? Is it possible that this strength is so strong, it actually is a weakness. And so, for instance, someone might say to you, oh, you are so visionary and of course, that’s a great thing, it’s a great thing to be visionary, but you need to ask yourself, could i be so visionary that it’s possible? I am not detail oriented enough. And if you look at it, if you look at the converse and are open to understanding that about yourself, that not necessarily a weakness, but it may be a weakness, then you can get the full picture of the information that you need. And you’re going to see some trends in just doing this with just five or six. Yeah, it was like, i mean and that’s enough. And you might want to sample different people in your lives, like people on the business side. People on the personal side. Yeah. It’s useful to get a cross section because we are, you know, i mean, for most of us were not completely different people, but but we do highlight different aspects of ourselves in our work-life versus our home life. Now, in one of the videos you have hungarian saying yes, i wanted to share that there’s there’s a woman. And actually, you know, interestingly tony it’s a day of coincidences. I am meeting this woman in person for the very first time today, right after this interview. We’re going to expose you to this quote that’s, right? Okay, yeah. We’re meeting for coffee in about ninety minutes. But she’s an angel investor from utah. Her name is judy robinette. She actually had a book about network and come out earlier this year, which is really interesting read but she we we met, you know, online and connected about three years ago. And as we were discussing the book that i was then in the process of writing, she said, oh, you know, this is so interesting. This reminds me of a hunger of famous hungarian quotation and of course, you know, i looked it up and, you know, i think we can find absolutely no evidence that it’s, a hungarian croatian, so we will nonetheless give her credit for it because it’s a great saying and and so what judy robinette says is if three people tell you you’re a horse by a saddle and what i love about that is that, you know, it really shows that there are things that can be so obvious to the rest of the world that we’re just not seeing about ourselves. And if one person tells you whatever, they could be deluded, they could have a weird perspective. But if everyone’s telling it to you, maybe you ought to listen. So what should we do with the with what we learned from from this exercise? Well, i think the first thing that we need to do is is to really hold it up and to say, okay, if this is the feedback i’m getting is this what i want to be getting is is this the message that i want to be sending to the universe? And if it is great perfect, you’re right where you should be. But if there are gaps, if if it’s not quite how you want to be seen, then you need to start asking the question. Well, what can i do to get people to see me? How, how i would like them to. Okay on dh that’ll lead to the second phase, but way have plenty of time, so we don’t have to rush that’s, right? Examples in there. Yeah. So, you know, just a quick point. I mean, i think for anyone who, if they want to make a shift, i mean, you know, the book reinventing you is really for intended for people who want to sometimes they want to do something, you know, really bold, like, change careers other times, it’s, that they may like what they’re doing, but but they want to just shifted a little bit. Maybe they want a slightly different position in their organization. Or maybe they want to take their job that they have now and emphasize certain parts and de emphasize others. And they need to get the buy-in of the organization to be able to do that. Even for, you know, sort of small reinventions like that. You may need to reposition yourself so that people get it. Oh, well, she’s, she’s really good with major gifts. So we ought to be giving her make more of that. That sort of thing or for the person who depart decides teo depart. What? What? I, uh, not so not so politely called wage slavery and and go off on your own then? Certainly all the more, because when you’re on your own, you are your work is your is reflected in your brand, and your life is reflected in your brand. Your brand reflects your right. I mean, it’s all zoomed in one. Yeah, exactly. I didn’t say that very articulately. I know you’ll say it better when we get teo you. When we get to the third phase, i know you’ll be much more articulate about that. But, um okay, um, so is anything else any other advice in this in this first phase about discovering what people think aboutyou what your reputation is? Well, i think i think it’s a pretty, pretty good quick overview s oh, yeah, way we could move on to phase. Teo, please. Like so, uh, this is this is what you’d like it to be. Yeah, go ahead. Absolutely. So so in in this next step, you begin to really create that vision of where you want to go. And some people already know they have a really clear sense, you know? Okay, i want i mean, i mean, finance and i want to move into marketing or whatever it is. And if you know that’s great for other people. It involves a little bit more excavation, and so in reinventing you, we talk about how to really home in on what you want to be doing and give suggestions, you know, whether it’s about finding finding ways to connect with people through informational interviews or creating your own kind of curriculum or reading list so that you can really get clear on that vision because one of the things that we see is that sometimes you can run into a challenge, because if you go out too soon and put out a thesis, i guess you could say, if you if you aren’t one hundred percent sure, but you say, yeah, i really want to do this, and then you change your mind you actually lose a little bit of political capital with people because they begin to see you. Is this person who’s crying wolf? Well, she told me she wanted to be a travel writer, and i introduced her to my friends who were travel writers, and now she doesn’t want to do that, and so it means they’re less likely to help you. So you have to be clear about what you’re messaging is at this. Stage that you can say, well, i’m exploring a number of options, and one of them is this, and i’d like to learn more, and that way people can calibrate accordingly how they’re going to help you. And in what way, right? She’s, considering something she’s been triggering travel writing, among other things, would you would you mind talking to her that’s, that’s, exactly right, another really important phase once you do get clear on where you want to go, and this is often times people ask me the question, where do most people fail in their reinventions? And i think this is the place is about creating a narrative, and i’ll tell you what i mean by that. Basically, most people, sadly, are not paying that close attention to you and your career arc they’re they’re kind of, you know, we’re overloaded. Yeah, we’re overloaded that, you know, they think, oh, tony that’s nice, you know? Yeah, he does blah, blah, blah. And it may be what you did like five years ago, but they just haven’t checked in to pay attention. Update their vision of you. And so, as a consequence, what we need to do is to create a really, you know, short, pithy, just a couple sentences explanation for people of what you know what we’ve done in the past, what we want to do and how it is that our past experience actually makes us really well qualified for this new thing, because otherwise they’re not going to make the connection. They’re not going to take the time to do it. They may not have the mental bandwidth they may say, oh, that’s, completely random you used to do non-profit fund-raising and now you want to be a travel writer? How does that possibly relate? Oh, he must be having a mid life crisis and, you know, meanwhile, you could have a really articulate explanation of how these things connect, but you need to give it to other people because if we asked them to invent it on their own, they’re not going to and it’s gonna be a lot less flattering than whatever you come up with. Can you give us a sample? Yeah, absolutely. So, i mean, in my case, i made a transition, which i think for a lot of people seemed random after i finished running mass bike. I started this. Marketing, consulting business and you might look at that and say, wait a minute, what? You know, what do you know about that? How do these things connect? They had no idea, but i needed to have a good explanation because otherwise no one would hire me. I needed to be ableto be convincing enough that i could build a client base and get business. And so even if you’re, you know, ableto created a short statement, i mean, in my case, it was something along the lines of, you know, i’ve in my career i’ve done a lot of media relations from being a journalist, too, working on a presidential campaign to running a non-profit and what all of those things have in common is it’s about finding creative ways to break through and get noticed in a crowded media environment. And so now, as a marketing strategy consultant, if you hire me, that’s what i can help you, d’oh, i can help your company or your non-profit get noticed and draw in the people that you need to support your cause, and so then they can look at it and see oh, actually, yeah, that that does make sense there is a common strand, whereas they might not have been able to piece that together themselves. Where does the will you recommend the informational interview? Are you are you calling on your friends and colleagues and your network to help you, teo find informational interviewing opportunities? Yeah. I mean, it’s really easier than ever, teo to do informational interviews. I mean, now that we have tools like linked in i mean, in the past, it was a little bit scattershot. Seo i’m really interested in this. Do you know anyone know? Do you know anyone know? You know, now, if you really want a job doing whatever if you want to be a travel writer, if you want to work at google, you khun see really easily in two seconds. Who? You know, that knows somebody there, and that makes it very efficient. But i think you know, we all no it’s sort of been, you know, drilled into our brains from college on word. Oh, yes. Do do informational interviews that’s really important? But i think there’s a few things that people miss, which is why i am dwell on it fairly extensively in reinventing you because there’s ways to do it right i think for a lot of people it’s, it’s a kind of, you know, like almost a military operation, they go in, they go out and that’s it. They think that having having this meeting and extracting information is the goal and yes, it it issue do you want to get interesting information that can help guide you on your career course, but really, if you’re doing it right, what an informational interview is is a prelude to relationship building, and most people don’t know how to keep the relationship alive beyond the thirty minute coffee and the rial secret is using that time strategically not just to get answers to the literal questions you have on the sheet of paper, but to learn enough about the person so that you have an excuse for a relationship. You find out about what sports team they like, and so then every two or three months when they’re sports team does well, you can send them an email and congratulate them, or you find out that they’re going to be taking a trip in a couple of months to asia, and so you give them travel. Tips before they go. And when they come back, you email them to follow-up and ask how it is. You know, whatever it is, but you you want to plant the seeds so that you can continue to stay in touch and have this person be a permanent part of your network, not a hidden run. We have partners. We have pinehurst you this i don’t even know if we find her. Ok, i know. Now now we’re going to be in touch for life. I have the local blogged i can forward you the local block from darryl woods. Oh, my goodness. Clolery e-giving giving a talk in pinehurst in october. Really? Where you can come where? There’s there’s, the famous ruth polly lecture siri’s at sandals community center in chicago. I know the college. I know the college well, yes, and s so i’m going to be part of it along with its an interesting line up. It is me. It is the just announced yesterday. It is morse dease who is apparently a civil rights pioneer. And paul wolfowitz so oh, my god. Yeah. It’s. Very interesting. Mix samuels. Community college gets gets quite a quite a panel nature. D’oh, he’s in a mr as as you are in. Well, he’s yeah. He’s an a lister in certainly different circles. Bigger. Just bigger circles. But you got your niche that’s, right? Of course. Um, cool. All right, well, to follow up on that, too. Yeah, i would rather i would rather do something like that. The information of you face-to-face if at all possible instead of over the phone, which is convenient, but i prefer to see people face to face. We have be your if it’s if it’s feasible. Is that your advice? Yeah. Absolutely. Say, no, i’m off the off the charts. That doesn’t make any sense. Yeah. No, no, you’re right. I mean, really the goal in addition, teo, as we said, in addition to getting the information, it’s, you want the person to remember you, you know, you you want a year later, you don’t want the person seo dori clark, who was that? You know, if you’re going to invest the time you, you want to turn it into something, and they’re far more likely to remember you if they’ve met you in person, if they know what you look like. If they have this sort of vivid memory, as opposed to just having a telephone conversation where just recedes into their memory immediately. Yeah, yeah, the ongoing relationship. Exactly. You. No way we can use the online networks for keeping in touch, but for setting, you know, for establishing a relationship, i just always prefers to. Face-to-face yeah, that’s, the way to do it, for sure, whenever possible. Okay, cool. Let me i’m gonna digress a bit because i wantto talk about a sponsor for the show, so i’m going to ask if you have ever done a run walk now you were with mr zits was bicycle coalition? Yes, so they ever do run walks way didn’t because everything everything involved biking, but but we, uh, we we do. We do support other means of locomotion as well. We give them the thumbs up. Ok, so the coalition supported walking a cz an alternative to baking that’s right way understand it in certain circumstances, one cannot always be on a bike, so in that case, if you can walk, go for it and our sponsor is generosity siri’s and they host multi charity five runs and walk fantastic so that a bunch of small charities get that can’t create an event on their own because they don’t have enough participants can come together ten or twelve form or charities, and they each have maybe twenty, twenty five maybe even fifty runners and walkers and together there’s hundreds and hundreds of people such a good idea, and it creates and it creates a cool event. I hosted one of theirs. Out in brooklyn last november and there were a couple hundred runners and it was the it was great fun event there’s, like a dozen charities or so one hundred thirty five thousand dollars was raised. It was a fun day was fundez so listen, as you, you have heard me talk about generosity, siri’s they have events coming up in new jersey, miami, atlanta, here in new york city, philadelphia and toronto, so, uh, i hope that if you think a run walk fits into your fund-raising plan that you’ll talk teo dave lynn he’s, the ceo of generosity siri’s he’s at seven, one eight five or six nine triple seven of course, i would prefer to talk to people you probably don’t want to drop by the office, but meeting him face-to-face call him first and then set up the face to face meeting aunt, of course, generosity siri’s dot com you’ll find them there too, and we are pre recording today as i mentioned as you are listening to today’s show i am on the beach at bethany beach inn in delaware, totally disconnected for the whole week. I’m offgrid there’s, no email, i’m not checking in. Four, square. I’m not taking texts, and i hope that sometime during this summer, you had or will have all those summers dwindling, thie opportunity to do the same. You’re in here, in a profession where you’re giving to others, and if you’re going to be successful at giving, you have to take sometimes, and that means take care of yourself, and that means take vacation and take time away. So back in spring, i urged you to plan some time, and i hope that you did. I really hope you got some time away. You come back refreshed, rejuvenated. If you want to be successful e-giving sometimes you do have to take for yourself, and i hope you did this summer and that’s tony’s take two for friday, twenty ninth of august, the thirty fourth show of the year do you take you take time off story? You go offgrid no, no, but i i should probably listen to you, tony, but no, actually i don’t i’m kind of ah ah work maniac, but but i’ll put an asterisk on it because for me, i feel like they’re phases in people’s professional lives, you know? And there are times when you really need to put the pedal to the metal when you feel like it’s, a unique opportunity for traction in your career, and if you sense that you have that moment, you really need to exploit that moment, and there are other opportunities for youto, you know, to rest up or to take a break, things like that. And so for me, my first book came out last year, two thousand thirteen, and really, since that moment, i’ve been going full steam ahead with speaking engagements, consulting things like that because the book is kind of a singular opportunity that that you know there’s there’s chats, there’s attention, it’s a moment when if you harness it properly, you can build up additional momentum that can help you coast a little bit more later because the snowball has been building and s o similarly, i’ve been working very hard this summer, finalising the text for my next book, which is coming out in two thousand fifteen. In the spring, it’s called stand out how to find your breakthrough idea and build a following around it. So i’m actually carting around right now in my briefcase, thie final edits, which i am going to be submitting in less than a week. So so that’s pretty exciting, and we’ll be working hard promoting that. But i do think that you need you need breaks eventually, you know? Some people have different theories that, you know, on different things that work for them. Some people, you know, the weekends need to always be sacrosanct and that’s the time that they take off other people, they say, well, you know, i need to always take, you know, at least a two week vacation in the summer and that’s my time to disconnect andi. You know, those air all good, plausible strategies for me of been going pretty hard the last couple of years, but, you know, one of my ambitions for myself once this next book is out had launched and promoted and to actually do something kind of kind of wild and crazy, i mean, i wanted teo one of the things i’m kicking around used to, you know, maybe live abroad for a year and just be, like, traveling and things like that. I sold my house earlier this year, so i now don’t you know, i’m renting now i don’t have things that are locking me down, so i’m actually laying the groundwork to be able to take a real chunk of time after after the book is launched to be able to have ah, time, you know, not necessarily a pure arrest, but a time of aa lot more lifestyle, recreation, i’m standing out is incredibly difficult in are very noisy environment. It is absolutely it’s ah it’s getting to be more and more of a challenge. There’s i mean, if you look even just blog’s there’s over one hundred fifty million blog’s out there, not to mention you know tweets and everything else in the world. So it is it’s very hard, increasingly, to stand out. But, you know, there’s there’s an upside and a downside to all this, right? Because the very reason for that is that it’s easier for than ever for people to get in the game. It used to be not that hard to stand out because there were gates and the gates were locked, and, you know, once once you were in the gates, you know, we had three tv stations, and so if you’re on tv, you’re famous now, you know, the upside is that you don’t have to wait for abc, your nbc to give you the green light. There are no barriers to enter, no barriers. You can make your home podcast, you can make your own tv show. You put it up on youtube, you know, whatever you want to do it’s out there, but the challenge is how do you then attract the audience for? And how do you get it noticed? And s o it’s it’s exciting because it actually is more egalitarian than it’s ever been. We all have a chance and that’s really what the book is about is how to seize that chance if you believe in what you’re doing. If you think it’s a message that people ought to hear, i want to help you get it hurt. Is that also published by harvard business review? No, the first one was the second one is going to be done by penguin by their portfolio imprint. Okay, good luck with that. Yeah. Thank you. Twenty fifteen. We’ll have you back. Yes, back to talk about stand out. Dahna all right, so we were in were in our second phase of closing this gap between where we stand and where we’d like to be. Where does all the content that you can create? Some of what you just mentioned talking about standout where’s that all fit in the podcast thing. You could do the blogging you, khun do videos speaking where’s all this content for them. Oh, my goodness. It’s such a good segue way tony into part three, which is living your brand. And i have to admit that was purely coincidental. I wasn’t really sure where content fit in, but i know it’s important. You’re smooth just like like slide right in their eye just ruin the smoothness by saying it wasn’t well, so so in part three once were sort of, you know, moving to this last phase with we’ve determined how how we’re perceived now we’ve begun to think about how we would like to be perceived by others. But, you know, the truth is you can’t just snap your fingers and say, oh, well, you know, i want you to see me this way now doesn’t doesn’t really work that way. People’s perceptions linger, and you need to give them a good reason to change their perceptions of you otherwise, you know, they’re just goingto stay the same as they were there’s not there’s, not a motivating factor. So how do you give people a reason to change how they see you tow? Update it? Well, basically, what that comes down to, you know, under the rubric of what i call living your brand is that you want to do something to make them stop and take notice and say, wait a minute, i didn’t know she could do that. Oh, that’s so interesting. I had no idea that she was interested in that or she was knowledgeable about that. And that’s, where content creation actually is critically important because one of the real ironies of reinvention that i discovered in the course of interviewing these dozens and dozens of professionals who’ve reinvented themselves is that you might think you might hope and expect that the people who are closest to you would be the most supportive of your reinvention and sometimes that’s. True, but sometimes it’s actually the opposite, because if you meet a stranger, right, let’s, say, you’re in a chamber of commerce event and you meet someone you say, hey, you know, nice to meet you. I’m in marketing, they’re going to say, great nice to meet you if you, however, see an old friend and you say, guess what i’m going to do marketing now, they actually oftentimes feel entitled to say, really, what do you know about that, noah? Is that a good choice? I mean, you’ve been too spent twenty years doing fund-raising isn’t that a little unwise to give that up? And, you know, they think they’re being helpful, but they actually are holding you back in some ways, and so for the sake of both establishing credibility with new people, but also especially to win over your closest circle who you do, in fact need in order to successfully reinvent yourself, you need to show them beyond a shadow of a doubt that you really are passionate and you really are knowledgeable about this new thing. So how do we do it? There are so many ways now no cost ways that you can create content. Really he’s you want, of course, is starting to block. I think that’s actually one of the best ways to demonstrate your expertise. And it’s it’s way easier than ever because you don’t even have to start your own blawg linked in recently made a change where anybody not just their celebrity influencers, can do blogging on the linked in sight and that’s. Great! Because there’s a kind of built in audience there and your articles appear alongside your linked in profile. So when people are looking for you that’s automatic proof oh, how interesting. She’s done you no one hundred block posts about marketing. She must know something about marketing and they can try it out. Read your stuff. See if you make sense. That’s. Great. Um, podcasting is a big one in my new book stand out. Actually, i profile a guy named john corcoran who is a bay area attorney who has his own podcast. Siri’s and one of the ways that he’s used it. And maybe this is the way you do is well, tony is he has a very explicit mission with his podcasting. I mean, it serves multiple purposes. One is it’s a kind of professional development because he gets the interview interesting people and learn from them. But it’s also a form of networking because he interviews yes, that he would like to meet. And then as we were talking about earlier, he makes them a part of his network. And he’s been able to to really build up his own brand is a thought leader by having these guests on and getting to be part of their circle. And it’s it’s been tremendously powerful for him in his career to do this. And i should’ve profiled may exactly what was this guy? John corcoran. I know we’re gonna hook you up, but so if you if you’re going into a new field and you want to meet the leading lights quickly and build relationships with them, start a podcast siri’s and that is an excuse to talk to almost anyone you want because many people, if they’re if they’re particularly well known there, they just don’t have time to sit down and, you know, have a coffee with just anyone, especially if they don’t know you, but a lot of them, almost all of them. In fact, we’ll say yes, if you say, can i interview you? And having close to ten thousand listeners actually helps quite a bit, but even in the early, even, you know, the first five ten shows when i don’t know, maybe they were twenty five listeners. I don’t know. My mom and dad were two of them, you know? Yeah. I found that people were willing to sit in front of the mic. I told them that it would live forever. It’s always going to be on itunes and there’s. Other platform, you stitcher, etcetera. But itunes is especially four years ago was the the premier. So i said, you know, would live forever. You could link to it. And that was that was appealing to people on. And then as the show grew, you know, i got more and more high. Profile guests chef gordon has been on, and craig newmark, founder of craigslist and craigconnects, and see you, you’ve used ilsen crazy network would kill for that story. Clark has been on. Oh, my god, this next you’re gonna have paul wolfowitz. This is gonna be unbelievable. I’m only one one kevin bacon thing. I’m only one level away from know too. If paul was sitting here, that will be one. So i’m only two levels away from possible for men. It’s remarkable. Um okay, so we have we have more time together. Do you have some examples of people who lived there brand very, very well, you think? Or maybe even maybe some lessons we can learn from those who didn’t do it so well? I don’t know. Sure, sure. Well, you know, i’ll start out. I’ve got a million stories from, from reinventing you and on elsewhere, you know, readers, fortunately, have have started to write into me and tell about how they have applied the principles in their own lives, which is really nice that’s good like, but one of the people that i profiled, who i think might be particularly relevant to your audience is there’s. A guy that i that i write about named craig della penna and craig actually had really his dream job. He was a rail trail advocate and he derailed train rails to trails, exactly converting that attracts toe hiking trails and biking trails. Precisely. And so he was extremely knowledgeable. He literally was the world’s expert in thie conversion of new england rail trails. And, you know, he loved it. He was so passionate about it. I got paid to do it. But when his organization one day they told him, craig closing your field office and you can keep your job but on ly if you move to a different state and he had to think about it but he and his family did not want to move. And so it was kind of a sad day because, you know, it’s not like he’s, an accountant, and he could just do accounting for a different firm. He had a really specialized knowledge base and s o you know what do you what you do? Do you give up the dream? You just take some other job you’re not passionate about. It was he had a kind of rack his brain. But what i love about craig and why i profiled him is that he came up with a brilliant solution. He and his wife had always wanted to have a bed and breakfast. And so they bought a bed breakfast next to a rail trail. And he already knew all the whole rail trail community in new england. So he marketed to them and said, hey, come take your vacations here, you khun bicycle on the rail trail in the backyard, right in the backyard it’s called the the sugar maple trailside in in florence, massachusetts. It was an immediate hit, so he supported himself that way. And additionally, because this is a guy who’s always thinking he really did. A lot of people said, you know, craig, i wish we could do this. I wish i could have a house near a real trail. So he got his real estate license and he specialized in selling people houses next to rail trails. So he’s found a way to tow live his passion and make way more money than he ever did before. That’s. Terrific. That is a great story of that. What’s his name again. Craig della penna. Excellent. I’m going to go out for our for our last break. I know you’ll stay with us. I don’t have to ask. You’re listening to the talking alternative network. Duitz durney have you ever considered consulting a road map when you feel you need help getting to your destination when the normal path seems blocked? A little help can come in handy when choosing an alternate route. Your natal chart is a map of your potentials. It addresses relationships, finance, business, health and, above all, creativity. Current planetary cycles can either support or challenge your objectives. I’m montgomery taylor. If you would like to explore the help of a private astrological reading, please contact me at monte at monty taylor dot. Com let’s monte m o nt y at monty taylor dot com. Are you suffering from aches and pains? Has traditional medicine let you down? Are you tired of taking toxic medications, then come to the double diamond wellness center and learn how our natural methods can help you to hell? Call us now at to one to seven to one eight, one eight three that’s to one to seven to one eight one eight three or find us on the web at www dot double diamond wellness dot com. We look forward to serving you. Talking alternative radio twenty four hours a day. Hi, this is claire meyerhoff from the plan giving agency. If you have big dreams but a small budget, you have a home at tony martignetti non-profit radio. You have on your block. One of one of the articles is the importance of leverage and how much you’re a number of people that are following you, whether it’s, twitter or youtube, etcetera views can be very, very helpful to you, but how do we get started? How do we avoid being discouraged on day one when the twitter follower county xero when our first youtube video has two views and those were both yours because you were making sure that it got uploaded correctly? How do we avoid being discouraged in the beginning? Yeah, it’s it’s an important question because it does always take time for things to gain traction. I mean, you know, there’s there’s, the one in the million situation where you put up a video and then, you know, tens of thousands of people are glomming onto it, but most of us can’t ever expect that i mean that’s it’s, just not normal. So, yeah, what do you do? Because we all start out in xero we all start out with, you know, three people or something like that. So here’s what i tell people your goals with building a platform and spreading your message. Should change over time. I mean, you know, later, on years down the road, you can say, oh, i’m going to post this and, you know, maybe ten thousand people listen to my radio show that’s fantastic, but in the early days you’re doing it for a slightly different reason, its toe perhaps toe work toward that, but early on, it’s, not about having tons of people listen to you, it’s about having the right people listen to you, and so if they’re not organically coming to you, you can you can bring your stuff to them and here’s what i mean by that. So, for instance, let’s say you have just started a business is a consultant for a small, not non-profits you start your blawg nobody’s reading it, but you come up with articles that you know are interesting and relevant to either your existing clients or your potential clients. So you write, you know, a few block posts, then you go to the chamber of commerce meeting you’re talking with somebody and you meet them and they would be a great client for you and see, yeah. So tell me about some of your business challenges. What? You know, what are you doing? What do you grappling with? They say, well, you know, we really have this problem with staff for attention, you know, everybody’s leaving we don’t know what to do and you can say, oh, that’s so interesting. I just wrote a blogger post about that last week. I’ll send it over to you. If that would be helpful, you get their card, you send it over and they look at it and see oh, this is brilliant. This is just what we need. And so then the next week, you follow-up hey just wanted to see if you like the article, you know? What did you think and that’s the opportunity to start the conversation where they say, oh, you know, tony, this was so useful. Do you consult in this area? And you know you can say well, why, yes, as a matter of fact, i d’oh so it’s it’s a lead generation tool that’s what it can be in the beginning, which is justice helpful in some ways may be more helpful then having ten thousand people know what your name is. And as you move on a test i found i get asked about whether i do things that i don’t do, and i think it’s pretty clear on my my sight, what i do, but still i get i still get contacts. Can you do this and you become sort of you become a good referral source? Yes to say no, i don’t thanks for your message, i don’t do it, but here’s one or two people have been on my show or who i know in the community that do this people start to see you as even more than you are. Yes, exactly, exactly there’s a principle in psychology known as the halo effect, and basically what this means is that if if i know that you’re good at something let’s, say you’re an expert in non-profit fund-raising i’m going to assume that you are really qualified at, you know, organisational development or finance consulting or marketing consulting, and i’ll just, you know, well, tony’s good, i’ll just ask him about everything and that’s actually a pretty great position to be in because, you know, i mean, of course we want to treat it ethically. You don’t want to say yes to something, you know nothing about you. But if you are looking to move into new areas, that could be really helpful because you’re given these opportunities on a platter and if it’s something that you you know, really aren’t interested in don’t know a lot about it can enable you to be teo really become a kind of powerful connector in your community because you have the ability to give people referrals to match, make and to make yourself indispensable resource. And then you’re helping other people too that’s, right? There’s just a joy that comes from putting two people together who potentially can can be of help to each other and withdrawing yourself. But knowing that you made you made the connection, yeah, feeling that halo effect, you know now in in painting on ly saints have halos? Yes, there’s now there’s a different screen. The halo in the nimbus the nimbus is that little sort of fog around somebody’s head, but the halo is that round circle it’s your i don’t actually, i said st too, it is for him is for sight, for silos, for halos, but i don’t know which i’m not sure whether the saints get the nimbus or the halo. The halo effect is still pretty cool. I wouldn’t call the nimbus effect is not too many people know nimbus that sounds like a cloud, you know, cloud type the nimbus serious or something, so don’t don’t change that stick with halo effect, all right? But i don’t know if it’s a sainthood or not after, okay, if anybody knows whether it’s, the who gets who gets the who gets the halo is that the saints or the saints get the nimbus we get so still another couple minutes together. What another example of somebody who’s living their brand? Very well, yeah, story. Well, you know, one of the ones that that i really think is is resonant from reinventing you. Tony is about a woman named debra shaw, and i like her story because e get a lot of blowback sometimes from people who, you know, they liked the concept, they say, oh, this is great story. I want to reinvent myself, but you know what? I can’t do it because i’m over fifty and they say, you know, reinventions for young people and i really want to push back and say no that’s actually not true people can reinvent themselves at any age. Deborah was over fifty when she reinvented herself, and i think her story is really a fantastic one. She spent many years as a human resource is executive in corporate america, you know, did did a great job, you know, had a fulfilling career, but at a certain point, she said, you know what? That’s it i don’t want to do this anymore, but i also don’t want to retired a pinehurst gogol thing, and so she was looking around, you know, really trying to think about what interested in her and a friend, just by chance, dragged her to a political fundraiser. She saw a guy speak who’s going running for governor loved him thought this is perfect. I want to help this guy, so she starts volunteering and shevawn, you know, for anyone who’s volunteered in a political campaign. You walk in the door and they give you the scut work, you know, you say i want a volunteer. Oh, great, make make phone calls for eight hours and this was a talented woman. She she had a lot more skills in that, but without complaint she did it. She made the phone. Calls she knocked on the door, she did all of the basic stupid things they wanted her to dio and she did them well. And she did him so well in made them take notice. And they said, we who? Who is this woman? What’s what’s her deal. And she never done politics professionally before. But within within a matter of months they hired her as a staffer. She became a regional field organizer and and ran a region of this gubernatorial campaign. I did it for a year made so many contacts, she thought this was going to be, you know, fun lark, but it turned into a career because a guy who was running for state senate had met her and said, you’re great, i want you to run my campaign. She became ah political campaign manager and has run probably nearly a dozen races. She now is the head of a political non-profit in massachusetts, eso following her passion, she made it happen. It’s a great story to end with thank you very much, clark. You’ll find her adoree clark dot com on twitter she’s at tori clarke the book is reinventing you to find your brand. Imagine your future, dori. Thanks so, so much. Thanks for having me. What a real pleasure. Thank you. Next week, make your events part of your larger cultivation strategy for your potential donors. Susan gabriel from cause effective shares, her tips and an interview from ntcdinosaur profit technology conference on using technology to organize people around your mission. If you missed any part of today’s show, you find it on tony martignetti dot com. Remember generosity siri’s for those multi-channel retty five k runs and walks, generosity siri’s, dot com, our creative producers, claire meyerhoff, sam liebowitz is our line producer shows social media is by julia campbell of jake campbell. Social marketing and the remote producer of tony martignetti non-profit radio is john federico of the new rules, this music it’s by scott stein of brooklyn. You with me next week for non-profit radio big non-profit ideas for the other ninety five percent go out and be great. You didn’t think that shooting getting dink, dink, dink, dink. You’re listening to the talking alternate network. Get in. Nothing. Cubine are you stuck in your business or career trying to take your business to the next level, and it keeps hitting a wall? This is sam liebowitz, the conscious consultant. I will help you get to the root cause of your abundance issues and help move you forward in your life. Call me now and let’s. Create the future you dream of. Two, one, two, seven, two, one, eight, one, eight, three, that’s to one to seven to one, eight one eight three. The conscious consultant helping conscious people. Be better business people. Dahna hi, i’m ostomel role, and i’m sloan wainwright, where the host of the new thursday morning show the music power hour. Eleven a m. We’re gonna have fun, shine the light on all aspects of music and its limitless healing possibilities. We’re going invite artists to share their songs and play live will be listening and talking about great music from yesterday to today, so you’re invited to share in our musical conversation. Your ears will be delighted with the sound of music and our voices. Join austin and sloan live thursdays at eleven a. M on talking alternative dot com, you’re listening to talking alternative network at www dot talking alternative dot com, now broadcasting twenty four hours a day. Have you ever considered consulting a road map when you feel you need help getting to your destination when the normal path seems blocked? A little help can come in handy when choosing an alternate route. Your natal chart is a map of your potentials. It addresses relationships, finance, business, health and, above all, creativity. Current planetary cycles can either support or challenge your objectives. I’m montgomery taylor. If you would like to explore the help of a private astrological reading, please contact me at monte at monty taylor dot. Com let’s monte m o nt y at monty taylor dot com. Are you suffering from aches and pains? Has traditional medicine let you down? Are you tired of taking toxic medications, then come to the double diamond wellness center and learn how our natural methods can help you to hell? Call us now at to one to seven to one eight, one eight three that’s to one to seven to one eight one eight three or find us on the web at www dot double diamond wellness dot com. We look forward to serving you. Talking.

Nonprofit Radio for December 6, 2013: Brandraise to Fundraise & Safeguard Your Donor Data

Big Nonprofit Ideas for the Other 95%

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My Guests:

Sarah Durham: Brandraise to Fundraise

Sarah Durham and Tony at Fundraising Day 2013
Sarah Durham and Tony at Fundraising Day 2013

Sarah Durham is principal and founder of Big Duck, communications consultants for nonprofits. People need to know you before you can ask them for money. What is brandraising and how does it pave the road to fundraising? (Recorded at Fundraising Day in June)

 

 

 

Scott Koegler: Safeguard Your Donor Data

scottkoegler2009-150Now that you have donors, how do you best preserve and protect their information? Scott Koegler is our tech contributor and editor of Nonprofit Technology News.

 

 

 

 


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Hello and welcome to tony martignetti non-profit radio big non-profit ideas for the other ninety five percent i’m your aptly named host feels so good to be back in the studio after our thanksgiving break. I hope you loved your thanksgiving and i hope you were with me two weeks ago. I’d be forced to endure ketoacidosis if i came to learn that you had missed empower your volunteers. Karen brewster is executive director of wreaths across america. They have grown their volunteer support enormously, and she explained how that was recorded at bebe khan twenty thirteen this past october and what’s their style. Maria simple returned she’s, the prospect finder and our prospect research contributor. We talked about the disk assessment tool to figure out whether your potential donors are dominant, influencing steady or cautious. Plus she had her sixty seconds style stop this week brandraise to fundraise. Sarah durham is principal and founder of big duck communications consultants for non-profits people need to know you before you can ask them for money. What is brandraise ing and how does it pave the road to fund-raising that was recorded at fund-raising day in june and safeguard your donordigital now. That you have donors, how do you best preserve and protect their information? Scott koegler is our tech contributor and the editor of non-profit technology news between the guests tony’s take to create a culture of philanthropy throughout your non-profit it’s a panel discussion that i hosted were supported by rally bound peer-to-peer fund-raising for runs, walks and rides, and by t b r c cost recovery. Getting you money back from phone bill errors and asians here is brandraise to fundraise welcome to tony martignetti non-profit radio coverage of fund-raising day two thousand thirteen, we’re in midtown manhattan in times square at the marriott marquis hotel, and my guest now is sarah durham. She is principal and founder of big duck, and her seminar topic is brandraise to fundraise, build your house before you throw a party. Sorry, europe. Welcome. Hey, thanks, tony. Thanks for having me. My pleasure. Tell me about the big duck agency. So i started big deck in nineteen ninety four and so were nineteen years old. We work exclusively with non-profits to help them communicate more effectively. I love the conciseness. Thank you. Thank you. What is brandraise ing brandraise thing is a model. We’ve developed over many, many years of working with non-profits to help wth, um, rebrand largely in order to be more effective at communicating with donors, clients and other key constituents, and it’s, a model that integrates, um, best practices from the for-profit world with some non-profit reality’s like, where should the board be involved in branding, or how does your vision mission of values integrate into the work? So we do recognize that there are lessons to be learned from the corporate side there definitely are, although i would say that many a non-profit i don’t think you can be too black and white about that. I think there are lots of great lessons to learn from the for-profit world, but what works in the for-profit world does not always work in the nonprofit world, and so, you know, that’s the challenge for sure, yeah, all right, how do we get started with identifying our brand and starting this process? Well, a lot of organizations usually back into thinking about their brand because there’s another challenge that has forced them to deal with it. So for instance, they want over how their website and their thinking before we overhaul. That web site we should really sort out, you know, the problems. We have their name or the challenge with our logo, and so they kind of end up, you know, sort of through the side door getting into branding. But we’re big advocates for rethinking your brand any time you go through a significant change after strategic planning. So strategic planning should come first. But then, if your strategic plan mandates a shift in communications, that’s a really good time to revisit the brands are now brand is much deeper than just logo and name and tagline, right? Absolutely. Help us understand how how what death is. Yeah. It’s. A great question. And i would argue that your brand begins with a clear strategy that everybody in the organization is aligned with what’s. The big idea you want to communicate? We call that positioning there’s a strategic plan it’s for grows right out of your strategic plan. And then also, what is the personality of the organization? What? How does it, what tone and style does it want to use to communicate? For instance, an organization like pita has a very different communications personality than the cia. Right on. Dh that personality can influence not only communications but programs themselves. Okay, the other piece i would say about a brand is that it’s not just what the organization produces it’s also, how you’re perceived externally and your reputations so there’s a very fluid wall between what happens inside and what happens outside. But how do we find out this, how we’re perceived outside, you really have to do some research, and sometimes that research is done in a very on the flaw, i’ve seen organizations to great kind of on the fly, a qualitative research, they just talked to their clients, talk to their donors really kind of have a feeling for how they’re perceived other organizations it’s done through market research, you know, focus groups, surveys that kind of stuff, okay, so it doesn’t have to be a formal process now with a lot of money and expensive, not at all and that’s. One of the reasons i wrote the book brandraise ing is that none of this is rocket science. It’s it’s pretty easy to do the hardest part is knowing what to do and facilitating process, particularly with non-profits that have the right people involved and has buy-in at key junctures, so but doing research is pretty easy to do on your own. In fact, um, i talk about in the book, and i years ago recorded a podcast about how to do your own research. Okay, well, let’s, take one of the time i was going to give you a shout out for the book at the end. You go ahead. You mentioned it. So, what is the name of your book? The book is called brandraise ing and, uh, yeah, it came out in twenty ten. Published by josie bass. Okay, on dh your podcast. What was that called? The podcast is kind of. You can find it on itunes and other places, but we don’t keep it up to date is called the non-profit jungle. And we did want about doing your own research, which is about how you create a facilitators guide and facilitate informal focus groups. You can also just use two is like serving gizmo and surveymonkey to do some interesting research. If you have a list to send it to. Oh, interesting. I say a little more about that. How can we use these free tools? Well, so for instance, if you’ve got let’s, say you’ve got a donor database of a few thousand people who give to you in a mid level, and those people also get your e news, you might embed a survey and your e news and ask them just two or three questions that might help, you know, help get a sense of of what they think about your organization or why they’re connected, and and that often informs the branding work you do. But but oftentimes with branding it’s also really useful to go back to that group and to test so if, for instance, we’re re branding in non-profit we might create two different brochures and then informally walk into a programme space and grab a couple clients and say here’s two different brochures, does one speak to you more than the other? Or is there anything that you would find inappropriate or offensive about this content? You can do that with donors, tio, but, you know, that kind of field testing is often a great former research, okay, excellent and this’s all about having people well, having people understand and having a consistent message about what you do, how you do it what the outcomes are absolutely, i often remind people in the nonprofit sector that if you look at big for-profit companies like coca cola or target or starbucks, they have much more money and a much deeper bench of staff than most non-profits due to communicate, but yet you don’t see them change their color change the logo. I had a conversation with somebody here earlier about wanting to create an anniversary your logo, which i was advising her not to do because you want every type of communication you put out there to reinforce the essence of who your organization is, and i would rather that all ladder up to the core rather than being fractured. If tiffany every few years said, you know what, let’s make the box pink this year, they would lose the equity of that blue box, which is, you know, a court of their brand, but we do that all the time in the nonprofit world. It’s a bad habit it is okay, so what is the effect of how would you define an effective brand and effective brand is one where the people internally feel connected to it representative of it and ambassadors of it where everybody in the organization, whether their staff, person aboard person, maybe even a volunteer, could speak in some way about the work and its value, and that it’s perceived externally by its core audiences is valuable to so it’s, both internal and external, and i actually think it has a lot to do with the culture and the values of the organization being, you know, authentic and alive and and the visual identity or the messaging is really just an expression of that, and i could see how this would certainly helped fund-raising you can articulate it better than i can. So, yeah, let’s, just make that connection well, it does. It does have a lot of impact on fund-raising and one of the one of the most significant impacts we’re seeing more most recently is around social media and the idea that if you’re going to push out a fund-raising message, we’re going to do a multi channel campaign, which more and more organizations they’re doing. Those people are not just going to get your email or your direct mail, but they’re going to visit your website. They’re going to be on facebook, they’re going to go to twitter. And we want all of those messages to really ladder up and reinforce the the essence of what the organization’s about what the campaign is about. So, so that’s. A lot of what i’m talking about here. It fund-raising day talking alternative radio twenty four hours a day. Do you need a business plan that can guide your company’s growth? Seven and seven will help bring the changes you need. Wear small business consultants and we pay attention to the details. 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Ivory tower radio dot com e every time i was a great place to visit for both entertainment and education. Listening. Tuesday nights nine to eleven. It will make you smarter. Hey, all you crazy listeners looking to boost your business? Why not advertise on talking alternative with very reasonable rates? Interested simply email at info at talking alternative dot com by the way, for those around the video, the background just shook there’s, not an earthquake in times square. Somebody on the other side, i’m sure got very exuberant about whatever, whatever any, whatever their business is on the other side, and i was shaking, so no earthquake in times square dahna this is, i guess, another way of saying this is all effective communications absolute, and it needs to be resident throughout the organization you mentioned, even even down to the level of volunteers, and you’re not talking about key volunteers, but but occasional volunteer no, i mean, i think if an organization uses volunteers and they recruit them effectively, and those volunteers have a great experience, the first thing they do is go on and tell their friends about it. So they become brand ambassadors that’s not to say we should train them on the brand, per se, but it is that we should make sure they haven’t experienced that is really aware of that and and use that to our advantage. I used in my workshop this morning an example from an organization called american jewish world service that has a program for rabbinical students and when you look at how they communicate this programme on their website, they actually tell you that if you go on this program, you’re goingto be asked when you come back to do some fund-raising on behalf of it and on the program, you’re getting sort of trained to do that work, and then when you come back, they give you the tools to do that work. So that’s a great example of an organisation using a programs audience and kind of turning them into a brand new master. You have a very vivid example before of pita versus american humane society and different messaging. How does an organization find its niche within all the organizations that are doing work within that same mission? Right? Well, again, that starts with research, and one of the things that i think is very important to do is to do a competitive landscape scans so you have to know who else is out there. George in jail on twenty martignetti non-profit radio? Yes, first we’re competitive. Landscape scan. Yeah. What are we doing? What with what we’re doing is we’re identifying our peers are partners people? I’m with you too, in fact, in fact. Way every year we do like a jargon jargon article on our block, and we have words to avoid for each year, but so, you know, so for instance, if you’re in the animal rights space, who else is in that space? What are their websites? How do they communicate? What? What are the key messages they’re using? What are the colors they’re using? What? How are they describing how their unique and i think it’s really important to always be monitoring that? Always be aware of how other organizations in your space we’re communicating that’s not to say that if they use blue, you’re going to use pink or that it’s, that kind of direct. But it is to say that it’s important to remember that people on the outside might be looking at those things a donor who wants to support animal rights might look a lots of different animal rights organizations, websites, and you need to be clear how you stand out in that space. It also again goes back to strategic planning, right cause hopefully in the strategic planning process, you’ve also had a conversation about what really makes our organization unique. And what should we? Be focusing on programmatically. Is this something that a small and midsize shop could do on their own? Absolutely. You don’t feel that there’s a need for expertise to do these kinds of competitive landscape analysis. There are other things. I mean, the difference between the smaller guys and the bigger guys comes down basically to two things. The bigger guys can afford to hire experts who take him through a process. And that’s certainly is nice. But what the small guys have that the big guy’s lack is agility. And i’ve seen some smaller organizations with staff people or with volunteers go through some really exciting, you know, strategic planning and branding processes on their own. Sometimes it takes longer and there’s more learning that has to happen on the way. Really needs a champion. It needs somebody who’s, you know, able to kind of take the work, run with it, make it their own and keep it alive. But it could be done really well. Okay. Could that person be the executive director? Absolutely. Is that you? In fact, i was i was in florida a couple of years ago, and i was giving a workshop and i met a woman who had was an executive director, one man band, no staff, just her and she she had been able to recruit volunteers, developed an incredible visual identity and messaging platform for organization she’s producing all this stuff to promote it. It was great what she was doing looked better than what a lot of large organizations i see do, and it was really about her vision. It was that she understood what effective communication should be, and she wasn’t letting herself off the hook by saying, i’m just one person she garnered these resource is she needs to make it happen. It was amazing. We’re talking about personality, right? I mean, isn’t that just another way of encapsulating everything we’re talking about? Definitely found she found the personality and was expressing her, and she knew howto she knew how to enforce it. And i mean, there are organizations that really get that executive directors who really get that who appreciate the value of great creative on dh then i think one of the reasons it doesn’t happen most often is that there are a lot of organizations where the programmatic work is so important as it’s founded. And everybody’s just putting every every effort that they have into getting those program’s up and running that the name the logo, the tagline, how we talk about the work, etcetera becomes an afterthought and and oftentimes it’s on ly five years, ten years, twenty five years in that the organization starts to say, wait, these things are actually holding us back. We need teo, you know, re prioritize you mentioned something that i want to explore a little more than enforcement. We’ve been through this process. Now we’ve found our niche and where expressing it, how do we keep it in fourth? Yeah, i mean, the old model is brand policing so that’s appointing a person who really, you know is somewhat of a bully about keeping things consistence and on track the person who would write style guide, for instance, it might be it might be bigger, but these days i what i really prefer and what i would really encourage organizations to do because i think it’s much more relevant is to cultivate everybody to be a brand ambassador, right? I mean, if if a staff person, any staff person can’t go to the gala or to a block party or to whatever is going on and talk effectively about the organization that’s a problem, right? So everybody needs to be able to be an ambassador for the organization in whatever way they can. And in order to make that work, it has to be very communications have to be very, very simple, and they have to be very accessible to everybody on staff. So you mentioned a style guide style. Guides are getting more and more common in the nonprofit sector. A stock historically has been a rule book for how to use the visual identity. I actually prefer brand guide, which talks more about the communications strategy for the organization and the messaging like here’s. How you abbreviate our name. Don’t use the acronym, you know to go back to juergen instead of in the workshop i gave this morning, there was one woman whose organization goes by a i x y abila long acronym. And when she unpacks that its association you know exactly what they do with the name so it’s. A cumbersome name. But i’d rather she call it the association if she has two short handed at least there’s a clue. Who they are okay? And this trickles down to i think you’ve made you’ve made the point already everybody in the organization doesn’t your function, maybe very ministerial down to maintenance, perhaps, but you still you need to be speaking with that same organizational voice, absolutely. And if the maintenance person is on facebook and might be posting something about an event that’s going on that they were involved in helping, then you want them to feel empowered to beyond message what else? What did i not ask you that you’d like to share with small and midsize shops about about this process grand raising how it helps supports fund-raising well, i would say, you know, one one one theme we’ve touched on, but i wanted to say again is don’t give up hope just because you’re small and you can’t afford to hire an agency or whatever, that doesn’t mean you can’t do a great job. When i wrote my book, i was trying very hard to write it from a point of view of could somebody who doesn’t do this stuff every day take this and use it, and i’m hearing back from people that they can, but i’m also seeing more and more examples of organizations just really coming up with fresh, creative ways to do it. We built this scorecard that we have on our website where you can go in and sort of answer a series of questions, and it reflects back to you how your organization is doing managing its communications on one of the interesting findings we we have uncovered from that is that this small guys do it, justus well, as the big guys, that that the the having staff people or money for communications does not necessarily make you a better communicator. Excellent website is picked up dot com it’s, big duck. Nice dot com okay, don’t you ignore what i said? First big duck and dot com sarah door. Um, you want to leave one last one last tip. Come to fund-raising days. Great show. I want to see you all here next year. You’ll be back. I’ll be back. I love it here. Yeah. Sarah durham is thanks durney principle. My pleasure. Thank you very much. Principal and founder of big duck leary in n y c her book is brandraise ing and i want to thank you very much for joining me, sara and listeners viewers thank you for joining my coverage of fund-raising day two thousand thirteen marriott marquis hotel. Thanks very much. Thanks. Yes, my thanks to everyone at fund-raising day and sarah durham. To bring this show, we need some help. And i want you to know about the two companies that are helping us bradrick rally bound is a sponsor. They make simple, reliable peer-to-peer fund-raising software. This is software for runs, walks and rides it’s friends asking friends to give to your cause. You get a discount as a non pas provoc radio listener. Get that claim that discount you can go to rally bound dot com or just call them up on talk to joe mcgee and he will answer your questions and help you build your campaign. And, of course, explain how rally bound khun do that for you. They’re at rally bound dot com or triple eight seven six seven nine zero seven six and we are also supported by t b r c cost recovery yourselfer benowitz runs t brc. He will go over your past phone bills looking for errors when he finds them, which he does ninety. Percent of the time phone cos it turns out, are not so good about billing correctly. Then he picks up the phone when he finds these errors and he fights the phone company to get you money back. These are not only errors in billing, but also services that you didn’t order or you’re getting the wrong pricing, not what, not what you were supposed to be charged for, a service and also he can fight well above market pricing when he finds that, um, i had mentioned a couple weeks ago that recently he saved a non-profit almost twelve thousand dollars after finding errors in their phone bill that went back three years and you only pay ti brc if they actually get money back from the phone company, they can also save you money looking far word, because if you’ve, um, if there have been mistakes in the past, then there’s savings to be accrued going ahead as well. Trc cost recovery yussef rabinowitz i’ve known him for almost ten years. He’s at tbe rc dot com or two. One, two six double four nine. Triple xero ask for yosef twenty steak too. I hosted a panel discussion. For the new york ilsen chapter of a f p about two months ago or so that’s, the association of fund-raising professionals, the discussion was about creating a culture of philanthropy throughout your non-profit very similar to what sarah duram was talking about in having everyone be a brand ambassador from the receptionist to your ceo. There were three very smart people with me. They were terry, billy, matt bregman and brian saber. It was informative conversation, and i love the topic because it does come up a lot. How do you encourage everyone in your non-profit two treat the people they come in contact with as potential donors. It was informative, and we had some fun as well. There’s a link to the video on my block at tony martignetti dot com and that is tony’s take two for friday, the sixth of december forty seventh show of the year. Scott koegler is with me, you know him he’s, our monthly tech contributor. He’s, the editor of non-profit technology news, which you’ll find it n p tech news. Dot com and on twitter he’s at scott koegler. Scott, how are you? I’m doing well, tony, how you terrific lee. Thank you very much. You have a good thanksgiving. I did way too much turkey. But, you know that’s to be expected. Alright, good. You had fun. He did. We’re talking about safeguarding your donordigital. What are the, uh what of the potential risks here if donordigital is compromised? Well, there’s a lot of risks. You actually tony and what’s probably the biggest one is that not just the the data is stolen, but the information about your donors is compromised and that’s something that has made a whole lot of headlines recently well, over the last few years actually, um about, you know, different different companies having having their data breached, having there credit card information stolen and now people losing, losing the privacy of the credit information identity theft by another word. So there are implications that are certainly public relations you don’t want to be, you know, it may not be a headline if you’re a smaller midsize shop, but you can have a public relations problem among your donors and volunteers without it being in the headlines. There’s legal implications and you couldn’t even have, like some financial problems mean if people if it comes to the point of people suing you? Are you having to pay for damages? Definitely. Definitely. You know that i moved to south carolina recently, and last year i think that was earlier this year. Actually, the the the state governments website was breached. And supposedly all of the information that that anyone who has filed tax returns in the state oh, my goodness is stolen. So, you know, i mean that’s bad enough. I haven’t actually heard of anyone who was, you know, was affected by having their identities going. But what happened was that the state, aside from the, you know, the political and and other kinds of just general discussion about how things were handled badly, they had to offer a free subscription service to an identity theft, monitoring service to literally everyone in the state. Oh, my and a couple people. And so on, top of on top of having to rebuild their infrastructure, you know, tighten down their security, you know, they have that financial burden, you know, just added things. So yeah, financial consequences definitely did this stuff the car during the five days when governor mark sanford was off with his girlfriend in in argentina is that when that happened, it could have i don’t know, i you know, it could have been an argentinean internet connection get part of the story his reputation has since been rehabilitated because he was he was elected. Tio what the house of representatives, i think for for south carolina? I think so. Although i have to have two admit that i haven’t really followed much of the south carolinian political situation, even though i should have. Okay, well, you’re you’re new resident. Well, i am your break now. Good vote. So, i guess it’s good. What part of the problem with identity theft, though, is that people the bad people don’t use the data right away because they know that everybody who’s data was compromised is on the lookout, but they’ll wait. I mean, they’ll wait three for five years and use the data then when your date of birth and social security number haven’t changed and maybe even your address hasn’t changed. And and by then people are not on the lookout for the for the theft. Because it’s been so many years since it occurred. Exactly exactly. And then it’s also hard to track down. Where that breach came from because if it wass, for instance, a small provider, small company or a small non-profit that got that breached, uh, may not have been reported, right? Not everybody owns up to it, and actually not everybody actually knows that they’ve been breached. Right rights, it’s not in the hacker’s best interest to notify anyone that had that data. Yeah, yeah, now it gets it gets discovered by some audit. Or maybe the hackers will sloppy or something like that, but yeah, i’m sure there are lot of instances where organization don’t even know that it’s happened. All right, so if we’re going to protect our donordigital what we need to be thinking about first? Well, the first thing is pretty obvious stuff is that, you know, if you don’t need the information, don’t keep it, don’t collect it, don’t get it one of the pieces of information, of course, that non-profits do. On whose credit card information, uh, and some sites you know, amazon in particular, and pretty much any e commerce site collect credit card information and then there’s a convenience to the chopper. We’ll store that information? Yes. And, you know it’s convenient. And in a situation like amazon, people may go back there and by things you know, almost daily, and so in that case, it really is a convenience, so you don’t want to. I don’t want to keep entering my my credit card information every time i buy something for a non-profit that that frequency is probably significantly less than what amazon gets and we would certainly hope with it it’s more frequent, but reality is they’re probably talking about a few times a year at the most. Yes, so in those cases allow the credit card information to the energy. Be sure that it’s over a secure line and that’s here’s a jug and peace for https that’s uh uh that’s the secure website connections that links the website that someone beat feeling to the with the back end server some reason, scott, i know that http is hypertext transfer protocol, right? And then i believe that as few yeses for secure okay, sorry, sorry. Nobody cares about nobody cares. Um, so and that part right there just means that someone monitoring are tapping into the line isn’t just catching the data while it’s streaming by them on dh collecting it that way. That’s the first line of security, but the second, you know, use the information, make the transaction, get the get the donation into the bank account, and then just don’t record the critical information, right? Just by doing that i could probably solve. I’m going to say at least fifty percent of the of the problems that a data breach can cause for constituents for donors. There’s other information that would fall into those to that category, i’m thinking, like date of birth, social security number, even even address? Yeah, address an email. I mean, you don’t want those to be compromised. Yeah, here’s an interesting piece of the security information. Did you know if you have a person’s first name your date of birth and their zip code, you can find out through there first name, date of birth and zip code that’s enough to identify? Yeah, yeah, that makes sense way, wouldn’t you? Yeah, when you say it, it makes sense, but somebody wouldn’t think that those if you’re not, if you’re not in a security role, you wouldn’t realize that those three things can be really damaging and you could find everything about those so i mean, date of birth, i mean, probably non-profits don’t have to save date of birth, right? Date of birth, you know? Krauz they probably do need address information in order to send maybe a ten, ninety nine, you know, donation form at the end of the right, right? But certainly so security number is not necessary. I don’t. I don’t think that’s required for a ten, ninety nine. Well, non-profits aren’t sending ten, ninety nine’s. They’re just sending the just sending acknowledgement letters. Okay, so, yeah, ten. Ninety nine’s that’s for contractors. So so wouldn’t you wouldn’t need it. You wouldn’t need you would not need it for donors. All right, but so there’s there’s information that we should save, but we should look scrupulously at what we are actually preserving is the point. Okay, what we need and don’t even ask for what you don’t need and those things that you do need, you know, on a on a short term basis, like credit card information. Just really okay. Okay. There’s still information that you need and there’s information that you want to keep. You want to keep the name, you know, the donation history, maybe. Their activities, you may want to keep their their their address, and they want it. Particularly if you do send out snail mail. Kind of, uh, information. You know, newsletters do still go by on paper. And so there is information that you want and here’s one of the ways that south carolina system was breached. No, if they could have avoided the entire disaster with the effects of the disaster. Maybe not for a public relations standpoint, but from the effect on its citizens. By encrypting the data they have. So wait, he talked about, you know, using a secure internet connection tps. And that applies and encryption to all of the information going across the internet wire. But once it reaches the program of stories that data, um, you know, that data is stored in a database and the database is usually, um, pretty transparent. In other words, you can open the database. Look at the information and it’s you know, it’s in english. It’s in what’s, commonly called clear text. So it’s, you know, you can look at it with a human being can read it and understand it. And i know it’s easy and it’s the way that things are stored most of time. What south carolina did not do on. Actually, a couple of others didn’t dio notable ones are adobe and link them okay. Not small names of people that you would think would know better. Um, they did not encrypt the contents of their database. So what that means is if the data is not encrypted, hacker gets in, they download the database and they can use it’s all visible in clear text. Okay. Okay. All right. So so the data that we do store, we should consider encryption, right? Absolutely. Absolutely their encryptions pretty easy. Most databases have it as a non option. You could just, you know, take a box and bingo. It’s all encrypted. So we have to also consider where this data is safe, right? It’s lots of different places and including portables buy-in night. Um, sure, cellphones get lost, laptops gets stolen, all those kind of things happen. I don’t know that. There’s an additional answer there. I mean, certainly you can password protect cell phones and laptops for typically people don’t do that. Yeah, well, we’re going to get to policies that they should be doing so. But they’re also the data is on servers. In your and hopefully your server closet is secure. I’ve seen a lot of servers that including businesses, small businesses where, you know it’s in a like a ah whole janitorial closet or something up on a shelf, not secure it all, but data can also be in the cloud. Uh, exactly that it could be in the cloud and it’s kind of a counterintuitive. I’ll just give you my personal take on this. I think on i believe that the data that’s stored in a no properly created cloud environment it was much more secure than something that’s residing in your server. Have your office. Okay, why don’t i tell you why? First of all, servers in officers are managed fly, but people in those officers typically and except for, you know, very large non-profits most of those people are not, um, it’s, not a full time job to manage the security of the service right there doing other things. They have a full time job for a part time job and a piece of a part of a tiny portion of that time maybe to make a backup of the server, on the other hand, cloud based systems it is their business, it’s, the only business, and not only are the, uh, typically bound by terms and conditions of the contract with that you have with them to protect your data, if if they’re breached, uh, they stand to lose their entire business just from the bad p r so it’s in their best interest to keep their, you know their customers, clients, data secure, you know, they those kinds of environments, too, support the https secure connections they do typically encrypt the data. I’m not saying you don’t need to check those things, but i do believe that it’s, no overall, safer environment, leave it in the hands of the professionals. Okay, way. Have to go away for a couple minutes when we come back. Scott. Now, keep talking about safeguarding your donordigital. We’ll get into some of the policies that you should have. Stay with us. You’re listening to the talking alternative network. Are you stuck in your business or career trying to take your business to the next level, and it keeps hitting a wall? This is sam liebowitz, the conscious consultant. I will help you get to the root cause of your abundance issues and help move you forward in your life. Call me now and let’s. Create the future you dream of. Two, one, two, seven, two, one, eight, one, eight, three, that’s to one to seven to one, eight one eight three. The conscious consultant helping conscious people. Be better business people. Have you ever considered consulting a road map when you feel you need help getting to your destination when the normal path seems blocked? A little help can come in handy when choosing an alternate route. Your natal chart is a map of your potentials. It addresses relationships, finance, business, health and, above all, creativity. Current planetary cycles can either support or challenge your objectives. I’m montgomery taylor. If you would like to explore the help of a private astrological reading, please contact me at monte at monty taylor dot. Com let’s monte m o nt y at monty taylor dot com. Talking alternative radio twenty four hours a day. I’m dana ostomel, ceo of deposit, a gift. And you’re listening to tony martignetti non-profit radio. Big non-profit ideas for the other ninety five percent. All right, scott, we know what data we’ve got and what we need to save and not save way we know where the data is stored, what kind of policies should we have in place? Yeah, well, as you mentioned, it’s it’s a good thing to have a policy that says, you know, you need to secure your devices with a password so that every time you go to use that needs to be logged in, um, in my experience that that may work in corporate environments where the shop has the ability to actually manage the devices that were used by their weather employees, but in an environment that says generally as loose as a non-profit think becomes pretty difficult to enforce. For one thing, you know, you’re your volunteers may all that they have bones that are being managed by their brother employers. So you get a conflict in that in that area, i’m still it’s a good thing to do. Certainly you want to be sure that the staff isn’t writing things down on pieces of paper, so if they are recording things, they are being recorded in a digital format in a secure format so that whatever protections are being enforced in the inn that digital connection are being used, they may not be one hundred percent, but it’s better than nothing for sure. We should also have policy around who has access to different pieces of data, absolutely, and that has to do with the, uh, the applications that you use in historian information some of the more simplistic application, for instance, locally, you know, homemade databases, spreadsheets, things like that have very limited security options, right? Most of the most of the non-profit applications that are available commercially have what they call multi level rules so you can define a roll of manager out of the data entry clerk, you know, hosting volunteer and different kinds of rules like that, and each one of those can have different levels of access to information. So somebody who’s carrying around a tablet that in the event registering people for the event, they only have access to the data entry function for that piece, it certainly would not have access two historical e-giving and other other information has already been recorded when i go teo cem, clients on i’m using their database there’s data that i can’t see? Social security number. For instance, i i can see that it’s preserved, but all i see in that field is a bunch of stars. Date of birth, i think is another one. Or maybe i see the year, but not the day in the month. Something like that. So there there are there are data, ways of preserving and i log on to that database so it knows who i am and what level of access i have. Exactly. When i was, that reminds me of when i was in the air force, i had i had top secret clearance. And then beyond top secret, there was something called psyop. Yes, i which was it was his top secret. T s psyop was the single integrated operating plan. And then, yes, i was for extra sensitive information. So you could have t s and then you could go beyond that, and then beyond that. And then there’s, you know, obviously there people bled levels of security clearance beyond me. But i had top secret c i a p ece anyway, so so just exactly as you told me that tony means you have to kill me right now. There. Are other reasons i need to kill you. Is that another doing? Just revealed. Okay. All right. So the software can help us. All right. So this is part of our policies is who who has access to what? On a need to know basis, right? That’s, basically, what do you need to know? To do your job? Exactly. And there’s one two things i’ll bring up here one is that, you know most well, most a lot of instances of breach come from, uh, not getting rid of logging access. That is not necessary any longer. So someone leaves the organization. The very first thing that should be done is that log in should be deactivated. Deleted whatever. Yes, at the very least. Password changed. But there are lots of lots of instances where that wasn’t done immediately. And the data, you know, goes away and let’s face it. You know, it’s it’s, not just a friendly departure. That person is more likely to take action immediately than they are, you know, a month down the road. So quick action is is really, uh, you know the right thing to do. Let’s, talk a little about insurance. There’s there’s. Cyber insurance there is dahna and, you know, i haven’t really looked at the prices for those, but i’m sure that there is based on the amount of information, the value of your database, all those kind of things, but i would say that most of the large insurance company i’m looking at the hartford and shove, for instance, they offer what’s called a data breach insurance, which is exactly what we’re talking about here, its protection against loss, its protection against lawsuits from some problems occurring based on the loss, liability, all those nothing i would say it’s definitely something we’re looking into. And of course, you know, hindsight will always tell you that you should have done it. Yeah, but, you know, pryce will make that determination for you, okay? We’re not holding you to the standards of of an insurance broker, so you don’t need to know the price, but but important for people to know that it exists and and as you suggested, you know, if you have a bad person, maybe they left on bad terms or maybe they’re still working for you, and they just have some bad intentions. No policy is going to prevent them from getting what they want if they’re if they’re industrious enough like and an interesting statistic. Seventy five percent of a raw data theft and i’m talking well, i guess it could be called hacking, but they left. This use of data happens internally of that seventy five percent, fifty percent of it is from physical, just physically copying the data onto a thumb drive. Or, you know, some other cd or something like that. So it really, you know, most of what’s gonna happen is really gonna happen within the organization and that’s for anything. And this heartening, unfortunately true. You’re a former ceo, right? Chief information officer, chief technology officer on the corporate side. Um what? What more do you want to impart? I haven’t asked you about, uh, you know, lock the doors. That’s, that’s probably the biggest and most difficult thing that we had to contend with was making sure that the facility is secure. Now, those when i was doing that, cloud computing was really not a big issue. So locking the doors, you know, for a cloud environment doesn’t really does it really work. That said, there are still, uh, there’s still paper records that your store in camp, almost any organization and locking the doors were locking the file cabinets or some other way, securing access against the paper records. Still it’s still the right thing to do, and we’ll we’ll avoid some of the day. The fact that we’re talking about yes, excellent. We’ve been talking about digitised data, but there’s still lots of paper records and just simple locks on a file cabinet on blocks on doors, andan that server door that you know that those hallway closet server that i see where it’s the maintenance you know, it’s it’s above the slop sink that’s crazy frank, right it is and have one one other issue that we talked about and that is what’s called social engineering and has nothing to do with data. Uh, it’s it’s really old fashioned and involved. Usually telephone, but it could be personal. Personal face-to-face okay, you know, we talked about the three pieces of information that will lead to someone really knowing who you are like that, uh, your first name, date of birth and your zip code. You may not say all those things to the same person at the same. Time, but, uh, social engineering involves people making phone calls into an organization, talking to different people and pulling different pieces of information from those different people and then assemble in those outside so they’re pretty easy to, you know, called secretary and they, you know, i’m trying to get the three owners birthday gift, you know, what? They were on dh, you know, by the way, you know, at another person calls in to another person in the organization and says, you know what? Town today with them? I mean, no, there you go right there. Three piece of information, yes. Wow. That’s okay, those air bad there’s a bad actors, but but if somebody want that they can, they can put it together over time. And andi, even if even a small organization, even if there aren’t that many people, if they can call they could do it over time, they can have a have ah, accomplice maybe helping. So one time it’s a man a couple weeks later, it’s a woman asking different things. Your office isn’t going to protect against that exactly. Then we’re not as people, we’re not wired to think, you know, in that. Kind of devious way to protect ourselves. Okay. All right. All the more reason for thinking about this thing about cyber insurance, i think. Exactly. Exactly. All right, we have just a couple of minutes left. Scott, i’m going to put you on the scott on the i’m going to put you on the scott. I’m going to put you on the spot for a holiday wine recommendation as part of your as your sixty second style stop. Whoa, what wine do you loving? In the month of december? A month of december, we actually we found one that we absolutely love. It’s it’s the two thousand ten it’s called immortal it’s zampa dollars. You might expect it’s just it’s, you know, luxurious it’s. Wonderful. And it’s. Got that typical in-kind of sweetness and smooth with a lot of food. Uh, that fifty bucks and i, you know, been enjoying that one. Okay. That’s a that’s, a red zinfandel or white red’s. Okay, two thousand ten immortals in scott koegler sixty second style. Stop, scott. Always a pleasure. Enjoy your holidays. Thank you very much. Good to talk to you. Thanks so much for your help, scott koegler on twitter. He’s at scott koegler konigstein are and he’s, the editor of non-profit technology news, which is that n p tech news. Dot com next week, the millennials study derek feldman will be with me. I’m pretty sure he’ll be in the studio. He’s, co author of that report also amy sample, ward she’s, our social media contributor and ceo of non-profit technology network and ten she returns next week. Remember our supporters rally bound dot com and tb rc dot com. I’m very grateful for their support. They’re good people. Please check them out. Our creative producer is claire meyerhoff. Sam liebowitz is at the board, as our line producer shows. Social media is by deborah askanase of community organizer two point oh, and the remote producer of tony martignetti non-profit radio is john federico of the new rules. This excellent music is by scott stein. Oh, i hope to be with me next week that’ll be friday, december thirteenth. The, uh i don’t know which friday of the year it is, but it’ll be at one to two eastern at talking alternative dot com. You didn’t think that shooting getting thinking. You’re listening to the talking alternative network duitz get in. E-giving cubine are you a female entrepreneur ready to break through? Join us at sexy body sassy sol, where women are empowered to ask one received what they truly want in love, life and business. Tune in thursday, said noon eastern time to learn timpson juicy secrets from inspiring women and men who, there to define their success, get inspired, stay motivated and defying your version of giant success with sexy body sake. Sold every thursday ad. Men in new york times on talking alternative dot com. Are you suffering from aches and pains? Has traditional medicine let you down? Are you tired of taking toxic medications, then come to the double diamond wellness center and learn how our natural methods can help you to hell? Call us now at to one to seven to one eight, one eight three that’s to one to seven to one eight one eight three or find us on the web at www dot double diamond wellness dot com way. Look forward to serving you. You’re listening to talking on their network at www dot talking alternative dot com now broadcasting twenty four hours a day. I’m the aptly named host of tony martignetti non-profit radio. Big non-profit ideas for the other ninety five percent fund-raising board relations, social media, my guests and i cover everything that small and midsize shops struggle with. If you have big dreams and a small budget, you have a home at tony martignetti non-profit radio friday’s wanto to eastern talking alternative dot com. Are you concerned about the future of your business for career? Would you like it all to just be better? Well, the way to do that is to better communication, and the best way to do that is training from the team at improving communications. This is larry sharp, host of the ivory tower radio program and director at improving communications. Does your office needs better leadership, customer service sales, or maybe better writing, are speaking skills. Could they be better at dealing with confrontation conflicts, touchy subjects all are covered here at improving communications. If you’re in the new york city area, stop by one of our public classes, or get your human resource is intact with us. The website is improving communications, dot com, that’s, improving communications, dot com, improve your professional environment, be more effective, be happier, and make more money improving communications. That’s. The answer. Talking.

A sign that says "Our recipe: Simplicity, Honesty, Innovation. MIx well. Serve anywhere."

Keep Your Marketing Simple

A sign that says "Our recipe: Simplicity, Honesty, Innovation. MIx well. Serve anywhere."
photo courtesy of duncan on Flickr
This ad for ebay™ Now is running in the New York City subway:

     Thousands of items from local stores. Delivered to you in about an hour.

I admire the simplicity and conciseness. It conveys lots of information in two short sentences:

     *We’ve got plenty of items for you
     *They’re locally sourced
     *We deliver fast
     *You know how to find us

Describing my consulting, I strive for the same info density in short descriptions.

     *Planned Giving: I help nonprofits raise money through estate and retirement plan gifts.
     *Charity Registration: I help nonprofits get into compliance in each state where they solicit donations.

It took me months to hone those messages. And they’re still not as exciting as the subway copy.

Can you make your marketing brief, informative and jargon free? Your readers will be grateful. Do you do a lot of speaking? Your listeners will be even more grateful. Readers can stop reading. The people in your audiences probably won’t walk out. But they can tune you out.

Those you’re delivering to will better understand your messages–and it’s good practice for cocktail parties. The second half of this episode of Nonprofit Radio is devoted to dropping cliches.

It’s a challenge to write short and informative, and it’s a skill worth developing.

(ebay is copyright © 1995-2013 eBay Inc. All rights reserved.)

Nonprofit Radio, March 26, 2013: Discover Your Brand & Content Marketing

Big Nonprofit Ideas for the Other 95%

Listen live or archive:

Tony’s Guests:

Nadia Christina Tuma
Nadia Tuma
Nadia Tuma: Discover Your Brand

Nadia Tuma is a brand innovation strategist with clark | mcdowall. Your brand goes much deeper than logo and tagline. What’s the process to discover your brand strategy? Once you’ve found it, how do you manage it? Nadia and I will discuss.

 
 
 

Scott Koegler
Scott Koegler: Content Marketing

Scott Koegler returns. He’s our tech contributor and the editor of Nonprofit Technology News. What content should you post for consumption and where should you put it? How do you start your content marketing? Scott and I will discuss.

 
 
 
Both segments have survey questions. Please take a moment to answer three quick questions. You’ll find it below. Thank you! If you could also share it with other nonprofit professionals, I would appreciate it.
 
 
 

Create your free online surveys with SurveyMonkey , the world’s leading questionnaire tool.

Here is a link to the survey: http://tony.ma/Zpjgmr


Top Trends. Sound Advice. Lively Conversation.

You’re on the air and on target as I delve into the big issues facing your nonprofit—and your career.

If you have big dreams but an average budget, tune in to Tony Martignetti Nonprofit Radio.

I interview the best in the business on every topic from board relations, fundraising, social media and compliance, to technology, accounting, volunteer management, finance, marketing and beyond. Always with you in mind.

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Here is a link to the audio for the show: 135: Discover Your Brand & Content Marketing. You can also subscribe on iTunes to get the podcast automatically.
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Metoo hyre hello and welcome to tony martignetti non-profit radio big non-profit ideas for the other ninety five percent, i’m your aptly named host. I want to wish you cog, posca, so make i hope i’m saying happy easter in, i’m trying to say happy easter in hebrew and ah and happy passover in italian is born passat born peskay it’s march twenty ninth, two thousand thirteen and i very much hope that you were with me last week. I’d be disgusted to hear that you had missed irs sale in aisle four o three b evan giller, a founding member of the law firm of giller and calhoun, explained, the i r s is fifty percent off the penalty sale for four o three b retirement plans that are not in compliance. Many plans are not up to code, and this is the year to fix the problems we talked about the common mistakes and what to do and compensation clarity are regular legal contributors jean takagi and emily chan of the san francisco law group, the non-profit and exempt organizations group answer these questions how do you determine what’s reasonable compensation for executives? What happens if camp is excessive? And what’s that automatic penalty that kicks in if you don’t properly disclose benefits. We did a mock board meeting and i walked out remember i had sound effects and everything. I’m amusing myself if you refuse to be amused. I’m amusing myself last week. I want to make something clear. Last week i had said that gary vaynerchuk, gary v you may know him as had been on last week, which would’ve been two weeks ago. He was scheduled to but he had to reschedule for may. Well, have him in may and i just want to make it clear i was not drinking last week. I had recorded the show many weeks ago, back when gary was still going to keep his promise. But then he broke his promise, but he made up for it. We love we love gary. I’m just getting gary in case any of his entourage is listening. We like gary v and he’s coming this week. Discover your brand nadia touma is a brand innovation strategist with clark i mcdowell that’s not an eye there’s no period it’s clark vertical line mcdonnell that’s very dramatic clark vertical line, vertical mcdonald, your brand i’m glad not he’s laughing. She hopefully realizes that i wrote this copy. So i know it’s, not an eye. Your brand goes much deeper than logo in tagline i hope you recognize that what’s the process to discover your brand strategy. And once you’ve found it, how do you manage it? Nadia and i will discuss all that also content marketing scott koegler returns he’s, our regular tech contributor the editor of non-profit technology news what content should you post for consumption? And where should you be putting it? How do you start your content? Marketing scott and i will discuss that between the guests on tony’s take two planned giving is part of your fund-raising team that’s what’s on my block this week, i’ve got some simple ways that planned giving can support the rest of your fund-raising my pleasure now to welcome and introduce nadia christina touma she’s, a brand innovation strategist with clark mcdonnell i guess you know it’s probably supposed to articulate the vertical line. It was an ampersand you’d say clark end, but it’s not supposed to be clark vertical line mcdonnell just clark macdonald that’s where she’s an a brand strategy innovation ist her work is creating and revitalizing brands in our swiftly changing world. She’s on the faculty of the school of visual arts, s via the masters in branding program, where she teaches brand strategy. She has worked with non-profits such as slow food and why i see in the pittsburgh concert society and in college at carnegie mellon university. She had a minor in piano performance, and we’re going to talk a little about that, too. Nadia touma, welcome to the studio. Thanks for having me, tony it’s. A pleasure. Glad to see you laughing already. Very good. Um, co-branding i think there’s a lot of misconceptions about what a brand is. What? What? What is branding? Well, that is a very good question. First one out of the box. Alright. Alright. Complimentary. You could stay the whole hour. With pleasure. Ah, i often get that question. A lot of people don’t quite know what branding is. I have a lot of confusion even within my family and my closest friends there. Not sure exactly what i d’oh. I think the best way to describe branding is to define it as what? It’s not co-branding is not. Ah, brand strategy is not marketing it’s, not advertising its not a logo it’s, not pr. It is actually the foundation. And the strategy is really the backbone of all of those things that it will then effect. So, you know, a brand strategy consists of things like a mission, a vision, reasons for being the dna of what a company and its products stand for you. And then all of those marketing pr efforts are executions off that strategy. All right? And then you have to maintain your strategy once you’ve once you’ve devised it well, not only maintain that’s very important maintain, but also stay relevant and state different. So it requires connection to the world connection to your consumer. You know, the world is not stagnant, and neither should have brand be stagnant. S o you have a very solid foundation, but you have to move with the times as well. Now, how do world renowned brands like apple? You know, nike, how did they create that that aura around them? And you just say apple and people think of steve jobs, and they think of beautiful design and innovation and slightly expensive products. But how did they how did they had to create that well, that’s, really the magic question and that’s, why people like me exist which is to help companies really create that magic, but at a very fundamental level there are couple characteristics that make a brand very strong, one of which is its first of all, that it’s relevant, that it’s relevant to people’s, lives to companies, lives. Another important characteristic is that its distinctive so it has to be relevant. But it also needs to be somewhat unique um, and somewhat special in a way that the delights people there’s also another really wonderful thing that strong brands do, which is they defined categories, and they almost shift culture in a way. So if you think about really strong brands like apple, for instance, you know they’ve really changed the way we interact with the world, with music, with movies, with people, you know, and those very, very strong brands are able to almost do that and shifting culture, which is really cool. All right, so let’s, let’s, bring this to the to the small and midsize non-profit level. You talked about a lot of things in developing the brand strategy, but so let’s let’s. Try to flush this out. How do you how do you start? Toe create your strategy. What? What you want to be? Yeah, and that’s oftentimes the biggest challenges actually understanding. What is it? What is our reason for being? Why do we exist? And that’s challenging? Because a lot of times there might be differing opinions or different objectives within an organization within a midsize non-profit but but every non-profit has a mission statement almost always go to the home page it’s a simple pull down it’s right there in front. They all have a mission and you in a vision. So, isn’t that. Isn’t that the basis or there might even be some the differences of opinion? Despite that? Yeah, i know a lot of times the mission statement it could have been written by, you know, someone who founded it years ago, and it may not be as relevant or the way in which it’s interpreted might not be consistent across people who are making decisions everyday within that organization. Eso when we think about a mission statement it’s, you know, it’s sort of a first level and that needs to be agreed upon, of course, but from there there other components like understanding who were retargeting what’s our consumer, our audience, you know, what exactly do we offer, even from not just a functional standpoint, but an emotional standpoint, even if you’re just a midsize non-profit that’s all very important. S o sometimes mission statements, vision statements are written without those components in mind. And so that’s what needs to be really fleshed out internally, say, a little more about the emotion? Yeah, so you know every organization, whether you know, whether you’re lady gaga or your you know, proctor and gamble, you’re offering functional things, so you’re offering toilet paper or you’re offering entertainment and music, but you’re also offering, and i don’t think lady gaga uses ivory, so probably not right. I don’t think she uses anything anyone else used, but from an emotional standpoint, you also have to deliver something right brands need to make you feel something on dh. So even if your say, you know a local music organization that promotes local talent, there needs to be something emotional that the audience gets from using you. Otherwise you become just purely functional, and a purely functional offering is not a complete brand and we can articulate all the all this i mean, we can pull all this into ah ah, cohesive statement and understanding among all our different constituents are bored are our staff are sea level people, the people who are benefiting from our services, whether they’re students or or the homeless way? Yeah, absolutely. And what’s actually critical when you’re implementing ah, brand vision or a brand strategy is to get buy in from every level of the organization. So everyone who’s doing the accounting? Teo being a spokesperson, teo, you know, being the ceo all need to believe it’s it’s the difference i often tell my students it’s a difference between interacting with a customer service representative it zappos, who clearly believes in the brand to buying something at duane reade and interacting with the checkout person, okay? Or maybe state government, maybe that’s all right, that’s a good example of the other end of the day. Yeah, okay. We’re gonna take a break. We’re going to dive more into detail about how to develop your strategy, what that process is about. So now he has certainly stays with me. And i hope that you do too talking. Alternative radio. Twenty four hours a day. Are you confused about which died it’s, right for you? Are you tired of being tired? How about improving your energy strength and appearance? Hi, i’m ricky keck, holistic nutrition and wellness consultant. If you have answered yes to any of my questions, contact me now at n y integrated health dot com, or it’s, six for six to eight, five, eight five eight eight initiate change and transform your life. Are you concerned about the future of your business for career? Would you like it all to just be better? Well, the way to do that is to better communication, and the best way to do that is training from the team at improving communications. This is larry sharp, host of the ivory tower radio program and director at improving communications. Does your office need better leadership, customer service, sales, or maybe better writing, are speaking skills? Could they be better at dealing with confrontation conflicts, touchy subjects all are covered here at improving communications. If you’re in the new york city area, stopped by one of our public classes, or get your human resource is in touch with us. The website is improving communications, dot com, that’s, improving communications, dot com, improve your professional environment, be more effective, be happier, and make more money improving communications. That’s, the hey, all you crazy listeners looking to boost your business? Why not advertise on talking alternative with very reasonable rates? Interested simply email at info at talking alternative dot com buy-in durney welcome back to big non-profit ideas for the other ninety five percent got tons of live listener love china so well represented. Young jang kun ming chung ching, shanghai, shenyang, wuhan. I’ve been to wuhan and i’ve been to shanghai. Shi on is not there. I was in shi on to where she on left fans behind and she on i thought. But china chinese ni hao. Very nice to have you with us and seoul, korea and day. John korea. Very nice to have you with us on your haserot here in the u s new york, new york. Welcome, smithtown, new york. Welcome. Will smith times at long island, i think i think it’s long island welcome live listen, love tto all those live listeners and more to come. Okay, nadia touma. We’re talking about the importance of branding here. By the way, when you become a partner in your firm, i want you to tell them you want an ampersand before your name. Okay? Not the verdict. I don’t care what kind of equity they offer you a share in the corporate jet. You want not the vertical line. You want to be end too much, really? The memo percent um okay, let’s, go let’s, get into this process a little. Now all these all these constituents need to be involved. You mention from accountants to board members at sea level. Bonem what do we what do we start this this process with if we want to develop our brand well, there’s, just like they’re possibly dozens of definitions of what brand strategist do there’s also many ways in which a process khun begin. I’ll tell you my personal perspective. I truly i truly believe that partnering with whoever you’re working with is incredibly important. So getting together say, your ah brand strategy agency or you’re working on your own, getting together with that client and really sitting down and understanding what’s the issue what’s at stake what do your objectives try to understand? What’s our goal and together as a team really outline what a success look like. You know, it’s really define what those girls look like and parameters, you know, what’s what can we change what’s off limits? You know what can we not touch from there? I think it’s really important to get the perspectives of a lot of different stakeholders within that. Organization and try to understand is there are other inconsistencies among them in terms of what the mission is, what the vision is. Do they see the company going in different directions? Do they see in a different place in five years? What are the different strengths and weaknesses that various parties see? Understanding even that is an insight is to understand what’s our current situation. You know where the inconsistencies, where the commonalities and from there, we can start to create a common goal. So there’s a lot of conversation, a lot of interviewing focus groups. Is that is that it was that all part of this? Well, focus groups come a little bit later. So once you do wanna interview internally and understand what’s going on within, because the change will have to happen from within. So getting a good read on that is really the first step. Okay on, i did survey listeners before the show on dass cked in the past five years, have you given considerable thought to your brand strategy? A little more than half said yes. About close to sixty percent said yes. And then about fourteen percent said no and about a third said, i’m not sure what brand strategy means i better listen to the show, so i hope those listen, i hope you’re on. I hope they’re either in china, japan or smith down listening, all right, but no more than half have feel that they have given a lot of thought within the past five years. Well, i think in the past five years, there’s been a sea change in the perspective of brand strategy. I’ve seen it absolutely well, i think that brand i mean it’s still a nebulous term that clearly people aren’t quite sure what it means. I think that there’s been quite a shift recently in going going from financial measures on ly in terms of measuring success to trying to build in metrics that measure the quality of your brand as well. I think cmos and ceos are recognizing the importance of having a strong brand in addition to the bottom line. Now, cmo is a very common term for you, but here on the show we have drug in jail on i would hate wade. You have a female ward for for george in jail offenders cmo so that all the listeners know what you’re talking about, chief marketing officer excellent does a lot of non-profits certainly don’t have cme owes a lot of this falls right on the executive director or maybe a communications and marketing staff but might not be a chief marketing officer. All right, so we’ve gathered all this information from all the different constituents, and i think including importantly, people who are benefiting from the work that we do a zay said earlier, whether they’re students or they’re the hungry who you’re feeding the batter to your sheltering them in there, they’re certainly included, we have all this information. Now what? How do we coalesce this what we’re looking for, right? So i think that once we’ve understood what’s going on internally, we want to then turn r r face toe to the outside world and understand who are we affecting? So is that the hungry? Is that students and decide who was it really that were after? And i don’t mean after in a predatory sense, i mean, in terms of who’s, our audience, who are we trying to read? That’s actually an incredibly important part of it to really define that target audience on and i don’t just mean to finding it in terms of demographics, so you hear a lot of terms thrown around, like males eighteen to thirty four or moms with kids or the baby boomers. The reality of it is that each of those groups has shades and shades of different types of people so it’s more important to understand. Are you looking at moms with kids who are into organic food or, you know, are you looking at males eighteen to thirty four who are married and, you know, working full time or are things like that that that add texture to who you’re looking at and then it’s important to understand? Let me ask you when you’re doing that? Do you ever devise hypothetical people? Absolutely had guests? I’ve had two guests in the past. You have talked about that for in terms of marketing strategy. Yeah, about that oh, that’s. Incredibly important. So we call them creating personas on dh it’s. Really? It’s it’s wonderful to do with clients. Because i think one of the pitfalls of working all the time with inman organization is you start to see your audience as a number or, you know, a cell. In an exception, a stereotype of some complete stereotype and it’s. Amazing to see the way in which top level executives will react. Teo very well fleshed out persona and what i mean by persona is outlining the person as if they truly were a person. What do they like to do in their free time? What brands do they use in other categories? That’s incredibly important. What’s their education level. Where did they go to school? Where do they like to vacation? And you really bring that person toe life and they become someone that is relatable. And in that sense, i think you create better solutions, theun just saying, while we need to increase exp i twenty five percent and why by sixteen percent do you give those personas? Name’s? Vivian? Oh, yes. Oh, yes. And a lot of work goes into that is, well, really the name? Yeah, sure. We’re okay. All right, all right. So i made you tigress labbate because that’s interesting cause the other guests i said have made the same point sabat so we’re coalescing this invention that we’re going outside. Are we doing interviews with with these potential personas? Were trying to meet people who fit the description of these different personas absolutely, i think that the most important thing to do is to talk to your consumer, and it’s really brings it to life. You, khun do surveys. My personal preference is to go out into the world and really interact with who you’re going to be speaking with on dh that could be done in a variety of ways. So ethnography zehr quite popular, and that means don’t get into that jail again, jack in jail ethnography xero when you go into the audience is natural habitat really so to speak? So if you’re studying, you know the way in which people consume alcohol, you might be going to bars or their homes before they go out. If you’re, you know, studying perhaps skin care, you might go and observe someone shopping for skin care. So you really want teo me? Clearly, it won’t be a pure experience because you’re their jotting down notes and you know, you’re obviously observing, but you do get to see those those nuances that you might you might not get if you’re in a focus group facility. Not to say that those air not incredibly valuable because they are one of the things you get from focused group that you don’t get in other types of qualitative research is that you get social interaction, so you’re watching people react to things, and then maybe another person says something that sparks another thing, and then someone else builds on that and you start to get these incredibly rich insights from whatever stimulus you’re bringing in. Nadia touma is a brand innovation strategist with clark mcdole, which you’ll find on the web at clark with no, no, eat the end. Mcdowell, m, c d o w a l l clark macdonald, dot com what types of questions are you asking these people? Well, that all really depends. It depends on the objectives of what you’re trying to find out. So if you’re if you’re doing just straight consumer package good type research such as skin care, alcohol or you nutrition shake or something of that nature you’re trying to understand really the needs behind it. One of the things that is let’s think let’s, bring it to a non-profit sure you’ve worked with a music and arts group in the past. Yes, i suppose it is. A small arts group. What what? What are we trying to find out from their their their constituents? Eso for example, for this small arts organization that i worked with, they sponsored and showcased local classical musicians in a recital setting. And they were having an issue with their audience. There wasn’t enough of coming to these recitals. So really it’s it’s not just saying, why are people not coming to a recital? That’s sort of just scratching at the surface? What you really want to try to understand or what are those unmet needs that is, is prohibiting them from coming, right? So what are those barriers that miss making people do something else rather than come here? And i think that’s really actually across the board what you want to find out and that’s incredibly challenging because people don’t know what they don’t want. So it’s very hard for them to tell you what they’re looking for, why they chose something else, exactly, or its group or a college why they chose it. Okay, so how do you start to get to this s o that’s? Really? Where the art meets the science it’s really that’s when you have to really sit down and create a solid methodology, and what that means is you really need to thaw. I almost think about what you’re trying to get first and work your way backwards. So if i’m trying to understand, you know what is really driving? Ah, consumer, not to go to our side and go to a football game instead really try to break that down in a way that gets sort of a roundabout way to get to them. You would never ask them. Why are you going to the football game rather than the recital? You’re trying to understand it a deeper level? What is that that makes them feel fulfilled? What is it that makes them feel happy with their free time? And then you have to do a lot of the back work to fill in those gaps. This is very esoteric. It’s. We call them leaps there you really have? Tio i almost asked around the question and look at that negative space in a way, and then make those connections to understand what’s missing. Okay, so all right, so now you’ve got your internal constituents, your external constituents. You’ve made some leaps. In judgment, there must be some kind of testing of what of the leaps that you’ve made, and the the early conclusion that you’re starting to draw? Absolutely. And this is when you bring it all together. So as you said, we spoke internally. We understood what was going there. We understand what’s going on in the outside world. And then now you need to bring it together and say, okay, what makes sense here if we have x and y parameters internally and this is what success looks like? And then this is the opportunity that we’re seeing in the outside world. How do we marry the two? How do we make a solution that makes sense given constraints, opportunities, but the organization and then what we see, as you know that that really juicy white space in the outside trying to bridge this gap you are between opportunity and on reality. Exactly. Okay, and so a lot of times, what will happen is you might have you might find these incredibly lofty, wonderful opportunities out in the world. And then what ends up happening is you do have to bring them down to earth based on what’s, actually. Possible on then. So there’s a process of testing on then what? What’s the end result of all this that’s a great question. Another one? Yeah, two out of twenty five. So it can take the shape of any number of things so it might end up being just a brief, you know, a word documentary, power point dahna document or it could be something that’s a little bit more of emmanuel, but essentially, what you’re giving is a set of guidelines. So, you know, you you should recount the journey that you’ve taken with the client so they can see how do we get here? You know, what does that look like? And then once you’ve told that story, you outlined things like, ok, what is our positioning mission vision statement? What does it look like when we apply that to our pr? What does that look like when we apply that to our visual identity? How do we talk about ourselves? All of these sorts of sort of guidelines to help you talk about that strategy that you’ve created? How do we talk about ourselves in terms of actual words and maybe stories that we tell or or things like that? Yeah. I mean, it’s it’s, all those executions i talked about at the beginning of our conversation. You know, what is advertising look like? What is marketing look like? Not from a here is a an ad, but thank you. Here are here’s a type of language you should be using here. The types of colors you should be using. The tone, the personality, all of these things that affect the way someone might interpret your brand. How do you feel that, uh, musical performance overlaps with with the work that you’re doing? How does that inform your work? Well, i would say that generally speaking toe work and brand, you just have to be curious. Keep your eyes open, be interested in a lot of different things because you have to make a lot of esoteric connections all the time. So music is just one of those other things that sort of opens your eyes and ears and fingers and a very different way exactly. And share what? What it is that you love about the work that doings. Clearly, you enjoy it very much. Very passionate about it. What? What is it that moves you? About what you’re doing, you know it, it’s it’s incredibly interesting because you are studying people and you’re studying societies and how people feel about things and make decisions, you know, ultimately, companies really are creating products and services for a changing world, and that means that you have to study the world and study interactions and connection and what you love about all that it’s incredibly interesting to be a part of and does the nature of the business is you’re always working on a different type of industry and a different type of consumer. So you’re always learning, you know, deeply about a lot of different types of things, thanks very much for being a guest, not here. Thank you for having me. Pleasure. Nadia touma is a brand innovation strategist with clark mcdowell at clark mcdowell dot com right now we take a break, and when we come back tony’s take two about plant e-giving as part of your fund-raising team. And then scott koegler returns and he and i are going to talk about content marketing. Stay with me. You couldn’t do anything to getting dink dink dink dink. You’re listening to the talking alternative network. Get him! Nothing. Good. Are you suffering from aches and pains? Has traditional medicine let you down? Are you tired of taking toxic medications, then come to the double diamond wellness center and learn how our natural methods can help you to hell? Call us now at to one to seven to one eight, one eight three that’s to one to seven to one eight one eight three or find us on the web at www dot double diamond wellness dot com. We look forward to serving you. Hi, i’m lost him a role, and i’m sloan wainwright, where the host of the new thursday morning show the music power hour. Eleven a m. We’re gonna have fun. Shine the light on all aspects of music and its limitless healing possibilities. We’re gonna invite artists to share their songs and play live will be listening and talking about great music from yesterday to today, so you’re invited to share in our musical conversation. Your ears will be delighted with the sound of music and our voices. Join austin and sloan live thursdays at eleven a. M on talking alternative dot com. You’re listening to the talking alternative network. Oppcoll hi, i’m kate piela, executive director of dance, new amsterdam. And you’re listening to tony martignetti non-profit radio. Big non-profit ideas for the other ninety five percent. Welcome back time for tony’s take two at roughly thirty two minutes into the hour. My block this week is planned e-giving is part of your fund-raising team i’ve got there five strategies for using planned giving to help other parts of your fund-raising there’s no reason that plan giving should be silo or blackbox. It should be supporting all your different fund-raising methods on you will fund, for instance, when you’re meeting a planned e-giving prospect, certainly you want to know ahead of time whether they participate in the annual fund and if they have been giving annually, you want to thank them and if it’s appropriate asked them for an increased gift to the annual fund if they’re not participating annually. It’s appropriate to ask why? Maybe there’s objections that you can help to overcome and and find a new annual donor that’s one that’s one way of helping the annual fund corporate support, maybe corporate sponsorship if you know in advance or you learn in the meeting, that person works for a company asking about the possibility of corporate sponsorship. Not that they would be the decision maker, but maybe they’ll make the introduction to who the decision maker is and that entree is always valuable now than being strictly a cold call to that office. So there are lots of ways that plan giving khun support other types of fund-raising i’ve got more ideas on my block. The post is called planned e-giving is part of your fund-raising team and that’s at tony martignetti dot com and that is tony’s take two for friday, the twenty ninth of march, the thirteenth show of the year. Where did march go before we bring scott on? I want to send more live listener love we’ve got guangzhou, china and nokia, finland and porta vallarta, mexico. Now, if i can figure out if we can identify those cities, how come it’s united kingdom? Why is that? We don’t even know the country and uk? Yeah, you well show you irish english, we don’t know what i’m going to say you’re you’re welsh because that’s the least likely so welcome from wales and if you’re not in wales, why is your what is your identity, your location being masked? We don’t want your street address, but certainly country would be nice, scott koegler welcome, i’m doing terrific, scott koegler we know him he’s, the editor of non-profit technology news, which you’ll find it and p tech news, dot com he’s, our regular tech contributor, and this month we’re talking about content marketing what do we mean? Marketing? Yeah, what do we mean by this? You know, i actually for a different name for that, i call it authority marketing because it’s really, you know, you’re trying to, uh, trying to put for information about things that you know about your so you’re asserting your authority and you’re letting the people that you talk to, hopefully that read, whatever it is you’re doing, i know that you are authoritative on then the short part of that is that you’re not really selling, although, you know, being an authority and something means that hopefully people will come to you when they need answers and when they need services and products, i see that that’s what we’re talking about, okay, authority marking is a little more more descriptive and and what would a, uh, what types of things would non-profit want to be demonstrating authority in? Well, you know, the short answer there is the things that the non-profit is about so the cause the methodologies they’re using again any anything that they that they know about so that’s kind of across the board for non-profits and also for-profit type organizations. But non-profits can talk about just all the things that they do. So it’s, you know, it’s putting forth your message in a non marketing kind of away. Okay, so you and i have talked in the past about surveying people to find out what their interests are. There might be value in doing that to find out what about your work or related to your work interests them? Sure, sure. You know, you always want to get feedback from your constituents. And sometimes you get feedback from from a survey. That’s that’s a very good way to go. You know that your percentage of respondents varies all over the place. You know, i’ve had i’ve had anywhere from one percent. Twenty percent response rate course, twenty percent is great. But it’s it’s tough to achieve. Yeah, has to be something very, very interesting to them. And you might heat, you know, so that maybe a second or third generation of your of your survey, you know, kind of homes in on those issues now, but you know, another way to get feedback on what’s interesting is to get feedback on as comments on articles that you post in a block and those you generally get significantly less percentage, but those are typically more insightful. They’re more direct, you know, you know that they’re interested in that particular topic because, well, they read the article on they’re responding to it. So it’s very good way to get get responses. Now you have an article at n p tech news dot com, which says that only we have a number of articles, of course, a couple you do, but this one specifically says that sixty nine percent of non-profits are not blogging. Yeah isn’t in that stunning in this age of every you know, every schoolkid has a blogger and, you know, uh, it’s tough to imagine that, you know, almost, uh, almost three quarters, certainly two thirds of non-profits are not putting out a block, so, you know, i won’t say shame on them, but shame on well and our listeners are consistent with that. One of the poll questions i ask before the show is is your non-profit blogging at least. Twice a month that’s not even very common, but i made it a low threshold twice a month and seventy one percent said no interest. Only fourteen percent said yes, the other fourteen percent they didn’t know. So this is very consistent, actually with with what your article is just within a couple of points dahna way believe that the block is a good place for all this content. How do you do get started with your block? If you’re in that sixty nine or seventy one percent is not doing it. I will say that it’s not surprising that the number is so high because even though the technology for putting together a blogger is really easy and really available and even free and i’ll talk about the specifics in just seconds, the time to do the blog’s is a very scarce commodity. You no way talk about operations and and events and all the things that have to go into a non-profit and there are a couple of things that are critical to writing a block one is the time to write the second thing is the ability to write, you know, cogent phrases and just, you know makes things that are right, things that are interesting on getting somebody to actually be consistent. So those three things are, you know, probably the killer’s toe actually producing a block on a consistent basis. So that’s one thing that’s this very difficult, overcome and that’s why a lot of organizations or maybe something not as many as we might think, actually hyre out there blogging, and they get professional writers or managers to produce content for them and manage the the website, the block, whatever it’s called and send for them, you could try soliciting content from your constituents could, whether they’re the people benefiting from your work. Or maybe if you’re a bigger organization, maybe some of your employees can contribute. I don’t have to be writing right could be video absolutely there’s all kinds of different blogging tools now one of them and we’ll just kind a segway into this. Yeah, you know what? We talked earlier about pinterest that was a couple months ago on dh pinterest, you know, i mean it’s really a blocking platform, but it is a way to put out dahna typically images or videos of of information that’s of interest to the organization and to the constituents. Another one that you well, let’s, step on pinterest, pinterest is not all that time consuming. Because you can be. You can upload your own content, but you can also be out on the web. You find something that’s interesting, relevant to your work. You you just pin it to a board using the earl. Great it’s it’s. Very quick and easy. The good thing about it is that it it keeps it can keep a consistent exposure. Uh, that if there’s a negative, i would say that it’s it really is not generally original content. It’s something that you you found and shared, right? Right. But it’s it’s bad, but it’s not really blogging, right? No. Right. But it’s jemaine to your work. And could be interesting to your constituents who are interested in the work that you do, right. And what you just said there is, you know, being interesting to constituents. That’s really the key to any of these you’re you’re content curator of of content, and you become an authority, hopefully within your within your sphere, right? I think, you know, tend to touch on that authority issue if you’re if you’re pinning some content that’s not your own, uh, that maybe, you know, kind of the reverse of becoming the authority. Okay, you’re a curator and that’s a good thing. So you’re bringing things of interest, but you haven’t really added to the authorities factor. So somebody who’s actually interested in what you pinned is just going to click on that pin and jump to the site. That weird originated, so i’d be careful of their, you know, but it is a place to get exposure. All right? Let’s, talk about the block you had. You have some suggestions about getting started with blogging? Yeah. One of them you talked about was was tumbler and tumbler is, i guess, it’s a version of interest and that it’s, highly visual. Um, but you actually can post content there. You can also curate it and post. So on it’s a free it’s, a free resource. You could just create a account you can upload pictures of your events. You can upload text about whatever it is that you’re doing. So so that’s. Ah, relatively easy way to get in. It’s, it’s, inexpensive and fur and supposes cheap on dh free i think? Yeah. Okay. And that’s t u m b l r write the word tumbler without the okay. Okay, so, yeah, i would suggest that maybe uneasy. Wait for an organisation to get in where there really isn’t any there’s. No overhead. It’s, quick and easy, todo. Now, wordpress is very popular, but that’s that’s maura, traditional type written blogged, right. Uh, correct. Right. Word press is probably the white, most rightly used blogging platform, although there are plenty of others but that that could be for you can actually do a you can set up your own wordpress block account by going tio it’s. Um, we’re press dot com, actually. And you could get the free option and start with that. And so you can set that up and you can actually just start to write articles. You can write the articles right within wordpress and just click save and it’s published so it’s very, very simple todo right there there are elaborate wordpress blog’s but you don’t have to shoot me not to start. You certainly shouldn’t start there. You start seeing i would say start with just the three one and go from there add content had pictures. If you have videos, you could do, those two do. Although the free site has restrictions on, you know how much you can actually upload and save to the site. Okay, we’re going to take a break, and when we come back, we’ll talk a little about maybe creating cem video, that’s, that’s, simple to do, because that could be compelling authority marketing. Now i’ve had to change. The name of the segment accommodates got from content marketing now already marketing that’s. Ok, i’m flexible, you flexible, dammit! All right, we could take a break. You stay with us, scott will, and i hope you do, too. Dafs you’re listening to the talking alternative network. Are you stuck in your business or career trying to take your business to the next level, and it keeps hitting a wall? This is sam liebowitz, the conscious consultant. I will help you get to the root cause of your abundance issues and help move you forward in your life. Call me now and let’s. Create the future you dream of. Two, one, two, seven, two, one, eight, one, eight, three, that’s to one to seven to one, eight one eight three. The conscious consultant helping conscious people. Be better business people. Buy-in have you ever considered consulting a road map when you feel you need help getting to your destination when the normal path seems blocked? A little help can come in handy when choosing an alternate route. Your natal chart is a map of your potentials. It addresses relationships, finance, business, health and, above all, creativity. 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All right, scott koegler let’s, talk a little about video because video, you know, you and i have talked about this before, it doesn’t have to be high production phones that take shoot video are so common you could arm your employees or your other constituents with the phone, maybe at an event or maybe just on their own. This could be good authority, content authority, marketing, absolutely. And it’s uh, sometimes actually, most of the time, it turns out to be very current because the videos, as you just mentioned a lot of time, shot with their with their cellular cell phones with their smartphones, and we’re even just any kind of digital camera now takes video. Uh, of course, the smartphones. You, khun, take the video posted almost live on, you know, the face of people like to see themselves and people that they know so particularly had events. I saw one organization that recently kind of they turned around the old thing about putting the the, you know, the throwaway camera on the table? Yeah. And they put a card on the table that says, use your cell phone, uh, shoot a video and uploaded here, and they got i think they were just overwhelmed. They think they’ve got a couple of hundred up loads. So, you know, that’s good and bad, right? How do you use and select the ones that you wanted? But it did. It proved the point that it was a very popular option and something that people would engage with immediately. So just kind of take that idea further. What do you do with that? Um, you can either download those those videos and create a kind of a montage using your own software, or you don’t have to do that. You can actually use tools within youtube to, uh to mash up your videos on create, you know, kind of an overview doesn’t have to be ah long or complex or even, you know, two super high quality just paste a bunch of pieces together, right? You to diligently, of course, youtube has editing editing tools right now. There’s a sight that we know one listener maria simple likes because we know maria because she’s, a regular contributor and you talked about this site almost a year ago on a moto for video. Exactly an emoto is great. Um and, uh, i mean, what it does is it allows you to use both video and still images and create a you know, we’ll call it a video, and it actually is a video. Even if you have images there, uh, there’s basically photos, and it does very complex transitions. You can overlay text on it. You can overlay background music on becomes very engaging. So, you know, in a matter of probably ten minutes, you can produce one of these things. Yeah. Maria maria has been using it for a non-profit that she volunteers with, but she heard about it from you first. And like i said now, it’s been close to a year she’s using it all right? And we’re just, you know, a free tool that’s simple to use and, you know, sort of quick and dirty video that can be can be moving or informative, right, exactly an authoritative and that, again, just the good kind of go back to that word that’s really, what we’re trying to do here is to increase the believability that you’re just you’re not just somebody out there trying to raise a few bucks for, for who knows what you know, but you are actually an organization. You have a purpose, you know what you’re talking about, and it gives the people that you’re communicating with something teo grab onto teo to associate with and maybe even to, you know, get it personally and personal involvement with well, there you go, that’s that’s what this is all that we were trying to engage, we’re trying to have a connection, a dialogue so that you become affiliated with the work well aware of the work and then hopefully become affiliated with the organization, maybe as a volunteer, maybe as a donor, maybe just as a spokesperson and an advocate on the web right? Absolutely. And you know right back to the blogging section. And you mentioned, you know, get some of your constituents, your volunteers, whatever to to contribute content. If you have a relatively large organisation, you have a much better chance of getting, you know, five or ten individuals who are able to contribute something. If you could get them each to contribute something every two months, even you’d have a you have something to become consistent with. Consistency is one of those things that really counts. Okay, on dh there’s, your there’s, your sort of army of advocates and and volunteers. I mean, you may never make that. You may never meet the people, but if they’re contributing content once in a while, they’re supporting your work. Exactly. Exactly. We did have a correction for you, scott. The forward press sight is its wordpress dot or ge. Okay. Yeah. Okay. Well, i got sign up. Dot wordpress, dot com uh, so if you want to go directly to the sign up, but you’re right, wordpress dot or ge is where you go first. I am sorry. Okay? That’s okay. Okay. No, no, no. All right, but sign up. Dot wordpress dot com. But if you want to go directly toward press and learn more about it, that would be wordpress dot org’s. Okay, now you what? You’re trying to be an authority buy-in and i really messed up well, but i want to help you. It’s xero there only nine thousand dollars will do good. Only nine thousand people listening. Well, no. Nobody listens to this show. So it’s not gonna matter. It doesn’t matter what you say. Any closing thoughts you want to leave people with in their authority? Marketing? Um, i would say it’s it’s something that really people are hungry for, even though there’s plenty to read on the web. Uh, you know, the old thing, you know, you can’t publish anything. It is untrue. It’s untrue. On the web, right? Yeah, of course. But i would say just along with that, if you if you plan to go into this one of your main goals, should be to be consistent and to do it on an ongoing basis, you know, putting up one post every three months just is not really gonna do anything. It’s. Probably worse than doing nothing. Scott koegler is the editor of non-profit technology news at n p tech news. Dot com and scott remind us what your twitter ideas it’s xero scott koegler course spelling koegler is not easy. So it’s seo t k o e g l e r all right, scott, thank you very much, but with this, we’ll have you back next month. Thanks doing my pleasure. Thank you. More live listener love, new york, new york, memphis, tennessee and richardson, texas live love to all of you hope you’ll be with me next week when we’ll be talking about talk between the generations. Phyllis weiss haserot is a consultant in cross generational communication. Ines boomer boss in a general i worker gen x boss and a boomer worker how about a general i fundraiser and a boomer or boomer plus donor? 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