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Nonprofit Radio for July 31, 2020: 500th Show!

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Claire Meyerhoff (co-host), Scott Stein, Gene Takagi, Maria Semple & Amy Sample Ward: 500th Show!

It’s Nonprofit Radio’s 10th Anniversary and 500th show! It’s also our last live stream. After today, we’ll be podcast only. To celebrate all these milestones, we’ve got the whole gang together. Claire Meyerhoff, our creative producer, will co-host. We’ll have live music from Scott Stein, composer of our theme music, Cheap Red Wine. Each of our esteemed contributors will join in: Gene Takagi, Maria Semple, and Amy Sample Ward.

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[00:00:57.60] spk_1:
Hello and welcome to tony-martignetti non profit radio. Big non profit ideas for the unlearned. 95%. I’m your aptly named host. That live music can only mean one thing our 5/100 show. Oh, I’m glad you’re with me. I did get slapped with a diagnosis of Corretta Conus. If I saw that you missed today’s show the 5/100 it’s non profit radios, 10th Anniversary and 5/100 show. It’s also our last live stream. After today, we’re gonna be podcast only to celebrate all these milestones. We’ve got the whole gang together. Claire Meyerhoff are creative Producer is co hosting. We’ve got the live music from Scott Stein, composer of our theme music. Each of our esteemed contributors will be with us. Jean Takagi, Maria Simple and Amy Sample Ward, and we have a bunch of surprises.

[00:01:44.64] spk_2:
Our 5/100 show is sponsored by Cure Coffee connecting coffee lovers with coffee farmers and their families. Kira coffee dot com. We are also sponsored by wegner-C.P.As guiding you beyond the numbers wegner-C.P.As dot com by Cougar Mountain Software Denali Fund. Is there complete accounting solution made for non profits? Visit tony dot m a slash Cougar Mountain for a free 60 day trial. And we are also sponsored by turn to communications, PR and content for nonprofits. Your story is their mission. Turn Hyson to dot co. That’s turned hyphen two dot co.

[00:01:50.24] spk_1:
That professional voice can only be one. It’s clear. Meyerhoff. Claire Meyerhoff, Welcome,

[00:02:01.24] spk_2:
tony-martignetti. This is the first time for us on Zoom. But I feel like you’re right here because you’re right there on my laptop.

[00:02:14.71] spk_1:
It feels it feels close. Yeah, Every every anniversary show has been, ah, in the studio. This one, of course, can’t be. But we pull it together because it’s the 10th anniversary and I’m grateful to you because you’ve been creative producer of this show since, like Episode one before that Episode zero You were creative producer.

[00:02:20.81] spk_2:
Yeah, about a little over 10 years ago, you and I had a dinner and you said, You know

[00:02:24.64] spk_5:
what I want to do. I want

[00:02:25.37] spk_2:
to do a radio show and I said, Do

[00:02:27.19] spk_5:
you have any idea how hard it is to do a radio show? And you’re like, No, I don’t care. I’m doing a radio

[00:02:32.22] spk_2:
show. Will you help

[00:02:33.62] spk_5:
me? And

[00:02:33.97] spk_2:
I said, sure. And here We are 10 years

[00:02:38.63] spk_1:
old playing love it, love it and you have that professional radio training to so that. But also

[00:02:43.96] spk_2:
I have a background in radio

[00:02:45.39] spk_1:
indeed, indeed. So how have you been? How are you managing what’s going on at the PG agency?

[00:02:51.53] spk_2:
Well, you know, I help. I help nonprofits of all shapes and sizes with their plan giving. And so that’s been fun. And I’ve been honing some of my skills at home like learning GarageBand and some different things that I didn’t have time to learn before. So that’s been that’s been quite interesting of a few new little endeavors, and I have some nice clients. It’s been interesting because I started out 2020 with this list of five clients I was working with, and then all of a sudden in March, like it all just changed and some went away, and one that was like a little project turned into now, like my main client, because they were in a different situation. So it’s really shown us sort of the fluidity of things in the nonprofit

[00:03:31.95] spk_1:
world. Well, that’s very gratifying. They love your work so much that they brought you in to do more.

[00:03:38.24] spk_2:
Yes, well, they had they had more need, and then other people had less less need and less money. So, um, I like more. More money and more need. That’s always That’s always good. When you’re independent person like we are,

[00:03:49.44] spk_1:
money follows expertise. That that’s you. And you. Um hey, Scott’s dying. How you been? I’m good. How are you, tony? Oh, fabulously Scott Stein, of course. The composer of cheap red wine, which you’ll be performing shortly. What’s been going on musically for you since, uh, late march?

[00:04:37.11] spk_3:
Uh um, Well, it’s certainly been a little slower than usual, as you can imagine is not a whole lot in the way of live music. Um, but finding ways to stay busy. Um, I teach and said my teaching it just has just gone online. Um, I have a couple of choirs that I conduct, and we are finding new and creative ways to stay active and stay connected and keep making music online. Ah, we all miss each other very much, but this is a good way to stay connected and, um, actually doing a couple of gigs here and there, mostly via zoom occasionally have been able to do an outdoor, socially distanced concert, Um, doing one a week from Sunday in Brooklyn, where I live, and, um so that’s always good. It’s just it’s just you just have to stay busy and stay active and and And that that keeps you motivated keeps you moving

[00:05:01.47] spk_1:
the online concerts. That sounds like an interesting idea. Yeah,

[00:05:10.88] spk_3:
it Ah, it works. You know, Um, it’s, um I think it’s probably gonna be with us for for a while, and but

[00:05:14.84] spk_5:
it’s, you know,

[00:05:47.00] spk_3:
it’s a nice way to play. It is a little weird. You finish a song and you’re used to hearing some sort of a pause and you just hear nothing. And so I mean, you hear you see people on mute clapping. It’s very And also when you banter, that’s the thing. Like, you know, we try to keep things light. And if you make a comment that you think it’s funny and you don’t get a response, it’s like I don’t know that was funny or not. I have no idea. I’ll just assume it was It’s strange, but it’s ah, you know, it keeps us making music, and that’s you know that’s the main thing right now.

[00:06:34.57] spk_1:
I attended a couple of online stand up comedy shows, Onda 1st 1 The producer kept this audience muted because he was afraid that people would be charming, intimate. But that was very disruptive to the comics to not know your I’ve done some some stand up, not to the caliber that these folks have, but you’re playing to the audience when the audience, when the laughter starts to subside, you know, you start talking, you don’t you don’t want a dead zone of no laughter, you know, and you got a time it. But they couldn’t do that because they don’t have the feedback. So but the producer learned, and then all the other shows. You know, the audience has been un muted, and they’ve been respectful and no hecklers. But it’s important for that. That feedback, you know, for a comic, just like you’re saying for a musician to get feedback.

[00:06:46.34] spk_3:
Yeah, And the best part about about doing this via Zoom though, is you do get a heckler. You can mute that person. Yes, you can. You can do that in a club. So? So there is that advantage. The

[00:06:57.07] spk_1:
equivalent would be like cutting off their head or having having I think security bounce there bounced their ass out, right? Yeah, In a live setting,

[00:07:05.47] spk_3:
it’s It’s a much less it requires a lot less aggression to just hit mute. Yeah, I kinda like that.

[00:07:20.24] spk_1:
Claire, did you do any any, um, performances by type, like your You void with that professional voice of yours, you have a podcast.

[00:07:21.77] spk_2:
I do have. I have a new podcast and I’ll be happy to chat a little bit about it. And that’s appropriate because the name of my podcast is charitable chitchat with Cathy and Claire

[00:07:34.91] spk_1:
considerations as much as I do. Well,

[00:07:36.54] spk_5:
it all works out

[00:08:23.10] spk_2:
cause it’s also Cathy with a C and clear with the sea. So we really like all our C. So I do it with with my friend and colleague Kathy Sheffield from Fort Worth, Texas, and she’s a very experienced, planned giving person, and she and I have talked about doing it for a while. And then when Cove it hit, we said, Well, we have no excuse. So I learned how to do garage band and record stuff, and I do all the editing and production, and Kathy and I do a podcast and it’s planned, giving focused. And each episode we have one guest, and we’ve had some awesome guests on from the California Community Foundation and North Well, Health Um, Nature Conservancy and a wonderful volunteer from the Girl Scouts of America who’s helped bring their plan giving program in less than 10 years from 400 plan giving donors to 4000. Yeah, nine years, so very successful programs. So we have a lot of great shows coming up, and, uh, it’s charitable. Should check dot com with Cathy and Claire.

[00:08:34.27] spk_1:
Is that that’s Is that what prompted the GarageBand learning that you talked about?

[00:08:43.04] spk_2:
Yes, it definitely prompted the GarageBand learning, and I had plenty of time to learn that. And, you know, I have a production background, but I had never worked with GarageBand, so some of it was intuitive and others. I was looking all over YouTube for tutorials and found some really helpful things. And hey, if I can do it, anybody can do it. So it’s It’s been a lot of fun, and it’s, you know, it’s nice to have a new project during Cove it because there’s nothing new, right? It’s like the same same house, Same different day.

[00:09:05.24] spk_1:
I did something similar. Other and audacity.

[00:09:07.64] spk_2:
Well, that’s great. Yeah, Audacity is a great A

[00:09:29.43] spk_1:
comparable GarageBand s. I knew so little about audacity when I started. I was ready to write a big check. I figured this is such a popular program app. It must be like 200 or 250 bucks. And that’s how little I knew about it. It’s free. Yes, audacity is absolutely. But I didn’t know that’s how little I knew. Right now I’ve gotten familiar with it.

[00:09:30.72] spk_2:
Well, there’s a lot to do when you learn like podcasting on your own. There isn’t sort of one solution out there That’s kind of like, Oh, the podcasting solution. No, you have to like, you have to record your interview on something like Zoom and get that into an MP three. Then you jump that into GarageBand or audacity. You cut that up, you add your music. That’s another situation, and then you have to up. I uploaded to Buzz Sprout after I’ve produced it, and then from Bud Sprout, you have to subscribe to the different service is like apple podcasts and Spotify and I heart radio and do that and and then you do it over and over, and it’s It’s a lot. It really is a lot to learn. There is a learning curve with do it yourself podcasting.

[00:10:21.69] spk_1:
Yeah, yeah, for sure. Yeah, You said you said you bring in the music. Let’s let’s bring in the music. Hey, Scott, remind us. Cheap red wine. Now, this is Ah, been our theme song for many years at ATTN. Non profit radio. Remind me the genesis of rind us the genesis of cheap red wine, please. And then and then play it for us.

[00:11:10.94] spk_3:
Sure. Ah, song Ah, I recorded it on a record back in 2009 record called Jukebox, and I’d wrote it probably about a year before that. Um, I like to describe this is coming from my angry young man phase. You wouldn’t know it from maybe from listening to it, but ah, yeah, I was. I was living, um, on the Upper West Side of Manhattan and, um, social circles that Iran in when I wasn’t playing, which was to say, my roommate’s friends Ah, there was a lot of people who worked in law and Finance. And I think they didn’t know quite what to make of me. They didn’t kind of understand that you could play music for a living, and, um and so and it’s also a big single scene up there. And I was single at the time, and I got a little cynical because I sort of felt like I was just in the wrong profession to be dating. So this some kind of grew out of that? Um I will add that I have been happily married for seven years now with, uh, with a wonderful son. So it all worked out, but anyway, so that’s where the song kinda had its origins.

[00:11:34.88] spk_1:
Alright, Please, Scott Stein. Cheap red wine.

[00:14:43.24] spk_0:
Just keep on talking sooner or later off around. What you mean a TV screen way in each other? You know, I used to find a charming can hands now promise diamonds. They won’t tired of the cut of clothing that I will wear good stuff too easily distracted. Teoh, I got too many options, so I’m gonna My goodness. But maybe you have some competition with radio. A wealthy man. I got used promises on the way for Heaven’s national victor Sound. Nobody else. No way You used a charming but

[00:14:45.88] spk_2:
I can’t

[00:14:46.43] spk_5:
think

[00:14:49.46] spk_0:
how. Never mind it.

[00:14:50.32] spk_5:
Don’t matter now

[00:14:56.71] spk_0:
Your time promises.

[00:16:03.74] spk_1:
I love that song, Scott. Thank you. Thank you so much. Thanks. There’s nobody waiting in line. We’re just, like, cheap red wine. Thank you. I love it.

[00:16:07.77] spk_3:
I I remembered those lyrics

[00:16:14.04] spk_1:
I don’t worry about that happens. So, Claire, I got this. I got some new venture planned giving accelerator

[00:16:19.38] spk_2:
s. It sounds very, very exciting.

[00:16:21.78] spk_1:
You in the plan? Giving space. So, yes,

[00:16:23.44] spk_2:
I am

[00:16:31.68] spk_1:
in the, uh, arena of shameless self promotion. Uh, okay. Planned giving accelerator. It’s, um it’s a membership community. I launched it two weeks ago. Nonprofits joined for an annual membership on, and I will teach them everything I know about starting and then growing. Yes, Land giving programs.

[00:16:45.73] spk_2:
That sounds great. So is it a month? Do people come on a webinar monthly or how do what do What do people get for their yearly subscription? How does that look to the to the non profit person hoping to grow their plane giving program?

[00:17:04.08] spk_1:
No, I hadn’t thought through that? No, they, uh, like tony get we’re gonna have ah, got

[00:17:05.89] spk_5:
a nice

[00:17:08.43] spk_1:
poster. There’s exclusive. Yes, there were exclusive webinars. We’ll probably get to a month. Will be exclusive podcasts. One or two of those a month. I’ll be doing small group asked me anything. Sessions on zoom Very nine. Talk through individual potential donor challenges, Suspect challenges or Doctor, you’re marking materials in their small groups. Um, there’s a Facebook community. Very nice. All exclusive, Just two members. It all kicks off. October 1st 1st group starts October 1st, and that’s what we’re promoting for. And it’s that planned giving accelerator dot com.

[00:18:07.44] spk_2:
Well, there’s a lot of Nate out there. A lot of non profits are not in the plan giving game or in the playing giving space. They think it’s too scary. They need technical knowledge. They can’t do it. They need too much staff, whatever. But frankly, any non profit can do something with plan giving and bring in those all important planned gifts. Also, I think you’ll be helping to educate people about like asking for non cash assets and things as well, like how toe you know, do more a little bit more complex gift giving.

[00:18:25.51] spk_1:
We will eventually we’re going to start off with getting bequests, Yes, but there’s only the whole groundwork. As you’re suggesting, there’s old groundwork that’s got to go before you start. Before you start promoting, you gotta promote to the right people on. Then give them the right message.

[00:18:43.84] spk_2:
Yes, and you have to have a back end. That’s the first thing that I help my clients with. It’s like, Well, what did they have? Do they even have information on their website? Like some plate people have nothing on their website and in, um, our most recent episode of our of our charitable chitchat podcast. We had a great this volunteer from the Girl Scouts, and she got started because she had updated her estate plans about 10 years ago, and she included the Girl Scouts. And then she happened to be in New York City not long after that, where the headquarters are. So she went to go meet with the development person, just a drop off like a copy of her, whatever her paperwork and the development person wasn’t there. So she met with the CEO and she sat down with the CEO and she said, Well,

[00:19:09.89] spk_5:
you know, I was updating my estate

[00:19:11.77] spk_2:
plans and I went to go find someone for

[00:19:13.81] spk_5:
I couldn’t find any information

[00:19:38.64] spk_2:
on your website about that. Why is that? And the CEO was like, I don’t know why. And then they from there they created a whole good, great plan giving programs. So, you know, the back end is first off. You need to have some information on your website. You need a dedicated page with some request language with your contact information with your tax I d. Just a couple of things. And if you have that Web page, then you can start getting in the plan giving game.

[00:19:40.37] spk_1:
That’s the beginning. And that’s the kind of stuff we’re gonna be talking about. Easy promotion.

[00:19:44.49] spk_2:
You gotta get in

[00:20:01.38] spk_1:
identifying the right people to promote to and giving them the right message and how to do that. And then how to follow up how to talk to your board about planned to give an all important, all all to get planned giving program started in the audience that I’m always most interested in. Small and midsize shot

[00:20:12.57] spk_2:
Me, too. I love I love the small nonprofits and there’s you anyone can get started in plan giving. So I think that your program is is really great, because if if you have, don’t your small non profit you have donors and they’re gonna leave. Some charities in there will, but they’re not gonna leave your charity in their will if you’ve never promoted the idea. And you’ve never communicated the idea

[00:20:25.96] spk_1:
absolutely right that absolutely, you need to be asking. So we

[00:20:28.95] spk_2:
need to be asking

[00:20:32.04] spk_1:
if you’re ready to get plan giving Started, Planned Giving accelerator

[00:20:33.77] spk_2:
call. Well, I’m looking forward to seeing the evolution of of this, and I think it’s a great it’s much needed in the space, and I think you’ll be successful and help a lot of people along the way. And that’s that’s what we’re all about. Helping helping nonprofits, especially the little ones,

[00:21:09.74] spk_1:
and someone who’s helping me toe promote planned giving accelerator is is with us. These Peter Panda Pento is part of a partner in turn to communications just renewed their sponsorship for a second year, which we are very grateful for. I’m very grateful for Peter. Welcome to the show. Great to be here, tony. Great to be back

[00:21:13.06] spk_4:
here. Tony, we’ve been checking in very regularly over the years. Excited to be part of this milestone episode.

[00:21:29.48] spk_1:
Oh, thank you. Yes, 500 shows. 10 years on. I’m grateful for your sponsorship. You and your partner, Scott turn to what? What? What’s on your, uh, what’s on your plate these days? We’re doing a

[00:22:07.83] spk_4:
lot of media relations work these days. A lot of nonprofits and foundations that we work with are really looking for to try to break through the clutter right now and get their stories told in the media, which is a really challenging thing right now during Cove in 19. I mean, it’s always challenging, but right now we have so many media outlets that are, um, operating with with furloughed staffs and with people kind of playing out of position, covering different beats. And, ah, nonprofits are really looking for extra support and trying to figure out who they need to connect with, how they can connect with them and how they can connect what they’re doing to the prevailing story lines of our time, which are Cove in 19 and racial justice and equity. And so we’ve been spending a lot of our efforts there, in addition to working with you on the plane, giving accelerator and other things tell

[00:22:33.19] spk_1:
indeed, yes, challenging times indeed, to get your voice heard. But it’s doable. As I say in the sponsor messages. You know, if you if you have those relationships with journalists, if you have the right hook, you can you can be heard even in the in the Corona virus cacophony.

[00:23:06.21] spk_4:
Absolutely, absolutely. And the relationships are really important. And, um, what I think a lot of nonprofits and really all organizations still make. The mistake in doing is thinking they can kind of spray and pray their way to, ah, success with media relations by spray and pray Amin kind of spraying out press releases to everybody and hope and praying that somebody picks it up. What really works is when you have some relationships with journalists who really cover the topics you care about and that they’re actually thinking of you when they’re looking for sources rather than the other way around.

[00:23:12.07] spk_2:
Yes, and as a former reporter, I wholeheartedly agree, because back in the day, as a as a news reporter for working in all news radio and working in television. You would get these, like, spray and pray, kind of like press releases and stuff that had nothing to do with anything you normally cover. And you know, you really need a more targeted approach and build a relationship. And I think nowadays it’s easy to build a relationship with news people because they’re all on Twitter and they’re all on Facebook and you can follow them and comment on their on their things and get to know them a little bit that way.

[00:23:41.84] spk_4:
Absolutely. I think investing in in a handful of those relationships and really trying to make sure you’re nurturing the journalists who actually care about what and and reach the people you need to reach. There’s so much value in doing that. You’re absolutely right.

[00:23:58.68] spk_1:
This and Peter, thank you again for your sponsorship of non profit radio.

[00:24:03.74] spk_4:
I love the partnership. I’m really glad to support her head, and I really believe strongly in what you do, tony. So we’re happy Teoh to be sponsors and to be part of this great community.

[00:24:13.75] spk_1:
Thanks so much. Turn hyphen to you. Want Check them you want? Check them out. Turn hyphen too dot ceo. Thanks so much, Peter.

[00:24:20.79] spk_4:
Thank you very

[00:26:11.18] spk_1:
much, Peter. Thanks, Claire. I have a story I want to read from from one of our listeners milled, uh, Mildred Devo. I’m the founder and executive director of Penn Parental, a small literary non profit that helps writers stay on creative track after they start a family. I got into non profit work because I had the idea for this collective of supportive writers running programs to defy the stereotype, which was rampant in nearly two thousands, that having kids would kill your creative career. I was already running a salon, Siri’s, that featured the diversity of work by writers who had kids. And I wanted to do more to prove to women and men that parenthood was just a life event and not an alternate alternate career. I self funded a fellowship for writers who were new parents and a lawyer approached me and asked if I had considered turning my ideas into a non profit I never had. She helped me pro bono. Now it is 10 years later, and pen parental has helped countless writers finish their creative projects despite the challenges of raising kids issues heightened to epic levels during the pandemic. We have one arts grants from New York City as well as New York State Council for the Arts. As a writer with two kids, it makes me laugh that all the encouragement I give to other writers has just now finally come home to my own career. I finally finished writing my first novel. I Want to Thank You. This is the touching Thank you so much. I want to thank you and and your non profit radio feel that inspiring. I feel that listening to recordings of past live streams, I’ve been exposed to some of the top minds working in non profit. Today. It’s like having an M B A in arts administration right at your fingertips, or at least the faculty of one. I’ve gained a lot by listening. So thank u s touching and, uh, milled, uh, milled is with us. Well, welcome to the show.

[00:26:18.21] spk_5:
Thanks. Thank you so much. It’s really exciting to be here. Did you see me taking notes?

[00:26:22.49] spk_1:
I was already took. I was like, clock town

[00:26:26.09] spk_2:
milled. I love milled his hair. That’s beautiful. Thank you. It looks very nice.

[00:26:54.44] spk_1:
That’s got beautiful bang. Great. Did I pronounce your name? Right? Okay. Have you been listening to non profit radio for a while? I have For forever. Yeah. Yeah, I frequently when I googled something that I don’t know, I will find a link, you know, on Facebook or somewhere, I’ll find a link to a show, and

[00:27:00.51] spk_6:
it s so it works like I don’t know, because I really, really, really learned

[00:28:37.84] spk_1:
this from the ground up, just sort of as I was doing it and Ah, yeah, it’s really so we’re gonna put on a plan giving page pretty much, yes, but it’s really it’s really wonderful that you bring all these experts together and when you interview them so so many of them are so generous with their time with their contact information, like it’s kind of spectacular, But I really kind of got into your show after you did the foundation center. I love the foundation center and motivated that can with them all their candid now candid. Well, they were there were the foundation center. You’re not wrong to call them that. They were that they were that back then when But for the you did I think four sessions or some Some amount of sessions, please. And you could go there and be a live audience, or you could watch it after it. So, yes, it was. It was non profit radio month at the Foundation Center and the Foundation Center month on non profit radio. That was very cool. Very cool partnership with the Roman. Thank you. I also like all the partnerships that you have with all the different companies. Like everybody said. Just what? Um, the guy that was just on Peter was saying that you develop these relationships. Well, I think I feel like I learned something from that from you. Outstanding Milton. That’s why I do the show. Thank you so much. So, for your for your generosity, do non profit radio and for sharing your how I got into nonprofits story we have Ah, we’re gonna send you a bag of cure coffee. Uh, I love coffee. Bring me coffee. It’s

[00:28:40.70] spk_2:
a wonderful prize. How you want to hear more about it? Cure a coffee directly connects coffee lovers with farmers and families who harvest the finest organic coffee beans. With every cup of cura, you join our effort to expand sustainable dental care to remote communities are around the world. We are direct trade coffee company with direct impact brought directly to you creating organic smiles beyond the cup cure coffee dot com. And that is your prize. Thank

[00:29:22.78] spk_1:
you. Listen, thanks so much again for sharing your story and for being a loyal listener. Really? It’s touching. Thank you. It’s so kind of you. I’m really grateful. And I love how you’re Musician nodded when he when I talked about having kids at home and being creative. That’s why I run a non profit for that reaction. I

[00:29:26.56] spk_3:
e that so much? Yeah,

[00:29:30.78] spk_1:
creatives are trying to create. So anybody who wants to pin Prentice said word we’d love the Have you come and find out what we dio and thank you again. So much for having me on the

[00:29:40.42] spk_5:
show was a

[00:29:50.34] spk_1:
place. Enjoy your coffee. Yeah. Yes. Pen parental as got or thank you. Thanks along, Claire. You’re You’re creative. You you’ve been writing.

[00:30:56.94] spk_2:
Yes, I am. I am, I am. It’s a It’s a blessing and a curse being a creative person because the brain just never shuts off. So we’re always making stuff from a tender age. I was like sitting on my front lawn with a basket of crayons and my mother register like an old egg carton or something in a pipe cleaners. And before you know it, we had, like, costumes and putting on a show. So that’s that’s my childhood. So I have written for you a special 1/10 anniversary problem for non profit radio. So would you like me to read it? Toe. Okay, here we go. Let’s celebrate a decade of the show by tony-martignetti. Here’s my poem. It’s goofy, so you better get ready. Tony had an idea. Tony had a vision. Tony wanted a radio show, so he made a decision. He started his show. He booked his first guest. He worked on a format, and then all the rest production with Sam Music with Scott sponsors and quizzes Man, that’s a lot Top trends and Tony’s take to non profit radio We love you. 10 years later, and 500 shows your silver anniversary, your listener ship grows your tony-martignetti non profit radio top trends. Sound advice. Should I end this poem? Yes, that sounds nice. Happy anniversary, tony.

[00:31:13.55] spk_1:
Should I send this up our mess Sounds like Thank you. Clear my raf. Sweet. Thank you very much.

[00:31:18.82] spk_2:
You got in somewhere.

[00:31:20.32] spk_1:
What a creative. I love it. Thank

[00:31:21.94] spk_2:
you. You know, it’s fun. Thank you. Something to do? It’s coverted.

[00:31:24.34] spk_1:
That’s very sweet. I am not gonna keep doing things that silver anniversary. I don’t think I thought of that. That’s right. The silver silver anniversary. Well,

[00:31:31.63] spk_2:
you know, I was thinking of ideas. I was like, What can I do for tony? Silver anniversary. And I was like, I was like, Well, it is the silver anniversary. That’s 10 years. It’s silver. So maybe I should send him, like, an engraved set of silver candlesticks. Or maybe I’ll write him a poem.

[00:31:45.52] spk_1:
Well, you could do the candlesticks to know they don’t have to be mutually exclusive. What?

[00:31:59.08] spk_2:
Amy, like those? I could do like 11 Right. You could do it for your in Amy’s tent. That wins your 10th anniversary. Did you have it? You missed it. Yeah, I missed. Okay. We’ll catch on the next one.

[00:32:00.28] spk_1:
Catch me on this one. It’s not

[00:32:01.43] spk_2:
old. Wait for your gold wedding.

[00:32:08.99] spk_1:
Oh, no, no, no. Wait. Office engineering by mere numbers it, Z, I’m gonna send you

[00:32:13.50] spk_2:
something really funny.

[00:32:22.95] spk_1:
That silver gift. I will. Then the expensive silver gift. Don’t don’t be constrained by by the artificiality of numbers. So, you know,

[00:32:24.04] spk_2:
I’m gonna go to Bloomingdale’s and register you.

[00:33:04.44] spk_1:
We got we got all our all our contributors there. Will our esteemed contributors air here? Nice. Yes, Absolutely. I see. Um, I see them. Indeed. I see Amy Sample Ward, our social social media technology contributor, and Jean Takagi, of course, our legal contributor and the brains behind the wildly popular non profit law block dot com and Maria Simple, the Prospect Finder at the prospect finder dot com. Welcome, Maria. Gene and Amy. Welcome. Hey. Hey, there. Thank you very much, Amy. See also Amy, of course, besides being our contributor and technology and social media, CEO of N 10. I was intend doing. How you doing, Amy?

[00:33:14.94] spk_5:
Um, I’ve recently been answering that question by saying that I am alive and awake in 2020 and all that that means on

[00:33:24.57] spk_1:
being in Portland, Oregon, as well,

[00:33:26.23] spk_5:
being in Portland, Oregon being at the intersection of, I think, a lot of opportunity to positively change the world

[00:33:36.84] spk_1:
Well, you three have never been on a show altogether. So I want to say

[00:33:45.34] spk_5:
I know Jean and I have definitely been on at the same time before, but I don’t think all three of us

[00:33:56.54] spk_1:
no threat. No. All three have never So. Maria, meet Jean Jean Maria. Amy, meet Amy. Meet Maria Maria, Meet Amy. Gene already knows Amy. Amy knows Jean. Oh, meet each other. Welcome. Welcome. Hey,

[00:34:03.54] spk_6:
you know, tony, I had suggested a long time ago that you should fly us all into that New York studio at some point, and so

[00:34:10.82] spk_5:
we would not have fit altogether.

[00:34:12.98] spk_6:
Since you never did that way

[00:34:16.41] spk_1:
are fly you all to the beach Now it’s much, much safer down here.

[00:34:19.80] spk_6:
Yeah, well, until this coming storm, that is. But

[00:34:37.43] spk_1:
uh huh. Yeah, Well, not this weekend. Let’s not get carried away. Like cat seven or something. We’re not doing it this weekend. No, it’s not that bad. It’s Ah, it’s like a to the one that so far it’s a one or something. Some of it’s we live, you know, that’s that’s part of our life. Living at the beach hurricane season,

[00:34:41.46] spk_2:
coming straight to your house. Tony,

[00:35:05.25] spk_1:
I got I got a metal roof. They’re gonna finish tomorrow’s good metal. Rudy’s air. Great. Two days before the hurricane, they’re gonna finish my metal roof. What color is it? It’s Ah, it’s a gray. It’s a pale grey. Very nice. It z neutral, neutral tone. Nothing. Nothing outlandish like those Clay. You know, there’s red clay colored anything but getting to cocky. How are

[00:35:05.99] spk_5:
you

[00:37:07.47] spk_1:
doing? San Francisco? It’s Jean. I’m pretty. Well, all things considered Azamiyah kind of reference does. Well, a lot of folks hurting. So happy to. To be in good health with the my family is well and good to see all of you and congratulations, toe. Oh, thank you. Thank you, Gene. And your practice has been very busy of late as nonprofits. Ah, non profit struggle bit. Yeah, a lot. A lot to deal with, obviously the pandemic and a lot of racial equity movements, which is a very positive sign. So, like Amy and trying to see some of the the silver linings and what changes and re imaginations may come out of this indeed. Quite a bit. I was I was talking to somebody earlier today that Ah It’s a good time for introspection. No. And that maybe on an organizational level two. And it may be that it’s Ah, not all. It’s not all voluntary, but, you know, some things have been foisted on us, so it seems like a good, introspective time, like on an individual level. And on a organizational level two seen a lot of that. Yeah, Absolutely. Um, and, uh, I think it’s really helpful for organizational leaders to sort of get together and start to think, um, sort of back to basics and say, What’s why we hear? What are we doing? Who are we serving? What are we trying to do? And how are we really walking the walk and not just talking to talk? Yeah, for sure. Right back. Back to basics mission for important for the board to focus on. I love actually adding values to that as well. So just saying we further admission that the mission, of course, that that’s important. David. Mission focus. But I think it’s now equally important to be Valdez focused. What we stand for. Yeah, Amy. You feeling that it Ah, 10. 10.

[00:38:18.12] spk_5:
Yeah, for sure. I mean, I think just gonna extend what Jeanne was saying. I think we see a lot of organizations, at least historically, Um, who hide behind a mission statement that doesn’t name inequity. Of course, mission statements are often like aspirational where you’re going and like, why you exist and because it’s those things aren’t named. They use that to sidestep accountability to those issues, right? Like because racism isn’t named in their mission. They don’t have to talk about racism. And maybe they get to say that they don’t perpetuate any of it. Right on Dhe. Now, this moment kind of. I think what you’re alluding to tony with, like it being foisted upon folks, is people understanding or at least demanding, that organizations don’t get to sidestep that, that there’s no way any of our social missions could be advanced if we aren’t ever talking about racism, right? Like that’s a root of why many of our issues even exist that we have a mission to address. So there needs to be less fear of that because the fear has really just got us to a very entrenched place of oppression. So can folks be willing to talk about that so that they can move forward and actually address that emissions and serve their communities and really be part of the change that our communities need.

[00:39:02.76] spk_1:
And we’ve had ah, good number of guests on lately talking about all those subjects on and more toe. There’s more to say about it. There’s more to the organizational journey to achieve racial equity and social justice. And I’m glad that we’ve been ableto have a good number of guests on, and I’m always looking for more on those kinds of subjects. Yeah, yeah, I agree with you. Maria Semple. What’s going on? Your practice? The Prospect Finder?

[00:39:15.16] spk_6:
Well, you know, you still have no profits who are thinking about their major gift programs, obviously. And, um, it has been a good time for some of them to kind of sit back and do some research on those donors that make you know, maybe they haven’t really focused on quite a ZX much, Um, and thinking about, you know, how is the the approach to them going to be different? And so you know, a lot of a lot of interesting things going on in the prospect research and major gift

[00:39:39.16] spk_1:
world. Very simple. Of course she’s about six miles away from me or so maybe it’s a little more. I’m not sure. Except

[00:39:46.48] spk_5:
some. I didn’t realize you to work.

[00:39:48.48] spk_1:
We’re on. We’re on the same island, different towns. But we’re on the same island. Thanks. Same barrier island in North,

[00:39:54.98] spk_6:
same Barrier Island that’s being targeted by this

[00:40:01.16] spk_1:
story. Support of life, Any of us

[00:40:02.67] spk_6:
pronounced story is, you know, but

[00:40:05.62] spk_1:
what’s the name of the name of the storm? Had Allah wishes? It’s like

[00:40:09.36] spk_2:
it’s with an I

[00:40:10.94] spk_1:
I I z o or

[00:40:12.53] spk_2:
something? Yeah, I don’t know.

[00:40:13.91] spk_6:
How does that help

[00:40:18.78] spk_2:
broker? Al Rocker said it really nicely today, but the job he gets paid, like $3 million.

[00:40:22.28] spk_5:
What the Who’s so seen?

[00:40:39.85] spk_1:
Some, uh, some interesting, Which could be, ah, good or bad, I guess. Funny, like Zoom Zoom backgrounds. You’re all we’re all talking. Yeah, we all have lots of zoom meetings. All of us. He’s got He’s got a good zoom background that you saw. Wow, like I see Scott Stein right now is curious. George,

[00:40:45.21] spk_2:
he’s got That’s the best one, and I just I just put that up on lengthen, so

[00:40:48.69] spk_3:
that’s not a background. This

[00:40:53.28] spk_1:
is not about. Well, it is now my toddler’s part of your background. It’s

[00:40:55.57] spk_5:
part of your

[00:40:55.92] spk_2:
background or your back. Oh, I think you should sell that to Zoom.

[00:40:58.91] spk_3:
I thought that curious George would just lighten the mood a little

[00:41:01.88] spk_1:
bit. Absolutely. Does

[00:41:03.44] spk_2:
my love curious George

[00:41:04.92] spk_1:
is inspired me to ask. Well, who else has seen something funny?

[00:41:09.25] spk_5:
Are you saying that the virtual backgrounds are you talking about just people having things in their background?

[00:41:13.38] spk_1:
I mean more like people in their backgrounds, in their home,

[00:41:18.14] spk_2:
their real backgrounds? Well, I’ve really enjoyed watching, like I watch the Today Show on NBC Watcher And so I really studied the backgrounds, and I like to read the titles of the books on the shelves behind the people, and that’s kind of interesting. And then sometimes, like if they have their own book that they wrote, there’s like 10 copies of it. So they have, like, four other copies, and there’s like 10 copies of their book and in a couple of more copies. So I like to look at the titles like Colbert has it, and it’s funny cause Colbert’s like in his basement and non allaying and It’s just, you know, nothing fancy. And it’s like an old desk and stuff. And so I like to look at the stuff on his on his shelf. Everybody likes, you know, history books and biographies.

[00:41:54.60] spk_3:
I was you were mentioning People’s books like You can always Tell the sign of an independent musician because somewhere in there place they have boxes and boxes of unsold CDs. Right? Right. It’s, Ah, one of my band mates referred to them as a very expensive caught coffee table.

[00:42:12.29] spk_2:
Well, that’s funny.

[00:42:13.00] spk_3:
It’s kind of what they’re doing,

[00:42:14.42] spk_2:
right. You could do Wall Art with them. Like to a whole.

[00:42:17.52] spk_3:
A tribute to me.

[00:42:29.02] spk_2:
Yeah, I my one narcissists. Come on. You got plenty of time. Don’t just got the’s. No. Now with the baby and curious George.

[00:42:33.65] spk_1:
Anybody else? I’m missing Something funny. Mark Silverman just had Mark Silverman is our web guy. He just had his, uh Well, that was That was a fake background. His driving. He’s driving background, but nothing. Nobody’s, uh I don’t think I sauce. I’ve seen good lighting. People have. I see people using light to good effect. I think people have realized that turned on light makes a much nicer back. Have

[00:42:55.26] spk_2:
light on your face to like this. There’s a lot of things for when you’re lighting an interview. You know, you put light on the person’s on the person. Stay so you’ll notice Everyone has diesel around rings, and sometimes you can see it reflected in their glasses. Yeah,

[00:43:06.93] spk_1:
that’s a problem. Light rings right. The glasses. You got it. You got to be careful with the glasses, because even just your screen will reflect into the glasses,

[00:43:13.38] spk_2:
right? Like, right now, I turn that way. Exactly. Turn that way.

[00:43:24.40] spk_1:
Yeah. Now your alien, your google eyes. Yeah. Yeah. Um uh Well, what else? I feel like I feel like it’s a cocktail party.

[00:43:28.30] spk_5:
Didn’t you say we were supposed to all answer some questions? I didn’t write down the question, Waas. I don’t like what? I didn’t think about the question, but I did make the mental note of tony Has some question we’re supposed to answer. Well, how you got into nonprofits? Yes, I like that. Like, what was your reverse non profit job? You know what I like

[00:43:45.85] spk_2:
to know? What did people do before they worked in the non profit because everyone has a different story. So what did you What was your last job before you entered the non profit space? And what was your first job in the non profit space?

[00:43:59.20] spk_5:
I only have one job, not in a 1,000,000 profit space. And that’s what I was 15 and I worked in a coffee shop. Okay.

[00:44:05.52] spk_2:
And then So your first job was your non profit job.

[00:44:08.63] spk_5:
My first job was working in the in the coffee shop?

[00:44:10.82] spk_2:
No, but I mean, your first non profit job was your current Is your current job?

[00:44:14.19] spk_5:
No, but I just always worked in a non profit sector.

[00:44:16.31] spk_1:
Right? At 16 years old, she was CEO event in its inquiry. I

[00:44:20.34] spk_2:
know. Easy. That’s

[00:44:24.10] spk_5:
cool. That’s a good idea. Jean, what do

[00:44:25.46] spk_1:
you do? Before you were a non profit attorney, you were hung fancy fans. Now I bounced a lot iced. I sold insurance. I worked in a beauty salon. No retail, but the last job I had was I was operations manager for duty free retailer in San Francisco. So we’re about a $50 million a year business in the early nineties, and I had to lay everybody off cause, uh

[00:44:48.98] spk_2:
oh, man,

[00:45:11.59] spk_1:
But Bender purse ity on. So it’s 150 people gone. I continued to work doing sort of national expansion for this huge global retailer, but, uh, it made me decide I wanted Teoh work. It’s something more meaningful. So I saw this little newspaper ad for what I believe was the first non profit graduate degree program in the country at the University of San Francisco. And so the two year program in the evening. So I jumped, shipped them, left my job, work for a tiny social service organisation. Azan office manager. And, yeah, that’s schools.

[00:45:30.32] spk_5:
That’s a

[00:45:30.56] spk_2:
great story. How about you, Maria? What did you do before you got into nonprofits?

[00:46:25.21] spk_6:
I was working for a French investment bank in Manhattan per five years out of college and, um, buying and selling and trading securities and French and, um, so very different from working in our profit space. Um, didn’t enjoy it very much. Was having dinner at my father in laws who owned a fundraising consulting firm based in Nutley, New Jersey, and complaining about my job and hating it. And, um, he said, Well, I am looking for a campaign manager for a Salvation Army capital campaign Wow in New Brunswick, New Jersey, and I raised my hand. And, like you said, who said to Jean just said, Jumping ship right, I jump ship and, um, landed in the non profit space that way and in consulting for him and then branched out on my own when I started a family and decided I could do prospect research from home. So I’ve been doing I’ve been doing this home based thing and yes, for long Talking’s yes, since, uh, since the early nineties,

[00:46:48.38] spk_2:
that’s cool. So, tony, before you worked in nonprofits, you’re in the service, weren’t you?

[00:46:59.88] spk_1:
Yeah, that was That was long before I was in the Air Force left. There is a captain, and then I went to law school and hated practicing law. And then I started my first business, which did mediocre. So I ended it and became director of plan to give him at Iona College.

[00:48:12.37] spk_2:
Everyone has a great non profit story. I worked in broadcast journalism. I worked in all news radio in Washington, D. C. I worked at CNN as a news writer worked it except satellite radio in D. C. And I covered a lot of nonprofits when I was a reporter. Because you you know, if there’s this, it’s cold and you do it. Music historian. A homeless shelter You end up at a non profit. You interviewed the director, that kind of thing. So I was like the non profit space and then later started doing like a little PR for non profits and things like that, and then eventually worked my way into the wonderful world of plan giving. We That’s how I met tony-martignetti because I read an interview that you had done, and I was needed some content for another publication. I was editing and I said, Can I take your article and turn it into a Q and A. I emailed you and your like sure, and we talked on the phone. And then if I had questions about planned giving stuff for this writing I was doing, I recall tony and he was so generous with his time and we became phone friends, and then, ah, then he wanted to do a radio show, and I’m a radio person. So 10 years ago, tony started that

[00:48:16.84] spk_5:
I can’t believe no one else spent years making espresso drinks and serving sandwiches to people like What kind of non profit group of people are waiting? The only person that did that? Well, if you

[00:48:24.52] spk_2:
go that far back I worked at Roy Rogers on Long Island and you know I said, Howdy, partner. May I help you? Thank you very much. Happy trails. I worked at Friendly’s. I was an ice cream scooper it friendlies. I was awake.

[00:48:34.37] spk_5:
Nice, nice.

[00:49:16.64] spk_1:
My only espresso experiences. Where? When I was waiting tables when in my restaurant the waiters had the create the oppressors and I always cringe when people ordered them because I could never get it right. Allow when one table order an espresso, everybody else was Wait. Everybody else was late. Their entrees. Cold salads didn’t come. I cut out the suit to get to the entree and tell him I Telemann was through the kitchens. Fault I couldn’t get a Nespresso built was never right. It was too foamy, right? Old Mr Hot. There was too much steam. There wasn’t enough steam. The coffee grounds were to compressed. They weren’t compressed enough. Wow, the curses. Espresso was a 20.

[00:49:17.49] spk_2:
Tony has nightmares about espresso. Hey, that that was an Italian restaurant.

[00:49:21.63] spk_1:
It wasn’t Italian restaurant. Yes. Had to been in the example. Ward, You did many more espressos. Like I’m sure you have it better down much better down there. She’s

[00:49:28.90] spk_2:
great at it.

[00:50:36.51] spk_5:
Yeah. I mean, looking back, it just seems so interesting. I mean, you know, I grew up in a very small town, so I guess that came with dressed. But like, you know, to 15 year olds, we were alone in the shop, running the entire shop, closing it, doing all the bank deposits, you know, like so I guess it helped instill from a very young age like responsibility, this and all of that. But it also was like we we didn’t have anyone else. They’re telling us, you know? Oh, you have to do whatever this customer says or whatever is just like, you know, to 15 year old people. And we were like, No, you don’t get that thing. That’s not fair. You just demand. Like I saw you put your gun. This person did this regularly. Take their gum, put it on the side of their play, eat their food, and then mix the gum into the rest of their salad and then come up and say there was gonna salad. I’m not paying. No. Yeah. And so we would just say Like Like, we don’t know. For adult manager telling us, the customer’s always right. No, no, that’s your gun. Back to your gun. You start getting your money back, you eat.

[00:50:54.51] spk_2:
We’re gonna swallow that gum. I’m 15 and I’m in charge. Yeah, well, that’s good. You learn assertiveness. You learn responsibility. Yeah, that’s great. That’s a That’s a great story

[00:51:00.08] spk_5:
we learned far better than tony. How to make espresso drinks. That was my first exposure to people. Like to melted cheddar cheese on top of their cold apple pie. Like, you know, I learned a lot about humanity in that

[00:51:12.53] spk_1:
herd. Yeah, I’ve heard of that one.

[00:51:14.67] spk_2:
Yeah. Yeah. I worked at Marie Rogers on the island man there. I learned a lot about humanity.

[00:51:21.92] spk_1:
We get into before we get to gross beef stories. Way we got to move on. Neighbor Maria, Maria, Amy and Jean. Thank you so much for what you contribute for you. I don’t want you to go stay if you can stay because Scott’s gonna perform another song, but I want to thank you. Thanks. Thanks to each of you. For all the years you’ve been contributors. Many, many years for each of you. Thank you so much for what you give to our listeners.

[00:51:47.11] spk_5:
Thanks for having a platform that’s open toe. Lots of people. Tony.

[00:51:56.98] spk_1:
Yes. I’ve seen the regulations on 500 100. It’s amazing.

[00:51:59.83] spk_6:
Amazing mission, you 10 More wonderful years.

[00:52:02.14] spk_1:
Thank you. I will do it. I’ll do it. It’s got Let’s get Scott back. He’s got ah, that’s gonna do singing Spanish blues.

[00:52:18.84] spk_3:
I am got starting. All right, here we go. Uh, this song, like the other one, has a lot of words for me to remember. So here we go.

[00:55:58.52] spk_0:
Morning with New York. Finishing way. My doctor asked for his Is it son? I think it just man. It’s somewhere in the east of Spain where Jonathan here requires a voice like church bells rang Way No way, man Stature way to my hotel. Try to rest my head with a familiar voice Reverb woman from my bed I jumped up and ran to the window. I could not believe my ears. I believe my eyes. Neither. She stood there in the clear now had no weapon type romance. This was much downstairs. And now there’s a lady in waiting way drains. Booth door process is an engineer. And when the Paschen shots last, she went back to back way missing in this gots time.

[00:56:04.70] spk_1:
Wow. Amazing. Thanks. Outstanding singing Spanish blues. Thank you. Thank you. I love Scott Stein. Thanks so much. Scott. Yes. Scott Stein music dot com. Right. Do have that right?

[00:56:11.81] spk_3:
Yes. Yeah, that’s correct. And and thanks again for having me, tony. And congratulations on 500 yeah, always always a pleasure to to do this with you. Here.

[00:57:45.03] spk_1:
Thank you, Scott. I love I love having cheap red wine is part of our show. You’re with me every every hour. Every intro, every outro, every show. Cheap red wine is with us. Thank you. Thank you. My pleasure. Check him out. Scott stein music dot com. So I said earlier this is gonna be our last live show. Friday 1 to 2 p.m. Eastern has been my slot at talking alternative. Now, talking radio dot N.Y.C. since July of 2010. And this is gonna be the last one. We’re We’re going to be live streamed. The show is just gonna be a well, not just gonna be the show is gonna be a podcast only from from here on. Um, and what that has meant for these 10 years is working with Sam Liebowitz Every show I’ve credited him. Sam Lever, which is our line producer. Um, and so it’s been just Ah, wonderful run with Sam. Hundreds of shows in the studio every anniversary show, which is every July, every 50 shows in the studio before this one. Um, and I’ve just been grateful for the partnership with Sam and and the network. The talking alternative network, which is again talk radio dot N.Y.C.. Sam, you’re not able to join us by audio. It doesn’t. I see you, but Ah, you can’t, um you have

[00:57:53.07] spk_7:
to keep switching. I can come on, but I have to switch back. Otherwise the rest of the audio doesn’t go out. But I don’t think I’m being recorded right now.

[00:58:04.60] spk_1:
Okay. All right. So, Sam, just Sam just spoke. Yes, we hear him, but he thinks he’s not being recorded, and we see him. So what? He said was tony has been an outstanding host, has been exemplary. He’s so handsome. I’m blushing on the

[00:58:16.77] spk_2:
ledge of color like notion on, um,

[00:58:18.88] spk_7:
and tony does remain the into the honor, having the honor of being, besides my own show the longest running show on work. Um, there was a period of time when we had several shows that have been with us for about five years. But out of all those shows, tony is the only one who has stayed consistent over all this time and to stay with this this long. Thank you so much, tony. I appreciate you know, all of the time that you’ve spent with us. I appreciate all your support and I love your mission. And I wish you the best of luck and only the best things moving forward.

[00:59:32.36] spk_1:
Thank you, Sam. I hope listeners were able to hear that we’re not. Sam said he’s not sure if if it was recorded, but, uh, I hope it was. Thank you, Sam. It’s been just Ah, lovely, wonderful fun collaboration for these 10 years? Absolutely, absolutely so. But where, Of course, the show continues. As I said on podcast every Friday, I’m gonna keep Teoh every Friday schedule. There’ll be a brand new show every Friday. Um, available to ah are 13,000 listeners a lot of this out of. Thank you. Thank you, John. So we got to wrap it up and I want a sky. I want to thank very much Scott Stein so much. Scott stein music dot com Scott, Thanks so much for being with us.

[00:59:43.45] spk_3:
Thank you for Thank you for having me.

[00:59:47.12] spk_1:
I want to give a shout out to our our web guy. Uh ah. I always I’m always crediting him on our Mark. Silverman is our Web guy. So Mark Silverman has been has been in the background for the show. I want to say hello. You’re not You do speak. I love the background on the background guy, but you know, I made if you will, tony, don’t make me stand up alive. But here I am, tony, it’s been great. I’m there every friday for you. I put the podcast up on to the website. It’s been a long and wonderful relationship. And 10 more years make it 20. I’m happy to be there for you and congratulations. Thank you, Mark. Thanks And thanks for all your help. It’s been many, many years. You’ve Well, you’ve been since the beginning. Yeah. Being doing the back end for us. Thank you so much. I wish I was on that submarine

[01:00:35.10] spk_4:
with you when you were the captain. That would have been even

[01:00:46.84] spk_1:
more fun. Submarine? I was underground, but I was close. I was I was underground, not underwater. But you were. So Yeah, I was subterranean. Claim Meyerhoff. Thank you so much. 10 years collaborating, creative producer, co hosting every single anniversary show.

[01:01:16.17] spk_2:
Thank you. It’s really, really been a joy. And, you know, normally I come up to New York and we did this great New York show in Sam Studio and Scott lugs in is you know, sometimes I meet Scott at the door and I carry in some gear for a minute. It’s always such a tree. And then afterwards we go out and we get a bagel or something in the city and Ah, but this on Zoom was really, really nice. And I’ve enjoyed it greatly. So if you needed a guest sometime, just hit me up and zoom away. We will. I’d love to. It’s been really fun,

[01:02:19.09] spk_1:
Thank you. Our 10th anniversary 500 show. Thank you so much for being with us. I’m grateful. I’m grateful for all of each of our listeners, and I’m glad that non profit radio helps you in the important work that you are doing. The feedback I get is, um, it’s touching. I know, I know. We’re helping nonprofits with their missions and their values. That’s why we do the show. Great job. Next week we’ll return to our 20 NTC coverage with more of anti sees smart speakers. If you missed any part of today’s show, I beseech you, find it on tony-martignetti dot com were sponsored by wegner-C.P.As guiding you beyond the numbers wegner-C.P.As dot com Like Coca mapped in software Denali Fund, is there complete accounting solution made for non profits? Tony-dot-M.A.-slash-Pursuant er, Mountain for a free 60 day trial and my turn to communications, PR and content for nonprofits, your story is their mission. Turn hyphen two dot ceo,

[01:02:32.87] spk_2:
and we’d like to thank Sam Liebowitz. He’s our line producer. The show’s social media is by Susan Chavez. Mark Silverman is our Web guy and this delightful, fantastic, marvellous live

[01:02:45.51] spk_0:
music by the Super town, too. That’s mine on

[01:03:06.49] spk_1:
your creative producer. That’s me with me. Next week. Big non profit ideas for the other 95% Go up and be great. Great show. Thank you. So

Nonprofit Radio 450th Show Recap

Last week was Nonprofit Radio’s 450th show. Here’s my highlight video including co-host Claire Meyerhoff from the PG Agency and live music from Scott Stein, singing our theme music, “Cheap Red Wine.” Also calls from Gene Takagi, our longest-running contributor, from NEO Law Group; Yigit Uctum from returning sponsor Wegner CPAs; and Peter Panepento at new sponsor Turn Two Communications. And a welcome to new sponsor Cougar Mountain Software.

Best part is the heartfelt cameo from Tony Martignetti, Sr., with commentary on his son. 

Nonprofit Radio for July 26, 2019: 450th Show!

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WegnerCPAs. Guiding you. Beyond the numbers.

Cougar Mountain Software: Denali Fund is their complete accounting solution, made for nonprofits. Claim your free 60-day trial.

Turn Two Communications: PR and content for nonprofits. Your story is our mission.

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Listen Live or Archive:

My Guests:

Claire Meyerhoff, Scott Stein, Maria Semple, Gene Takagi & Amy Sample Ward: 450th Show!
We’re celebrating Nonprofit Radio’s 9th anniversary and 450th show! We’ve got Claire Meyerhoff co-hosting, live music from Scott Stein, giveaways from Cura Coffee, our contributors Maria Semple, Gene Takagi and Amy Sample Ward, July 26 history lessons and lots more fun. To win prizes, tweet about our 450th using #NonprofitRadio. We’ll pick the clever ones and shout you and your nonprofit as winners, making you a part of history. Celebrate with us!

Top Trends. Sound Advice. Lively Conversation.

Board relations. Fundraising. Volunteer management. Prospect research. Legal compliance. Accounting. Finance. Investments. Donor relations. Public relations. Marketing. Technology. Social media.

Every nonprofit struggles with these issues. Big nonprofits hire experts. The other 95% listen to Tony Martignetti Nonprofit Radio. Trusted experts and leading thinkers join me each week to tackle the tough issues. If you have big dreams but a small budget, you have a home at Tony Martignetti Nonprofit Radio.

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View Full Transcript
Transcript for 450_tony_martignetti_nonprofit_radio_20190726.mp3 Processed on: 2019-07-27T00:45:39.647Z S3 bucket containing transcription results: transcript.results Link to bucket: s3.console.aws.amazon.com/s3/buckets/transcript.results Path to JSON: 2019…07…450_tony_martignetti_nonprofit_radio_20190726.mp3.427129504.json Path to text: transcripts/2019/07/450_tony_martignetti_nonprofit_radio_20190726.txt Hello and welcome to Tony martignetti non-profit Radio. Big non-profit ideas for the other 95%. You heard that live music. It’s our 450 of show foreigners. That’s a lot. That’s a lot of radio. I’m glad you’re with me. I’d be thrown into op Telmo psychosis if I saw that you missed today’s show. It’s our 4/50. Claire Meyerhoff from the PG agency is our guest co host. We’ve got this live music from Scott Stein. All our contributors Jean Takagi, Amy Stamp Award and Maria Simple will be calling in along with the new sponsors to introduce and announce we’re gonna giveaway bags of cure a coffee. Scott is going to be playing more music for us. Claire’s gonna lead us in a fun history lesson. We’re live tweeting with the hashtag non-profit radio, So join us on Twitter. We’re on Facebook. Live at the Tony No at on my page. Tony martignetti zoho of your If you are a friend there, we’re on Facebook. But if not Twitter with the hashtag non-profit radio. This is all on our 4/50 show, ninth anniversary Thank you so much for being with us. Were sponsored by Response, sir by Wagner c. P A is guiding you beyond the numbers. Wagner cps dot com By Cougar Mountain Software Denali fundez They’re complete accounting solution made for non-profits tony dot m a slash Cougar Mountain for a free 60 day trial also sponsored by turn to Communications, p. R and content for non-profits, your story is their mission. Turn hyphen two t w o dot co So that website is turn hyphen. T w o dot CO and for the 450th show were sponsored by Cure Coffee connecting coffee lovers with farmers and families who harvest the finest organic coffee beans. Cure a cough a dot com. Don’t you talk pretty? That’s clear. Meyerhoff. Welcome. Welcome. Oh, she’s a trained. She’s radio could tell that I’m on treyz Telemann train and she’s a pro. Welcome back to the show in my heart for 50. Thank you for coming up. Thank you. Came from Washington D c. I drove actually was in New England. Drove down yesterday. Will be driving back to D. C. Welcome. Bible days are creative producer. It’s good to have you. Yes, way We started this show. Will you started the show. But I helped you way back when you asked me some for some advice, and you were like, What would you charge me? And I’m like, you know, really wouldn’t charge you anything. But you know what I’d like? I’d like my name at the end of the credits of every show. It’s been their claim. Our creative producer, cloudgood I know it’s serving last. That’s what you want. It’s there. Nine years. It’s been, like one. A legacy. Scotty Stein’s got Stein. Welcome back. Thank you. Thanks for having me. Always good to see it. Always good to be beyond the show. Pleasure. I love having you for the anniversary shows. You bring your keyboard. Yep. We’re gonna hear cheap red wine. We are gonna hear a brand new composition World release. Ah, yeah. I wrote it this morning. Okay. E wrote it this morning. First to hear it are awesome. Yes. What? What’s going on in the Scott Stein music World Music gigs coming up? Yeah, actually, doing a gig out in Brooklyn on Monday at a place called Bark or Tits And the debt. Ms. Park section of Brooklyn, close to where I live. Uh, me and three other songwriters Jerry Cherry, Kyle Lacey and Sarah Wise doing kind of a song writers in the round thing. It’s a great little room for that. So I’m doing that on that. I’m about to head to Chicago on Wednesday. I’m goingto Lollapalooza. I’m playing really play? No, I am playing a CZ part of a kid’s rock fan, Joanie Leeds in The Night Lights who I’ve worked with for almost 10 years. Uh, we’re playing the kids stage at Lollapalooza on Thursday. Friday, Joanie Leeds and that’s it. Love that. Congratulations, follow-up, Pollux. Yeah, I’m excited. How do they define kids at Lollapalooza? But, uh, I think 10 and under. Okay. I mean, I think the general demographic for Joni’s me could be anything from like toddlers up. Three. Think that 1st 2nd grade, something like that. It’s pretty broad range of children’s ages, but a lot of fun. It’s super super fun. Congratulations. Thank you. It’s awesome. Yeah, What’s going on in the clear Meyerhoff PG agency World plan giving creative. I continue to help lots of wonderful non-profit organizations with their legacy programs, helping them build out their legacy societies and helping them reach and engage their best prospect. So they make requests and other plan gif ts to their favorite non-profit charities. About s So where you living now? You live in North Carolina and I live in Washington, D C live in Alexandria, Virginia, in Alexandria. Okay. Okay. What’s Ah, that’s a cool town. It’s great a lot going on right now. That’s Ah, that’s the new isn’t Google. It’s coming. The Amazon Amazon. Remember? Amazon had the big contest and it shows part of Arlington, Virginia to be the darling of Alexander. Pretty darn close. Pretty close. Does this mean your property value is going about my condo in October? And it’s already increased quite a bit. So it was. It’s been good for real estate, Awesome in the DC area, people buzzing about this And I guess that’s the thing like Courtney, I don’t know. You know, you’re not in the, you know, in the local Well, there’s a lot to talk about. What you live in Washington, D. C, for instance. There’s this guy on Pennsylvania Avenue and there’s this Congress and okay, so people talk about it and then they talk about non-profit radio there, like every day I walk down Pennsylvania Avenue, our Constitution evident. People are just talking about Tony martignetti non-profit radio and I go What’s not to talk? That’s great. It’s 9th 9th 10th anniversary. You know, I can’t believe Help me. You did help me in the beginning. It’s got nine years on. I have, I have when I’m gonna get to actually way could share these Now I got I got the history is where it was a little thematic Well, history’s thematic thing Yes, you’re clear Your very first show non-profit radio. Yeah, I have it. Here’s the show sheet from It was July 23rd 2010. Wow, nine years ago. That was nine years ago. We started in July. So you were on, like the third or fourth show I was. What was I talking about? I think donorsearch Tory’s for playing storytelling was actually story storytelling in jargon. Remember mary-jo argast maybe jargon jail Throw people in jargon jail. That was your charge. It was your concept. I hate jargon. Credit. I hate the word used all the time. I don’t want any. I don’t ever want to hear the word youth in everything because as I learned in broadcast journalism from Bill Torrey at American University. He said no one ever says, like I saw five youths running down the street. People don’t talk like that. No, this I saw you got five teenagers, five young people running down the street. But that was your first show and jargon. See, the, uh well, I made you those shows. She’s a major your clock. But look how Look at the comparison. I mean, there’s the 2010 show sheet is just like lines, right? And the 2019 is big paragraphs. Dense. We got more going on. All right. Scott Stein. I got your first, uh, Scott Stein. We first used your music on the September 6 2013 show That’s coming up nine years. Yeah, I know. I’m sorry. Wait. Coming up. Six years starts coming up six years? Yes, exactly. I agree. And ah, so that was And that was the first time we used it. And then your for your first time, live with us. Was the 200 show July 18 2014. Okay, 200. You’ve been here for every anniversary since. Except one. Yeah, there was one. I had to go to your apartment record, right? I think I was gonna be on the road or something. That during that during the live broadcast. So yeah, but I pre recorded way pre recorded cheap red wine and played it. I don’t know if that was the 3/50. It was like the one you’ve been on every anniversary since doing every 50. It’s fun. It’s really like a high. Almost like a highlight of the year I turned summer. I’m like, Oh, pretty soon we’re going to do the New York New York show. You think about just I love it. It’s fun because biggest for me. I worked in radio for years, and it’s like my only radio thing I do anymore. We’re gonna turn Scottie. Alright, cheap red wine. This is the song that I licensed from you in 2013. And of course, we only sample of 10 seconds before the vocals. You know, Uh, so I always wanted it. I always want you to play it live. Yeah, and full. And so, if anything you want to say about cheap red wine, I don’t know. This song is older than the show. Uh, comes from a record that it did back in 2009 10 years ago. And I think the song was had already had it for about a year before that. But, uh, yeah, it’s Ah, it’s been really fun. Thio here. It used in this kind of context, So happy to do it for you, son. Please hurry up, baby. Just keep talking sooner later. Offing a routes to what you mean seeking romantic advice from a bimbo. Dumb luck never answers upon a TV street way can agree on nothing way Get tail or ups from my down It is a pawn in each other now, baby. And this look that we found you know you used if I’m a charming gonna can figure out how And you said you thought I was handsome But it doesn’t matter now so keep fallin lungs Your time will allow because I gotta empty promises every bottle of cheap red wine and wait, Wait, Just diamonds. They won’t talk to the cut of clothing that I wear with good stuff when you’re too easily distracted too. Okay, you got to, man. So I’m gonna do the best that I can, but maybe you have some competition day when I’m a wealthy man. You know, I used to find a charming, but I can’t figure out how you said you thought. Always handsome. But it doesn’t matter now, so get full in my punch. Sloane’s your time allow because I’ve got her and promises a bottle of cheap wine. And let’s raise our glasses to take a drink of better days. The other bilich a kiss like that, you say, And I ain’t gonna kill Helen’s dialogue. National victory signs. Who’s We’re perfect for each other long nobody else. Nobody is way. You know, you used to find me charming, but I can’t figure out how you said your father was. Hanson never minded, no matter now. So he had fallen from a punch. Eyes is like your time will allow. Got her Any promises? Neo-sage I love that. I just love that song. Thank you. There’s nobody waiting in line just like cheap red wine. Love. It’s got Thank you. Thank you so much. E-giving are gonna play another one for us later on. Yeah, the the World release premiere. Um I want to give away a prize. We’ll start with Yes. We’ll start with our prize is the 1st 1 is going to This is these are our recent subscribers to the insider alerts where you get it. You get an email from me every Thursday tells you the guest star insider alerts linked to my video on the 1st 1 The most recent to be subscribed is Dennis Lee. Dennis is executive director at the Marching Elite Foundation. So Dennis is gonna get a pound of cure coffee. Congratulations, Dennis Lee, Your coffee going to Dennis Lee? Thank you for being our most recent insider dentist. And, um, we have a little, uh we have a little We have a little bit about, uh, a little bit about your cure Coffee. Well, what we do, we D’oh! I love your coffee. It’s my favorite cure. A coffee directly connects coffee lovers with farmers and families who harvest the finest organic coffee beans. And, you know, with every cup of cure, you joined their effort to expand sustainable dental care to remote communities around the world. They are a direct trade coffee company Now, with learning opportunities for dental students in the U. S and abroad. Cure coffee dot com. I love that mission that is so great. They do the dental work for the farmers of the of the beans because the CEO of the company is a dentist. That’s great. I love that Thomas Godlessness. Fantastic. He’s a dentist in California. Yes, bona fide dds after his name. So maybe I’ll go to California to see him. Because, you know, a good dentist. That’s that’s what you find when you stay for life. I’m going to California for years old Blue Frost and Rutherford, New Jersey. Really? Um, yeah. Trust in, like, 3000 dentists. And then you’re not going to, you know, practice dental loyalty. Well, I D’oh, but I guess I have moved to other places where it’s not practical to my dentist and Carl play. Well done, Island, New York. You’ll dentist with anybody? Nothing. My original dentists. Bad reputation, the bad dental grip. You should practice more dental lorts. I hope you’re practicing safe industry. I have my new dentist in Shady Side Maryland. 1,003,000. Dentists. I hope you’re doing it safely. Um, So there was something, huh? Let’s see. Where are we now? Okay, Is that it’s somebody on the phone. Oh, excellent. Okay. Awesome. That must be Jean Takagi. Hey, Jane. Congratulations. Thank you. That is Jean Takagi Eyes our legal contributor, Jean Jean. The Law machine. You’ll find him at neo-sage log group dot com and he’s at G. Tack on Twitter. Longstanding, longstanding contributor. How are you, Gene? I’m doing excellent. How are you? Oh, very good. It’s the 4450th 9th anniversary, huh? You know, we’re doing great. My voice is cracking, which means I’m excited that we’re doing great. Like I’m 14. Um, what’s going on? It, uh, like Neil latto. What do you, uh, what you all paying attention to in San Francisco? We’re enjoying this summer. It’s not. It’s not so hot here. So we’re having fun here, And, uh, I’m working with my partner, Aaron bradrick and Cindy latto. Actually, who’s the director of the master of masters and science of the non-profit management program at Columbia University. Designed a course for the program that we’re really looking forward to doing that. So does that mean you’re gonna be in New York teaching? I may be a little bit more, but we’re doing the design phase right now. Still in design phase. Okay, but you’re hired, right? It’s not You’re going to do it. We’re all working it out right now. Okay? I won’t make any premature announcements. Would get everybody excited. I’m sure we’ll be the first to know. Yeah, yeah, we’re here. We’re here in New York. It’s gotta be. It’s gonna be the breaking news here, so let us know, Gene. Absolutely. Okay. Um and what would you be teaching? It’ll be a program on sort of a business law issue for for non-profit professionals programme A programme? Oh, not just Of course I was I was minimizing it. What would be like a top topic in that in that class for non-profits that they would need to know about what’s what’s a top 10? Things like public private partnership collaborations and kind of some of the legal issues that may arise in those type of interaction. All right, well, you let us know when it breaks. Gene, you’re, uh I always talk about when you’re first way talk about when you were first on the show and then I never know exactly, but I found it this time. I actually did the legwork. It only took me about three years. We’ve been talking about this, but your very first time on this show was August 27th 2010. Nine years. We have just about nine years. Way had just started in July 1010 1 of the show’s Gene’s been on forever. Yeah, regular contributes an original. Well, that’s why he’s changing the law machine. Yeah, he’s on his own longest running contributor. Not not producer. Is that, like Israel tag liners? That attack line you gave him again? He’s too modest. These jeans. A very modest man. He wouldn’t He wouldn’t do that to himself. Right? So you like Tony? Tony, you cringe, Gene, when I say that the radio machine, it’s just a little bit you blush a little bit. Tony Tony, the radio pony like that? Uh, more like a horse, but not a pony. Move on. All right, Jean, I want to thank you so much for calling. It’s good to talk to you. It’s been always my honor and pleasure to Congrats on for 50 and looking for Thio. All of you. Thanks. Thanks a lot. And he has it in his bio. I love that. Thank you, Jean. Good to talk to you. And thanks so much for what you contribute. Thank you, guys. Thanks. Jane. Already anywhere else on the phone. Okay, then, uh, there was this New York Times article on podcasting. Yes, I saw it. And there’s you emailed, just like two weeks ago that I was so excited. But I thought of you as soon as I read it. I did because I said to a friend of mine I was with my friend Laurie and we were reading New York Times at our favorite Starbucks in Newburyport, Massachusetts, and I turned to Laurie. And I said, Look at this article about podcast and and my friend Tony, He has this long time podcast I think he liked goes down into the history books for the podcast. And I think there were a lot of great points made in that podcast. And Sam talked about one of them. Scott Well, Scott. Oh, so Well, Sam talked about what, The 19%? Yeah. Uh um, from march to May of this year, 19% of podcasts had a new episode, right? And there’s something like 700,000 podcasts, and only 19% of those has have produced a new episode in the last few months. So they’re staying. They’re mostly stay after men s three months. March, April May s O That alone puts us in the 81st percentile just of eso tribute to how much work you put into this. You know, I think one of the up shots of the article was that a lot of people go into podcasting and think it’s easy and think it’s, you know, it’s It’s not as much work as it is. And it’s to your credit that you’ve kept this thing going, not just for the number of years but the number of episodes. It’s a lot of work. You have to really devote yourself to it. And, ah, you know, it’s that the technology may not. Maybe, you know, it may be easy for everyone to get started, but it’s hard to to sustain it. And ah, knowing your audience of having your niche is is a big part of it, which is something that you have it. And they said that in the article, Yeah, yeah, And over the years since I’ve been involved with your podcast, people will be try. Oh, I want to do a podcast. I want to do a podcast and I say, Well, do you have any idea what goes into a podcast? Because my friend Tony martignetti has been doing one for 789 10 10 years now, and and he does them consistently every single week, except for two weeks a year. So he does 50 podcasts a year and to produce a podcast every single week and book the guests and come up with the topics and write all the things and keep the sponsors and work with Sam and and work with Scott. And to get it all done is really a great achievement. So around of applause, that’s a good tagline that zoho that’s a good better than the non-profit pony. Yeah, radio pony Radio Way could let the pony die. I send the money to a farm in the form of a glue factory farm in Vermont. That boy got quickly. Thank you. Thanks a lot. I guess it’s, uh it’s gratifying. It’s just a love affair. I just love doing the show and all the work. Uh, it doesn’t matter, cause I know that, uh, we’re helping non-profits helping small and midsize shops who I always have in mind as I’m as I’m doing it. That’s the God and, Scott, you gotta be in a niche. You gotta be loyal to your listeners that gotta get values value to listeners. Otherwise, right, they’re going to be Oh, there’s Ah, major correlation between that and being a musician, you got to know who your audience is Without that, it’s very, very difficult, right? And provide content specifically for them. And don’t drift off into other places and provide, like something else just cause you want to so right, like you don’t have a sudden play like, you know, the hokey pokey Or do you want me? And I am playing kids music in later? Well, I guess the parallel only goes so far. There’s there’s there’s a balance to be struck for sure, but, uh, we got off the mood strikes. We got somebody on the phone who is very committed to like exactly what we’re talking about. Staying true to mission, not veering. And that is an example. Ward our social media and technology contributors. Do-it-yourself Award. How are you? I’m doing great. Congratulations. Thank you very much. Were you able to hear our conversation while you’re on hold. There. I You did. So we were just talking about staying true to mission, right? I mean, you’re about that. Yeah. And I was reflecting on, you know, the whole, like, 50 episodes a year, All the work that you do to make sure that you have tops and people to join the show and all of those things And how many times we’ve been on. And I wanted to make a joke, but I didn’t make it because I felt like, maybe I maybe I should sensor that joke. But I was Yeah. How is there anything to say anymore? But you always find new things to talk about. And I think that’s to your credit. Thank you very much. You help? You’ve been contributing a long, long time on social media and technology. Your first show with us was, um it was July 13th 2012. The 100 show. Exactly. Right. Um, And at that time, with the 100 show, we had 1000 listeners. So yeah, so two years into this thing. So we started in July 2010 July 2012. Your first show, 100 listeners. I’m sorry 100 shows. We were celebrating having 1000 listeners, and now we’re over 13,000. Wow, that’s pretty cool. I think that’s you know, that’s that’s great. Thanks pretty good. 13,000. Pretty good. 13,000% growth. Is it 15%? I don’t know. 13,000% better. It’s more than 13% stock in that 50% of thousands. 130. It’s 13,000% growth 1000 times. This is not the math show, right? 15,000% growth is 13,007. We got it sends a music show non-profits fun stuff, no matter what’s going on it and 10 dot org’s You know, I love non-profit. You know, I love intent. I’m not supposed to say no. Never What? Uh, what’s going on in time going on while we have, um, 20 ntcdinosaur action proposals just opened. So people are submitting their ideas. And this year, for the first time, we have moved the ignite applications intothe same sessions, a mission timeline. So in the past, ignites which are a type of presentation with five minutes exactly, and you have 20 sign and the slides auto advance every 15 seconds, and they are hosted up on the main stage as one of the general sessions in the morning. In the past, applications to be one of those people opened Ah lot later in the year after registration was already open, they were open in, like, November and December. Okay, but this year we decided to do it all at the same time. So what types of conversations or topics? They want a surface of the conference. They you know, they could do that a little bit more holistically. So, uh, sessions in-kind of more standard breakout format as well as the main stage content, are all open for submissions. Right? Cool. And this is all for really big. This is offer. Then this is all for 20 and T c. Right? Next. Give us the dates for 20. Sure. 20 ntcdinosaur be in Baltimore, Maryland, which we’ve never been to before. I mean, people I’m familiar with the conference has never been hosted in Baltimore, and we will be there march 24th through 26. Okay, Okay. Cool. So submissions air open you goto and 10 dot Or if you want to submit, it’s a very, very good conference. Non-profit radio has been there, I think, half a dozen times. Maybe I’m exaggerating. Maybe it’s only five, but always on the exhibit floor, capturing the brilliant speakers that that a subset of the brilliant speakers that in 10 has and expanding their reach and expanding the reach of the conference. I love doing it, You know I do. Amy, don’t You know I love it. We lose any sample word? Well, trust me, she knows She knows that I love it every step forward. No, no more. Okay, well, I’ll pretend that you may be speaking. Well, it’s a great conference, and everyone should go. And it’s in Baltimore. Yes. And, uh, that’s two of us. Who, speaking for Amy. Amy, thank you very much for calling. And thank you for being ah, contributor for so many years from since the 100 show. Thanks. Thanks so much, Aimee. Simple work. She’s great. Um, let’s I want to welcome one of our new sponsors. Um, and that is, uh, Cougar Mountain Cuckoo Mountain software. They do accounting software for non-profits, the Denali fundez your complete accounting solution specifically designed for non-profits. They have a free 60 day trial and you can find that a tony dot m a slash cougar Mountain. Don’t you talk pretty, tony dot m a slash cougar mountain for your free 60 day trial of the Denali Fund. Your complete accounting solution specifically designed for non-profit. Very excited to hear about it And brand new brand new sponsor. Because because non-profits need things to be more, you know, simple and specific. And Taylor to them agree. Not using QuickBooks, which is designed which is made for corporate and individual and, ah, trying to tailor it to a non-profit. It doesn’t doesn’t work because you got your fund accounting problems, which right? Denali farmer takes takes care of you. Come on to talk about, uh, no, but but he’s the marketing manager. Brian. Brian. Brian blessed our marketing manager who have been working with Welcome, Brian. Glad to have you. Thank you. Thank you for joining. Not properly with a sponsor. Thank you, Brian. And thank you. Cougar Mountain software. Um, you had, you know, a little something going on. You want to talk about a little history? I do. Well, Mr Ethan, will you know, Tony, your show really is historic to may that this is the 450th show. As we discussed earlier in our discussion about how podcasts are, really, you know, it’s just hard to produce these podcasts and keep them going. So so kudos to you for doing this historical show. So today, in honor of that, as you enter the history books, I have a little game for us, a little door just a little today in history thing. So the 1st 1 I want to mention is that and and you asked me when I say that I would do this well, that clears air non-profit angle to it. So I’m gonna try to do my best to Time non-profits to these as much as possible. So in 17 75 the office that would later become the United States Post Office Department was established by the second Continental Congress. Benjamin Franklin, Pennsylvania was the first postmaster general now way have a musical clue for you on the state. In 17 88 a certain state became the first actually became ratified as state in the United States. The 11 state. Which day was it? We have a musical clue wrote down. Try it again. Scott, New York, New York so that non-profit Italian is, Of course, that’s the home of non-profit radio. Oh, that’s tenuous. Oh, my goodness. That’s cool. What? You’re clever. Well, and for the post office one, I was gonna say the tie in is how much not how much mail have non-profits sent over the years through the U. S. Postal Service? Thanks to Benjamin Franklin Weaken, send nice mailers to people to raise money. Clever mailers, envelopes post towards all that, All that. So on this day in 1945 the Labour Party one the United Kingdom General election by a landslide and that removed Winston Churchill from power on this day, the Labour Party. One serious. Winston Churchill was a Tory. I guess I should have done that. But, um yes, of the Labour Party came into power today. So in 1947 Harry Truman signed the National Security Act of 1947 creating the C I A, the Department of Defense, the United States Air Force, the Joint Chiefs of Staff and the United States National Security Council. And I do not have a non-profit tie into that. But you know, that’s great. It’s okay. That’s important. Are we Don’t you cut me off because I got a whole thing here. I know. We got it. We got a call her. We have a call or ever sponsored me. Can we come back to our way? I can’t. I don’t want to keep promises. I can’t keep way. Way will try. Okay, you duitz doom. How are you? Hey, Tony. Good. Very good. Very good. How you doing in there? I’m sorry. Thank you very much. Are you in Madison, Wisconsin? Yes, I am. Okay. Of course I’m grateful to you because, uh, you’ve been a guest on the show a bunch of times. In fact, your your first time on the show keeping with the history theme that Claire set up for us. Mystery theme That clears that up for us. Ah, was September 12 2014. So five years ago, almost five years and you’ve been on you’ve been on a couple times. And I’m also, of course, grateful for, uh, for Wagner. C p. A sponsorship. It’s been a couple of years now, and I’m grateful for that. That’s awesome. Yeah. They’ve been with us a couple of years waiting to cps dot com. What’s, um What’s what’s Wagner looking at for non-profits this summer? First of all, we’re really be supporting your show. And I would like to thank you for your dedication again. Um, for nine years now and helping out the other 95% of the pregnancy. The eighties. They were looking at you a constant standard. All the very, very fighting. Okay, Yeah. Don’t go into detail on you. Can’t be gonna be different going forward. It’s gonna be more challenging. And we’re helping our clients kind of, like navigate through the complexity that giving them some implementation plan. Okay. And wedding has a bunch of webinars they’re doing this summer. I’ve been a summer on the fall. I’ve been promoting them on the show. So you’ve got a ramped up Your free resource is for non-profits. Yeah, we started thing, baby nurse. I get like, two years ago now and we plan on doing a lot more and abila xero pompel latto part that other other resource is we’re creating for our clients again. We work with a lot of nonprofit organizations and we understand that they enough resource is sometimes like the other 5% provide that. Yes, Thank you like the other 5%. Thank you very much. Um, eat. We have to go. But I want to thank you again. Thank you for the sponsorship. Thank you for your sharing the value that you do when you’re a guest. And, uh, we’re gonna get it. Be getting you back. I know you and I are working on that. Yeah. Yeah. Thank you so much. Thanks for having their happy contribute. Thanks. Thank you so long. So long. Uh, let’s give away another prize. I don’t give a prize. Another sec a second. Most recent, uh, new insider on this is Thio Alana Cooper, who is the senior director of donor relations at the Jewish Federation of Palm Beach County Beach County, Florida. Alana Cooper is gonna be a bag of your coffee coming your way. Congratulations, Alana. That’s a wonderful non-profit organization. You know what? Your federal I’m very familiar with the Jewish Federation of Palm Beach in that area. Would you, uh, cubine teamviewer quaint? Just with the cure of one more time? Cura Uh, okay. You’re a coffee. Well, I love Kira coffee because it directly connects coffee lovers with farmers and families who harvest the finest organic coffee beans. With every cup of cura, you join their efforts to expand sustainable dental care to remote communities around the world. They are a direct trade coffee company now with learning opportunities for dental students in the U. S and abroad. Cure a coffee dot com and now I want coffee. Thank you. It’s so hot in here. You sure you want coffee? One iced coffee? It’s the reason the reason I’m here is because the host doesn’t like the air conditioner on really during the during this show. If anyone was wondering because it makes me I don’t care for So that’s why um let’s do the live lister love because we’re, uh, cool like this. Look at this list of listeners. I mean, it’s incredible. Look at this. The sheet of live listeners, um, shot him out. San Francisco, California Middlebury P A. Longview, Texas Tampa, Florida Alexandria, Virginia. I lived My neighbor. You leave is listening. Yeah, sure. Awesome life. Listen, love to Alexandria and Washington D. C. Right by them if he’s listening. Oakland, California monisha, New York, New York. We got multiple New York, New York, as usual. That’s good. Uh, Charlotte, North Carolina. Um, Seoul, Korea. Seoul? Yes. We got Seoul, South Korea, on your haserot. Come So ham Nida, for our Seoul Korea. For our South Korean Romania, Romania is with us. Tulani osili Ramani Iran. Iran. I was I was recently very close to Tehran, Iran. I was nearby. You were living in January. We took a cruise and and for a while my phone gave me a little thing. It said I was in Tehran. All right, let’s take a person. All right. Theron, live. Listen, love out through Tehran. Um s boo. I don’t know if I’m pronouncing right, but the country is Finland. Yes, piela Oh, as proof Inland, Uh, live nation left to you and, uh, also abroad. We got some other broad. Uganda, Kampala, Kampala, Uganda Indeed. Also in South Korea. Got CEO Joo. Were you near Seo? No, but I might go there next year. Okay. Ono Japan and bringing it back. Uh, we got Hell’s kitchen. That’s interesting. Hell’s kitchen. New York shows up differently than New York, New York. That’s funny. A lot of good restaurants Night. They have 10th abila station live listener left to you. And congratulations on showing up separately from all our other New York New York listeners going upstate Watertown, New York is with us. Um, going out a little West West Salem, Ohio, and um oh, Munich, Germany. Gooden, dahna and Freeport, New York Report, Long Island, New York Report New York Right near There you do. I’m pretty far away from Carl koegler York C a R E l E P L A c They’re working on the new train station there. My friend Mary Ann was right by the trains. It is being to get that extra stuff going on. Moscow’s with us. Moscow nasco I don’t and no Russia. And ah said Munich, Germany. All right, so live Mr Love. Awesome. And Sam, if anyone new ones come in, that’s treyz. Would you update us, please? Because I want to shout out everybody falik If there’s all over the place all over the world, it’s incredible. We got multiple multiple continents, indeed. And of course, the podcast pleasantries were multi Continental and were, and even, uh, further reach then the live love is the podcast. Love the podcast. Pleasantries to the outs where the over 13,000 people listening each week on small and midsize non-profits, uh, CEO, executive directors, fundraisers, board members, consultants and other vendors to non-profits. Podcast Pleasantries to you. Thank you for being with us. I hope the show continues to serve. You give you value. I believe it does cause the listener numbers keep growing, so and the feedback I get is positive. So thank you for being with us podcast, especially board members like you. Dorothy Hamill. Today’s her birthday. Today’s Dorothy Hamill’s birthday. What is your boardmember? She is a boardmember or a recent boardmember of the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra. How do you know all this? But well, because I researched the whole bit that I was going to do today. So I know your birthday’s today and everything that happened today in history. So I’ve got a musical clue from Scott here. There’s a the original sitcom anarchist, the original sitcom actresses Birthday today. Who is it? Close. It’s Ethel’s birthday. Vivian Vance Vance and she was married to William Frawley know they were well on the show. They hated each other in real life. They hated each other. It’s a legend that was Fred. Fred and Ethel never even spoke off. Hated each other. You got one more. You got another history thing, another history things. So there’s there’s another. It’s another musical clue And someone’s birthday today. What’s the band? Sam knows Rolling Stones today is Mick Jagger’s birthday. Uh, that sounds better on the guitar by, and I do not have, like, a non-profit link to Mick Jagger. Actually, I found that I think he’s kind of not that charitable that he spends a lot of time trying to hide his body from the But he’s born July 20,000 fans she shares a birthday with Britt said non-profit really are all right. Hyre s Let’s, uh, there’s another Tony martignetti in the studio here. Oh, step up. Step up to Scott’s Mike, would you Come on. Come on, Come on. You’re gonna be on a podcast. Yes, I’m gonna like there’s another Tony most second. There’s a second Tony martignetti here. I just want a little shout from better looking. Thank you. Thank you. Come a little closer. That every proud of my son on the work he’s doing for nonprofit organizations goblets and and thank you for your faithfulness. Appreciate it. Thank you, Dad. Thank you. That’s so sweet. And after the show, I’m gonna explain to Dad what a podcast is. He’s got to start his own podcast. Uh, all right, well, uh, Scott, I wanted to Ah, what you do? Another song you got? You got a world world premiere. Yeah. Uh, they said earlier on the show. I wrote this this morning, which is half true. Um, I have had a part of this song running through my head for the better part of, ah month. And then I wrote a quick, rough draft Ah, a couple of weeks ago, and then I wasn’t quite sure where the music was gone, and I put it aside. And this morning I had about 15 minutes, and I was like, Let’s just let’s just finish this song, right? You know, sometimes songs spring songs are like, Sometimes it’s like pulling teeth. And sometimes it’s like cooking breakfast. And, uh, this one’s been a little of each make on fits and starts. So what is it? Uh, I have a number of ah, All right. World release a cz yet? Untitled. Yeah, I think I got a couple possible titles. Ilsen Okay, maybe we’ll challenge. Maybe we’ll challenge listeners to come up with a title for Scott Stein. So listen closely. And, uh, at the end at the end, we’ll tell you how you can reach Scott with your title suggestion. Great. Great. All right. How does this go again? I am only half joking now. That’s too all right. Uh, Getsem inside information. Someone’s me a copy of the master plan. Sources were dependable, but they’re in a language I don’t understand. You know what? I’ve always been a sin for as long as I can remember. Always skipping past super landings. Always looking for that snow in September. Good. The way you play the song. Always someone since long Booth. Some days your own busy Some days you can’t get a damn thing done. Some days you get the car key. Some days it’s the keys to the king. Sometimes the changing of the guard, professor than changing of Caesar way Sometimes the people that you love way very good reason. Wait. I once was beginning. Wait, don’t just watch. You know, watching you know. All right, Scott, that Claire was smiling. Way no, Scotty. So talented. He’s right here. And this is great. Absolutely often do have, like this really good artist right in front of you Sing a song he just wrote first here. I think my favorite part was hit the last court, and there was a truck or something going by honking his horn. I’m saying I don’t like you understand? Like those of you who are listening. I’m on a keyboard. I’m not on a piano, so I’m going like this. Think didn’t just go out. Oh, what did I hit? A wrong note. I think I was right. It’s got if if people do wantto well, give you feedback and or maybe even give you a suggested title, How did they reach you? Uh, on social media on Facebook and Instagram and Twitter. I met Scott Stein music on my wife’s a Scott Stein music dot com where you get to come out to bar chord in Brooklyn on Monday. And there’s my little plugs. There are New York, New York and Hell’s Kitchen listeners. Absolutely. Um, when else do you play in New York? Give us a little, um right now I’m actually just getting back into playing gigs. Uh, I’m just getting back into the into the map. for a while. Um, I took a little hiatus. My wife and I had a baby in October. Maybe boy and early October. What? October, uh, cover nine. Nice. Very nice. And thank you. So s so. I took a little time off from that. And as could imagine, my spare time is non existent these days. So it’s every second is precious these days. And, er eso I’m doing I’m doing this show tomorrow and I’m doing another one back-up Bark or another song Writers in the round on August 19th of things. The date’s on Monday evening and then hopefully more on the fall once I’m sleeping a little. Congratulations. Awesome. Thank you. We got we got another new sponsor on the phone. Peter panepento. How are you? I’m doing great. How are you? Very well, thank you. Peter panepento is with turn to communications, and they’re also a brand new sponsor of non-profit radio. So I thank you very much for that, Peter. Yeah, Thank you. Unfortunately, I didn’t bring my keyboard or my singing voice quite entertaining. No, no, you’re Scott Scott is up to the company. Would have been up to your competition too. So uh, what’s turned to tell us? You know, I’m telling listeners 32nd bursts, but you could take 45 seconds and tell us what turned to is about. Sure. So turn to is a consulting company. We provide PR and communications and marketing support, too. Non-profits and foundations. And it stems from my experience in the non-profit and foundation world. I was an editor or a number of years, the Chronicle philanthropy, and actually had a co host a podcast with you way back when Tony and Thea to see you’re still going so strong after all these years. And we’re really adept at hoping translate the messages that, um that non-profits hell thio to their key audiences and making sure that we’re doing it in a way that really resonates with them and help them make a bigger impact with their work. And, of course, their turn hyphen too dot Co ceo. Um, Peter, you were You were first on this show. Now I was on. I was on your show when you were ah, doing a podcast for The Chronicle. We’re not sure who was first, but I I know. I don’t know. I don’t know if you could look back in your archive, but I look back to the non-profit radio archive and you were first on non-profit radio on August 13th 2010. That was our that was our second month. So you are also very early newcomer. Yes, we were. Yeah, we were. We were blazing new trails back then, Tony, and it’s really amazing how much podcasting and digital radio has has grown up since then. It’s, uh it’s really been been really cool to have been on the ground floor of things like podcasting in social media and and webinars and everything else that we were doing at the Chronicle back in-kind of the explosion of the Internet. And and it’s been really, really cool. You you started out as as one of the, uh, as one of the staple podcasters for The Chronicle back when we were when I was there, too, and, um, hard to believe it’s almost 10 years now that’s making me feel quite old. It is. Uh, you’re referring. I think Thio fund-raising fundamentals which you produce. We collaborated on that. Peter and I would collaborate. It was it was a chronicle chronicle podcast, and I was on that I did a e-giving one. You were on fund-raising fundez forgot. Thank you. Yes, that’s right. That was That was that was a different format with 10 minutes. We were people. We were trying to keep those, like, 10 12 minutes. Max, Right? Right. Yes. And the thinking was we needed to keep it short for people to want to listen to us for tea, get to the end that way. Wanted to keep it short and tight. And you’ve really been ableto build a really engaging, thoughtful, long format program. And the fact that you do it so consistently is is really a testament Thio your skillet this but also the amount of work. You’re putting it really incredible. Thanks a lot, Peter. And, uh And who would have thought when you were a guest, 2010 our second month that nine years later you’d be your company? You have a company, and you’d be sponsoring non-profit radio knife. I thank you for being our newest sponsor. Thanks so much. Thank you. Thank you. It’s a pleasure to do it. I’m thrilled to be associated with it and hope you have 454 Thank you. Thanks a lot. We’ll be talking. Thanks a lot, Peter. So long. All right. Thank you. Bye. We got Maria Semple online. Maria Semple. How are you? I’m doing very well. Thanks. How are you? Awesome. Thank you for calling. Maria. Simple That she’s the Prospect Finder. She’s at Maria Simple. She’s the You’ll find the site prospect finder dot com No, wait. I messed that up. You know the prospect finder dot com The prospect finder dot com All right. To the source. And she’s at Maria. Simple. Did I get that right? That’s right. After all these years, you would think I would know. Yes. All right. How are you, Maria? Simple. I’m doing very well today. Thank you. Okay. And we’re well here, too. Is having a great time there? Yes, we are. 4/50 anniversary shows were always cool. Absolutely. Um, congratulations. You got what you got going on for your summer. Ah, well, I am calling you today from the beautiful downtown waterfront in Beaufort, North Carolina. Uh, yes, yes. Uh, can I stay here? The weather finally broke. We don’t have the crazy humidity today, so all is good. Are you on your boat. Wonderful. Wonderful. I am effort. That’s awesome. Um, okay. Uh, so I wanted to congratulate Scott as well. Real quick. I heard that he had a baby. I love the new song. It’s a good life. I have a feeling that maybe, uh, did the baby get some inspiration to that? That song, perhaps. I love it. Yeah, you may have. May have uncovered something in there. Yeah, that’s certainly at the forefront of, like everything I do. Right? Oh, thank you. Yeah. Maria, your first show with us was August 12th 2011. So you’re You’re a newcomer. You’ve only been on eight years. You’re a newcomer. Oh, boy. Don’t hold that against nine years. I think it’s pretty. That’s quite the legacy. My nose was cool, but she’s been gone eight of nine years. 9 8/9 What’s that? That’s a lot of divide. A nine latto percent that? Yeah, that’s a long time. So the Prospect Finder and the first thing we talked about was linked in for prospect research. That was your first subject with my like Clinton linked in. Yeah, it did for prospectuses. Right there. It’s bonified duvette duvette no duitz still talking about that today? Yes. So what’s your latest? Yeah, what’s the latest thing we should know about Lincoln and Prospect finding? Um Well, you can definitely do an awful lot still with the advanced search feature for free. And, um, you know, some folks deciding to take advantage of a free month of premium Thio get the, you know, the additional search fields and so forth. So certainly something to think about. I love Lincoln. Great. Yeah. Yeah, because after all these years of, like, sort of collecting people, it’s like this awesome roll index that keeps updating itself, and you never know. You might find I have. I’ve gotten a lot of work from lugthart valuable. Yeah, well, people will, like, sort of follow me on Lincoln for a while, then refer me to someone and mostly biggest. They know me from linked it not from in person, so it’s kind of interesting. Yeah. Okay. Glad it’s working for you. Reassemble. And so you feel like the free premium is worth checking out, Maria? Uh, definitely. Yeah. Why not? I mean, if you could do something for free for 30 days, why not? Um, definitely, But have a plan. I have a plan to use it and implement it well and do something with all of the great data that you’re gonna uncover. Okay, Cool. Thank you. Maria Semple. I got, uh we have to move on to another prize. But thank you so much for calling Maria. And thank you. Thanks, Maria. Thanks for all your years. Contributing 88 years. Thank you so much. Congratulations. Thank you. I want to give away another prize. We said it was like two minutes left in the hole. The hole in the whole shebang here, this’ll one is gonna be This is a book. It’s gonna be a book from the I’ll tell you what it’s going to be. Peter panepento. His book. Yes. It’s going to Peter’s book. All kinds of great information on marketing, communications and getting your message across and not using jargon. Exactly. It’s modern media relations for non-profits, which he co authored. He cooperated with the Internet car because you could be your own. Oh, I know into it. I think I might not think I’m in that book. Really? Yes, but no. I think I think I was interviewed for that book. actually now that because it’s Internet. And that was my grandmother’s name in the book. There was, Dad. Thanks, Peter. Thanks to put me in the book, So, yes, but yet because now I think these days you could be your own media mogul. You don’t have to rely on the traditional media. You can. You can be your own media mogul. Well, Barry, Steven’s gonna learn that he’s gonna get the book. Mayberry R. Stevens. He’s president of the Northeast Louisiana Arts Council. Barry Stevens with a V, not a ph. President. Northeast Louisiana Arts Council. Peter panepento book is gonna be coming to you, Barry. And, uh, we got a pretty much wrap it up. Scott Stein. So much. Thanks so much, Scott. Hey. My pleasure. Glad you guys are doing this practically in my backyard. Well, not quite. I’m in Brooklyn now, but we were in my I don’t have come to North Carolina or DC to do it right here in New York City. And the next time we all get together, which show is it gonna be? It’s gonna be the 500. Uh, summer. We’re going to get a celebrity to come in. I gotta work on that. I’m gonna find us a celebrity to come into the studio. Don’t look at me. I think should neo-sage No, you’re a celebrity. I made another kind of celebrity. I have someone in mind, I think. Claire, thank you so much for co hosting. Hey, thanks. Thanks for having me here was wonderful. Thank you so much. Happy for 50th. Thank you. Next week. Inconceivable That metric does not mean what you think it means. Plus Google analytics and Google optimize If you missed any part of today’s show, I beseech you, find it on tony. Martignetti dot com were sponsored by Wagner CPS Guiding you beyond the numbers Wagner c p a gps dot com weinger cps dot com By Cougar Mountain Software Denali fundez They’re complete accounting solution made for non-profits tony dot m a slash Cougar Mountain for a free 60 day trial Also sponsored by turn to communications, PR and content for non-profits, Your story is their mission. Turn to dot CO. That’s turn hyphen, T w o dot Co and for the 450th show sponsored by Cure a coffee connecting coffee lovers with farmers and families who harvest finest organic coffee beans. Cura coffee dot com Don’t you talk pretty? Thanks. Thanks, everybody. Thank you so much for being with us for the 450th show. The ninth anniversary non-profit Radio Our creative producer is Claire Meyerhoff. I say that every single week Sam Liebowitz is the line producer shows Social Media is by Susan Chavez who did are live tweeting today. Thank you very much, Susan. Mark Silverman is our Web guy and I say this every week. Do this Music is by Scott Stein, Brooklyn, New York, with me next week for non-profit radio Big non-profit ideas for the other 95% go out on Be great! You’re listening to the talking alternate network You’re listening to the Talking Alternative network Are you stuck in a rut? Negative thoughts, feelings and conversations got you down. Hi, I’m nor in Sumpter potentially ater. Tune in every Tuesday at 9 to 10 p.m. Eastern time And listen for new ideas on my show Beyond potential Live life Your Way on talk radio dot N Y c on the aptly named host of Tony martignetti non-profit radio Big non-profit ideas for the other 95% fund-raising board relations, social media. My guests and I cover everything that small and midsize shops struggle with. If you have big dreams and a small budget, you have a home at Tony martignetti non-profit Radio Fridays 1 to 2 Eastern at talking alternative dot com Hey, all you crazy listeners looking to boost your business. Why not advertise on talking alternative with very reasonable rates? Interested? Simply email at info at talking alternative dot com Are you a conscious co creator? Are you on a quest to raise your vibration and your consciousness? Sam Liebowitz, your conscious consultant and on my show, that conscious consultant, our awakening humanity. We will touch upon all these topics and more. Listen live at our new time on Thursdays at 12 noon Eastern time. That’s the conscious consultant. Our Awakening Humanity. Thursday’s 12 noon on talk radio dot You’re listening to Talking Alternative Network at www dot talking alternative dot com now broadcasting 24 hours a day. Do you love, or are you intrigued about New York City and its neighborhoods? I’m Jeff Goodman, host of Rediscovering New York Weekly showed that showcases New York’s history, and it’s extraordinary neighborhoods. Every Tuesday live at 7 p.m. We focus on a particular neighborhood and explore its history. It’s vibe. It’s field and its energy tune and live every Tuesday at 7 p.m. On talk radio dahna, you’re listening to the Talking Alternative Network.

Nonprofit Radio’s 450th Show

On July 26th it’s our 9th anniversary and 450th show! We’ve got giveaways. To win, tweet about our 450th using #NonprofitRadio. Watch to learn how to win. I’ll also welcome new sponsors Cougar Mountain Software and Turn Two Communications. 

We’ll stream on Facebook Live. Friday, July 26th, 1-2pm eastern. I hope you’ll join us! 

Nonprofit Radio for July 27, 2018: Nonprofit Radio’s 400th Show!

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Claire Meyerhoff, Scott Stein, Gene Takagi, Maria Semple, Amy Sample Ward, Trent Ricker & Yigit Uctum: Nonprofit Radio’s 400th Show!
Claire Meyerhoff from The PG Agency returns to co-host & Scott Stein, composer of our theme song, is back with live music. We’ve got giveaways from our Anniversary Show Sponsor Cura Coffee, and call-ins from contributors Gene Takagi, Maria Semple & Amy Sample Ward, along with sponsors Pursuant & Wegner CPAs. It’s tons of fun for Nonprofit Radio’s 8th anniversary!

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Board relations. Fundraising. Volunteer management. Prospect research. Legal compliance. Accounting. Finance. Investments. Donor relations. Public relations. Marketing. Technology. Social media.

Every nonprofit struggles with these issues. Big nonprofits hire experts. The other 95% listen to Tony Martignetti Nonprofit Radio. Trusted experts and leading thinkers join me each week to tackle the tough issues. If you have big dreams but a small budget, you have a home at Tony Martignetti Nonprofit Radio.

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Duitz ah, hello and welcome to tony martignetti non-profit radio. Big non-profit ideas for the other ninety five percent it’s our four hundred show. You recognize it from that live music it’s our quarter centenary show. Eighth anniversary we have to listeners of the week charlie mcelveen he e mailed me. I’m a longtime listener and enough for-profit consultant i refer folks to your podcast frequently and quote oh, charlie, i like that very much. Thank you and daniel maori she tweeted, check out twenty martignetti for the roll up your sleeves work of keeping non-profits going. His four hundredth podcast is tomorrow. Danielle, thank you very much. I read that i got goose bumps. Charlie and danielle, thank you so much for supporting non-profit radio. Congratulations on being our four hundredth show. Listeners of the week. Oh, i’m glad you’re with me. I’d suffer the embarrassment of octa phobia if you told me you missed today’s show our eighth anniversary, we’ve got claire meyerhoff, our creative director and president of the plan giving agency the pg agency she’s here to co host. And we got scott stein, composer of our theme song he’s, back with his mobile eighty eight and live music. We’ve got giveaways for anna from our anniversary show sponsor that’s cura coffee, year after year. Very loyal cura and lots of calls coming got listener stories of how you got into non-profit work thank you so much for all the stories you’ll be. I’ll be reading them. They’ll all be part of our eighth anniversary show. It’s tons of fun fur non-profit medios four hundred show, eighth anniversary tony stayed too. It’ll be live listen love podcast pleasantries and affiliate affections responsive by pursuing full service fund-raising data driven and technology enabled tony dahna slash pursuant by regular cps, guiding you beyond the numbers wagner, cps dot com and by tell us turning credit card processing into your passive revenue stream. Tony dahna slash tony tellers let me welcome claire meyerhoff. Hi, great to see you. Great to see you two. So nice to be in our new studio owner in new york city, it’s only the second show, second window in the new studio, lovett high ceilings, more light, nice and bright. Thanks for being here. Thank you for having making trip. Let’s. Say a little scotty stein. Scott stein. Hey, hey. Hello. Hey, dahna composer of our theme song, uh, chief red wine, but she’ll be performing as well as another song for us. Yes, i well, something off the most recent album, yes is well, alright. Cool. Yeah. Hyre having me it’s always a pleasure, scott. Absolutely. Absolutely. You’re part of the show. Um, clamor half what say you what’s going on with you in the pg agency? Well, all kinds of things helping non-profits big and small with their planned e-giving marketing efforts. Aren’t you an altruistic person? Yes. And i’m going to be an ignite a speaker at the charitable plane. Give unconference in october in vegas and thie ignite speakers are are some select speakers who get five minutes and twenty slides and it’s a really strict format. So you can’t go over five minutes and you take over twenty slides. So you’re putting the place on fire. I’m gonna put on fire and there’s this one where the slides go in a rapid like everything. I think so. Yes, exactly. You when you’re ready or not. The slide right answer, right. So i’m doing in five minutes and twenty slides. I’m doing twenty do’s and don’ts for creating donor-centric marketing efforts don’t profiles for your play e-giving marking do’s and don’ts so, like i do start way ahead of time don’t leave it to the last minute to get the donor that you want to feature because some people think, oh, i have this donor, they’ll do it and i can do it in a week. No, you should start six months ahead of time, okay, tow line up your daughter so and if you want to get the other nineteen or the other nineteen didn’t know he was claire in las vegas and you think it’s too terrible give planning conference. No, i’m not, but i know it’s cg ap terrible gift you know that’s that’s tell gift annuities the transfer conference for still dropping planning weight. I took a picture of it. I haven’t. Um i have my keep talking about to tell you what it is in a second. All right? Because i took a screenshot earlier so that i know exactly what it is. And it is the c g p conference. National association of charitable gift planners, which is the awesome, fabulous organisation. And together we’ll get school. October seventeen to nineteen. Let’s. See, we got anybody on the phone? No. Okay. Well, then, uh, scottie, you don’t know what’s going on with scott stein? Uh, well, i’m staying busy and just, you know, living the life of a professional musician here in new york. It’s my eleventh year here in new york. Right now, i’m doing. I’ve got a couple projects going. I just took over as the music director for a show that is running off broadway called wicked frozen it’s it’s kind of what it sounds like it is a mash up of the two blockbusters, and it makes fun of them. It’s very, very funny. It runs sunday nights through labor day at st lukes theater on west forty sixth street. And i have a monthly songwriter siri’s now in brooklyn, which is happening this thursday at bar chord out. Did ms park s o this thursday at nine p? M okay, i should be a lot of funds. Grayce, right? Yeah, we’ll chat again. We got we got telethon klain on the phone. Tell us shake on you with us. Hey, hey, hey, i’m here. I know you are, tony. Hello, she’s. The vice president of marketing. At pursuing on dh pursuing has little sponsorship announcement don’t you? For us, we dio we have got our latest pursuing e-giving outlook ready for your eyes and your ears? No. Even before that, i meant that you were going to renew your sponsorship of non-profit radio. Yes, you are. You’re welcome. Hey, thank you. We won’t partnering with you and we are really honored to to do so. We are all working for the good of small and midsize non-profits big non-profit ideas for the other ninety five percent. We’re all working on it. Ok, so tell me about the thiss pursuing e-giving outlook. Yeah, yeah, i jumped the gun. I gave away the goodies. Uh, front e-giving outlook is a report that we deal with. This is our third year in a row did to do this where we really take a bunch of the major industry trends in our sector. We look at the giving us a report. We look at target analytics donor-centric index. We look at the end, men are online sexual support, and we kind of digest those into one white paper that we put together with our insight from various fundraisers and marketers. Here on the scene. Cool. So it’s a it’s a roundup that’s around up there, claire. So, yeah. So, taylor, what would you say is the most surprising thing that you that you learned is you put together the white paper? I mean, it’s interesting to see, just like the magnitude of giving, you know, and it’s a four hundred ten billion dollar industry. I think that that’s just astounding. Um, one thing i think is an interesting thing to call out izz the growth in individual e-giving continues sort of surpassed growth and other areas when looking at e-giving by foundations, corporations uh, requesting like that all of it is growing, but individual were only makes up seventy percent of the land of the living landscape. And, um, i think that’s interesting to know that that’s the one that still continues to grow with the fastest pace. I also would say that the trends and online and mobile e-giving we’re starting to see that you know, traffic here once fifty percent of coming from mobile and hard about what you need to be thinking about global should have been yeah, you should have been for years now, so in addition to the paper, there’s, also a webinar that people could watch right, even though webinars passed, they can get the archive on the landing page, right? Yeah, okay, and that is that page for you to get the pursuing e-giving outlook, the paper, and also to watch the webinar is tony dahna slash pursuing capital, p capital p, for pursuing and please. Okay, taylor, i want to thank you very much. Hey, thank you, thank you. Having me on. Thank you, thank you, thank you, and thank you again for your support of non-profit radio. Love you. Yeah, of course. All right, speculator. Okay, um, i brought a little history along. Claire. Come my love for you. Yes, history i love brought the you helped me devise these show sheets, which i’ve, you know, tweets a little bit over the years. But you gave me the basic format years ago, eight years ago, to be exact labbate started twenty ten started this gig and that’s a lot of things. And your first show, it was july twenty third, two thousand ten, and that was that was shown over two. You were only a second. Showed you on the second show you believe? That’s great. I’m not upset that you weren’t on showed over one. Well, i i think i helped you sort of get show number one together, and so i feel definitely a part of show number one, and i’m honored to be i think we are number two. You are. You wouldn’t come on number one because that because show number one was called tony martignetti show. Yeah, we never called it that thing i made you change told me that name sucks. Yeah, well, i need you need to have non-profit people are googling like non-profits. Yeah. Tony martignetti non-profit radio show that’s it twenty martignetti probably reinardy morphed eight years later. So you were willing to come on with the title improved show number two s. So what do we talked? We talked about oh, storytelling in jargon zoho jargon. And we came up with a guard in jail. So i have to admit george in jail is claire miree dafs construct? Yes, jargon. Jail sametz somewhere to seo non-profit order, right? Like we need to raise money to build capacity. So we conserve more you? Yes, i was passing building in way. Want to help more young people? Yes, young people not use right. Alright. So jargon jail was your oh yeah. And so so since july twenty third, two thousand ten it’s amazing is your first show sheet right there. That’s eight years ago it was donald trump was not president, right? No wass obama obama was two thousand ten force obama. Alright, way. Don’t do politics. I’m not properly. Please, uh, unless i say so. All right. So, um, one of the xero we have a bunch of listener stories. Why don’t you? Don’t you read our first story on dh then that’s who? It’s by okay, there you go and, you know, we’re joyce is from i don’t know, okay, so so tony and i, when we were trying to think of what a good topic would be for this four hundred show, we came up with the idea that let’s find out why people started working and non-profits people don’t go to college and major non-profit so don’t lend up in non-profits way collected stories from our listeners and others about why people working non-profits so here is a story by joyce heavy, and she says the seed was planted in the nineteen seventies when i was in my twenties. I’m sixty nine now. I was in mogadishu, somalia, living on the upper floor of a hotel. It was evening almost dark, and i looked down into a dusty alley. I saw a young man walking and carrying a large caught almost a twin size bed on his head later in the lobby, i mentioned it to a friend, and she said, don’t you know, he was looking for a place to put his bed down for the night that planted a seed in my heart to seek opportunities to work, to help others. Have a better lives? I did my first americorps year with volunteer maryland in two thousand five at the age of fifty plus at partners and care of maryland, and they hired me as a grant writer. Now i have moved on till langton green and annapolis. I’m in annapolis all the time. They provide homes and support two adults with intellectual and developmental disabilities. It is truly a privileged to write grand proposals every day for support for this wonderful organization. And then joyce goes on to say thank you you for the good work you trust well, thank you, joy you, joyce. Thank you. Coffee sometime in annapolis? Yeah, i love annapolis. Thank you for sharing. Thank you for sharing your story, joyce. Two of our stories today, we’re going to win prizes from cure coffee. Teachers are show are always our anniversary show sponsored, always grateful toe cure a coffee. And you know, when i introduced you, i neglected to say the pg agency dot com and claire says claire says seeley i r e z fancy cc you find around a pg agency, dot com or the land giving agency llc but pg agency dot com is our website no, the just pg agency websites just peachy jutze okay, thank you. We got a little more time. According to my little schedule here. So why don’t we read another story? I was that’s what i was going to say. How about i do want you read one, please. This is, uh, kate cover line. She put it on the website. It was the employee culture that first got me involved with non-profit work non-profit office atmosphere is typically one of collaboration, creativity and scrappiness. Read adaptability here, a junior achievement of greater washington. We’re a close knit bunch, often working on many large projects across multiple departments development, education and operations as a young professional wanting to learn as much as i possibly could. The non-profit environment was a perfect match for me. I find myself wearing multiple hats on a daily basis, and i wouldn’t have it any other way. Awesome. Thank you. Keep cover line. And she’s in d c she was in dc. We got dc. We got annapolis. Thanks, kate. Great story. Thank you. Starting to see a theme of help, you know, helping others. Not surprising. Right? All right. And doing. Something for the common good, not just two. You know, the world is bigger than making profits for a big corporation than all of us. Yeah. Scott. Scott stein, yes, i should like a little music. All right, so your your music directing this show, first of all, i am not you okay. Any any recording coming up is that? Is that a bad? Is that a tough question? Asked a nen dependent position. No, it’s, a totally fair question. I’m just a little bit of a lull in terms of recording right now, so i’m just spending my time. I’m working on all right development timed other projects, including this, this off broadway show, i conduct four different chorus is here in new york city on de so those air that’s taken a lot of my effort right now, but i’m still playing, and i’m still writing, and hopefully, soon hopefully getting back in the studio. Ilsen okay, okay, awesome. Cheap red wine. That is our theme song. So i brought along the timeline. This claire’s clothes timelines are ubiquitous for this show. Chief red wine first debuted on non-profit radio on september sixth. Twenty thirteen. It was we were into scott and i were introduced by a mutual friend. A lawyer friend? Yeah, yeah. My friend josh becker. Yeah, she was my roommate. Okay, where was he? Where? Here. On the upper west side. Okay. Josh becker introduced us. I loved cheap red wine. I told scottie what i was looking for. He suggested this song. I listened to it and it was magic. And so, september six. Twenty thirteen i was the first time he was on that. That cheap red wine was played. And it’s been our theme song. Everything. So what did you have for music? Before that we stole something from beauty and the neo-sage treyz. I tried to find josh becker. The crack attorney tried to find who license who owns it. The light from its very hard. A lot of songs are like nobody will know it’s not us, it’s, not us. It was an old song free fried green tomatoes way could not find i did, we did. Dilgence i hired attorney, try to find the right find who that license it from. We could not, so we just kept stealing, and then the first time scott was on the show was our two hundredth show, which was july eighteenth, twenty fourteen. First time you were on with two hundred remember. Well, it’s got a plea. Would you please play this song that i love? I love this. I love this, thank you damn song. Alright, red wine is not going well with that kind introduction. Baby, just keep him talking. Sooner or later, i think around. Just so watch me. You see romantic advice from a bill. But i’m looking for answers on a tv screen. Wait till our ups from my down, just a bit game. And this love that we found. You know, you used to find charming, but it can be here on how you see. It was handsome, but doesn’t matter now. So give for land for my eyes along your time, allow because i’ve got her any promises, but i’ll let you read on. And now, no way living diamonds, and they won’t come back. In-kind clothe good stuff, and you’re too easily distracted to care. Wait, i got to minute options, so i’m gonna do the best that i can. You have some competition day when i’m wealthy, man. You know, you used to find it charming that i can’t figure out how you see your photos, hands, but it doesn’t now, so get for a long time, because i’ve got a big promises, but she brit who i am now wearing glasses, take your dream labbate days, the people can kiss my little black things. We see way, because the heavens no fast, all victory signs, is perfect for you. No! Nobody is way. Hyre hyre yeah, you know, used to famine, charming, but i can’t figure out how you’re saying your boat was handsome. Never mind it. Don’t matter now, it’s. Okay for a long time, allow gotta remmy krauz osili buy-in hyre. What? Neo-sage hyre cheap red wine. Scott stein. Thanks. Very absolutely. He’s you’ll find him in scott’s, time music, dot com and also at scott stein music and he’s gonna play the song they don’t show me another. Another one coming from scotty. What? We got something on the phone again. You don’t do you there. How are you? Hello, you. How are you? Good. Good. Very good. I’m calling today’s a thank you for your dedication to educating non-profit i think it’s really impressive to keep this going for eight years. I’m not keeping any burial show doesn’t show that face a little dedication. I know you were really hired. Thank you. Happy. Thank you. Thank you. I thank you very much. Really. Uh, for genuine. Thank you. I thank you because you’re a partner at weather cps. And when you see piela is one of our sponsors. So i’m grateful to you and wagner that you’re helping us keep this show going for the benefit of small and midsize non-profit so thank you very much. You guys are really happy to support your wonderful show. I think like our passion ofthe non-profits matches your passion so he really feel that they’re really good. And geever with connor’s off non-profits that are equal in the other ninety five percent dilgence in twenty different states. So and they really all that hate, all the education they get. So thank you. All right. And you’ve been a guest, and we’ll have you back when there are accounting topics to discuss in the meantime. Okay? Absolutely. Yes, but again. So thank you. And thanks for calling me and thanks. Really? Thanks for your kind words. Thank you so much. Thank you. You duitz tune there at wagner cpas. Dot com. We got time for some stories. We got jean online alert that’s so let’s. Jump to jean jump. Jean jean takagi latto keep this going. Jean takagi, how are you? Hey, and in great tony. Congratulations on four hundred. Oh, my god. Thank you, jean. Thank you for being our such a regular contributor. Legal are legal contributor. This is jean takagi principle of non-profit exempt organizations law group in san francisco and it’s. The wildly popular non-profit law blogged dot com which you need to subscribe to he’s at g tak and jean i brought along your very first your very first appearance. I brought the show sheet for your very first appearance on non-profit radio. That was show number seven. That was august twenty seventh, two thousand ten that’s. Awesome. And we talked about governance. I think right board security or something? Yes, techniques to keep your board on, i might might voice just crackling on a fourteen year old techniques technics to keep your board on board and out of trouble. That was our first topic together. Yeah. That’s. Awesome. Eight, eight years kind. Alright, i recall that you met emily and i done here. We had a drink. That’s, right? That was when emily chan was with you, but so that you know, you’re our longest running contributor, jean. I’m so grateful to you. Thank you so much. Every month you’re thinking of topics developing them coming on the show and and sharing your expertise. Your wisdom. Thank you so much for that. Well, thank you, tiny. Now let go ye and say thank you for for helping that the other ninety five percent of non-profits that oftentimes get overlooked on educational shows. Another thing so thank you. Absolutely that’s our that’s, our core, the other ninety five percent of smaller. Midsize. So all right, jean, i want to thank you so much for calling. Thanks for being a part of our four hundred show and the show on the show month after month. Thank you. Congrats, honey. Thank you, jean. Um, so, let’s read some stories again now. Okay? Let’s. See what you got? Maybe a little background music for like, that was a short one from from daniela’s maori. Danielle mauer. Now, she was one of our listeners that we have a week this week. Yes, i think i know her. Hi, daniel. So danielle says i’ve always enjoyed working with non-profits from as a penn state student government to helping start new york cares day to working for international dyslexia association to amazing brooklyn book festival. You always feel better when supporting a non-profit volunteer staff donorsearch just do it. Just do it. Thanks, danielle. Just do it. Just work with non-profits help people. I’ve heard that somewhere before. Just gets to do something for me and tell me that that’s daniel’s? Yes. Okay, it’s. Not even a nike stolen from daniel. I know that. Some of what little i know about sports. I have t shirts and gave me it’s, a guy swinging a baseball bat, says touchdown, that’s, hard that’s, my sports, that’s, my sports repertoire. So i’m not even gonna ask you, mr yankees nick’s, because you’re in new york, this like may, when the knicks and the bucks on the hawk see you’re from new jersey, so you’re probably like a yankees fan. Your parents rocks the hawks, the jets, they all get together for the next hour past of those for the super series. What year? Tony what’s. Here we have a super siri’s, super serious. All right, i got one, i got one. This ah, karen graham she’s, the executive director of idealware she’s, been a guest. Idealware is a very good, very good non-profit helps organization’s used technology and mates, rates all kinds of different software. That’s, great before non-profits they should be on the show. Yes, it really is. Karen graham summer before i graduated college, i worked at a summer camp run by united cerebral palsy that was my first non-profit job camp sandy wheels, everyone helped out with the chores according to their abilities. One of the campers was a preteen boy who had limited control over his arm muscles, resulting in some erotic spastic movements. So maybe you can imagine what happened when it was his turn to help wash the dishes after dinner. I don’t think he’d ever washed dishes before he was having the time of his life, splashing soap and water all over the room and grinning from ear to year, delighted to be doing his part. That was heartwarming, but that’s not why i got into non-profit work what inspired me to a career in non-profits was his parents a t end of the week, they told me how grateful they were that he got to have this experience while they enjoyed a week of respite, hearing that help me to understand how our work at the camp was making a difference for families all year round. She’s no longer on the front in the front lines of helping people but she’s still got to be a part of the profession that is itself enriching people’s lives. Big, big support idealware can ground that’s great. Thank you so much. Thank you, thank you. All right, i’ve got a story it’s from diana in virginia. So diana says that after working a variety of jobs from commercial fishing worked up in alaska and like a salmon place to investment banking and private jet sails, she worked in a private jet sails. She said she wanted to be part of something that contributed to more than simply enriching already wealthy members of society, so she wanted to do something better. So she took the first non-profit job that caught her eye answering phones at an in house member call center for national wildlife group. Once she got her foot in the door, her previous experience and skills helped her naturally progress to development work by chatting with donors and fielding tough questions from their diverse constituency. She really learned what motivates different types of donors to give and participate or not, and why? So? She says, though her job responsibilities ended up including large direct mail campaigns in mass marketing, everything she learned from working with donors on that front line, answering those phone calls confirmed what she already knew. No amount of aggregated data can substitute for personal interaction with the donor. A quick, friendly thank you call can establish your strength of a relationship is easily as a crappy postcard can end one. So picking up the phone, chatting with a donor, you’ll learn so much more about why they give and why other donors like that give them just like senate. Crappy direct mail was buy-in dahna thank you, doctor. Thank you. All right, we need to take a break. Weinger cps, it’s personal now huge to you just heard him talk. That was him. You could talk to him yourself. Find out how the firm can help you with your accountant. He’s a partner. He knows all the stuff. He knows. All this accounting stuff non-profits in and out. You heard him say twenty, twenty states. They’re representing hundreds of non-profits twenty states. Check out the firm at regular cps dot com. Then you pick up the phone and talk to him. It’s easy. No pressure. You know the guy now? Pregnancy piela dot com now, time for take two. It’s alive listen right piela l l p p a i got to do the live listen love well p p a l i double r empty, eh? It’s going out live listen loves going out. Tio rockford, illinois. Portland, oregon. I love portland, new york, new york. Multiple, always multiple new york, new york lovett. A story in new york that my parents are from a story. Yeah, they grew up in a story. My love’s down to ah story as well as manhattan, tampa, florida edison, new jersey. Lovett, um open california adah latto california. Welcome, atalanta sounds like rapido latto latto ilsen loved all those. We got to go abroad. How about, uh oh, eight million nixon missouri. Sam spelled missouri. Mos es that’s what i thought was mexico. No. Nixon, nixon, nixon, missouri. Like live love out to you, germany. We can’t see your town, but i know to say guten tag germany’s with us and one john ville john ville, brazil open it! God! Oh, my god! Oh, to brazil, large of portuguese. Thank you. On the heels of the live listen, world has become the podcast pleasantries because we got a tank that’s the bulk of the audience that’s the thirteen thousand people listening podcast pleasantry so pleasantries out to you. Thank you so much for being a part of our four hundred show for sending stories. Thank you for supporting the show. What can i say? Pleasant trees to the podcast listeners and the affiliate affections go out to our am and fm listeners throughout the country. It’s got to have a little background just for the am and fm affiliate as i send affiliate affections. Here’s a little music because i don’t want over them to get lost because i had them. I thank them last. I don’t want them to feel it’s, you know losers last or something like that. Actually, they’re they’re like radio. That was first terrestrial regular. Exactly radio this is the video from the twenties, twenties teamviewer. That means my own age. Nineteen teens i work in radio in the stone age you were a technology that long island g b b the pulse of long island. And you were in a washington station too. I was the wto’s news radio fifteen hundred. So the am and fm was going nowhere on what happened with digital media. Minister. Mazarene next-gen radio. So the right kayman perfections to our am and fm listeners throughout the country. Thank you to your stations for so much for hosting non-profit radio. I’m gonna read you more stories. Yes. Your ship back-up music, scott. I’m really grateful. Thank you. It’s. Got in a frame. It’s got there? Yes, there. His head. Okay, we’re on facebook live. I ended with non-profits very organically because the needs of our special needs son were so great. I didn’t rejoin the workforce after his birth. Yet being a little gregarious, i found opportunities to volunteer and sat on two boards of directors as well as volunteering with girl scouts. One of the board president said to us, we’ve had a shortfall, so we’re asking everyone to raise one hundred dollars. That was twenty years ago. So one hundred dollars. Twenty years ago, i decided to email ten friends latto asked for ten dollars each. I had four responses totaling two hundred forty dollars. I knew then that this could be fun. The rest of this say, is history that’s? Interesting? I love they. So they emailed ten friends and asked ten french for how much apiece white-collar so that’s a hundred which really was looking for donors gave and two forty? Yes, exactly. On average of sixty bucks each write some for. Yeah. So i’m gonna know that’s that’s from tricia magic baker treyz imagine baker, i’m nominated for prize. You’re pounding your plastic that’s pretty good. Would you care? Uh, claire, would you mind reading for for patricia? Exactly. Whatthe cura mission is mission is in blue there for us. We have such a pretty voice. Thank you, tony. Cure a coffee directly connects coffee lovers with farmers and families who harvest the finest organic coffee dance with every cup of cure, you join our effort to expand sustainable dental care to remote communities around the world. Way ara direct trade coffee company with direct impact brought directly to you creating organic smiles beyond the cup. Cura coffee dot com cura coffee dot com don’t you talk? Pretty that’s. Beautiful coffee, dot com that’s beautiful. And you know the ceo of your coffee is a dentist. That’s? Why? They do throw in dental care dental care for their for their independent being farmers yeah, i love that cause that’s near and dear to his heart and that’s a you know, authentic. You know charity for him to set up that’s. That’s that’s him he’s, the coffee guy. All right, so just, um, matty magic baker. You’re gonna get a prize. You’re going to get a pound of cure. It will be sent to you. Just get your address later on. Let’s. See where? Uh, where we are now. Amy, we got any simple ward on the phone. Yes, it is an amy and amy. Amy, several ward. How are you? I’m doing great. Other than spending a couple seconds reflecting on the fact that it’s the four hundred show and i was on on the one hundred show and calculating how many years that went by other than that, i’m doing great. Okay, well, you are doing great. You’ve been great for six years. That’s out. That’s the calculation you came up with, of course. There’s. Any sample ward? Our social media contributor. Ceo of entender non-profit technology network at inten dot organ. Of course, amy, is that amy r s ward? The artist for rene? Any simple word. So? So i have your first show sheet here. You were on? Yeah, you were on the first time you were on. Was indeed the one hundred show. Exactly. That was july thirteenth. Twenty twelve. And where had you on for the full hour? It was an all social man show that show. Yes. One hundred show jamie sample. And i’m so grateful. Amy, you know, we have such good conversations. You spend so much time, you know, curating topics for the show, we talk about it in advance, and then you come on and, you know, like, wherever you are, you’re so giving, you know you’ve called from hallways you’ve called from home when little lauren lewis was sick. You’ve called from home, you know, of course, the inten office. And i’m very, very grateful to you for all these six years of being r social media contributor. Thank you so much. Oh, thank you. It’s. Certainly been fun. I do, though, miss. Uh, you know, when i first started about one hundredth episode but the episodes after that when i was living in new york and we got to do the show in the studio together. That was fun. I i enjoy getting to call in from anywhere and make the same kind of show happen, but it was definitely fun getting to call in from the studio together. Yeah. Yeah, that was there was one. You you were running. You were out of breath. Remember that one? Yes, because i would it’s live. I don’t usually late, but if new york and you don’t get to control the subway. So i was feeling very, very late. That was okay. Yeah, we know you were on your way. We of course you could. You couldn’t call because you were in the subway. Actually, i knew you were on your way. And, you know, i kept everybody occupied. Oh, well, you stalled out there. Yeah. Yeah, of course. Of course. But so grateful. I mean, back then that when you started back then you were just you were the membership director of that. I i shouldn’t say just because there’s a membership director now, then ten. Of course, you were the membership director of inten and then, uh, quickly promoted to ceo. And thanks for being on non-profit radio high was fired-up ceo it’s a credential? It’s a credential? No question about it. Absolutely. So thank you for all these years, you know, thank you for having me on and six year i’m raising my pen. What i happen to have in my hand, here’s to many more years. Thank you. Okay. And we’ll see you with, uh, we’ll see you in portland. A toe non-profit technology conference. Twenty nineteen? Yes. Wait. All right. Thank you again. And simple. Ward. Thank you, everybody. Bye. Scott. Yes, but you do a second song for us, ok, tell us about it. Sure, i’m going to do a song from my most recent album, the records called traveling companion, and this song is called the goodbye road to baltimore, and if you check out the recording studio recording of it, you’ll actually hear my wife sing ing on it as well. She sings the back-up for so little fun. Fact. Okay, andi, the name again, it’s called the goodbye road to baltimore. He was supposed to be good bye to the road of baltimore, but i was really tired of the time, and i wrote it down wrong. And then i decided that was better than what i had in mind. So it stuck. So here we go. Wait, sunrise on ninety five, four thousand seven times on each day, wass the day that you’d come out on time, but the gas lads on and you got a stone on the good bye, rhoda ball. More driving south through the move. A lot of use turn shore. If the winds at back in law always be perfect in awhile and care sand free, no way riza come to blows me on signs. Making friends with white daughter lives takes a laura hero to make it this far. Sometimes you’re not sure which one you want on the good bye road ball, more driving south through them, a lot of the eastern shore, and if the winds at you back, it will always be perfect in a wild and careless and free. How do you know? Oh, your new with five is in more than the distance to the mirror. Life, you’ve been offgrid soul. Is it just tio hyre get back, all right, dahna son runs on ninety five, or whatever makes you feel alive, maybe tomorrow’s the day break through and, if not someone’s, waiting for you on the good bye road ball. More driving south through them, a lot of the eastern shore. But if the winds at you back a long way, wild and careless, perfect, wild and careless, perfect in a wild care, less and free way. Dahna absolutely perfect and wild and careless and perfect and wild and careless, careless and free at some point in that song i close my eyes and i thought, who does he sound like? Enough? James taylor that’s me altum they will happily take that. Thank you. Agree? Yeah. He’s. Amazing. He’s. Amazing. Schnoll yeah. That’s says my wife amy’s here. She also says billy joel oh, and there’s. Someone in the background, there’s a there’s, an intern there’s, a studio in turn up to the mike nobody, nobody is an anonymous on non-profit radio. Just tell us who you are. Studio in turn reminded. Remind me, please. Hi, my name’s, darryl. Hi, my name’s. Darryl beaker, can you see me up? There we go. Yes, your intern. Right. You have the studio. Thanks for being here. All right, no problem. Thanks for having me. Pleasure. You’re in the background there on facebook and we can’t have that, you know, just like who’s. That guy back there. Okay. I think we got some time for more stories. Okay, reasonscall little hasn’t touched fixing the facebook frame there. Okay, um, yeah, we got first. We’ll take a break, though. Actually. Tellers. I have a new company. Tell us moughniyah lll quote tell us, provided us with great customer service throughout the initial process and that same top notch service has been provided through our working relationship. Additionally, tell us was able to offer us the best pricing and to top it all donates fifty percent of the processing fees to the charity of our choice. There is no doubt that teller is one of the best companies to partner with the credit card processing and quote you, khun b that charity of choice that’s the whole point. Watch the video at tony dahna slash tony tell us now clear my ralph, we got time for some more stories. I’m going to read one. Okay, can i think i think they could jump. Okay. This is from let singleton she’s been she’s been a fan of the show for a long time. Then she she was on hiatus for a while. But national back then that singleton thanks to the Job training partnership act of 19 eighty two summer after i turned sixteen, my very first job was administrative clerk at a crisis center as a disadvantage you, it was eye opening, life altering experience. Since then, i’ve spent my entire adult life protecting and supporting people’s dreams, volunteering and working to improve the lives of others. I’ve been fortunate to leverage that passion to build a well rounded career in non-profit and small business operations, and i now serve as the vice president of operations to support the partnership for southern equities mission to promote racial and economic equity in atlanta and the american south. And then she says, tony, congratulations on your eighth anniversary of four hundred show, thanks for all you do to strengthen the other ninety five percent. Well, thank you and thank you for sharing your story. Thanks for being so loyal to non-profit radio i’m glad you’re back got your back. Would you, uh would you be kind enough to read one clear my love to read one. Okay, there you go. This is from joanne telser. Freyre literacy chicago. I have lived and worked in france, egypt, pakistan and guitar where i learned many of the skills i need today, i started out simply teaching english and ended up becoming academic director in a french language school training sl teachers. I also spent nine years as a journalist on q b, s radio q tv television and for the newspaper, the peninsula and guitar, where i learned about how to communicate clearly and effectively so very important. Everything i’ve done in my professional life has led me to what i do today. Reading has always been a passion, and i’m thrilled to help other people enjoy the written word and that’s joanne from literacy chicago. Thank you so much for your lovely story. Thank you, joined she’s, a program manager, i believe literacy chicago. Yes, thanks, joanne, she emailed me. She mailed me that two days ago. Wei had, of course, we just add any sample ward on on ten ceo here’s, somebody who works for and ten she’s there, i think, finance, so she says it. Okay, patty carlin carlin from n ten. After working in mental health research, hearing the experiences of the participants compelled me to do something to help them. I became director of a peer support organization and it’s been non-profit ever since as the finance director for in ten, i’m living the non-profit dream, patty carlin, nice story, there’s. Uh, like if she was on, i would like to probe a little more hearing the experiences of the participants. You know what? What what was it about? What were they doing? What was she seeing that that compelled her would go a little. I’d like to probe battle it more, you know? I mean, this is a real story. This is fun, cholera there on here. I’m gonna nominate this one for a prize, would you? Would you read? You read this one from mildred devo, devo, founding director of pen parenthesis i have always been an artist first a singer than an actor than fiction writer, i started a reading siri’s to disprove the stereotype that people give up creative careers when they have kids. It was a smash we were booking authors a year in advance who wanted to read read for us to shatter the stereotype, people told us it changed their lives. A lawyer in new york city started attending the salons she heard of these writer lee stories and was moved. She offered to sponsor us to her firm to give us counsel probono to become a non-profit accepting her generosity was the first step to creating pen parenthesis. Five oh one c three devoted to helping writer stay on creative track after starting a family. We’re going on ten years that you know, that’s, a very specific mission, but really cool, she goes on to say, i’d say starting a non-profit was a win all around my work, encouraging other parents to maintain focus on their creative careers inspires me. To keep on creative track. That’s, mildew, devo. Founding director at penn parental. All right, mildred. You’re gonna get a pound of cure coffee sent to you. And she started her own non-profit i mean, that’s, that’s, that’s! Not that easy and regular non-profit yeah, yeah, and around writing. You admire that? Totally like communication arts short. Would you be good enough, teo? Read for us again? What? What? What? The mission of kira coffee is to remind mildred milled a building that she’s going to get well. Mildew. You want some coffee and it’s provided by kira coffee directly connecting coffee lovers with farmers and families who harvest the finest organic coffee beans. With every cup of cura, you join our effort to expand sustainable dental care to remote communities around the world. We are a direct trade company with direct impact brought directly to you, creating organic smiles beyond the cup. Cura coffee, dot com that’s cura coffee, dotcom. Thank you. Thank you. I love that cure. Coffee mission that’s. Awesome. That is also, um we, uh, hold that. One more story we got. We got maria simple on the phone. She’s? Uh, yes, maria simple. That she’s. Here. Yes. Hello, maria. Simple. How are you? I’m doing well. How are you, she’s? Our prospect research contributor, of course. Are the rounds out? Rounds out our our triumvirate of of contributors. She’s, the prospect finder. You’ll find her at the prospect finder dot com and at the prospekt finder and maria, you, uh, write your show. She’d along first time you were on our twelfth show. Twelfth show. Here he goes. Our first one was your first one was october first, two thousand ten way had just started in july of two thousand ten. Thank you, maria non-technical. I’m thrilled that you asked me for for participation in that first show and and all the subsequent shows as well. Yes, i am too. I’m grateful to you. You know, you spend so much time thinking about topics emailing, you know, we go back and forth. Then you come on the show, you share your experience and wisdom in prospect research, you know, for the benefit of our listeners and small and midsize shops. And i’m very grateful to you. Very grateful all these years. Thank you so much. Oh, you’re very welcome. And congratulations to you and the entire team that, uh, has really, as one of your other listeners said, really participated. And every week, coming up with a terrific content for the other ninety five percent that’s what we’re about. Thank you. Now we just read milton devos. Story and milled is goingto win the coffee from cura coffee. She e mailed me something. Quote, any show with maria? Simple is a show worth listening to forever. How about that? How about that? That’s, a testimonial? Who put that on your web site, maria. Thank you. You know that building devo that’s? Amazing. Congratulations for that man. Awesome. She’s using to you. Well, all right, all right. So i know you’re gonna be on. You’re gonna be out in a couple weeks. Going pre recording next week, maria simple. But, you know, until then and after then one. Thank you so much for all your contributions to non-profit radio over. You know, eight years. Really remarkable. Thank you so much. Thank you. And a shout out to all of you in the studio today. Great show. Thanks, brandon. Thank you. Thanks, maria. We’ll talk soon. Okay. Um, here’s sam will let me know if anybody else. Way chat. Good job, chad, chad. Okay, i was chadband is on, and we have a major announcement to make a major announcement for the four hundred show. Like we have a new sponsor, and it is chadband boyd’s company. Chadband welcome to non-profit radio. Hey, thanks, tony. Glad to be here and, like everybody else, congrats on the four hundred show that a huge milestone provoc a podcast before and to do four hundred shows. We’ve got to leave that. Thank you, man. Thank you, and welcome to the non-profit radio family. You’re you’re ceo of text to give dot ceo and a new new sponsor going to starting next week. Sponsorship that’s, right, that’s, right, we’re started, yeah, glad. Glad to be a sponsor, because you’re you’re doing mobile, giving for small and midsize non-profits and, uh, that’s, our core that’s that’s, who we produce the show for week after week. So listeners going to hearing from you and from for me, you know, promoting onboarding text to give that ceo and for now, and this is going to be continuing if if you text npr that’s november, papa romeo in alphabet, in military talk, you talk hoexter npr tio four, four, four, nine, nine, nine. Then you’re gonna get more info on text to give and there’s a special offer for listeners. Is that right, exactly right, you gotta correct, okay, all right, we’re doing so good, we’re doing good so far, okay, i got the got the first yet the first announcement done. The first announcement, correct, all right, chad. Oppcoll you want to say a little bit about text to give that ceo? Yeah, yeah. So, um, we are a mobile first donation platform, the text enabled. So, you know, you text them to make your donation, and our thing we’re trying to do is break down the barriers e-giving to make you know it really easy for donor to give to small and non-profits out there. So perfect for your target audience. Okay? And as i said, listeners will be hearing about it. Week after week will be, we’ll be shutting you out. And, uh, and again, chad, i thank you so much for sponsoring non-profit. Is there some, like triumphant music? Kottler is good. Yes, something triumphant for a brand new sponsor wave. That’s the fanfare. Thank you, scott. Now now, yeah, eleven. Thank you again. So much. Thanks for being thank you and welcome. Welcome to the show as glad to be here. Thanks, tony. All right, chance along. Wei have one more story i got get time for. Okay. It’s from jeff. Jody, lighthouse counsel. My parents set the example of being involved in the community. So this is the parents e-giving volunteering and leading in college, i was part of my first campaign raising funds to restore the historic home of a debate society. I began to volunteer at the colleges advancement office. I moved up while working in a major medical center. My boss volunteermatch volunteered me to be chair of ah, march of dimes chapter. So i went from being a very young board chair to becoming a very young ceo for most of georgia, either working in the arena on loving it ever since. Jeff jody from white house counsel neo-sage podcasting with beacon podcast. We gotta wrap it up. Okay. I want to thank. I want to thank scott stein. That scottie. Thank you so much. Hey, thank you for having me and getting congratulations on four hundred. My pleasure. Thank you. And you you fill the room with an energy playing. Really? They love it. Glad to do it. Claire miree off our creative producer. Thank you so much for tony was great to be here on the four hundred show. I can’t wait to be on the fourteen hundred forty. Thank you so much. Thank you. Twenty ninety eight. Oh, my god! What? And also thanks tio teles shanklin huge tomb chadband void jeanne takagi, amy sample ward marie a simple thank you all for being with us were supported by pursuant online tools for small and midsize non-profits data driven end technology enabled tony dahna slash pursuing by legacy piela is guiding you beyond the numbers. Weinger cps dot com bye tellers credit card payment processing to pass of revenue stream tony dahna slash tony tello’s on by text to give text npr for for for nine, nine, nine for info. If you missed any part of today’s show it’s your life, i watched it clear myer off sam lee woods is the line producer show social media’s by susan chavez thiss music is by scott stein on mark silverman is our web wiz a special shout out to mark silverman he’s working for me for ten years on, i’ve never shattered him out on the show with the closing credits. I don’t know why it’s terrible, i know alistair, you federally never i’m doing it now i’m doing it now! He’s our web is mark silverman, so remark dahna mom, you with me next week for non-profit medio big non-profit ideas for the other ninety five percent. Go out on be great. Great. You’re listening to the talking alternative network. E-giving nothing. Good, you are listening to the talking alternative net. Are you stuck in a rut? Negative thoughts, feelings and conversations got you down. Hi, i’m nor in center of attention. Tune in every tuesday at nine to ten p m eastern time and listen for new ideas on my show. Beyond potential live life your way on talk radio dot n y c buy-in. Hey, all you crazy listeners looking to boost your business, why not advertise on talking alternative with very reasonable rates? Interested simply email at info at talking alternative dot com. Fired-up comics, movies and pop culture at large. What about music and tv? Then you’re in for a treat. This is michael dulled, your host on talking alternative dot com. I’ve been professionally writing comic books, screenplays and music articles from fifteen years. Catch my show secrets of the sire at its new prime time slot. Wednesdays, eight p m eastern time, and get the inside scoop on the pop culture universe you love to talk about. For more info, go to secrets of the sire dot com. You’re listening to talking alternative network at www dot talking alternative dot com, now broadcasting twenty four hours a day. Are you a conscious co creator? Are you on a quest to raise your vibration and your consciousness? Sam liebowitz, your conscious consultant, and on my show, that conscious consultant, our awakening humanity. We will touch upon all these topics and more. Listen, live at our new time on thursdays at twelve noon eastern time. That’s, the conscious consultant, our awakening humanity, thursday’s twelve, noon on talk radio. Dot latto. You’re listening to the talking alternative network.