Tag Archives: team care

Nonprofit Radio for April 19, 2021: Team Care

My Guest:

Susan Comfort: Team Care

Susan Comfort wants you to go beyond self care, which gets a lot of attention, to team care. Yes, take care of yourself, but then look after your team. She’s founder of Nonprofit Wellness, and part of our 21NTC coverage. This week’s show is shorter than usual, so you can spend more time taking care of self and team.

 

 

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[00:00:02.84] spk_2:
Hello and welcome to tony-martignetti non profit radio big non profit

[00:01:37.84] spk_1:
Ideas for the other 95%. I’m your aptly named host of your favorite abdominal podcast. Oh, I’m glad you’re with me, I’d suffer the effects of dengue fever if you bit me with the idea that you missed this week’s show, Team Care. Susan comfort wants you to go beyond self care, which gets a lot of attention to Team care. Yes, take care of yourself, but then look after your team. She’s founder of nonprofit wellness and part of our 21 NTC coverage this week’s show is deliberately shorter than usual so you can spend more time taking care of self and team tony take two Go take care were sponsored by turn to communications pr and content for nonprofits. Your story is their mission turn hyphen two dot c o here is Team Care. Welcome to tony-martignetti non profit radio coverage of 21 ntc. Do you know what it is? It’s the 2021 nonprofit technology conference where we are sponsored by turn to communications turn hyphen two dot c o with me now is Susan comfort founder of nonprofit wellness. Susan Welcome back to nonprofit radio

[00:01:39.87] spk_0:
Thanks Great to be here.

[00:01:49.24] spk_1:
It was roughly a year ago. Last april when 2020 20 NTC was not in person. And we talked with mo abdullah about coronavirus and Team care.

[00:01:54.34] spk_0:
Indeed. And here we are a year later and we’re facing the same issues except worse.

[00:02:00.64] spk_1:
Yes, because it’s multiplied by because we’ve been in this for over a year.

[00:02:05.89] spk_0:
Exactly.

[00:02:15.14] spk_1:
Okay. And so your topic is very, very similar. Team care, not self care building. Resiliency in an era of burnout should be resilience. Should have been resilience, not resiliency

[00:02:20.94] spk_0:
building resilience building resiliency. I think they both work.

[00:02:39.64] spk_1:
You do All right. I think one works better the other. All right after I’m not I’m not strictly a grammarian. I’m only a curmudgeon. I’m not a grammarian or uh Entomology. I’m not an entomologist. I’m just curmudgeonly. Got it. Some reason I see. Billion resilience. Alright?

[00:02:42.58] spk_0:
Hey, as long as you build it, I don’t care what she calls.

[00:02:52.64] spk_1:
We’ll get we’ll be resilient. We’ll be resilient. Alright? So yeah, we need to keep taking care of ourselves and our teams through this and and beyond right beyond the pandemic. We’ve still got to be thinking about team care.

[00:02:57.54] spk_0:
Well, let me ask you, this was a self care. Mean to you. tony

[00:04:03.04] spk_1:
I can give examples. Is that what you is that what you mean? Like? It means uh Not so occasional daytime naps. It means um glass of wine. Maybe, no, not every night, but several nights a week. Glass of wine after work. It means ending work at a decent time. Even though, Well even before the pandemic, my home has always been in my office has been my home for about 15 years, maybe 20 years. So, uh but you know, so I don’t have trouble closing the door. So there’s that boundaries around time, in terms in in other words, um there’s some examples walk on the beach. I live across the street from the beach and the ocean. So walks on the beach. Love it. Some examples. And why do I think it’s important because I can’t I can’t be good to other people if I’m not good to myself 1st. And I I take that to heart and I think I take good guy. I mean, I exercise, I eat right, I’m cautious about too much meat and processed foods and think, you know, so there’s a lot, there’s a lot that goes into it for me

[00:04:37.44] spk_0:
for sure. And we all have the same human body. And so we’re feeding it were resting it, we’re hydrating it and we’re moving it. Those are physical kind of self care impetus is right, that you just gave some great examples of, and we know that were in charge of self care, right? There’s nobody else in charge of our body. And we’re told that were in charge of self care. Hey, don’t forget to self care, take time for self care, set your boundaries. Well, guess what? In the nonprofit world and in the education world where we’re increasingly working, people aren’t so great at self care naturally on their own. You remind me of self care, but that doesn’t mean I’m going to do it or do it well.

[00:05:09.54] spk_1:
And particularly we’re working in our homes, it’s so easy to lose the boundaries between work and personal. That’s where you’re not allowed in. You’re not allowed in after six PM or what, you know. But, but if you’re not accustomed to that, you got thrown into it in an instant, there was no, there was no teachings going on in, in, in february and early March about how to do this. You got, you got slammed with it.

[00:07:07.44] spk_0:
And at first we saw it maybe as a benefit like, hey, no commute. But then we thought, ah, that commute was the one hour a day I had to myself or to listen to the radio or to listen to my book or to detach and create that boundary from work to home. Now you’ve been working from home for a while, you’ve kind of gotten practice at this, but you’re right, everyone else is kind of new to it. Not so good at it and being told in a time of unprecedented stress and pandemic. Hey, don’t forget about self care when you know what, we probably weren’t good at it to begin with. And so that’s why, well, that’s one reason why we focus on team care, because we’re just not good at self care. And the second reason is especially in a world where we’re serving others, were educating others, were giving to others in the nonprofit world. We are usually, but it’s also because we’re in this unprecedented time, self care won’t cut it. Going back to the regular, old normal we used to have isn’t going to work, it wasn’t working then we weren’t caring for ourselves particularly well then. And it’s not getting any better with bad solutions on a new framework. So we have to take this new framework, a pandemic informed world and say, well, how are we going to do things differently next time when we return to the office is what’s going to be different when we return to our teams, how we’re gonna manage differently? How are we going to work from home differently? How are we going to communicate differently? All of these things are opportunities to reset our culture? So we we coached teams, nonprofit schools, et cetera. How to take that world changing energy and reset your culture. So we’re actually turning our superpowers on each other, taking care of each other, which were really good at doing so that we can take care of ourselves better because having longevity in this career is crucial. Turnover is a silent epidemic facing the nonprofit and the education worlds. Some of its measured often it’s not. But if we don’t keep people in these jobs longer term, keep the relationships, keep the commitment, keep the knowledge, then we’re not going to do a very good job at educating Children are changing the world.

[00:07:27.94] spk_1:
All right. You have some resources for for us taking care of ourselves. You have a personal stress prescription and a stressor scorecard. Yeah. Can we, first of all, can listeners get these somewhere or is it something you create on your own? You don’t need a template?

[00:09:24.74] spk_0:
Well, both. You don’t need a template. We created it for you to use as a discussion tool or a self care tool, but you don’t need our form. What we did and you can download it at nonprofit wellness dot org slash resources. What we did was put together a list of about two dozen evidence based stress relief solutions. These are things that have been studied that are proven to both either lower your cortisol, the stress hormone that’s released when we’re stressed or to reset our bodily systems or to relax us. And there’s good and bad things on the list or quote good, quote bad, right? Like friendships you might think of as good, but some friendships are toxic right intoxication you might think of as bad, but actually you have a glass of wine some nights it’s good. You mentioned it as part of your self care, right? But for some people, it might be a challenge. Um, I stopped drinking three years ago. For me it was more of a challenge than a benefit. And so I cut it out because that was easiest, but everybody has to make their own decisions. Is it a glass of wine? Is it not at all? Is that? Hey, I need to go out for happy hour or more because I’m a little uptight. You get to make your decision on the personal stress prescription what works for you. And I guarantee there’s stuff on the list you’re already doing great, celebrate that. Do it more because that’s low barrier to entry if you’re already doing it. And then there’s stuff on that list that maybe you should pick up something new, something different, new world, new strategies and then there’s stuff on that list that you could really be doing with a team of doing with somebody else and that’s going to help you actually do it. Have more fun, go longer. And those are the things that we need in our wellness, right? When we actually do it, when we have fun and when we go longer and harder, right? That’s what having a buddy or having a team and accountability aspect to our care. That’s what it does for us. And the research shows it. So we need team care, not self care. I mean, not just self care. We need team care and self care, but we like to be a little bit polemic and say team care, not self care because we want to differentiate ourselves from everybody destroying self care. Don’t

[00:10:01.24] spk_1:
forget we need both. So these are at nonprofit wellness dot org slash resources. I did not uh now I’m bringing out my curmudgeon again that I did not, I didn’t I didn’t uh I didn’t miss that. You snuck in template. It’s template, it’s template. How do you get template? You know? And you? No, and there was born and raised in Maryland. I was in New Jersey, weren’t that far away, but it’s template. Nothing

[00:10:05.92] spk_0:
tony How do you spell curmudgeon?

[00:10:14.04] spk_1:
C U R M U D G E O N? Well, because I hustled you about resiliency being wrong

[00:10:16.98] spk_0:
if I want to talk real ball Mariza, I say with her and I say you can go down the ocean and you can walk on the beach all you want hon, but you don’t have to invite me or you can have your own self. You want me to do a Maryland accent the whole time, tony I’ll do it.

[00:10:32.14] spk_1:
It sounds annoying. Um, yeah,

[00:10:36.05] spk_0:
I worked at a crab house five summers. I’ve got the Baltimore accent down pat.

[00:10:40.24] spk_1:
You worked at a crab house.

[00:10:42.03] spk_0:
Indeed.

[00:10:42.69] spk_1:
A servant, servant?

[00:10:44.44] spk_0:
Yeah, yeah. Even after I was a vegetarian, I served recently killed uh steamed crabs right onto

[00:10:50.67] spk_1:
your table. This number. All right. So as a vegetarian, is it inappropriate for me to ask you what what what type of crab meat you believe is best for crab cakes? Is that the lump is the jumbo lump at the back?

[00:11:13.44] spk_0:
I’m a lacto ovo crab, a vegetarian. So I’m authorized to speak on this matter, of course. Back then you can put anything in a crab cake, but you want jumbo lump and very few breadcrumbs.

[00:11:15.15] spk_1:
Wait, you’re saying it’s back then and jumbo lump.

[00:11:19.14] spk_0:
Well, they’re the same thing. Jumbo lump is just the bigger chunks of back fin.

[00:11:27.34] spk_1:
Right, well, right, the lump or jumbo lump, you get a mixture. Okay, back then. And some lumps, usually in the top of the container, in the bottom of the container. If you

[00:11:32.56] spk_0:
say so, I pick my own crabs tony If you say, that’s what you get, that’s what you get. Just get the best crab meat you can buy in the biggest chunks you can. And if you’re like me, you can pick your own, make your own crab soup. Make your own crab cakes. Just not too much bread. Okay, It ruins the crab cake.

[00:11:55.84] spk_1:
Right? Not too much. I I agree. I just made a batch with very low gluten free plank. Oh, but It was £2 of crab meat and I think A third, I guess it was 2/3 of a cup I think of.

[00:11:59.79] spk_0:
We’re going to be imagining it’s Panko, not plank. Oh, tony

[00:12:04.20] spk_1:
Did I say plank? Oh, I say plank. Oh, I’m going to play this back. No. Did I say plank? Oh, that’s embarrassing. I know it’s Panko. It

[00:12:14.54] spk_0:
sounded like it. You can edit that part out.

[00:12:15.93] spk_1:
All right. I’m not going to edit it. No, no. I called you out twice template. I’m not gonna not gonna cheat and edit out. But that’s embarrassing. I know it’s Panko. Of course, it’s Panko. Thank you for correcting me. All right. It’s very important to know what kind of crab meat is best. Alright,

[00:12:32.97] spk_0:
Indeed.

[00:12:40.24] spk_1:
So, all right. So we take so we get these resources or we just develop our own pursuant Egyptian and stressor and a scorecard. A scorecard worked with the prescription is that they work together

[00:14:18.74] spk_0:
the scorecards under revision. So by the time your listeners here this, there might be a new one. We took the stressor. Scorecard, which was based on the ace Score card stands for adverse childhood experiences. And it’s actually measure of childhood trauma. It’s quite triggering, triggering. But we took the a scorecard and we said, well, what’s the measurement of adult stress? There wasn’t one. So, we made one and we kept revising it and we’ve gone undergone another revision. Or instead of just ranking your stressors. And these are societal stressors, not work stressors. So it might be identity related to who you are in society. It might be a circumstance related to what you’re facing right now in your life. So a circumstance could be like a divorce or a food allergy that causes you stress an identity, might be your gender, your race or your sexual orientation that may or may not given where you are in society, may or may not cause you stress. So if you know the score when you walk in the door, if you know your stress score from society, then technically we should know who gets the most wellness resources. That would be wellness equity. If we knew who got the most stress, then they would get the most wellness resources. But the way it is now is we give the corporate world wellness resources because it’s a $7 billion industry in the corporate workplace, but the nonprofit world and the education world don’t really get sort of wellness benefits or like extra help yet. I would say that we are probably among the most stressed in society. Not only do we face a lot of stressors because of who we are, what we face and our lower incomes. But also we have really stressful jobs that are that depend on us to literally change the world or change people’s minds and that is not the same as a bank job. Sorry. It’s just not. So we have more stress and we should get more resources than we do.

[00:14:39.34] spk_1:
We should get more resources than right. We definitely should. Yes. And at least as much as if you’re gonna write if you’re gonna do it equitably. At least as much as you see in the in the corporate side. I mean you know you have

[00:15:57.94] spk_0:
jobs I don’t want to the other people scorecard it didn’t go into though is is under revision is the strength the growth and the joy that we achieve from these identities and circumstances. So we actually put two scores on the new one where you can rank your stress but you can also rank your growth and joy. So for example I’m a woman and I identify as queer being a woman and a white woman at that in society has not caused me a lot of stress but I would say some maybe a low amount of stress being queer in society has not caused me very much stress. But when I look at both of those and I think of how much growth enjoy being a woman has brought me and how much growth enjoy being bisexual has brought me as a part of the queer community that’s off the charts. I rank much higher my growth and joy than I do my stress. And so in that way I go, hey, what a bonus that I have had this stress in my life. What an opportunity for growth and joy that this stressful thing brought me and that puts it in a whole new frame for me I think. Yeah, I face a lot of stress and my job and in my life. But look at how much I’ve grown and how much joy I get out of life. And so that’s our stressor. Scorecard revision. It’s now called the stressor and resilience Scorecard because again, building resilience or resiliency is super important in a time of constant change and stress.

[00:17:23.34] spk_1:
Thank you for saying resilience first. And then or or resiliency as the second alternative. Alright, so how do we then bring? I’m relentless. If nothing else I don’t let go, it’s time for a break. Turn to communications when there’s something in the news and you want to be heard when you want to get an op ed published. When you want a guest on blogs and podcasts, speak at conferences and be shared on social turn to turn to your story. Is there mission turn hyphen two dot C O. It’s time for Tony’s take two. I want you to go out first. Take care of yourself as Susan is advising and then take care of your team. This is a short show and a short Tony’s take too. So you will use the extra time. I hope to take care. Please go forth and care. That is Tony’s take two. We’ve got boo koo, but loads more time for team care, but not as much boo koo as usual. So how do we bring this now to a team level? Because it’s his team care and not self care. I’ve been wagging my listeners can’t see, but I’m telling you, I’m wagging my finger. We’re distinguishing ourselves from all the, all the nannies who say take care of yourself, how we convey this now to team care.

[00:18:04.54] spk_0:
Well, I’m glad your listeners can’t see it because there’s nothing better than non profit types wagging their fingers at other people telling them what they should do right. Um, it’s really funny. It’s really simple. All you have to do is talk about it. So Burn A Brown has many best selling books about vulnerability and shame and courage and she a pines. I mean the research show shows that when you are vulnerable, you inspire empathy and it’s really the height of courageousness to be vulnerable. It’s not opposite. They’re two sides of the same.

[00:18:12.40] spk_1:
Yes, absolutely.

[00:19:48.14] spk_0:
Yeah. And so if you tony are a vulnerable leader and your courageous enough to say, hey, I’ve been struggling with my physical health in this way. So I’m going to take walks on the beach every morning and I’m going to have a glass of wine every night because that’s my plan for self care and I want you all to support me in that by not scheduling meetings during my walk time and not making fun of my wine selection or whatever it is, right. But by talking about it, people go, oh, tony is being vulnerable with me. That means I can be a little vulnerable with him and say, well, tony I’m struggling with some things in my physical health and I would like your support on this. Whatever it is, it doesn’t mean that somebody has to go on the beach with you. It just means that they have to support and know that that’s something that you need for your mental or physical health. And when we talk about ourselves, we we become a little vulnerable, we keep ourselves safe usually. And then other people have empathy for us because we made ourselves vulnerable. And that builds trust and trust is the elusive element that so many teams are missing. And so if wellness can be kind of a shortcut to that great, But it just means we have to talk about it and that’s why we create discussion tools. We want you to be able to talk about this with your team openly vulnerably and honestly, but also like have, you know, have something to get out of it. Maybe you all could support a new direction with your team care based on your discussions. Maybe instead of pastries in the kitchen, you’re going to have nuts in the kitchen because it’s healthier. Maybe you’re going to go for group walks or measure your steps together. Those are all physical things. But where we really get into the interesting stuff is when we talk about mental health things, which is a little less accepted at work, but that’s the most important thing of what we’re doing

[00:20:06.44] spk_1:
okay before we get to mental health, let’s let’s keep a little simpler, a little safer. How do we just Open these conversations? Like are we are we having a meeting for this purpose or is this 10 minutes? Uh, at the beginning of a one hour meeting? All

[00:22:00.94] spk_0:
of the above. So, you know, if you have a meeting about it and that sounds like a wellness committee and that would be great because a wellness committee could definitely be a diverse group of voices that pushes the agenda forward rather than like one yoga nut in the office, which is who I used to be, right. But if you don’t have time for a wellness committee or you’re not ready for wellness committee yet. No problem. Just at the beginning of every meeting, maybe you ask a checking question that has to do with health. So like what did you do already today to support your mental or physical health? That’s a quick check in question and people will think about what did I do today just walking my dog. Don’t maybe walking my dog counts as physical and mental health. Yeah. Walking my dog, I’m going to walk my dog more because that’s really good for health. It makes them think about things in a different way and it makes them share. Maybe people didn’t know you had a dog. Maybe somebody would like to go for a dog walk with you. Maybe somebody would like to bring their dog into the office and they know that since you have a dog, you’re going to be more open to it. I mean there’s many directions these conversations can go, but you just have to open it up. So it’s usually like a checking question or maybe a lunch and learn or a brown bag lunch where everybody could talk about these things. But I would say set and it set a topic. Um maybe it’s nutrition, maybe it’s some specific aspect of nutrition. Maybe it’s a movement. You know, these are things that are safe and yet they affect our mental health. So if we start talking about physical things that affect our physical health, then we’re going to start to get into, well, you know what when I take when I exercise, I feel you know happier. Well that’s mental health. And so you’re going to start talking about mental health, even though you’re talking about how you’re feeding, moving and resting your body, which is physical. Mm

[00:22:02.44] spk_1:
Okay. Uh by the way, if you were the yoga nut, then I guess you would have been pushing up against me the curmudgeon if we would have been in the same workplace

[00:22:11.26] spk_0:
probably.

[00:22:28.64] spk_1:
But I’m not uh you know, this is a recent, a recent uh, revelation for me that I’m a little curmudgeonly. I see it in my neighborhood. Like, you know, my my neighbor across the street has has a big piece of construction waste in a role that that that the garbage people are not gonna pick up because it’s been there for over a week. You have to put your garbage in a can. It’s gotta be, it’s gotta be an authorized can with wheels and it’s got to face the right way. But they’re not going to pick up this guy’s big tart, but he leaves it out there. You know that that bothers me. I’m looking at it right now. It’s annoying.

[00:22:48.14] spk_0:
It sounds like it causes you some stress.

[00:22:50.14] spk_1:
Well it shouldn’t be there. It’s not part of it is the injustice of it because he knows it’s not gonna get picked up. It’s been there over a week and we have garbage pickups every monday and friday. So it’s not going if it didn’t go the first day, it’s not going the next door the next after after that. So it’s the injustice of it. I I follow the rules he should do.

[00:23:09.04] spk_0:
I think the

[00:23:28.74] spk_1:
neighborhood neighborhood beautification, you know, what’s that tarp out there on a big role may be the next neighbor will put a little load of uh concrete after he, after he takes his grill out of the concrete slab that it’s been in and they leaves a little to foot chunk pile of broken concrete. There’s

[00:23:29.16] spk_0:
a neighborhood

[00:23:30.84] spk_1:
liberties and then the next and the next next thing I have to sell my home.

[00:23:46.44] spk_0:
That would be terrible. Hey, get a big piece of chalk and create some sort of art out of that rolled up tarp. Maybe it’s a caterpillar. Maybe you write a note on the street and chalk like, I don’t know, I can’t think of something

[00:23:48.29] spk_1:
the hell out of here. Is that well,

[00:23:58.54] spk_0:
that would be curmudgeonly. You want that hilarious. You used to be a comedian. Be hilarious, tony something funny, make them laugh.

[00:24:45.94] spk_1:
You know what I was laughing about recently, I learned David Sedaris has a home in my town and a lot of people in town have pretentious names on their homes. Like when I moved here, it was seven seas. I had that the first thing I had a contractor to rip that stupid 17 1st of all it’s the atlantic ocean. It’s not A C. So it’s misnamed Second of all. These names are pretentious. David Sedaris has his house name is C Section. How good is that? How brilliant is that? Go right to the heart of the pretense. And uh so if I had thought of C Section, I would have had the contract and make those letters. But he took that one. But yeah, you’re right. I could put something in chalk. I have talked to because I have uh

[00:24:46.94] spk_0:
Rafter out loud is one of our top 12 immune boosters. We

[00:24:51.99] spk_1:
just, I mean this is not a

[00:25:11.54] spk_0:
Topic because laughter laughing out loud actually is one of the 12 immune boosters that are masters of public health interns research to find the cheap easy. Absolutely scientific based immune boosters and laughing out loud is at the top of the list. So, uh, you will boost your immune system and everybody on the street, if you can figure out something funny to do with that rolled up tarp, I will follow up with you tony to figure out what it

[00:25:21.74] spk_1:
was. The caterpillar is a good idea. I’ll keep I could make it a big turd, but that’s kind of

[00:25:26.88] spk_0:
yeah, like dinosaur, you know, like make up north Carolina, dinosaur breed and say like this is the ancient, you know,

[00:25:36.63] spk_1:
it’s a fossilized brontosaurus turd.

[00:25:39.74] spk_0:
Exactly, you’re getting there, getting there.

[00:25:46.64] spk_1:
I’m amusing myself, you know. Uh But I just

[00:25:48.61] spk_0:
did it did it for yourself, right, then. It make you laugh rather than making you stressed out.

[00:25:53.04] spk_1:
Okay. But I’d like something for the community to be able to chuckle at two. Exactly. All right. This is uh you

[00:25:59.19] spk_0:
know, David Sedaris or anything, but you’re tony-martignetti and that’s not not

[00:26:25.24] spk_1:
okay. Right. I know my place. I know my place. All right. So, this has turned into an individual mental health exercise, which is not supposed to be so. But this curmudgeon thing is just evolving in my mind about how I’m you know, traditions, there’s importance around laws and tradition and you know, so humans I might have clashed. Uh but I wasn’t conventionally when we would have been in the same workplace. This is only within the past few weeks. I’ve come to this revelation

[00:26:34.14] spk_0:
blame it on the pandemic. That’s what we’re all doing. Many bad personality traits on your lifetime

[00:27:01.24] spk_1:
practice. I mean, it’s a lifetime practice, right? It is absolutely. So, you know, in this phase I have curmudgeonly, maybe in six months or six years, I’ll be out of it. Um, you have some skills like you, your, your workshop identified, but you have some like skills, we can practice your stress for our teams and ourselves. Yes,

[00:27:12.74] spk_0:
I think this is a really good one. This is a really good one. Okay, so what I want you to do is look out the window and anyone listening, just look out the window right now, Tony is going to be looking at a giant dinosaurs turd across the and uh, you want to name five things you see out the window besides the brontosaurus turd, tony go

[00:27:32.04] spk_1:
the ocean, the uh, the walkway, the, the little wooden walkway to the ocean. My neighbor’s homes who I don’t know too well, I’m a little curmudgeonly. Uh, and there’s my, my front yard landscaping, which I’m very proud of.

[00:27:36.00] spk_0:
Excellent. What’s one of the parts of the landscaping? That’s number five

[00:27:41.54] spk_1:
Oh the mexican continues. They’re just starting to bloom awesome. Well grow, they’re not blooming yet, but they’re growing out of the ground green.

[00:28:23.94] spk_0:
You can see that their roots have taken hold. So that’s that’s part of a mindfulness exercise where you name five things you can see for things you can touch three things, you can hear two things you can smell and one thing you can taste and it says it’s an anxiety arresting exercise where if you’re feeling anxious, you’re worried about stuff, you’re thinking into the future, you’re worried about the past, you come back to the present moment and how do you do that? five things you see four things you can touch, name them, touch them, see them, say it out loud. That will bring you back to the present moment forces you because you’re engaging all five of your senses.

[00:28:30.82] spk_1:
Yeah.

[00:29:23.84] spk_0:
And that’s the best thing we can do for our mental health is be mindful. The second best thing is to move our bodies because moving our bodies trains our brain and so being mindful, being more mindful, being better mindful. These are all things we can do are things we can all do. Being more movement, having better movement, being movement oriented. These are things we can all do no matter how much we move, no matter how much we’re meditating or mindful, but mindfulness is just being aware of the present moment. But it takes us out of that worrying cycle. It takes us out of that rumination, prefrontal cortex and actually forces us to be in the present moment which is a huge skill. I practice it every day for seconds per day. I’m aspiring to get up two minutes, you know, just being mindful, being present. That is a huge skill that I have been practicing a ton and that is a relief that I don’t have to become a meditator. I can just be a mindful person. What a relief. I don’t have to sit and meditate, I can just be mindful.

[00:29:40.34] spk_1:
Would you count down the five again, please? Five things you can see for things you can touch, then, what

[00:29:47.94] spk_0:
three things you can hear, two things you can smell and one thing you can taste,

[00:29:51.84] spk_1:
Okay, so go and go and do them going,

[00:30:23.74] spk_0:
you just start in the moment like, oh I have a you know, old coffee taste in my mouth, it’s just that moment, that’s what I’m experiencing in this moment right now, you know? Yeah, so the skill that I would ask everyone to practice is just being present. Just taking a present mindful breath several times a day. We take 20,000 breaths in a day. So try and make like three of them. Mindful ones, maybe 10. You know, those are skills we can always practice and always improve and they’re actually good for your brain. It’s not just like, well yoga teacher stuff,

[00:30:31.14] spk_1:
I like being mindful around food that I’m actually tasting it. I’m enjoying the texture smell. I like to I can smell the food before I taste it so that I get an extra sense of taste because the, the aromas wafting over my palette. Yeah,

[00:31:07.64] spk_0:
like in that out you can anticipate food. Like I’m going to have some sort of chickpea thing for dinner and I’m anticipating those chickpeas, you can cook the food mindfully and like be in the moment while you’re cooking and appreciating those textures before they get soft in the oven or you know, just all of the moments of food, it’s not just smelling it and eating it. It’s the anticipation, the preparation, the cleaning up, the discussion about it, the laughs that you had over the meal. Like if you could be present for all of that, amazing.

[00:31:20.34] spk_1:
If we spend a little more time, I’ll give you your own, your own show on nonprofit radio You don’t have to be. We’ve already been like a half an hour because I went on a diatribe about homogeneous and the third and we turned it into a personal thing for me. Well, I haven’t center of the universe, so I think that’s appropriate. We

[00:31:37.14] spk_0:
all are despair of the universe. In fact, we all are of our little universe. Amazing.

[00:31:44.14] spk_1:
So that’s not. So that’s not.

[00:31:48.70] spk_0:
But that’s why people love talking about themselves because they’re the center of the universe. And if you ask me a question of myself about myself, well, thank God, somebody noticed that I’m the center of the universe. I would love to tell you about my food or my exercise or when I am most present. Yes, I would like to tell you about that because I love talking about myself. We all love talking about ourselves in some way.

[00:32:08.84] spk_1:
We do some of us more than others, some

[00:32:11.29] spk_0:
more than others. You know, you could just go on clubhouse and do your show their tony Have you thought about that?

[00:32:16.33] spk_1:
You know what is the clubhouse?

[00:32:18.44] spk_0:
Well, that’s a, that’s a topic for another day. It’s an only iphone only app that is sort of taking over the social media world.

[00:32:41.14] spk_1:
We live obviously dating myself, I’m 59, so I’m not hiding. So I’m not familiar with clubhouse. Um, let’s see. Well, all right. Where can we spend a little more time? Susan comfort. Um, I don’t know. You tell me you’re you’re the person who thinks about this all the time. I only

[00:32:45.24] spk_0:
I think everybody should stop listening and go outside and take a walk. We’re listening while

[00:32:50.48] spk_1:
at the end of the don’t stop now. Keep listening until the end. You

[00:32:59.84] spk_0:
know, you should stop. Stop now. There’s nothing of value coming later. Stop now. Turn it off. They won’t

[00:33:00.54] spk_1:
show you’re killing my show

[00:33:06.54] spk_0:
it off. They’re addicted to you. I can’t wait to see what curmudgeonly thing you’re going to say next.

[00:33:10.34] spk_1:
All right. Uh, So what do you want people to do?

[00:33:40.74] spk_0:
What I what I want to stop the interview. I want people to go actually take care of themselves, but in a team because that’s what I’m talking about. Team care, not healthcare. No, we usually end our trainings 10 minutes before the hour because we don’t want people to be back to back to back with meetings all day because then guess what? You don’t have any time to take care of yourself. So if anybody ever asks me, if they like, do I have any other questions or what else should we do? I say we should stop doing this thing and go take care of ourselves, go outside and take a walk on the beach tony

[00:33:45.74] spk_1:
Okay, I’m going to end the show, which uh, so together with the little sponsored messages I have to put in and my tony stick to and uh blah blah blah. This is going to be about a 36 or 37 minute show and usually they’re more like 45

[00:34:01.82] spk_0:
to 40

[00:34:08.34] spk_1:
five. I’m cutting myself short. No, they’re more like 50 to 50 to 60 minutes is 50 50 50 50.

[00:34:10.27] spk_0:
Look, I need to say I can talk about this stuff for hours.

[00:34:14.07] spk_1:
No, no, we’re taking your advice now.

[00:34:25.74] spk_0:
I’m just saying have me back. People can go listen to me on youtube, whatever, but you don’t need me. People need to go take care of themselves. tony You’re keeping them from it. All right. Just you

[00:34:41.04] spk_1:
were just teasing you were just teasing saying I can talk about this forever. I’m saying no, nobody said shut it off. So we’re shutting it off. All right. We’re building this show around your advice. Alright. Susan comfort. Your pronouns, what are your pronouns?

[00:34:45.34] spk_0:
She her and a Yeah. A spaniel debemos entry entry. The star in espanol, approximate west

[00:35:17.04] spk_1:
next time. Okay, I understood some of that. Susan comfort founder. non profit wellness, you can get the resources that you talked about, the personal stress prescription and the new updated stressor and something else. Scorecard, resilience, stressor and resilience, not resiliency scorecard at nonprofit wellness dot org slash resources. All right. Susan, thank you very

[00:35:18.15] spk_0:
bad. Hope to talk to you soon. Again on the beach.

[00:36:13.54] spk_1:
I’m sure you will. I’m sure you will. Thank you. And thanks to each of you for listening to non profit radio coverage of 21. Ntc. The 2021 nonprofit technology conference were sponsored by 20 y. Turn to communications turn hyphen two dot ceo. And that will almost nearly be the end of this show. Uh huh. What a whirlwind did I did I just say I would have her back. Oh my is that is that a promise next week? Impact Stories and modernizing your I. T. If you missed any part of this week’s show, I Beseech you find it at tony-martignetti dot com were sponsored by turn to communications pr and content for nonprofits. Your story is their mission turn hyphen two dot c o. I got to move this along. I don’t want to I don’t want to take away from your your care time.

[00:36:50.14] spk_2:
Our creative producer is Claire Meyerhoff shows, social media is by Susan Chavez. Mark Silverman is our web guy and this music is by scott Stein. Mhm. Thank you for that. Affirmation scotty. You’re with me next week for nonprofit radio big non profit ideas for the other 95 go out and be great and take care. Mhm, mm. Yeah.

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[00:00:55.57] spk_0:
welcome to tony-martignetti non profit radio coverage of 20 NTC. The 2020 non profit Technology Conference. As you know, the conference had to be canceled, but we are persevering virtually throughout through Zoom were sponsored at 20 and T C by Cougar Mountain Software Benali Fund. Is there complete accounting solution made for nonprofits? Tony-dot-M.A.-slash-Pursuant Manton for a free trial with me now our Susan Comfort and Mo Abdullah. Susan is founder at non profit Wellness and Mo is founder of culture. Energized Susan. No. Welcome.

[00:00:57.27] spk_3:
Thank you

[00:00:57.70] spk_4:
for having us.

[00:01:43.84] spk_0:
Thank you. Thanks for working this out virtually. Um and I know that you’re each well and safe Susan in D. C. And Mo in Denver. I’m glad to know that everybody’s well and families were good. Um, your mom, your NTC topic was team care, not self care, building resilience, resiliency in an era of burnout. But we’re gonna convert this into, ah, special episode of non profit radio and thank you for your willingness to do that. So I’m gonna get it out quicker to our audience. And, uh, we’re gonna talk about team care in the era of Corona virus pandemic. Um, mothers there. Why don’t you get us started? I mean, we can, in fact keep the team together, keep the team energized and efficient and functioning well, even though our work lives, Air totally upended.

[00:02:35.67] spk_4:
Yeah, it can be done, but it takes intentionality, right? So and also understanding that it’s going to look different. So it can’t be business as usual when we moved to remote working. Let’s understand that there’s kids at home, right that need homeschooling that, um, talk about acceptability. And does everyone have Internet but then would have access to a computer to do meetings? So if you just say all right and what was really working from home and don’t put intentional, inclusive practice, this is in place. That’s what makes it a little bit more challenging, but it can be done. There

[00:02:40.41] spk_3:
are a

[00:02:40.50] spk_4:
lot of businesses that are doing it carefully and have been doing it successfully for a really long time.

[00:03:05.24] spk_0:
Susan is revealing that they’re not only Children at home, but they’re also pets. I’ve been doing off almost 30 of these interviews. I’ve had, uh, had a child walked by, thankfully clothed, but I’m ready for the naked. I’m ready for the naked two year old coming across the screen in minutes. You know,

[00:03:05.58] spk_3:
we’re ready to

[00:03:06.66] spk_0:
do enough of these, and it’s bound to happen

[00:03:38.24] spk_3:
from podcast of video right away. I agree with with Milo that it takes intentionality to build team when team can’t be together. And frankly, nonprofits have dealt with this for a long time with distributed workforces. When nonprofits have folks strewn across the country of the world when nonprofits can’t afford, um, expensive office space anymore, they go, Virtual said. Non profits have actually been pioneering this kind of team building in a way, because we’re always low budget, we’re always scrapping. Girl is traveling for far flung, um, creations have had to figure it out, of course, to and governments. But the nonprofit sector is sort of uniquely suited to figure this out.

[00:04:19.24] spk_0:
We’re recording on Wednesday, April 1st, so I’m gonna assume that organizations have already figured out the Internet access problem. You know, if there were people who didn’t have Internet access, I’m gonna assume by now that they do. But there could still be a mo was saying there. Ah, that could still be technology issues even going even now, three weeks into, um, being at home. Do you think or are we? Are We passed the technology issues, too?

[00:06:32.24] spk_3:
There are always gonna be technology issues, right? And I think, what Low and I moan I met when we worked for Play Works, which is a recess organization working most of the kids in schools. But what we learned is that the social emotional capability or the emotional intelligence that people have is really nurtured interactively through personal person contact. That does not have to mean touching contact that could mean words that are expressed, you know, spoken or written, or even a high five, you know, or an elbow bump or a cheer were, You know these things don’t have to happen in person. So when you think about team care and the importance of sure everybody has to take care of their cells, But in the nonprofit sector, we’re really bad at taking care of ourselves. We’re really good at taking care of other people or the world over not so good at taking care of ourselves. So telling a non profit worker that they need to up their self care is not gonna be ineffective strategy figuring out how we can systemically create tools and systems that effect team care where we can all take care of each other. That’s what’s gonna be the game changer for non profits, because it will encourage our own self care, hold accountability to others and build the team in the process. Because you know what happens when we talk about wellness, we make ourselves vulnerable. I’m telling you what’s going on with my body or my mental health, and that makes me vulnerable in some way. I can keep myself safe, but it’s still telling you what’s going on with my body was just personal. So if I’m making myself vulnerable, what bring a Brown says is that then inspires empathy. Because you have a body, you understand, you know what I could be going through and then that builds. Trust on what most workplaces are challenged by is a lack of trust, and so if you can figure out howto build trust, then you’ll have better automatically team care because you’ll give each other the benefit of the doubt. You’ll trust each other to have each other’s back. You’ll know that most doing the best she can, etcetera, but you’re it’s not gonna have that trust if everyone is off fighting their own battles in their own little zoom worlds or computer boxes.

[00:07:08.75] spk_0:
All right, so, Moe, why don’t we, uh why don’t you get us started with some intentionality around team care? You both have talked about the intentionality. Let’s get into some details that people can raise as discussion items in there are in in there. I was gonna stay in their offices in their in their meetings, Or they can implement themselves if they’re if they’re the CEO. You know what started with some concrete ideas, please?

[00:08:01.34] spk_4:
Yeah, well, I think one of the first things to recognize is that communication is going to look different, right? When you’re in person, personal person conversations, you can read body language. You can see it was really stressed out. But overall computer screen, that’s really, really challenging to do so. One of the first things you have to do is you have to set the New Lord. Um, and one of those norms should be around respecting boundaries, allowing, uh, you’re always to block out, um, parts of their calendar to get done. So maybe they block out stuff on the calendar saying, I’m gonna be home schooling my kids or I need to take a walk during this time and respecting those boundaries. Another thing is sending a gnome around. How many meetings did people have per day when we start moving to remorse? Working Everyone was over. Communicate. Everyone’s meeting is super duper important. But then you end up having people sitting down for 4 to 5 hours, meeting after meeting after meeting and after two. You’re really no longer productive. So really setting some boundaries around how many meetings were having and respecting people’s of boundaries as faras blocking out time.

[00:08:34.14] spk_0:
Why don’t we feel, what with this question, why do we feel like we need to have more meetings when were distributed just because we’re no longer physically close? So we were trying to compensate. So now all of a sudden, we gotta have meetings with people, you know. We used to just meet monthly or weekly. Now we gotta meet Ellie is it will be overcome

[00:08:47.18] spk_3:
and singing

[00:08:48.88] spk_4:
a lot of people. It’s a trust thing, right? Like if I don’t see you, how do I know that you’re working? Um, we need to have meetings. A lot of people think that

[00:08:57.29] spk_3:
people

[00:08:57.64] spk_4:
would communicate right is being able to see someone face to face. But the cool thing about remote working is that there’s things that exist, like flak, using chat, using email’s on and also understanding what our meetings for right. If it’s just to tell people stuff, it’s just big enough mint. You can do that. I’m a different platform. Meeting should be around creating discussion accident questions until knowing that religion a point you’re making. What, What is the purpose of meetings? Who are we having it? Um, you know, just keeping get at a decent time. So we don’t want to be having meetings for two hours. Every meeting. Some evenings are just for 30 minutes with the central people, and sometimes it’s a larger discussion that you need tohave, which make a little bit longer

[00:09:52.84] spk_0:
motion. One of those boundaries include the use of texting while we’re all remote, like texting is forbidden. Nor is only for emergencies or something of that are you?

[00:09:58.24] spk_3:
Let me be a cultural thing. That’s not something that one person can dictate what the Norma’s like. That’s gonna be a culture for every we get a lot of culture right Culture energizes most company finds about building a culture of well being. The culture is different everywhere. It’s just the way things are done here, right? So if texting is part of your normal work culture, it should be now as well. But we can’t say what the boundaries should be for any workplace, because that’s up to the workplace to set. But the the actual process of creating those boundaries is a perfect way to build trust. So what you just said, tony, is what the boss should be asking their employees. They should say, Hey, you know, while we’re on this Corona virus worked from home rotation, should we be texting? And then his employees will say, Hell, no or please yes or whatever. But the point is that we’re talking about our presence is we’re talking about our limitations, and we’re deciding as a group what that culture should be. Not the boss listening to this non profit radio podcast and saying more, Susan said we shouldn’t tax or we should definitely just depends on with it.

[00:11:06.90] spk_0:
I was trying to box you in, put you in an awkward position. I just did. And you, uh, you got out. Okay, That was my

[00:11:12.69] spk_3:
concrete things folks could do to that. Okay, even when we’re not in crisis.

[00:11:17.33] spk_0:
All right, go ahead. Well, let’s stick with the current. Uh, let’s try to keep it relevant. Oh, the crisis that we are. Okay, What else? What else have you got? Susan,

[00:11:26.54] spk_3:
The important thing is again. It’s not that we should never talk about self care. It’s that we should talk about it within the context of we’re gonna support each other. So what I like to say and behind me is even is that red and blue makes purple. Like when we talk about physical health and mental health.

[00:11:42.60] spk_0:
Now wait, Susan, everybody, everybody is not going to see the video.

[00:11:46.59] spk_3:
But this way is when you, when you talk about

[00:11:48.82] spk_0:
physician, described it

[00:13:18.12] spk_3:
mental health. Then that creates team health. Because, like I said, we make ourselves vulnerable. So if we just ask each other, not just how are you doing or what’s getting in the way, but like focused action initiative answers or questions like, How are you taking care of your mental health or what do you do that works to get you moving during the day. And if workers team members answer these questions with each other, you magical things happen right once. One, they’re focused on action on non things that work. It’s got appreciative inquiry. What’s working about right now? You can keep that going more easily than starting anew. Habit. Appreciative inquiry. Sharing about yourself like, Hey, I like to go from a TRO. Walks. Well, maybe there’s somebody else on the team that likes to go for nature walks. Well, then you could schedule your next call on a nature walk you over there and your team member over there. Maybe there’s somebody who likes to ride bikes. Well, now you know who to go to when you need a new bike shop, right? You find out all of these similarities about how people take care of themselves, and that builds that trust. And Moe was just talking about We have all these dumb meetings and we were already bad of meetings and nonprofits to begin with. Now we’re having done long meetings online. This is a terrible situation, but it’s because we’re not trusting that people are working. But if we can build the trust so that folks have authentic communication with each other. No, I’m not gonna be at that meeting is after home school my kids. But I will be online for two hours after bedtime to get your memo done right. They’re with honesty and with of compassion.

[00:13:43.88] spk_0:
Yeah, mo this this idea of vulnerability building trust it’s This has come up in a couple of NTC conversations that I’ve had people feel that being vulnerable makes is a sign of weakness. You’re you’re revealing some flaw or fall to our shortcoming that you’ve got. But it’s I think it’s 100 degrees from that. Being vulnerable is a sign of strength.

[00:14:50.90] spk_4:
Exactly, you know, in it And it it’s so powerful when leadership does it first right. You allow people to be able to make mistakes and follow your lead. And so as a leader, one of the first things if you haven’t already done it already do a team building exercise. And in that people the exercise understand how the people like to be communicated towards and as a leader also share some of the challenges that you have and also some of the things that worked really well for you and allow your team to follow the lead. So I know for me when it comes to meetings, one signals past, like, 40 minutes. I need to be able to take a break like it’s gonna be really, really tough for me and for other people, it could be, Hey, I am really shy and speaking up. Even though that might be a group norm to speak up, that might be really challenging for me to do that. Is it okay if we can utilize the chat box? Um, at some point, doing during our meeting and just creating a little bit more dialogue and getting people comfortable because once everyone knows how you communicate in the communication is going to be 10 times better and you’re not gonna get mad at people because

[00:15:06.37] spk_3:
you

[00:15:06.56] spk_4:
were so that they are, you know, not replying to emails or not speaking up for not being engaged. Instead, you can have a little bit more empathy and be able to move.

[00:15:18.42] spk_0:
Is there a team building exercise? You can suggest you can explain in just a couple of minutes.

[00:15:25.52] spk_4:
Yeah. Um, you can go on Google this thing called the leadership company

[00:15:30.79] spk_0:
Leadership Leadership Compass.

[00:15:32.84] spk_4:
Yeah, there’s a leadership compass, which

[00:15:34.95] spk_0:
is kind of

[00:16:03.57] spk_4:
like How do you take lead their people that need a lot of information? They’re more technological. They, like details, is looking better. Our creative thinkers. And so you do have a discussion with your team around where you follow on the leadership compass, Um, kind of one of the strengths and weaknesses of that. And then in the stroke of your work, what does that mean for for meetings or for one on one time, we’re getting things done. So that’s what Do you have siblings?

[00:16:05.72] spk_3:
Yeah, Thanks. On my website non profit comfort dot com, I have a whole page of icebreakers that don’t suck that I like to facilitate. Moe knows

[00:16:15.69] spk_0:
that the most you can say about them is that they don’t suck. Is that this longest endorsement? You can

[00:16:20.20] spk_3:
hear you if you really want. One of my favorite icebreaker is a check in question. It’s very simple. You don’t need any equipment. You don’t need any prep. They could be short. That could be long. They could be deep. That could be fun. Checking questions beginning of a meeting house. People build familiarity and commonalities and therefore trust

[00:16:37.08] spk_0:
like what’s an example of what’s example of a checking question

[00:17:21.41] spk_3:
Check in question Could be. What did you do to support your physical health today? Something really is. You know, people can share as much or as little as they want. It could be. What superhero would you be or what’s your superpower? What tattoo do you have or what’s a country you wanted is It could be any of those things, but I like focusing them on wellness because then again, people are making themselves vulnerable. They’re finding commonalities, and they can build more team support that way. So they’re icebreakers you can do and you can’t even focus them around wellness or someone care or diversity or inclusion or any topic you want. It’s the structure of the ice breaker that people get stuck on. And that’s where, like most said, you know, if you just try some or read Cem overviews and then make it your own or make your make the topic or the subject matter your own, you can really use the structure of the ice breaker to get people out of their comfort zone and get some new ways and relating in new ways.

[00:17:37.23] spk_0:
Okay, Okay, Susan, let’s stay with you. Other ideas that, uh, folks can implement while we’re in this roaring in the midst, This

[00:18:47.84] spk_3:
this is a more advanced one. And so I would only say this for teams that have already started down the road of diversity afternoon inclusion work like the work that motives. So we have. Ah, we developed a thing called a stressor scorecard, which is basically a list of identities and circumstances in life that brings stress. So some of them are identities, like being woman or being a person of color. Being a member of the LGBT community as a circumstance stressor might be, I’m going through a divorce or have a food intolerance or I have a terrible commute, right self circumstance that could change. But when we go through these circumstances or we have these identities that bring us stress in life, it’s important to realize it ourselves and also share that with each other in some way. So the stressor scorecard is a little bit of, um away to spark discussion. It can be a simple eyes like what is your score or what causes you stress where it could be a deeper discussion. Like Why do these things cause of stress? And how can we support each other? Because this is the stress we bring to the office. It’s not the stress that we experience it work from deadlines and too much work or even changing the world, which with no profit Cesaire already stressful jobs, world changing jobs, right? We’re talking about the stress that you bring

[00:19:09.09] spk_0:
with you. Where is there? Someplace just on. I realized this little more things further along group, but but we may as well just pursue it just to get the resource with stressor. Scorecard. Does it exist somewhere?

[00:19:16.04] spk_3:
It’s on my Web site. Non profit comfort dot com.

[00:19:23.17] spk_0:
Okay, okay, let’s bring it back to the more basic, though, Uh, you got another. Another tip for team team care.

[00:19:55.49] spk_3:
There’s so many. I think that the important thing is that you figure out a system for keeping it up like we’re in crisis right now because we’re in the midst of a cove, it state shelter, home place that is going to pass at some point and we’re gonna be back in some sort of new normal. Yes, the world will have changed fundamentally, but we’re gonna go back to some sort of new normal, And we need to figure out what systems changed more permanently. So, for example, workplaces should have some sort of committee or task force that’s focused on culture or wellness or health. And if you don’t have one yet, you should create one. It’s easy. It’s free. You can put a budget on it or just reallocate some of your budget for food or retreats or meetings to that group and the naked detect decide what the snacks are. They can decide. Um, you know what to do. It retreats or what? The wellness

[00:20:28.59] spk_0:
well, or what? To be what it is now. Yeah, well, or we could all have a common treat. Maybe, uh, you know, everybody brings their favorite cookie or something. All right, we got it

[00:20:34.85] spk_3:
yourself. You

[00:20:35.11] spk_0:
gotta gotta wrap it up. No, I’m gonna give you the closing words a little. Ah, little more encouragement, Mo.

[00:21:40.03] spk_4:
Yeah, I think, uh, end with keep the positivity going, but you have to build in a lot of different practices to keep positivity, Whether that is having shout out as part of your normal routine when you get on there having ice burgers, Um, just keep the positivity going just because it is a very, very stressful time. And so if you’re not building in those positive practices, a lot of times, you’re not gonna know when your team is feeling stressed out. It was they’re stressed out. That’s gonna lower productivity on and just make the working experience, you know, kind of dreadful. So, manager of a group of people working those practices, not every time that you need to meet face to face, but it doesn’t always have to be works. It could be a simple Hey, I saw you have 10 minutes on the calendar. Let me check in with you. How you doing today? Um, one thing that I just But I just learned that you do make sure you’re practicing wellness. So having, um, work related communications with also having personal check ins, I think it’s gonna be really impactful and keeping us all light and energized as you move through this crisis.

[00:21:59.02] spk_0:
All right. Thank you. That’s more. Abdullah, founder of culture, energized and with our Susan Comfort founder of non profit Wellness. I want to thank both of you. Thanks so much for sharing. And we’re gonna get this out shortly. Week or no more than two weeks. A special episode. So mode, Susan, thank you very, very much. Thank you. Stay safe.