Nonprofit Radio for April 26, 2019: Strategic Knowledge Management & Ethics In Your Prospect Research

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Dar Veverka & Janice Chan: Strategic Knowledge Management
Documents. Data. Projects. Governance. Training. They’re all components of knowledge management and our panel from 19NTC explains how to manage properly. Both returning, they’re Dar Veverka from Urban Teachers and Janice Chan at Shift and Scaffold.





Maria Semple

Maria Semple: Ethics In Your Prospect Research
There’s a lot of personal and private info available on your donors, volunteers and prospects.  Your researcher’s job is to find it. Where are the boundaries? How do you protect it? Maria Semple takes on these and other potential landmines. She’s our prospect research contributor and The Prospect Finder.





Top Trends. Sound Advice. Lively Conversation.

Board relations. Fundraising. Volunteer management. Prospect research. Legal compliance. Accounting. Finance. Investments. Donor relations. Public relations. Marketing. Technology. Social media.

Every nonprofit struggles with these issues. Big nonprofits hire experts. The other 95% listen to Tony Martignetti Nonprofit Radio. Trusted experts and leading thinkers join me each week to tackle the tough issues. If you have big dreams but a small budget, you have a home at Tony Martignetti Nonprofit Radio.

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Nonprofit Radio for April 19, 2019: Grit: Succeeding As A Woman In Tech & Great Ideas

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Marisa Lopez, Sara Chieco, Tami Lau & Aparna Kothary: Grit: Succeeding As A Woman In Tech
Our panel takes on the common challenges facing women in tech as they share their own stories and reveal lots of strategies for succeeding in this overwhelmingly male-dominated career. They’re Marisa Lopez, Sara Chieco, Tami Lau & Aparna Kothary. (Recorded at the 2019 Nonprofit Technology Conference.)





Graziella Jackson & Marcy Rye: Great Ideas
Also from 19NTC, we get methods for generating strong—even breakthrough—ideas, everyday, with help on how to choose and implement the best ones. Our panel is Graziella Jackson & Marcy Rye.





Top Trends. Sound Advice. Lively Conversation.

Board relations. Fundraising. Volunteer management. Prospect research. Legal compliance. Accounting. Finance. Investments. Donor relations. Public relations. Marketing. Technology. Social media.

Every nonprofit struggles with these issues. Big nonprofits hire experts. The other 95% listen to Tony Martignetti Nonprofit Radio. Trusted experts and leading thinkers join me each week to tackle the tough issues. If you have big dreams but a small budget, you have a home at Tony Martignetti Nonprofit Radio.

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Nonprofit Radio for April 12, 2019: Be Accessible & Go Bilingual

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James Kinser & Cyndi Rowland: Be Accessible
Inclusive website design that builds in accessibility helps everyone, not only those with disabilities. And it helps you with SEO. Our panel uses the example of the MacArthur Foundation site rebuild. They’re James Kinser, from the MacArthur Foundation, and Cyndi Rowland with WebAIM.





Oliver DelGado: Go Bilingual
Oliver DelGado helps you navigate the bilingual balance in print, social and on your site, as we discuss opportunities and challenges. He’s from Levitt Pavilion Los Angeles.





Top Trends. Sound Advice. Lively Conversation.

Board relations. Fundraising. Volunteer management. Prospect research. Legal compliance. Accounting. Finance. Investments. Donor relations. Public relations. Marketing. Technology. Social media.

Every nonprofit struggles with these issues. Big nonprofits hire experts. The other 95% listen to Tony Martignetti Nonprofit Radio. Trusted experts and leading thinkers join me each week to tackle the tough issues. If you have big dreams but a small budget, you have a home at Tony Martignetti Nonprofit Radio.

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Transcript for 20190412-Be_Accessible_and_Go_Bilingual.mp3

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Hey. Oh, hi there. Hello and welcome to Tony martignetti non-profit Radio Big non-profit ideas for the other ninety five percent. I’m your aptly named host. Oh, I’m glad you’re with me. I’d bear the pain of Macro Stone Mia if I had to say that you missed today’s show Be accessible. Inclusive website design that builds in accessibility helps everyone, not only those with disabilities, and it helps you with the CEO. Our panel uses the example of the MacArthur Foundation site Rebuild their James Kinzer from the MacArthur Foundation and Cindy Roland with Web aim Go bilingual Oliver Delgado helps you navigate the bilingual balance in print, social and on your site as we discuss opportunities and challenges. He’s from Levitt Pavilion, Los Angeles, on Tony’s Take two Grieving in your plant e-giving. We’re sponsored by pursuant full service, fund-raising Data driven and technology enabled Tony dahna slash pursuant by Wagner c. P. A’s guiding you beyond the numbers regular cps dot com But tell US Attorney credit card processing into your passive revenue stream. Tony dahna slash tony Tell us and by text to give mobile donations made easy Text. NPR to four four four nine nine nine here is be accessible from the nineteen ntcdinosaur twenty nineteen non-profit Technology conference. Welcome to Tony martignetti non-profit radio coverage of nineteen NTC. You know what that is tonight? Twenty nineteen non-profit Technology Conference Way are in the convention center in Portland, Oregon, and this interview, Like all of ours at nineteen NTC is brought to you by our partners at Act Blue Free fund-raising Tools to help non-profits make an impact With Me are James Kinzer is senior associate for digital communications at the John D. And Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation and Cindy Roland. She’s director of Web AIM at Utah State University. James Cindy. Welcome. Welcome to non-profit radio. With pleasure. Thank you, Cindy. What is Web aim? So Webb started in nineteen ninety nine. Two. Actually, we started with federal funding to assist folks in higher education with Web accessibility. We’ve since grown were now working in literally every sector on helping Web developers, Web designers and content creators will make their content accessible for individuals with disabilities. OK, OK, and James, I I hope I can get this right. That MacArthur Foundation seeks a more just verdant and peaceful world was full world. Thank you I’m a big NPR listener. What do you do specifically at senior associate with digital communication? What does that mean? That the foundation. Right. So my primary role is to manage content on the Web site and Tio manage over email communications, But it also involves a lot of project management. And so one of the largest projects that I managed recently is the complete redesign of our website. Look at this wonderful transition. Yeah, to redesign of the website to include accessibility. Exactly. Okay. Okay. And you, uh, you built in some grantee grantee encouragement there, too. With guides. Is that right? We’re in the process of developing developing that with the wedding team. Currently? Yeah, we’LL get to that. Okay, good. If I forget, remind me. Okay, Because the fact that you’re trickling it down it didn’t It doesn’t stop with the foundation, But you’re encouraging your grantees to do the same. Or at least a attempt. Yeah, exactly. Conscious are our learning. You’re so great and valuable. We recognized that it would be so stingy for just for us to keep that to ourselves. We wanted to make sure we were sharing that with the greater population And, of course, it doesn’t just stop with MacArthur grantees this booklet. Once it’s done, it ,’LL be available. Really, Teo. Anyone in, well, anyone? But certainly we envision that it’s going to be of use to you lots and lots non-profits non-profits. Cindy. Why is accessible design important form or with the wider population than those who need accessible sites? Right? Well, you know, and you you are hitting on a really important piece, which is, of course, everyone’s going to agree that we make content accessible to everyone, including those with disabilities, because that’s just the right thing to do. You know, anyone who has a moral core isn’t going to purposely exclude a segment of the population. But there are lots of reasons that you would develop accessibly just for typical users on DH. I won’t even go into as we all age. We all acquire disabilities, but we all typically in our lifetime have some accidental disabilities. Whether it is, I break my arm. I dropped my mouse and it busts into hundred pieces. I have, you know, some kind of ah temporary vision issue that needs, you know, Cem correction and takes a little bit time so accessible design ends up by being hopeful for everyone. It’s helpful on mobile devices. It’s helpful in virtually, you know, every platform. So those folks that are developing accessibly are not only helping those with disabilities, but they’re helping everyone. Okay, is there also an sio advantage? If we have to make it, bring it down to such a basic level, right? Which I admit. But I’m the one asking questions. You know, they’re they’re they’re also there is all right, So you know there’s there. We all know that it’s, you know, secret sauce in the background there as to how the the CEO’s air really pulled together. But those sites that are accessible end up by being, you know well, it makes sense because you’re able to call through all of the text information, and it’s able Teo, get at things that you might be presenting visually. So let’s say you have an image or you have a chart that you’re providing to visual users. If you have alternative text or you have some description, the search engines air ableto look at that text and be able to index that properly so it does end up by helping fun folks find your content. Okay. At the MacArthur Foundation, James, what raised the consciousness that in your redesign you needed to consider accessibility? Yeah, So we had a CZ. Part of our regular development process is worked with a developer to do just kind of an ad hoc scan on accessibility for the website. And then about five years ago, with new leadership of the foundation, there was a real turning point in our approach to grantmaking and s. So the the number of grantmaking areas was reduced down to a more focused number and there was a greater sense of urgency brought to the work. And it was at that time we were also looking at, um, asking ourselves the question Are we really living are our tagline Are we living this commitment to be in a I’m a more just, verdant and peaceful world? Were we truly being just if we were not giving access to everybody to the information on our website? It’s a very introspective discussion that that someone raised Yeah, that, uh, you know, that takes a lot of courage to consider that we may not be living up to our our own tagline, right? Right. So essentially, once that question was answered, way had our marching orders from from leadership, and it was something that I was already aware of and passionate about. And so it just kind of came together really beautifully. Acquaint us with the with the start of the process. How does the accessibility fit into an overall redesigned right? So for us, we actually worked with the Web AIM team to do a scan of our sight. I think that we gave them maybe twenty, twenty to twenty five pages to review. And from that review they created a report. And that report identified all of the areas that were not in compliance with accessibility and essentially ranks them in priority order. And so made it really easy for us to go to the designers and say, Hey, we’ve got all of these issues, These air, the scaled need for each one of them. Let’s incorporate that into the new pages as we design them. Cindy A. Z do that kind of ah evaluation. Where are the standards? But how do we know where they are? Is our cottage is codified somewhere? It absolutely is. So the the World Wide Web consortium that W three c has Web accessibility initiative w ay, I’m going into alphabet soup. No way. Have jargon jail on radio. Okay, okay. Transgress. I will not. So they created the web content, accessibility guidelines and I’m going to throw another one at you. It’s called Would CAG. Right now they’re at version two point. Oh, So you confined the wood. CAG died. Guidelines, Web content, accessibility, eye lines to point out yet so Google it it’LL provide all the technical standards. Therefore principles perceivable, operable, understandable and robust. Each of those principles has a set of essentially success criteria so that you know that you’re meeting what? That what that is. So let me just throw out example so that all content is perceivable. So let’s say that I don’t have vision. How am I going to perceive that content? Well, I’m probably using a screen reader to read the the What’s behind what it is that we see. So if a developer does not put alternative Tex, there’s no way for me to extract the content of that. Let’s say I’m deaf and you’ve got a video. How am I going to perceive that content well. If you have captions that I’m able to get that content, so just very simple things like that. Now you know somewhere a little more complex. It’s not way used to say that accessibility is simple, but as the Web has developed and matured, things are more complicated. But it’s still something that can be achieved when you agree. James. Definitely it’s time for a break. Pursuant. The Art of First Impressions. How to combine Strategy, analytics and creative to captivate new donors and keep them coming back that is, there a book on donor acquisition. They want you to read it. Check it out. Um, helps you make a smashing first impression with donors. You will find that the listener landing page tony dot m a slash Pursuant capital P for please. You know that Let’s do the live. Listen, love. Let’s I bumped it up. It’s accelerate because my heart’s bursting with love for the live listeners. So it’s going out now. Live love to you. If you are with us, the love goes out. Like I said, it’s Sze being redundant, right? Okay, enough said live love tto listeners. We’re listening now and to those listening by podcast pleasantries to you, the vast majority of our audience so glad that you were with us whatever time. Whatever device, however, non-profit radio fits into your schedule binge or week after week pleasantries to you. Let’s continue with James Kinzer and Cindy Roland. How do we work our way into it? So that the MacArthur Foundation they asked you to evaluate twenty five pages or so and you applied the standards right? Is that something that buy-in organise that small and midsize shop could do on their own? Absolute thing, finding guidelines or the guidelines a kind of technical and the guidelines air absolutely technical. So if you’re not a technical person, you you may go read them, and your eyeballs may spend around head. However, there are lots of places that you can go, I think even just starting understanding. There are lots of introductions to have accessibility. Web dot org’s certainly has one of those. There are others as well on DH. There are tools that are available, of course. Webb has one that’s it’s free for folks to use and other people have to. So I’m not trying to just, you know, talk R R R But if someone were to go to wave and that’s w A v e wave dot web dot org’s, they’d be able to put in a whirl and wave will check for them where they are with the standards now about Yeah, that’s all it takes just Well, yeah, yeah, yeah, yeah So here’s the rub. Only about twenty five or thirty percent of the errors Khun B. Programmatically detected by any look any tool, not just ours. Any of them the rest of them need. They require a human determination of whether or not it meets the guidelines so you could get started. Wave dot web dot or dot org’s absolutely and you know, thie. Other thing that I’m goingto mention about wave is as you look at the errors it and we describe, you know what the what The area is, why it’s important, how you can fix it. And there’s even links to little tutorials that go further in depth about that whole thing. So, to be honest, Wave is used an awful lot by developers and designers as a tool to learn about what it is that they need to be doing Okay, James, what are what are some lessons that some takeaway is that you you can share from the from this redesign? Yeah. I think a really great example of, uh, before and after a people meaning accessibility was the grant search page on our website. When we originally we’re looking at it, it was just the results were all just in a long list, and they were really wide columns of a text. So each line was really long. And as we were going through the redesign process that we recognize that this wasn’t optimized for people with cognitive disabilities. And so what we did is we shorted shortened each entry. What? I’m sorry. What’s the What’s the deficit that that they have that prevents them from reading are seeing longlines? Yeah. What is that? Specifically very questions. So a person with cognitive disabilities, the longer the line of text, the greater the chance. By the time they get to the end of that sentence, they will have forgotten what they read at the beginning. And so, by shortening the line lines, what that means is that they can increase. Is there there retention? Okay. And I will say also, for many folks that are struggling with literacy issues, that notion of them visually wrapping back around if it’s really long, then there they have to visually scan back to the leg left next to the next line. And that can become visually a difficult task, even though it’s not a visual problem problem. But it’s a visual processing problem. OK, alright, So thats the benefit in the redesign was that we took that knowledge. We sat down with the designers, came up with the new layout and moved things into more of a grid pattern. And so what it meant is that the lion lengths were shorter. But then also for typically sighted people, it meant that they could actually see more information on the page but scrolling wherever they’re scroll across. Exactly. So So this is a really great example of how we were addressing accessibility for for one audience. But then it it still had a really significant benefit for everyone else. Yeah, excellent. OK, Tio Cindy’s point earlier about the benefit for all rank. I love that. What else? You got? Another take away. What else have you learned from this whole thing? How long did this take, Let’s say, from the time that you asked Web aim to do the evaluation of twenty five pages, Tio, you felt like okay. I mean, website is never completed. I realize that, but you know, that button eyes a project manager, But until the point where you sat back and said, OK, we’ve pretty much where where I wanted to be back then, right? How long was that time? It was a three year process. Okay, Now MacArthur’s gotta have an enormous mean tens of thousands of pages. I cite you. Remember the number? I think there are a hundred. Two hundred thousand. Okay, but it’s a long front. Yeah, yeah. Okay, but smaller sites not going. I’m not going to be a daunting right. Okay, so another. Please. Another another. I’m trying to think of one of the other pages that we were working on. So one of the other, the significant takeaways is that start wherever you can like before. Five years ago, I really knew very little about accessibility, and I reached out. I took a workshop and overtime working with the designers. I learned a lot more about it. So I think using what resources are available to you. TTO learn is super important. I think it graded another example or take away from the site. Is that because something is a, uh, wait, Just have to make sure that everything that we’re seeing on the side of a CZ typically sighted people is truly consumable buy-in e other person that has a disability. And so when I’m formatting content now, I’m thinking about that. I’m making sure that, uh, was that descriptions that I put in for the photos. Are they going to be clear? Are they in the right format? Uh, it’s it’s, uh, it’s It’s not just a developer issue. It’s a content management meant issue. So I take a lot of responsibility for making sure that, as I’m formatting, that content that that I am formatting with accessibility of mind. And I’d love to just add another. Although I don’t know that this is MacArthur’s experience and you could you could certainly mentioned it is, But I think it’s so critical for folks to understand that web accessibility is not a one and done that. It has to be baked in. You know, you’d mention that you’re never really done with the website. Well, to the extent that accessibility is then part of baked into that process by by virtue of that, you’re never done with accessibility either. One of the things that we see over and over and over again, people will come to us. We’LL work with them. The folks that are on that team get it, they make those changes. But then those folks leave. They go someplace else. And the accessibility problems creep back in because, organizationally, they haven’t shifted the culture. They haven’t created a workflow that is going to sustain accessibility, even at the level of how their purchasing, you know, products, you know, widgets, naps and all that. Are they even asking the question if we buy X and embedded in our site? Is that accessible? How do we, uh, create a cultural change? Yeah, it’s t institutionally, the conscious of accessibility. So that has turned over occurs. It’s not lost weight. What do we do? Well, I think first and foremost you gotta start with a commitment from the top. I mean, if you don’t have those you know, top executives saying in our shop this is something we value and This is something we’re going to monitor every year, every two years, every whatever. We’re going to have a regular way that we look at this and it’s going to be systematic if you don’t do other things that will help sustain it. So, for example, in HR, why would it be that for technical people you wouldn’t routinely put into your job descriptions when you’re hiring that knowledge and skills of Web accessibility is, if not required, at least preferred, because that sends a message out to the people that want to have these jobs. Oh, well, apparently, this is a skill set that I need to acquire. How about purchasing? You know, if if you’re if you’re you’re webber, your other digital materials do rely a lot on the work of others. Let’s say it’s templates. Let’s say it, you know, whatever it happens to be, maybe it’s Ah, um uh, you know Cem donor-centric where you’re using, you know, how is it that you are checking to see the accessibility of the easy way to start is to ask the vendor to make a declaration of how it is that they conform to the current standards of accessibility. There is a thing called and sorry. Here we go again, as long as you define okay, as long as you tell the veep at the voluntary product accessibility template or in version two point Oh, now so don’t accept anyone that sends you a one point no document, but it’s very common to act in your in your requests and your solicitations say that you’re going to require that what you procure, what you purchase or acquire conforms toe tag, too double double and that the vendor either submit a V pat or some other kind of declaration. Or sometimes, folks, we’re just going right to give us a third party. A report of where where you stand with accessibility. Now, all is not lost if the vendor has some problems. It’s not that you don’t by the product you want, but you have a negotiation about what’s your roadmap for accessibility. If if we put money down, how long will it be in your development process before weakening exact that art that the stuff we’re hosting is going to be accessible, You know, it’s three three months of its three years, you know that may give you pause. Okay, okay. Very good. Uh, I’m gonna go back and underscore something that that Cindy mentioned earlier and that that’s leadership. Energy is welcome. So? So I just feel like it’s important to underscore that that that getting buy-in from leadership makes this process infinitely more simple, like it would be with anything and any significant initiative. Right? And And I think the turning point for the MacArthur Foundation was truly that that moment where we were looking at our tagline like I mentioned before. Ah, and for for people who are organizations that are concerned about how do I get buy-in? I think that that’s the easiest way at a mission driven organization is to look at that tack line and say, How does this pair with accessibility? And how can we, uh, make that argument? What? What case would you bring to your CEO? When you are, your consciousness is raised. Uh, how do you How do you raise? But he raised the issue up above. Yeah, I think that, uh, once I were educated Ah, a little bit more on it. I would go to leadership and and say, Look, this is this is kind of like Rex of our presentation later today is you know, it’s not just addressing accessibility for people with disabilities. It’s truly it’s truly improving for everyone, for everyone, right? And it’s our It’s embodied in our mission way just haven’t been conscious, right of of how our mission intersects with accessibility. Right? So it’s just making those two points connect. Okay. Okay, um, Cindy’s Web team did a evaluation of one hundred one hundred sites. Yeah, we were just We were just doing a quick little scan of Of where the non-profit world is in terms of accessibility. How did you pick one hundred? What we did is we went to a website top non-profits, and they had a lovely little list of the top one hundred non-profits. And of course, you know what does top mean, right? You know, But we took their list is probably names that we would roll recognize for one reason or another by budget or employees. Eyes are exactly yeah, annual fund-raising. Whatever. Okay. And and for me, the purpose was just to just to get a sense of what’s happening. So we just landed on the home page of each of those now the rationale is that, you know, as we well know, home pages get the most attention home pages get the most. Is that still true? Now, a lot of times I’ve had guests say that not to be overly focused on your home page because a lot of people coming in directly looking for the content that’s buried in your side, your sight because of because of a link that they follow, right? So for those people that have a direct link, you’re absolutely right. But if somebody doesn’t know the organisation, it doesn’t know the content that they want. How are they going to get in? They’re going to get in through your friends. They’re explored. So they’ve heard your name and they want to, right? Exactly. Exactly. So let’s say I’m a, you know, a family. And I’m feeling particularly philanthropic. I’m going to be I’m gonna be rooting around here looking at you know, where might I want to, you know, engage in sin, flandez. Okay, so we’re gonna learn about. So we went in and we we ran the wave on one hundred pages and do so when you’re when you’re back in Utah State. Utah State University. Yeah, this. So do you all do away and there are there six of you? I made it that way. I wish we didn’t run the way. Wave Runner. Okay. Yeah, You don’t You’re not doing that at heart. And I will take it on. Okay. Okay. Well, we’ll do that. Bring that back back east from here. It’s back. He’s okay. Based in New York. So it’s strange to say he’s for Utah. Okay. Wey came at us dahna aggression. We came out up from his acronym, But you’re right. We should be thinking about into a wave. Think maybe every Friday. That’s good. Alright, Anything. So we were running it through the way and way were only looking at those items that were again programmatically detectable. So how can the machine that hogan this after her to say that? Only thirty percent you said? Oh, yeah. Isn’t twenty five or thirty men are right in that vision. Indestructible Because we knew he didn’t have the time to do, you know, an in depth, blah, blah, blah. So again, we’re not looking at accessibility. What we’re looking at are errors, problems. That’s thes air. This is the low hanging fruit. This is the stuff that if you’re considering accessibility, you’re probably going to be nailing these things, right? Okay, because the things that are harder, those things that require human interaction and detective in deduction sadly, of the hundred, there were only three pages that didn’t have programmatically detectable arika cloudgood. So ninety seven percent of that sample and again, we don’t know to what extent that generalizes to the rest of the pages blah, blah, blah. But these are big organizations. These are, however measured these are And and I mean my heart just sunk because I thought, if there is ever if there’s ever a sector of our society that should be aware of this and working towards this, this should be the non-profit world. These air, the folks that are you know, the the standard carriers for lots of ethical causes and equity and rights of people with disabilities is certainly one of one of those. So I’m very sad to report that the data are that bad and we we are going to follow up, and we may end up by doing a much larger look at non-profits, not just home pages, but you know, scanning. You know, main domains and looking at thousands of pages, you probably need some funding for that. Well, you know, it’s always it’s always very helpful. If there’s anyone out there that would like to sponsor a deep look into this, give me a holler, OK? Our audiences, non-profits. Yeah, I’m not I’m not sure, but, uh, okay. Noble noble cause and yeah, disappointing. But I will say the stuff that work, the stuff that we did, you know, that was just I found internally little pot of money. We just did stuff We do stuff like that out of, you know, anyway, because it’s just part of it’s part of our mission to make sure that we’re getting information out about the state of accessibility. Does Webb aimed Is there a way I am? Stand for something? Well, it it really does. It’s the The initial project back in nineteen ninety nine was keeping Web accessibility in mind. So we have the web. Aye, aye. Accessibility in mind. Okay. And that’s the one thing we want. We want folks to keep a web accessibility in mind as they’re considering their content as they’re developing design frameworks. is They’re thinking about their coding on all levels. So this is all well, initially, consciousness raising way. Need to be aware, APS and then we can go toe wave dot web, a web dot organ, and we can begin their right. James, we got, like, thirty seconds, so I’m gonna give you the the wrap up. What would you like to leave people with? Yeah. Ah, a few things. I think the first one is that that accessibility applies to everybody and, uh, take the opportunity to learn about it. To do some research, to take a workshop, started any level on and then you can begin addressing it in many different ways. There there are small steps, medium steps, deep involved, development steps. So, really, it’s it’s it’s completely pardon of fun accessible to everybody. He is James Kinzer, senior associate senior associate, the digital Communications at the John D. And Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation on DH. She is Cindy Rolling, director of Web aim at Utah State University. James, Wendy, Thanks so much. Thank you, Cindy. I’m sorry, but, uh, you’re listening to Tony martignetti non-profit radio coverage of nineteen ntcdinosaur non-profit technology conference. Like all our interviews here. This one is brought to you by our partners at Act Blue Free fund-raising Tools to help non-profits make an impact. Thanks so much for being with us. We need to take a break. Wagner, CPS. They’ve got a free webinar coming up. It’s on April sixteenth. Tips and tricks for your nine ninety. The best part of this is using your nine ninety as a marketing tool to do some PR for you in various sections, including Narrative, but they’re going to talk about other uses for your nine ninety. It regarded regarding PR and promo. Okay, because it’s so widely read, it’s so widely available. Ah, if you can’t watch the live, you can watch the archive of their webinar weather cps dot com Click seminars, then Goto April. Now, time for Tony. Take two grieving part of your plan to giving program. As I was grieving, my well still am. My father in law’s death came very sudden in Ah, late March, and, um, it occurred to me that grieving is part of your plan e-giving program. And that happens when relatives who contact you because a donor to your organization has died and so you can’t expect those relatives to be at their best. UM, they’re going to be a little gonna be on edge. You know it’s there, not goingto be contacting you the day after the death, or even probably within a week. But when they do, they’re still grieving and you know it’s it’s likely to be a spouse or a child that’s the most common s. So it’s it’s someone close. And when it happens, you wantto handle them appropriately and keep things simple for them have a simple process to make them jump through hoops. I’ve got a bunch of ideas on managing and working with the grieving relatives when you do hear from them in my video, and that is at twenty martignetti dot com. Now let’s go to Oliver Delgado, also from the twenty nineteen non-profit Technology Conference, and this is go bi lingual. Welcome to Tony martignetti non-profit radio coverage of nineteen ninety si. That’s the twenty nineteen non-profit Technology Conference. We are in the Convention Center, Portland, Oregon, and this interview, like all our nineteen NTC interviews, is sponsored by our partners at Act Blue Free fund-raising Tools to help non-profits make an impact with me now is Oliver Delgado. He is director of marketing and communications at Levitt Pavilion, Los Angeles. Oliver, Welcome. Thank you so much for having me. I appreciate it. My pleasure. It’s great to be here in Portland’s Great to be here with you. I agree with you and, well, not that it’s great to be here with me, but I agree that it is fun to be important. Important is a wonderful city. It’s my first time here, so I’m taking it all and so much to see. And really, in the short amount of time I see a lot of drink through, it’s started Edible Food and Drink City. I started last night. I got very lucky. There’s an amazing restaurant in my hotel, and food was fantastic. Where was the food? It’s Ah, guess. Contemporary Mexican American fusion. Okay, Yeah. Super cool Down in the Pearl District, I went Tio when I first got here first night I went Teo, I’ve always heard that Israeli food is very good. I want a place called shoot Shalom Y’All y’all like y’All I love come over. Yeah, yeah, that’s not a Finnish border. Zoho are Israeli word. It’s your long Y’All Yeah, was X there have to one in the north east, their one southeast and southwest. I think it’s funny you mention that actually just saw this really cool report on Israeli food and considering that’s a fairly recent kind of evolution and food, considering the history behind the country and how it’s really a fusion of so many different regions. And so they’re taking so many different steps to just create an identity for it. Which means the food is just amazing. So I’d love to baby check it out if you recommend it. Although I do. I had a roasted eggplant, which was outstanding. Their home is their to bully both very oath. Oh, a light, a light and tasty falafel. Very nice. Dunaj dahna like a dark brown. Not a golden battle darker brown. That was incredible. You had me at recommend Shalom. Y’All All right, but we’re here to talk about sabelo Espanol. That’s right. Expand your reach and impact by going bilingual. Why should we? What if we’re not serving a non-profit? We’re not serving. Ah ah, Spanish community, Spanish speaking or Mexican speaking community. Why should we, uh, should we abila spaniel sure this is really specific to Los Angeles, and I think for us going bilingual has to do a lot with sustainability on and being able to reach more people in an organic way, and it’s not limited. I think Spanish for us is the case study. It’s the example. But I think if you’re living in a major metropolitan city or not, we see that there’s migration patterns across the country from all parts of the world. So it may not be Spanish. It could be Russian. It could be Chinese. It could be Hindi. It could be Farsi. There always be theirs. There’s probably a secondary language being spoken in certain communities and cities across the country. So when you look at those demographics and you look at those shifts and statistics, how do you tap into those alternative language and communities essentially with your organization? If the impact or the goal is to be sustainable, to be far reaching toe have longevity. It’s about reinvention. It’s about adapting. It’s about finding different ways to use different tools to reach people. So be aware of the demographics in in the area that you are serving absolutely and be responsive? Absolutely. And I think just speaking factually, the US eventually will be a minority majority country. So it’s twenty, twenty, twenty five, I believe so. I believe by twenty twenty five. So you know, we’re at twenty nineteen, and it gives you a really good idea, especially a lot of organizations who are toying with the idea of employing a secondary language or even a third of how to start doing it connecting with communities. And that’s what I’LL be talking about today is the multi layered approach from really identifying a language to identify your audience. Is your media lists your brochures or collateral? The programming, the PR, the communications of community relations, your digital presence? Everything has to be intertwined so that your message, or rather, your intent, has has legs. How do we make this case to leadership before we get there? Buy-in. Before we can go ahead, it’s so we can start spending money. Sure, it’s looking at your, especially from a fund-raising point of view. Are you maximizing what you’re able to raise when you have an event when you have a gala? If you have, if its an electronic of it? A letter appeal for end of your donations or a seasonal campaign. Uh, whatever our whichever mechanisms you used to fund-raising Are you maximizing its potential? Right? And I think that’s the lens that we look at. Eleven l. A. It’s not only the fund-raising but the friendraising, because our impact is creating, and our intent is creating stronger, more connected communities through the yards, and it’s kind of a dual approach. We also need to be ever support the yards fiscally for us to be able to get our mission. So it’s a little more about what Levitt Pavilion does. Sure, absolutely. Levitt Pavilion Los Angeles is It’s part of a national Levitt network, and Levin Foundation does incredible work in twenty six cities across the country, with the mission of creating stronger, more connected communities through the arts and specifically free live music. So throughout the country, you’LL see cities and towns come alive every single summer, respectively, between twenty five and fifty concerts. Every Levitt pavilion that’s designated as a permanent pavilion has the task. And really, though these air structures, these air structures, Yeah, absolutely. And so we’re all tasked with creating an offering fifty free concerts every single summer, and we do so by away of a public private partnership where we partner with the city departments in the respective city that were in what the foundation helps provide some seed money. But also the most important piece is getting the community buy-in because at the end of the day, if you don’t have the commuters support for something that is intended to serve them, what’s the point? So what’s incredible about Levin Potvin Los Angeles, is that it came at such an incredible time in MacArthur Park, which is a historic park in Los Angeles. Jimmy Webb dahna Summer, Right? So they were talking about this epic park that was once the premiere vacation oasis. The Shabelle is a of Los Angeles, and over the years, over the course of one hundred years of transition from being an incredibly wealthy neighborhood to one that then became a creative enclave, really boho chic, think Lower East Side Manhattan in the seventies and eighties and then continues in transition as resource is stopped coming to the neighborhood, especially city services. You know the migration patterns, especially as the civil wars in Central America really left, warn Torrente lands and people seeking refuge, and we saw an influx of Central American refugees into this specific neighborhood. But it happened so quickly that the density literally just expanded within maybe a few years, to the point where the neighborhood, because it was such a wealthy enclave, the sing the one single family homes had to be slapped together and carved into multiple family. When and you can imagine what that looks like, right, it’s, you know. And then we saw this very specific example. MacArthur Park went from the shop Elyse Tomb or oven, Ellis Island. And it’s incredible to know that Levitt Pavilion now and where we are. We are going into a thirteenth season we launch in two thousand seven in MacArthur Park. We have reached about five hundred thousand people coming through this place. So it’s we’re moving the needle, and it’s about exploring different ways to do so. Let’s talk about some of the challenges of doing bilingualism or trilingual is you said. You know, it could be depending on your demographics. What are some of the obstacles we’re gonna have to overcome? Sure, I think some of the obstacles, I think, just from a logistical point of view, it’s the long term investment is making sure that shouldn’t organization, especially at non-profit, commit to a plan of incorporating a second language into their marketing. And as part of their brand identity is identifying, Do they want to build an in house team to manage this every day and what that looks like? Or do you outsource it? And is it more of a campaign kind of a seasonal initiative? But the issues you run into that is continuity. When you have different hands kind of touching, OH, are influencing or molding the ingredients, you may get different results. What are some of these ingredients were talking about? You don’t meddle with different communications channels. So all the different, especially the communication channels, because everything has to be interlinked from your E blast from your website to your social tio, literally your printed materials, your hyre rabbis, radio, TV billboard. Everything has to be a cohesive marketing unit, even down to the programme in the community relations, right the way we conduct those meetings and identify and select and create a lineup, it’s creating a path for all of that to be connected through a single lens, you got to take a break. Tell us it’s the long stream of passive revenue because you get fifty percent of the fee. When cos you refer process their credit and debit card transactions through Tello’s, check out the video, then refer companies to the video if they’re still interested. They found the video interesting, then asked if they would consider making the switch and then you contact, Tell us and put the two of them together. It’s all in the video at the listener landing page at tony dot m a slash tony. Tell us for that long stream of passive revenue. Now back to Oliver Delgado. There’s gotta be more to this. I’m sure they’re then then just the language. You have to. You have to understand the culture of the the needs, the frustrations of the people in the community that you’re now trying to reach out to. It’s more than just speaking their language. Correct. You need to understand what what they’re about. Absolutely, and that is really That was the foundation of what Levitt Pavilion sought to do, and that’s create organic ties in the community. And that’s the first already start faith communities really everywhere, anywhere where the doors opened. So for us it was because of MacArthur Park, in the way that it’s structured it, surrounded by schools, churches, neighborhood organizations and businesses. It’s a very dense neighborhood. You were talking about eighty two hundred thousand people in about six square miles, right? So we’re talking about almost like the density of Manhattan, right? So I think that made it easy for us and being able to reach more people quickly. But also, it means that we have three more strategic and how you developed that plan, right? So the schools, the faith based organizations, you touch them all. You have to be able to be open, open, open toe, learning open to learning. And really, you know, the cultural nuances Just because, you know, blind ex culture is so vibrantly divers in itself, you know, from Mexico to Central America, Teo, even South America, the language changes so much that you have to be adaptable and be mindful that, you know, different words mean different things in different countries. So employing you know, the formality informal, the presentation. But ultimately is the trust it going in with an open heart and open arms so that people understand that it’s a dialogue not so much a speech critical. Otherwise, you’re not gonna build trust. Correct. You’LL have a meeting and xero and nothing correct, I think from it. So for Levitt Pavilion, Los Angeles one of our fundamental tools really is our Community Advisory Council. And this is a coalition comprise of principles residents, business owners, different organization and community leaders that acted one as our sound board for potential sponsors, for just bouncing ideas on artist to come to the stage, but also to get their eyes and ears on the ground learn from them directly. What’s happening in the neighborhood that we should be mindful of should be reflective love. So you can invite community leaders in the community you’re trying to approach to an advisory committee and say, You know, this is not a not a pro forma counsel. We really want your want your input. We want your advice. That’s right. We yes, we do want your connections also correct. We need them to reach the community that you’re now serving correct, and then for us, it’s about creating the space. And so everyone has a seat at the table. Yeah. Okay. You, uh, you planning talking something about developing your marketing lists? That’s right. Best practices for developing marketing list? Sure, Absolutely. So for eleven Pavilion, Los Angeles, again, we develop our English language baseless, which means that everyone on that list has opted in when they signed on up for a concert from ours weepie to get reminders of certain shows they had option of being about to receive information in English or in Spanish. So once we get that information, they’re actually collated in that way. So the English sign ups go to one lesson in Spanish sign ups go to another, and then we target those specific list with specific language newsletters. And so that way nothing is cut out. Nothing is impacting away where you’re lessening the content or, you know, undercutting it you’re presenting. If it’s for the weekend of concerts, is providing a glimpse of what’s to come. But also who are the community partners who are the sponsors who are the different? What are the different pieces? Making that specific show so unique? So for us is being able to deliver that message in a timely way, but also easy to follow. Easy to read, as the kids say, making a very chill right, making it approachable. I’m just easy to digest. OK, anything else but best practice Wai’s best practices. I mean, I have a whole list. It just depends on how you sometime. Absolutely so. If we were to look at labbate putting Los Angeles we, the first thing we had to do is identify our audiences. And so we know that we had the task of incorporating and reaching the local community of West Lake. But then, looking at what makes our work possible. And that’s then we have our sponsors, our community partners, thie elected officials, kind of the periphery supporting cast that plays a crucial role. So identifying those audiences that helps us figure out how we present our information. From there, it was creating, enduring in on. We’re going to present our secondary language in an informal way or the informal Spanish, right? So you, you know, quick Spanish lesson. If you haven’t reverses the form, correct, you have the to form and then you have those dead form, which can be as different as a swimsuit versus a power suit. And that’s how different the communication ring communication can come across. So for us, we’re identifying that informal old home and then identifying the in house team. So that’s myself and a couple of associates where we create every single day opportunities for our bilingual approach to have legs. So through our social writing, different mechanisms to make sure that that’s observed. Um, you can’t you can’t outsource. This is you mentioned earlier like you can outsource it on what kind of what kind of consultant freelance or are you looking for? Well, we don’t because I’m not, you know? Yeah, sure, would one. What would one would be looking for? Absolutely. I think the aforementioned when you figure out your audiences and you figure out what tone you want to take is finding people who specialize in that specific thing in that culture and that culture, because ultimately this person is without you knowing or wanting is your surrogate right in the communities in just written and spoken word. So it’s how do you essentially create this opportunity for someone to learn your voice or create your voice in a way that’s organic to you and is possible for you to continue past their involvement with organization on a consultant basis. So again it’s created for digital presence. For us is massive because that’s the way that we reach more people. So the website we have when you go to our website, you have the ability of hovering and clicking on the English side to get all the information in English and then hovering over to the other side of cooking the Spanish button. Everything goes into Spanish, but the most crucial thing and this goes back to the house human capital. And that’s when you click over to the Spanish. The’s are all handwritten translations were not running it through a filter. It’s not a plug Google translate. Now Google translate these air hand rin translations because we want to present the same level of enthusiastic, community oriented and accessible information the way we do in English. Same way in Spanish. Okay, Yeah, And so that weaves into social media that we into the electron newsletters. It goes into the brochures or collateral, your swag, your videos, your programming, which is fundamental, right? Yeah, let’s talk about some events. So live events. How do you make those bilingual? Absolutely. So what’s really cool about labbate Pope in Los Angeles again, we we’ve bilingual that that bilingual asking to everything we do. So when you come onto the Levitt Lawn, you’LL see a massive led wall, a Jumbotron, if you will, and it displays real time information from set list to the vendors selling food or merchandise document partners. Any special announcements or recognitions all is per presented visually in English and Spanish, right? So there’s that step. And then there’s another layer, which is really cool is that we have emcees. Every show was the last summer, was emceed by a bilingual professional from local influencers. Podcast Media photo there. So they’re speaking in both. So they speak both languages. They’LL say two or three sentences in English, and then they’LL say it in Spanish. That’s correct. And so and this emcee not only helps narrow rate the experience for level, especially for new comers, new visitors, but it helps really set the tone of the excitement so that what is written can now have an auditory base and support, and so from commercials, as we call them to prompts from even two no smoking and picking up trash or even promised to donate on venmo or through our buckets. It’s providing that accessibility both in English and Spanish. Our sign Ege Everything is in English and Spanish in case it should the led well go out Should the sound go out and emcees can’t speak, we actually have actual signs that display the same information. And then when it goes to our actual advertising, which is placed beyond you know, our neighborhood and in Westlake and goes across the city very targeted for certain neighborhoods so that we funnel in and really reach demographics you’LL see that the billboards are staggered you’LL see English and Spanish side by side and you’LL see it for Rose and Rose and the whole point there is again presenting information at once, especially considering that you have short amount of time. Someone’s driving down the street is that you have seconds and his you know, we may have a little more time with her at a red light. Ah, and our goal there is hopefully by the end of that, you probably expanded your Spanish vocabulary. But at minimum, you know that there are fifty free concerts coming to MacArthur Park from June first two September first twenty nineteen. Time for our last break text to give you diversify your revenue by adding mobile giving. It’s not only for disasters, it’s not only for small dollar donations, it’s not on ly through the phone bill. It does not need to be through the phone bill. There are different ways of doing it that can make the donations larger. You could find out all about what text to give. Does ah eliminate some of the misconceptions you may have all by texting NPR to four four, four nine nine nine. We’ve got several more minutes for go Bi lingual. We still have some time left together. What? Absolutely, What else you want to talk about? Best, Maybe more. Best practices around the list building the membership. I’m sorry, the marketing marketing lists? Absolutely no. So I think what? Ah, very big piece, I think, fundamentally is the fund-raising. I think that’s a lens that we’re also in a new venture for us in the Spanish speaking community because we haven’t seen a culture of philanthropy and this specific neighborhood, because again we mentioned its transition, and it’s currently ah, low income community. But that doesn’t mean that you can’t create it. It just means that you make it more accessible, Easier to tap into or participate so means lower dollar fundraisers, but nonetheless, on a continuous basis. So that one people know that we need their support, but too, they can participate. How do you How do you get contact info for people who attend concerts? Sure thing s o our web. So we have kind of like a multi pronged approach. So the digital phase is on our website. There. We have a third party plug in O R. Rather service that helps present every single concert so that you can say All right, great. These are the fifty shows I’m gonna click on one, and then it asked youto ours VP, you put in your email, you select which language you’d like to receive information in, and then we’re able to, you know, grab, you know, capture that information. And then we have our community relations team that has a presence across so many events across the city that then they are actually physically collecting emails. How do they What do they say? Somebody. So they they’re walking among the audience before the show starts. Yeah, eso business, eh, Externally from our site. So if they’re out of community event, what happens? Oh, I’m sorry. He’s a community, not let us. So we have to go out. So you have tables. That’s correct. So let’s say a festival year are already all those things. You know, our swag are very appealing, so that makes it easy to bring people over. So that’s one way of getting emails. Two on the lawn again. We have our info booth, right? Very much very branded info, booth, English and Spanish information equipped with volunteers and staff. They’re also bilingual, so they’re trained cultural sensitivity, language, sensitivity. And again, that’s another way that we collect information. Because if you want to get some water, if you want to get a brochure, if you want to get a tote bag, you want to get a hat. You want to get sticker whatever it is. Once you’re there, you’re probably more likely to try to get more. You want to get more information because you’re not only receiving information, but you’re experiencing what our brand and what our mission is. Okay, I like your first point about being out in the community, not just waiting for people to call, and you don’t know that. Do you need to go out to like street fairs are great idea. That’s that’s crucial. And the thing with us is that we we want to reach everyone. So we’re all parts of the cities in different neighborhood and ethnic enclaves. Just because we want to make sure that one Level eight continues to put inclusivity at the forefront of everything that we do, too, that we make that earnest attempt of creating this organic, trusting relationships by those connections and three a letting people know there’s an incredible way to connect with fellow Angelenos and a freeway and get quality entertainment because we offer both local and international talent. And so, in a situation where L. A is an expensive city and you know, let’s say a family of four to six can’t afford four hundred dollars worth of concert tickets, right? You’re the alt correct, and so tickets, food, beverages easily. You can spend five hundred dollars in the night well, versus coming over to the level L A stage bringing your food. You know, it’s kind of a cook outside you can bring your blanket, bring your food, bring the whole family we have. Actually, we have one really cool Levitt ear, as we call them, of very staunch supporter of of ours. And her name is Nora. And every single summer she celebrates her birthday at eleven Ellen, and she brings out forty people for this, right? And it’s one of those things where it’s a great equalizer. Everyone can come whether it’s water, whether it’s juice, whether it’s a sandwich cake, they’re all coming out. Creating this potluck environment and enjoying the music and adding to the vibe at eleven Really a magical experience. We still we still actually have about two minutes there so together. So what more you’re going to share with your audience that we haven’t talked about sure that we haven’t talked about that That’s applicable for them, not about what we’ve done a lot of absolutely. I think it is just exploring the different ways that you know folks and get involved. I think media is going to be a very big point that I’m going to drive in because it’s important that people realize that should they adventure out into a second language it’s creating again those organic relationships or media. So I have conversations with Spanish media where my conversations are completely in Spanish. Right? That’s important because again you’re meeting them on their turf. I have conversations with England English media partners where everything is in English and then I have newer engagements or rather, interactions where it’s tze bilingual, right? It’s kind of reflective, right? Especially if I’m working with Gen z millennial media outlets or, you know, social media entities. It’s creating that really cool, conversational direct dialogue with them and meeting them on their turf so that when we meet them where they are absolutely so again, it helps frame the experience. But two, you know, people will be more likely to try to get involved with you if if they see that you’re making a really earnest attempt, you know, connect to their audience is that the same is travelling to another country, correct. When I think when when foreigners see that you’re you’re making an attempt to learn to use the language, your pronunciation isn’t so good. You may be the cabin. The vocabulary is not a robust, but you know it’s over between pointing and attempting and, you know, you’re you’re outreaching to them in their homeland. Correct. They’re going. They’re going to try to meet you halfway. That’s right, Right? With a little, you know, some variation of of their their English. That’s right. And what’s really same same. Exactly. And that’s and then ultimately, hyre one end this our programming, our programming, obviously, is our main product. And so we present ah, fifty percent of our baseline concert. So twenty five shows are going to be Latin genres. Right? And we’re talking about not only the cumbias and the betting is in sauces, but the acid jazz, the hip hop, the rnb thie Scott, the reggae, right? Just exploring the different visions auras of Spanish language music and presenting in away sametz correct where where they are again, understanding the culture understanding, but also helping people expand their musical pallets right there. Right, Gobi out. So the so the so The marine gay listener is getting exposed to Scott. Correct? Correct. We gotta leave it there. You’re sure? Alright. Is Oliver over Delgado? That’s right. Director of marketing and communications at the eleven a civilian Los Angeles. This is non-profit radio coverage of nineteen ntcdinosaur non-profit Technology Conference This interview. All of them at ninety ninety Sea brought to you by our partners at ActBlue Free fund-raising Tools to help non-profits make an impact Thanks so much for being with us next week. Grit, succeeding as a woman in Tech and how to create an implement. Great ideas both from nineteen Auntie Si. If you missed any part of today’s show, I beseech you find it on tony. Martignetti dot com were sponsored by pursuing online tools for small and midsize non-profits, Data driven and technology enabled. Tony dahna Slash Pursuing by Wagner’s Deepa is guiding you beyond the numbers When you’re cps dot com. Bye, Tell us Credit card and payment processing your passive revenue stream. Tony dahna slash Tony Tell us and by text to give mobile donations. Made Easy text. NPR to four four four nine nine nine A Creative producers. Claire Meyerhoff Sam Liebowitz is the line producer shows Social Media is by Susan Chavez. Mark Silverman is our Web guy, and this music is by Scott Stein of Brooklyn, New York Thanks for that information, Scotty. There with me next week for non-profit radio. Big non-profit ideas for the other ninety five percent go out and be great. You’re listening to the talking Alternate network e-giving Wait, you’re listening to the Talking Alternative Network. Are you stuck in a rut? Negative sports feelings and conversations got you down. Hi, I’m nor in Sumpter potentially ater. Tune in every Tuesday at nine to ten p. M. Eastern time and listen for new ideas on my show yawned potential Live life your way on talk radio dot N Y c Hey, all you crazy listeners looking to boost your business. Why not advertise on talking alternative with very reasonable rates? Interested? Simply email at info at talking alternative dot com Thie Best designs for your life Start at home. I’m David here. Gartner interior designer and host of At Home Listen, Live Tuesday nights at eight p. M. Eastern Time. As we talk to the very best professionals about interior design and the design, that’s all around us right here on talk radio dot N. Y c. 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Nonprofit Radio for April 5, 2019: 19NTC and NTEN & Strong Social Ads On $100 A Month

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schnoll Hello and welcome to Tony martignetti non-profit Radio. Big non-profit ideas for the other ninety five percent. I’m your aptly named host. Oh, I’m glad you’re with me. I’d turn die gastric if I had the stomach. The idea that you missed Today’s show. Nineteen ntcdinosaur n. Ten We kick off our coverage of the twenty nineteen non-profit Technology Conference with intends CEO Aimee Semple Ward. She dishes on the conference, including its wonderful food, Portland and the organization she leads and strong social ads on one hundred dollars a month. You can have an effective social media advertising campaign on a small budget if you plan smartly for your targeting, messaging and measuring. George Winer is co founder of Power Poetry Dot or GE, and that was recorded at the twenty nineteen non-profit Technology Conference on Tony’s Take two Grieving in your plant e-giving. We’re sponsored by pursuant full service, fund-raising Data driven and Technology enabled. Twenty dahna may slash pursuing by what your CPS guiding you beyond the numbers regular cps dot com by Tell us Attorney credit card processing into your passive revenue stream. Tony dahna may slash Tony tell us and by text to give mobile donations made easy Text NPR to four four four nine nine nine Here we kick off our nineteen ninety six coverage with Amy Sample Ward. Welcome to Tony martignetti non-profit radio coverage of nineteen ninety si. You know what that is? It’s the twenty nineteen non-profit Technology Conference were at the convention center in Portland, Oregon, This interview. Like all of our nineteen ntcdinosaur views brought to you by our partners at ActBlue free fund-raising tools to help non-profit make an impact there, Right next door here. I know you can see him on the video you got, you got you got a piece of them in the video and with me now is the CEO of the hosting organization of NTC, which a lot of people call. And ten we’LL get to that. But the organization is in ten. The conferences NTC and Amy Sample Ward is the CEO of and ten and, of course, our social media and technology contributor on non-profit radio as well. It’s wonderful to see you. Thank you. It’s nice to get to be in person as we say that every year, but it’s the only chance we get. Exactly. Teo I’LL have to coordinate a trip to New York at the same time is a records show. Yeah, that would be very nice if you could put it on a Friday. Friday. Wanted to. Were still same as we used to. Try and make it happen. How many years have you been out here now? Six, five six. Have I been well? I used to be out here. Well, yes, you were born here, but I moved back. Yeah, six years ago. Six years ago this summer. Because that’s six years ago this summer. I will have been the CEO. Okay, June. That’s right. You took you took in June. And before that, you were the membership director, Correct. But on non-profit radio? Much, much longer than that. Why do you know so much about me? This is like a strange fact findings. Because because because I’m common knowledge doesn’t know its way here. And I knew you think I don’t think I have a page on like a piano? I don’t think so. I don’t either. I don’t think it’s something you need to aspire to necessarily. No, no, just just sharing. Your parents will feel bad about that. Um, all right. So we’re at NTC, which a lot of people say we’re at intent. I had I had probably a dozen people e mail me ami it inten Yeah, I’m going to intern. I heard you going to Inten. I don’t bother to correct him. Do you know you could probably get one hundred times more than I do? Do you correct them, or do you just accept it? We don’t necessarily say. Oh, you said the wrong thing way. Just respond with Yes, we’LL see you at the NTC. You do that. You know I do the same thing, you know, in conversation or email. We do that. But on Monday and Tuesday, a lot of the work of whichever staff person was currently that we call it Social Media Captain, whoever’s the ones you know, staffing social media for that. Well, we do like, two hours at a time. Otherwise you get, you know, subject to the Internet. A lot of their work the couple days before the conference is replying to people that are using the wrong hashtag. Okay, then say it’s not in ten, nineteen, nineteen antisocial people. Do you know, Tio, they do every combination of N ten in the year and ntcdinosaur the year. Yeah, so Ah, lot of it is just so glad you’re excited. Please use the actual half way. Have these for a reason. Right? Okay, so we are at NTC, which is hosted by and ten. Correct. Okay, we’ve said that correctly. So I see the way I’m opposite the thie audience. Big center, stage, stage, office at the main stage. And I saw a right now it says gender neutral bathrooms, restrooms. But earlier, I always say bathroom too. And the other day, reward restrooms made that intentional kind of thought of. Well, you don’t take a bath. No, I know, but so a restroom is really just We’re not really resting either. Depending on what we all know, health is bringing the status of your health may not be resting either, but I do see two three four five two thousand three hundred forty five registrants so fast that yesterday’s lowercased eso still killer still. Yeah, I see. One thousand four hundred seventy four. First time registrants. Yeah, enormous it is. It’s higher than we usually have a way. Were chatting about it. All right. Wait. You have a nutrition problem, I think. Well, I think it is also important. Remember that this is the most attendings we’ve ever had. So it isn’t as surprising that there’s that, that there’s a significant bump in new folks because we’ve never been in Portland before. It has a proportion, but I’m just saying the NTC has never been important lit. So that’s a lot of folks who’ve never had the conference come to their area, even if it’s not Portland, you know, the larger region. And the last time the NTC was in the Pacific Northwest was Seattle in, like two thousand five. So ah lot, you know, the this the Washington, Montana, Idaho, Oregon, Alaska what we consider the Pacific Northwest. Those five states haven’t had an NTC in a super long time. So I think there’s a lot more folks from the greater region that came out this year that have never come. Okay, Okay. Yeah, we’re also exciting that that many new folks where you come in great energy Yeah, yeah. Now are their stats on longest the greatest longevity and NTC scene that slide. Well, we don’t necessarily, you know, in the super early days, there wasn’t like a database that was trying to track it. So we don’t have. We don’t have the receipts from, you know, two thousand, two thousand one two thousand two. But we do track how many folks have hit the ten year mark, and I think that we have a slide. I think it’s like seventy six that are here. Have been to ten or more. Okay, that’s that’s a yes, I have to. You know it. Shout out ntcdinosaur and intend for the slide. I just saw that you were very It’s very friendly. I think there’s a breastfeeding in lactation room on, and it’s not often the corner. It’s right by the elevators. Prominent? Yes, you have a You have a meditation room and meditation and Ricky prayer room by room. Yes, so that you know, because this this can’t be cacophonous and right fast learning and oh, my God, I’m overwhelmed. How could I bring all this back and you need to settle right Then we have folks who feel like they have to miss an entire session block because they need to go back to their hotel to make sure that they can pray to certain time like No, Just come downstairs for those fifteen minutes and pray and go back to your session, you know? Yeah. Very, very welcoming way. Wanted to be level of all d ay, you’re inclusive. You welcoming. Thank you for saying that. Thank you for noticing those efforts. Yeah, I appreciate that. Because that takes time and money and stat. Yeah, of course. Of course. Um so Wei have three hundred sessions here. Nineteen. We’ve got one hundred eighty over three hundred speakers. Your speakers, because you got a lackluster host. I’m sorry, but it’s OK. I’m here to correct the facts. Yes. No, fake is okay, right? Please don’t. Okay, So three hundred speakers out of eighty session. Yeah, we’ve got a record here. Non-profit Radio thirty seven. Wow, They’re having interviews. That’s going to be a full schedule. It is. It is. Yeah, that’s awesome. Last year was twenty eight or thirty, Okay. Thirty seven thirty seven. Every session, every every session block shoutout to ash. Who by? By sending emails told speakers that he wouldn’t have been coordinating with. Yeah, he was. He was excellent. Great. Helped us get a record. Great. I don’t know. You’d have to You have to extend the conference for us to have it. Or, you know we’re not We’re not. How would you say? I guess we’re not sustainable, right? We’re not scaleable scaleable. Thank you. You’re correct. We’re not scaleable. We are sustainable. We’re not scaleable. Yes, you’LL have to expand the conference for us to get more than you or I don’t know. I don’t eat lunch. Don’t you don’t get a restroom break. Neither of which is sustainable, right? Crack or feasible? What else we got? Menus. Your food here is always very good. Always a gluten free gluten free options Vegan Kosher. Hello. Everything excellently taken care in there that cost money. It costs a lot of money across a gross amount of money. Kosher in law was a lot more than well, just bring out, you know, brings whatever you got. Yeah, fifty percent of our menu has to be gluten free and begin so that already costs a lot of use because they consider that specialty meals they do. Is that because of institutional policy at inten? Yeah, we just know that by doing that were also ensuring that there are other corollary allergies that are being taken care of and accommodates a lot more folks with that kind of level. Yeah, yeah, it’s time for a break Pursuant. The Art of First Impressions. How to combine Strategy, analytics and creative to captivate new donors and keep them coming back. That’s their e book on donor acquisition and how to make a smashing first impression. It’s at the listener landing page, of course. Tony dahna slash pursuing capital P for please. Now back to nineteen ntcdinosaur and in ten Tell us about the keynote speaker. Oh, Italy in Bombay, you don’t eat. Elina loved that Italy abila. Yes, please. She is incredible. She is, ah, community activist and technologist and on everything on. And we asked her to join us and share some of her experience interviews, specifically because of her work at the intersection of kind of traditional non-profit, work-life isn’t necessarily one campaign or one organizing effort, but you know, meant to be kind of sustained programs over time. And what does it look like to do that with folks who are only going to be engaged for one protest or one march or one campaign, one program? Maybe that maybe they will be inspired to join after that, but you’re not necessarily banking on that, right? So her experience and work at at those two intersections, all of it because of technology she has. I mean, she shared this morning, but also a lot of what she’s passionate about is making sure that everyone who works for social impact, whether you’re in a non-profit, you’re building your own activism, your community organizer in your community that you are ensuring you have tech skills because that is going to be what helps us win these fights, right? You have to be able to organize online. Teo, use the Internet to find information like all of those pieces, that it’s not some IT department in a sophisticated organisation, every single person working for change needs to invest in their own tech skills to be able to really organize and fight. Now, other days, lots of conferences would have multiple keynote speakers, right? You don’t do that. We don’t have one keynote speaker. Yes, and then the other s o tomorrow and Friday. You have the ignite session. Yeah, so tomorrow are ignites. There are six different people and they are all telling stories their stories are very different from each other. But all of their stories are about how we can use the Internet to change our communities, change our organizations, change the world. And on Friday we announce our three awards, the Antenna or the Lifetime Achievement Award, and the Robb Stark Memorial Ward. So Friday is brunch. We got a jazz band. There is even more food than we already provide on we’LL just announce those community words. Okay? Yeah. When do we get the announcement? About twenty. And tc, uh, twenty. They’re all up on the website. So in twenty twenty, we will be in Baltimore in twenty twenty are Sorry. Yes, twenty twenty ntcdinosaur, Baltimore twenty one and TC is in Pittsburgh and twenty two anti sees in Denver. Okay, Pittsburgh for months in college. Really? I don’t know that Carnegie Mellon. Oh, cool. I don’t know that I like Pittsburgh latto hyre life Pittsburgh to and especially when we’re talking about the non profit sector and the tech sector those to the intersection of them also those two have are really changing pittsburgh right now. Si mun pit with Nelson. Yeah, right. And the Russians have been so many drugs in the tech companies and start ups there. There’s non-profits who’ve been there for a hundred years. And there’s non-profits, who are just starting. You know, it’s a really vibrant city, so I’m excited to go there for the NTC. They’ve had a true revolution. That was That was steel, steel, steel manufacturing, right. Industrial city. Yeah. Back is Justus. Recent is like the seventies there would be Sometimes the street lights would have to come on in the middle of the day. So the guy gets the coal ash. Right? So that’s an off on output of steel manufacturing like that. I mean, it was it was a dirty durney manufacturing city, but that, you know, a part of the industrial Revolution, our industrial economy. Yeah. Yeah, then But now very high tech biotech, right. The University of Pittsburgh Medical Center. Huge. So huge in, in medical, medical tech, Andi, Also in some incredible museums and art organizations, they’re so yeah, really, I’m excited, but I’m also excited for Baltimore next year. You know, Baltimore has seen ah, lot of visibility and news. I think in ways that folks can believe things about Baltimore make generalizations about Baltimore that aren’t aren’t consistent with the lived experience of the community there, you know, and especially with intense focus on digital equity, there’s a lot of work in Baltimore right now to make sure people have access and are getting online are part of the Internet world. So I’m really excited for what we can dio in Baltimore and, you know, things we can lift up from the local community at the conference, which, you know, is part of what we’re always doing trying to make sure people are out in connecting and experiencing the city when they come to a conference. So yeah, yes. So So for so many years, you were wedded tio contracts that have been signed years ago and you were alternative, and they don’t exist anymore. Your This is your first year of freedom, isn’t it? From those two. New Orleans was our first was seventeen and DC was our last DC contract. Okay, Okay. I brought a piece of nostalgia and you gave me and I forgot to get it because I was so excited to get started. Could you bring me R? She’s off camera dancing around my laptop bag. Please. Please. There’s a bit of a well, so excited. It’s not too far back. Okay, So what else can we, uh What else You want to acquaint us with nineteen NTC? What? I mean, I’m I’m really excited for this year because we have a couple different kinds of sessions in the past. You know, we’ve always had ninety minute sessions and they could take different formats, panels or presentation. One day, seventy five, there were ninety. But now, this year, we’ve introduced tactical sessions, so these are intentionally short. They’re only thirty minutes long. They’re meant to just be, like, truly tactical. You know, these are five tools you can use to do X. You know, eso folks can use that as their time to just, you know, pick their new photo editor or there what? You know, whatever and get really specific advice about how do I do this thing in WordPress or whatever it might be? So the click candy of conference, right? Right. Third, and it’s quick. Right? Learn something fast in five hundred, you know? Yeah. Yeah. So we’re excited just to test that out this year and see how it goes. See what we can learn from that. How to make it better for next year. But I’m excited that we can have both of those. So it’s not always big, heavy, brain taxing topics. There’s also some that are like we just had lunch. I just want you to tell me what app to use, You know, for managing Twitter or something. And I want to go. Okay, So, yeah. Was that staff driven or community community idea? Yeah. Community folks have been asking for, you know, not a thirty minute session specifically, but they’ve been asking for other ways to get Mohr lighter way tactical content and wondering, You know, if you have a whole ninety minutes, we’ll you’re going tohave to cover like, here’s one hundred tools that you you know. And that’s not helpful, because now it’s overwhelmingly a long list. Eso We’ve heard that community feedback for a few years, and this was our our first attempt that howto make it happen. All right. Yeah. So what’s your nostalgia? I only sixteen. I brought the last print. Yeah, Print program guide in programme programme. Exactly. I have to say these were from the non-profit radio perspective. This is actually more convenient for me? Yeah, because I could have it out, you know, And I could go right to I had all the pages Dog eared for which session? Our interview next See there highlighted their starred It it was always there for me, so I would just like it’s like you’re conference here, but they would lay flat. Yeah. And then I could just pass this off to the person doing our postproduction. Heywood have all he It always was a guy. He would have the information that he needed, and I didn’t have to type it out, right? Were sent him to a site. Um, it was a lot easier for me, but see, instead I had a bottle. You know, we have a pdf version of the agenda that you can have that in print. I guess I could go on. All right. All right. I’m not sure, but I think this is a keeper. This is like the last er, Yeah, the last stapled Rolling Stone magazine, Right? Exactly. Exactly. Um, let’s talk about D I Okay. And as it relates to the conference in ten. Very conscious of diversity equity and inclusion aside. Well, you certainly mentioned prayer rooms. Very important. What else? What else? Folks should know that this is a very conscious, consciously designed conference. Sure. I mean, I guess there’s a few different layers we could talk about. One is the kind of surface experience layer where, yes, you could go to a prayer room. You can get pronoun ribbons. You can use a gender neutral restroom. Those kind of surface level things, the next layer down are things that only some people see and that is work we do with speakers. We give them communications and training ahead of time, orientation ahead of time. And then we give them essentially like reminder sheets in their room that remind them of, you know, not saying you guys not saying I t guy or, you know, whatever. What? What can be a common micro aggression as a speaker, you know, on ly calling on certain people. So we try and train them to be ready, act in a way that is consistent with how we want this conference to go on, and then the next layer down from that are things that folks probably don’t see at all, which are, you know, the policies and practices we have for picking and engaging vendors. You know, anyone that works with us has to commit to our policies. Has Teo participate in an open process? We invite certain folks to apply to be vendors, you know. So there are things that happen behind the scenes that also help create the accountability kind of a true beginning of that chain that we really want to be part of. We’re told every year by the convention center that we work with, that they have never had, which I can’t believe it’s true but whole different. They tell us different, convey that they’ve never had anybody say we will only be here if we can have gender neutral restrooms that we will only be here if you open up your process to hyre folks of color if you know. So when we put that out. Convention center staff say we’ve never been asked this before. We’ve never been asked to meet these expectations. We will, you know, let’s go work to do this. And some of the folks we worked with have said Now that you’re demanding this of us, I’m in a position to tell, you know the place I work. They need these standards. But I may need to work in this way, Graham. Right? Exactly. So then we can influence that process for other folk enforcing it through the organically right? On DH they’LL they’ll do it they’Ll They’re not only their consciousness raised, but they’Ll adopt policies. Um, right, organically right on DH for market for market driven purposes they want they want attract other conferences. Exactly. And they can now make Now, hold this out as an attribute, whereas before in ten game, right, they didn’t even But maybe they don’t even have consciousness. If they did, they didn’t happen on organizational was important when we’re talking about, you know, organisational institutional power and how to use that power. You know, it is in that way in negotiation, in contracting. But also, you know, we have in our policies that we will not hold any of our conference is in a state that has laws that discriminate. So when you know, a certain state says, hey, we really want you to come and we say Great, Will. You just introduced this bill. We will not come to your state. They you know we are not an organisation that, like has lobbyists and does that kind of work just have the money that you spent. But a convention center does. Right giant hotel chains dio eso when we tell them we will not come there. We will not give, you know, the Marriott or the Hilton or whoever any more money unless you go send your lobbyist to take down that bill from your state Congress. That’s also a form of institutional power that we want to be consciously wielding. Well, then, New York is open and North Carolina is out. Its true North Carolina’s out and Indiana’s out, he says. Well, um, my wife and I live in two different cities. If everybody knows that, you might have heard that from times. If you listen, a lot of you may have, you may have heard rumors to that effect. You’re an insider’s true if you’re in sector. Thank you. Wait. We have a couple minutes left. What’s what’s knew it knew it into Well, we’re hiring two positions right now for okay, so we’re hiring office and admin coordinator. So somebody that would be working with all staff on you know, all of the kind of admin processes like renewals and invoices and all of that kind of stuff. But then also working with the technology team on in office technology support, getting Teo learn how to manage a database. We’re We’re thinking of it as essentially our entry level tech job that we’ve never been able to create before, so that we are also building up new technologists who are probably not with a degree in technology or anything like that. And then we’re also hiring a membership and marketing director. That used to be your job. Yes, many, many years ago. Membership included marketing as well. It just wasn’t in the title right on DH. Someone left and created an opening. Yes. Okay. Yeah. And so we use that opportunity, you know, just to kind of really refine what they’ll dio. And we can talk more about this in coming months. But in later this year, in twenty nineteen, we’re going to roll out a new membership model. So they’ll also get to be part of the strategy and implementation of that. Of course, this is like a long time coming. Staff have been doing this work. It’s not we’re not going to get hired and make it up like we’ve already got it. But they’LL be part of how we message it and how we work with the community and that change. I’m a member. You are just mean. The place is going up. No, no, it’s not about that. It’s just the model around membership and and what it means to be a member. What you get is a member s So we will talk about that coming months. Yeah, remind me if I forget to ask. Okay, income share in coming months for sure. And so and let’s make it explicit. Thie, the ten office is in Portland. Yeah, this is where your baby This is our timeline at home. Yeah, the first time you ever said that. You said that before? Yes. And you. But of course, you do have virtual employees. We know that we know that from previous conversations. How many? How many here in Portland? We have eleven in Portland. When we have three that are remote. We’re hiring too, So we’LL see how that goes. Okay, so you’re going up to sixteen. You have sixteen staff. Does that sound right? Um love Oh, I’m messing on the math Wrong We’LL be at fifteen eleven threes fourteen Oh, yes. A ten, ten and ten and three plus two. Okay, Yeah. Okay. Um, we could leave it there or we could talk for another minute. So let’s talk for a minute. I don’t get to see you that often. Yeah, well, what’s So what’s new with non-profit radio, I would say the biggest thing in new on non-profit radio. Well, very exciting. The AC bilich sponsorship. Yeah, Sponsorship. ActBlue isn’t awesome. Yes, vendor partner in the sector. We appreciate that they are a good one to partner with you. You know, I would’ve told you if they were a bad one. You know that e I know you would’ve You would’ve looked out for me. Thank you. So that’s very exciting to have a kind of of prestigious partner on the other thing. Nuit non-profit radio would be the insider side of videos that are a little late on rolling out there. They’re having they’re gonna have them there on my phone, there in the zoom. There isn’t a cloud. Nice postproduction by me has not been not done yet, but yes, only insiders and get a little deeper. Dive. Ah, short short form five, five five six minutes. Video Deeper Dive with a guest. Then What about What about outside of non-profit radio? What other work stuff? We never talked about your works. We talked about my work study plan giving consulting? Yeah. Twenty nineteen to very, very Marquis names. I’m now consulting and playing giving for what is now Brady. How it used to be the Brady Center or the Brady campaign to prevent Gun violence right now. Just rebranding within the past few weeks. They rolled out there. Brady? Yeah. Thank you for doing work with them. And I am their plan giving council. Yeah, it’s a pleasure. Yeah. On DA. This is a very big year for them. Twenty fifth anniversary of the signing of the bill. Right? Fortieth anniversary of ah, they have another there. They have another anniversary to know. I didn’t know that I was a twenty fifth anniversary of the signing. The Brady Bill? Yeah, on the other theater, marquee name really is visiting their service of New York. Oh, cool. Huge agency? Yeah. Have fifteen thousand employees, right? Two billion dollars in revenue. Yeah, and written work. I am building their plan giving program as well. Oh, great landing. Yeah. Thank you for doing all of that. Does important work way. We never get to talk about it. We don’t because I don’t like, you know, like, what if I get to interview you one day? Let’s not get carried away. Wait, Let’s leave it there. And now it is time. I have to say goodbye. Okay? Having me, thank you for being a part of this fun. Three days. This is our fifth. Yeah, it’s not probably fifty NTC. Yeah, but I haven’t been to a session yet. Oh, my God. You look, you get your own version of the session with speakers here. Dio How many? I get thirty seven sessions. Right. Get the quick, get the short version. The thing. Get the thirty minute version of thirty seven sessions. Yeah, she’s Amy Sample Ward, CEO of and ten. And we’re in nineteen ninety Sea. She’s also the social media and technology contributor for non-profit radio. And this interview, like all our ntcdinosaur nineteen ninety si interviews, is brought to you by our partners at ActBlue Free fund-raising tools to help non-profits make an impact. Thank you so much for being with us. We need to take a break. Wagner, CPS. They’ve got a free webinar coming up. It’s on April sixteenth. Tips and tricks for your nine ninety. The best part of this, I think, is the part that talks about increasing the PR value of your IRS. Form nine ninety using different sections, including Narrative for Marketing because you’re nine ninety is widely available. Guide Star, Charity Navigator, your own site and widely read by potential donors. Regular cps dot com Click seminars and then go to April. Now time for Tony Stick, too. Grieving is part of your plan giving program. I’m still grieving my father in law’s death early late late last week. Um, and it got me thinking in my sadness that there’s grieving as a part of your plan to giving program. And that is when relatives call you to tell you that someone who was a donor to your organization has died. They might be calling because the donor had you in their life insurance. Or maybe it was a charitable gift annuity. Whatever the reason, grieving people will contact you when, ah, when your plan giving donors die on. I’m I’m talking here about when family members contact you, not when it’s an attorney’s office. That’s that’s different there. They’re not grieving the way family members do. So I’m talking about the family members calling on DH. You need Teo Teo Treat this special and I talk about it in my video. I’ve got some tips there, you know, like making sure that you keep your promises. For instance, meet your deadlines. All the more reason to do that with someone who’s grieving and, ah, and needy and and not at their best by any means. So I’ve got some ideas on my video as it occurred to me as a ZAY was grieving and that the video is that tony martignetti dot com Now let’s go back. Let’s go to George Whiner and Strong Social ads on one hundred dollars a month. Welcome to Tony martignetti non-profit radio coverage of nineteen ninety Sea. It’s the twenty nineteen non-profit Technology Conference We’re sponsored by our partners. At Act blew all the interviews that nineteen ninety cr they have free fund-raising tools to help non-profits make an impact. My guest is George Whiner. He is co founder of Power poetry dot or GE George. Welcome. Hey, thanks for having me. Pleasure. Pleasure to have you on the show. Your topic is effective. Social media advertising on one hundred dollars a month. This is doable. Yeah. I mean, that’s why we titled the session that way. Why would we do it? Otherwise, you might Maybe you’ve ah, had sessions in the past that were not well enough. Attended. So you needed to kind of lead in. Well, the problem was, we originally started with ninety nine dollars. No one believed it. You know what that extra dollar made? All the difference. All the impact came in that last dollar. Very good. You have us your own podcast. What is that? What you give a shout out for your own? Well, we do appreciate the love the whole well dot com slash podcast is social impact tech talking about stories in the nonprofit world where people find that you can find that at a whale dot com slash podcast culwell whole whale dot com dot com slash podcast. Okay. No. And you’LL give a shout out to non-profit radio next time you’re in front of Mike. We absolutely will. Okay, we will. Hey, we could have a crossover episode cross over. That sounds intimate. I don’t know. It’s all right. We’Ll get there. We’re talking about our here. We could talk. We’re going to figure this out zoho old hands first. Um OK, so you say this is doable. I believe you. I believe you. That is the session topic. So identifying the best platforms. How do we How do we pick our best platforms for ah r o I of our our our small investment. Oh, my gosh. I feel like people playing at home should do the bingo card. Every time we say roo I the return on investment or K p I you can start to mark off the bingo cards. Choosing the right platform you’re right is saying, you know, where do we go to find the audiences that we want to resonate, that we want Teo to bring to our site or convert to action and just at a high level, you know, spoiler alert. Frankly, we’re starting with Facebook and Google. They’re very big, like we’ve heard revealing artefact. Yes, yes, you can Google to that effect. So it’s a good place to start because frankly, if you want Teo, go where the humans are there, there. And anyone who says the teens are not on Facebook anymore have forgotten that Facebook owns a little company called Instagram Whatsapp and continues to grow. So your audience is likely there. And so starting with those platforms is a eyes, a safe bet. Okay, now, I had someone on earlier today say that her advice is regarding Facebook, that you not use Facebook for fund-raising, but use it as a referral source back to your own site. Because the data around fund-raising isn’t shared by Facebook, which we that that seems that’s common knowledge. So Tio not sacrifice data beyond Facebook because billions of people are but use it to drive people to your own site for actual donations. Is that consistent with your advice? Yeah, these are various flavors, and and the funny thing about you’re going to say no. No, it’s not. Funny thing about Facebook is like tactics or temporary. I understand what you your core question was there is, like, follow the data. Am I getting the data? What is the value of that? Am I decreasing friction, However, by having a Facebook fund-raising button. By the way, we’ve had organizations that turned on the Facebook fund-raising button and with no other activity whatsoever, literally just cash checks for tens of thousands of dollars. So it would be an error to, say, Ignore this, reduce friction. However, if you are driving a campaign, if you are creating messaging by all means, send them to a owned platform by own platform. I mean, you get the money and you get the data because, by the way, like you mentioned, if you can’t follow up with that one hundred or five hundred dollars donor, you are losing out on the lifetime customer value, which can be estimated at roughly three ex initial investment. Well, like that’s that three three times mission. So if you look at if you look at selling widgets, right, three to five acts is what if we were selling e commerce like you’re selling blankets or glasses, that user comes on and now they’re modeling in general, they look at that. You can also look at sort of em in our benchmarks, knowing that you’re only going to keep, you know, one out of four thereabouts or one out of five thereabouts of that first time investor. But you kept them. He kept that donor so retention Israel. And it’s probably a lot less on Facebook. Okay, amend our M in our bench market report. What is that? Men are It is Ah, you know, quickly. Ah, it’s ah organization that does a lot of consulting, but also a very well known benchmarking. Reports of the M in our benchmarks come out they, like, analyzed about two thousand on profits pull together a tidy little report. I’m not familiar with it. And our non-profit radio, We have jargon jail. I went to Dragon chaillou. You’re in, you’re in. But it’s easy. It’s easy to get out. Probation is plus Now I should say parole parole is widely available. Um, okay, that was Facebook. So Google, you wanted to be taking advantage of the Google advance? Well, before we were all away from Facebook, there is more Facebook. So we’re talking about a hundred dollars like the last thing I feel like most people want to dio is give Mark Zuckerberg another dollar and I like pause there, and it kind of kills me that I’m like at a non-profit conference saying Hey, you know, needs like another overpriced hoody, That gentleman. Now I’m gonna pause again and say Facebook is not a social media platform. Stop the podcast. Replay that Facebook, if you are a business, is not a social media platform. It is an ad platform. If you think it is a social media platform and if you think it’s free, you are incorrect. Every minute your social media team spends on creating the perfect post the right picture putting it up on every Tuesday at three PM you have spent time. Time is money. You were already e-giving value toe a platform that, by the way, reduces through the drank, reduces the amount of people seeing your post on your platform. So by not paying you were actually losing money. Reduces the number of people flush this out for me. Sure. So let’s say you have forty thousand people on your Facebook page which power poetry does in twenty fifteen. That was awesome. We made a post and of that audience, ten to twenty percent potentially hyre. If we did our job right would see that post that’s tons of impressions, tons of traffic. Today, that number is well under five percent and decreasing, meaning every post doesn’t go to every person the same way that if I had an email list of forty thousand people, we actually get analytics. It ends up in their inbox. Is if I send a text message, We know that it’s arriving. There is not the same way on Facebook and thinking that is an error. Okay, So if you are a business, do not be thinking of Facebook as a social media. It is an add plastic. It’s a A. All right, How are we gonna y How do we wisely spend one hundred dollars? All right, let’s get to the hundred dollars and paying attention to what we want out of Facebook. You mentioned accurately. Before that, maybe we want donations. We’LL precursor to donations are emails, relationships, relationships built over time, you’ve had many guests that talk about nurturing those relationships. Now you can spend anywhere from you know, we’ve seen numbers at fifty cents to two dollars to get relevant emails, registrants people on your newsletter that you can a nurture a relationship over the next nine months and get that donation. By all means. You can also go right for the hard. Ask the will you marry me on the spot? Type of like give me money. However, it makes more sense to overtime buildup. That list and Facebook has an ad platform is frankly creepy and fantastic. You, Khun Target any subset a person you can look and create lookalike audiences from your existing email list. Your existing donors You, Khun target people that are friends of your existing donors. The amount thie amount of targeting and options, uh, is daunting. However, if you focus on what you’re after, For example, the emails that lead two dollars you confined value confined are why there The same way that a company selling sweatshirts online does you can sell the opportunity to get to your organization. Okay. Okay, um more you want to say about Facebook before we, uh oh. I don’t think I could rant and on and on, and I really No, no, I I’m excited. I I I couldn’t let that topic go away and tio my big thing this year. Tony, My big thing is making sure that I say the words Facebook is not a social media platform. If you are a business, it is *** platform and P s Instagram is next. Oh, yeah, Yes. Got to take a break. Tell us you were in fifty percent of the fee. When cos you refer process their card transactions with Tello’s we’re talking debit credit card transactions. The small fees add up, you get half of them and that’s what makes your long tail of passive revenue their video explaining it all is on the listener landing page at Tony dahna em a slash Tony, tell us you watch it, then have the cos you’re thinking about referring Watch it and then make your ask. Would they make the switch to tell us for a long stream of passive revenue for your non-profit? Durney dahna may slash Tony Tell us, Let’s do the live listener love. It’s gotta happen. Uh, we are pre recorded this week, but the live love goes out nonetheless. You know that the live love is not mitigated or dampened or hampered or hindered or minimized Ah, or trivialized by any means or any of those synonyms that you could think of. So if you’re listening live, the love goes out to you. And if you’re listening by podcast, the pleasantries goes out, go out to you. Try to keep the noun and verb agreement in sentences. It’s what? The storm. That’s why that’s why I’m aspiring to. So the pleasantries go out to the podcast audience to our over thirteen thousand listeners. Thank you for being in our podcast audience now back to George Whiner. But I want to turn. I want to turn over to Google because Google’s awesome. You mentioned the So You want two more months? Yeah, great. You want to see us focusing on add grants or you got something else because we have a couple of guests already talking about at all right, So you know, I grant you, Let’s talk about your God, the actual dollars that we can apply to Google. Google. Another fantastic at platform Add grants are an incredible gift. That said, there’s been some updates that put handcuffs on the grant, namely, you are now. If you were in the ad grant as of right now talking in twenty nineteen, do you want you? Only your ads only hit remnant inventory, so that means the people that are paying go first, and once they have maxed out those positions you are then given access to remnant Inventory, which is still awesome. Still drives traffic, however, if in your ad grant and this is your homework. If in your aggregate you realize there are certain words that literally print money, traffic users, emails, whatever it is, throw fifty bucks at it. Say, Hey, we’re gonna actually pay to show up in the prime position at the prime hour for conversion rate and let’s pay for and see what happens. Look, if you could turn one dollar into two dollars, do that. And by the way, if you’re dealing with, say, puppy adoption and your local community and you realize that like nine p. M. On a Thursday is like puppy a clock and you realize that that’s when people are looking, spend the time. Get those people onto your site when they’re in that buying frame because you don’t have that level of control with ag grants. Its a little bit more distributed, and you’re sort of second in line. Your second. Alright, alright, but so now if you if you do test this and it does well, you’re you’re encouraging organises orders too. Spend spend money to get the higher rank and not just get the remnant inventory. If this test goes well, invest more in it. Even though you have the Google at Grand, even though you have the Gula grant, the Agron is wonderful for testing ground for paying attention to what’s working across many different areas could get ten thousand dollars, use it or lose it a month. But if there is something again that is of high value, you know, take, you know, take off the hat of like, Oh, we’re getting for free. Why would we pay for it? Because you will get better positioning as you mentioned, better priority of time and placement. And you know what? I’m talking about one hundred dollars a month and I’m doing that. I’m not saying spend twelve hundred dollars all at once. I really want people to think about this as drumbeat advertising not to campaign advertising, not one and done. Because we just don’t learn. Because by the way, you Khun spend twelve hundred dollars in one day and learn absolutely nothing on either of these platforms. Okay. Okay, um, targeting the audience going, Can we switch the audiences durney instead of platforms? Khun, we’re speaking audiences were latto audiences. We are We’re speaking tio, not radio, since both insiders and casual visitors How do we? Uh, well, let’s let’s go back to Facebook. As you said, it’s It’s, uh, what would you say? Fantastic and creepy at the same time? Yeah, Useful, angry. Be peaceful, Creepy. How do we How do we start to target the right the right right audiences on Facebook. So when you’re talking about your audience, you know, think about it more abstractly first, and we can talk about the, you know, brand personas that you imagine. And if created with your your various marketing firms or internal, you know, your internal activities, you know who does our message resonate? Who do we want to resonate with Now we can think about it from the perspective of you know, you’re probably thinking immediately because you’re in the nonprofit sector. How do we get more money? How do we get more donors? However, there’s some organizations, for instance, that are interested in shaping the hearts and minds of let’s say, college students around a certain topic. Call it I don’t know reproductive rights, or let’s say you’re interested in shaping how government officials in a certain area are thinking about the importance of water rights. These are all opportunities to make sure your message shows up in front of that audience because you can have, for instance, a thirty second p ece a bit of awareness and you can actually have a targeted audience. Let’s say I wanted to find all of the college is in all the colleges in California and say, You know what I think is important that you make sure that women feel safe and have an ability to report acts of sexual violence. And here’s thirty seconds on why that’s important. I could then set up a campaign that makes sure that every single dean and above or staff member has seen that at about seven times and roughly for at least ten seconds. What is the value of that level of awareness in that level of targeting? Now? It’s enormous. That is so easy to do on the platform, and that’s just the start of it. We can use the Facebook pixel on your site, which also delivers analytics, but we can use that pickle to retarget. We’ve heard this term before. I don’t want to end up deeper in jargon. Jail retarget just means Hey, there are people that stop by this booth. Now, after two weeks have gone by, I can send an ad in front of them disproved being a metaphor for your Web site. I could send an ad that follows them across instagram Facebook and say, Hey, way know that you were here. He’d probably want to say that, but come back and watch the show and we could do this for one hundred dollars with one hundred dollars. All of this is yours. Retargeting. All right, where do we find these tools on on Facebook? So, fortunately, and unfortunately, Facebook makes it very clear that you should be advertising. And it starts at business, not facebook dot com. So it business dot facebook dot com They’re going to be showing you how to spend money. The thing that grinds my gears actually about the advertising is that most people would have answered that with well inside of your Facebook page, and you go into your posts. And when you’re in the admin view, there’s a little button that says Boost Post that is the biggest rip off on the platform, and I won’t like it. Go too far down this rant. But that is a waste of money ninety five percent of the time because it’s only targeting to your existing audience. It’s also just taking a random message that you happen to post and selling. You reach selling you likes when you could have taken that ten hundred, however many dollars back and look at how much you’re spending on post when you could’ve taken that and done something is fistic ated, as I just mentioned before, turn that into say, Hey, we know that for fifty cents we confined emails of people working at colleges. We can targets so much better than that. So instead of the simple minded and easy instead of the boost post, you need to be going to a business that facebook dot com correct. And you need to set up an ad account. You need to think about the audience. You need to think about the message, how that will resonate and drive toward the outcomes that are going to move your organization forward. Okay, okay. Who’s post? Everybody does that. Everybody does that. You’re a troublemaker. I like causing trouble like No, no, no. When I when I see the tide going the wrong way. But I think when you see this, I going well, yeah, I absolutely agree. Never, never do something because lots of other orders they’re doing it because there’s a lot of crappy practice out there. So the sole reason for doing something should certainly not be Lots of other organizations are doing it. You know, I would like to do, you know, just like a moment of empathy, saying that look when it started, boost Post was actually a decent tactic, and then it became woefully inefficient. Tactics expire, and unfortunately, in our technological landscape at present, they expire faster than ever. And so you’re learning something that’s two years old, and you’re like, That’s still good because the half life of knowledge just dropped off a cliff. And we have many, you know, talented marketers with great instincts that aren’t able to refresh on every single nuance of what’s going on on this platform. So shows like this our helpful conversations like this are helpful, and TC is helpful because we have a chance to be like, Hey, everybody, I found this thing. Don’t do it or do it. What you doing? It powered poetry dot or ge? So what about Yeah, You know, I feel like I have this split split life here. Power poetry dot organs the largest teen poetry platform in the country with roughly four hundred thousand monthly active users on it, creating a safe, creative platform and free, by the way, for young people to share their work. And so they share their work. We have, ah, funny machine learning algorithm that tells them what’s similarity. They are two poets and rap artists, and they learn more. They learn more about their work. And we tricked them into writing more poetry, which is a fantastic literacy and emotional expression. Tools. So that is a co founder there. It’s an incredible organization. We’re always looking for partners. If you have a pulse, will partner with you. Uh and then on the whole whale side, I’m I’m the founder of a whale. A digital impact agency, that there’s an agency behind the podcast. Yeah, Okay, okay. Digital marketing agency culwell digital marketing and also way offer educational tools for non-profits as well through our site. Time for our last break text to give diversify your revenue by adding mobile giving. It is not only for disasters. It is not only for small dollar donations. It does not have to be small. You can build relationships by text. You’re doing it all the time with family and friends. You could do it with your donors. Khun, learn how? By texting NPR to four four four nine nine nine NPR four four four nine nine nine. We’ve got several more minutes for strong social ads on one hundred bucks a month. We still got some time left together. Yeah, yeah, yeah, we got another seven minutes or so. So, uh, what else? What else did you promise, Teo to those who attend your session, plan a campaign from targeting to messaging to measuring, Measuring? Let’s talk about some measurements. Thank goodness. Because if you didn’t mention it, I was going to mention it. If you don’t measure it, it won’t get better. We’ve heard this statement before, but especially true with ads coming back to why it’s a hundred dollars a month and not throw it away in twelve hundred dollar bonfire on a Tuesday is because it gives us the opportunity to measure What we’re looking for are the signals that those dollars are turning into emails turning into valuable traffic or the outcomes that way seek the she’s. The analytics available on Facebook are fantastic, and it seems you’re spending money. You’re getting so much more than you used to when you bought a billboard or on ad and the, you know, fill in the blank paper. Which is a different problem, however, were getting and looking for things like cost per acquisition. That just means how much money did I have to spend for that email or that click or that engagement? So I want to be paying attention that I’m also using Google Analytics, Google Analytics, a free tool code, every single page of your sight. That thing gives you insights into the source of traffic behavior of the traffic and how people are using your site. And so you want to look at both of those, especially as you’re you’re advertising across platforms, saying, All right, I’ve set up a goal, have configured it, saying, Hey, Google analytics, you know what’s awesome when somebody donates, you know, it’s also awesome when somebody gives us an email set those up his goals so we can see the source of traffic. Did they come through an ad and then sign up or convert, as we call it? Convert toward one of those outcomes. We can analyze that we can create reports, but those of the metrics that we’re looking for things like conversion rate are great things like that. As I mentioned before, cost per acquisition and knowing that for your audience of our great flush out the conversion rate just in case listeners not not familiar with that hundred people come to your website and you happen to know that two of them happened or Ted say ten of them just to make our math easy. Suddenly we have a ten percent conversion rate. If ten of those people signed up for your e mail list, that means, Hey, we may want to pay attention to that more than something that’s a cent traffic to your site and only one out of one hundred one percent ended up converting anything more on measurement seem to be pretty pretty passionate about it before, before I open it up to general topics. What love general traffics. However, get there, we’LL get there on measurement. What’s happening right now is we have a wealth wealth of numbers being thrown out of us and data data burdens. Yeah, we’re sort of drowning in it, which means the signal to noise becomes harder to track. And so coming back to just plain old common sense is a real asset. And I like to think of it as our acquisitions. Perfect example. How much did it cost me to get that even? Unfortunately, also thrown numbers like reach and things like, how much, uh, reach of your friend’s interactions frequency. There there are more numbers than you know you care to mention so paying attention, tune. But what are your goals? What do you want? You want an email? You want a dollar? What? Don’t I get that? But you can get distracted, and sometimes it’s fine to go on those sort of data dives and be like, I have a crazy question. I’m gonna go find the answer. However, if you’re driving down the road, I don’t need to know the reach of that Twitter post. I need to know how fast I’m going. So miles per hour. How much gas I haven’t tank and That’s the reason when you look at your car dashboard, it’s not telling you how many followers you’re freaking car has. It’s telling you what you need to know when you need to know it, and it’s giving you information. As you know, one common tip is when you look at the next dash border number in your team has handed you, Ah, ask them. Nice. But so what? What is the Delta? What is the difference of this versus the time period prior or this time last year? Because if I give you a number, Tony seven. Are you happy or sad right now? Number used to before compared to what they used to before, the higher the better. All great, but we don’t know that xero depends what you’re asking. So ask what the delta is. Make sure your dashboards have that delta with relevant time frame, so at least know whether or not to be happy or sad about the number. Okay. George weinger. Um, we got another minute and a half or so. Maybe two minutes. If I If I feel generous, What did I not ask you? What would you like to talk about? Around this one hundred dollars advertising spree. I think it’s hard, Tio, when we approach this from a scarcity mindset when we think we don’t have the money, good scribe mindset, even a hundred dollars a month, you’re like, Oh my gosh, it’s so much hope that finds that doesn’t go doesn’t reach that low. But if you are, I mean, there’s some people listening to this being like Hey, that’s a lot. And you know what? The hope is that after six months of this, that hundred dollars is actually turning into more money for you, and you’re sort of hinting at it before. By the way, if something’s working, if you’re turning one dollars into two dollars, you should do more of that. I would take that bet very often. And so one piece, you know, whenever this may come out. But during cue for especially may be a good time to turn on some of that retargeting we talked about and saying, Hey, you know what anybody that has come to our site in the past year? Or maybe he’s even on our donor list. Let’s just remind them with a sort of at least four impression thirty second video, meaning that we’re looking for a frequency of four. Hit him four times. Say, Hey, we’re still here and we’re doing our one time appeal. That is the one time a year where I’m saying it’s okay to ask for the donation because it is more top of mind. You do that overlapping around giving Tuesday you set your monthly budget. We’ve seen those types of budgets return on investment, assuming that you’ve been doing your homework over the year, assuming that you’ve been building in a list of anything that you were going to hear it again and again from guests on your podcast about building that relationship. And that’s a little extra already a little extra boost at the final stretch of the year for you. Okay, George, is this podcast have been around since two thousand ten, so I’ve heard about relationship building a few times. How long? What’s the longevity? Of course, longevity is advantaged. Vanity metric. I could have twelve listeners have been doing this since July two thousand ten. How long is a whole whale been around? We were founded in twenty ten, so we’ve been around a little while, and I don’t think about anybody but the twenty fourteen, so I respect anyone who can hang on for for a while. You know, it’s it takes a lot of energy and persistence. Teo do the hard things over time. I’ve heard rumors to that effect. Yes, I’ve been to thank you very much. I’ve been told he’s George Whiner cofounder, Power Poetry dot or GE and you’re with twenty. Uh, what are you with your? With the nineteen ntcdinosaur twenty nineteen non-profit Technology conference, the non-profit radio coverage thereof. And along with all our nineteen and TC interviews, this one is brought to you by our partners at Act Blue Free fund-raising Tools to help non-profit to make an impact seethe swag on the desk, which is a water bottle for for listeners who don’t have the the luxury of the video. And you also see it on my chest on my T shirt. Well, it’s on a teacher, not literally. It’s a tattoo. It’s not that he tattooed it. George Whiner. I already I already I already backed you up, so let’s let’s leave it there on this is Tony martignetti non-profit radio coverage of nineteen ninety si, thank you so much for being with Me and George Whiner. Next week be accessible and go bilingual both from nineteen ninety. See if you missed any part of today’s show, I beseech you. Find it on tony martignetti dot com Responsive by pursuant online tools for small and midsize non-profits Data Driven and technology enabled Tony dahna may slash pursuing capital P by witness CPS Guiding YOU beyond the numbers regular cps dot com by Telus Credit card and payment Processing Your Passive Revenue Stream Tony dahna may slash Tony Tell us and by text to give mobile donations made easy text NPR to four four four nine nine nine Ah, creative producers Claire Meyerhoff Sam Liebowitz is the line producer show Social Media is by Susan Chavez Mark Silverman is our Web guy and this music is by Scott Stein You with me next week for non-profit radio Big non-profit ideas for the other ninety five percent go out and be great. You’re listening to the talking alternate network e-giving Wait, you’re listening to the Talking Alternative Network? Are you stuck in a rut? Negative thoughts, feelings and conversations got you down. 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