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Nonprofit Radio for August 17, 2020: Google Ad Grants & Be A Payment Processing Pro

My Guests:

Chris Barlow: Google Ad Grants
These are generous grants, up to $10,000 per month. What do you need in place to take advantage of the grants? How do you get in? What are best practices? Plus advice on 3-year-old tantrums from a father of 6. Hear it all from Chris Barlow at Beeline.

 

 

Christina Schnoor, Lily Ickow, & Maureen Wallbeof: Be A Payment Processing Pro
You’ll keep more of your online gifts if you make informed decisions about online payment processors. They’re not all the same. Our 20NTC panel gets you where you’d like to be. They’re Christina Schnoor with American Near East Refugee Aid (Anera); Lily Ickow from EveryAction; and Maureen Wallbeoff at Practical Wisdom for Nonprofit Accidental Techies.

 

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[00:00:12.58] spk_1:
welcome tony-martignetti non profit radio big

[00:01:47.54] spk_2:
non profit ideas for the other 95%. I’m your aptly named host. Oh, I’m glad you’re with me. I’d get slapped with a diagnosis of leptospirosis if you infected me with the idea that you missed today’s show. Google Ad grants These are generous grants up to $10,000 per month. What do you need in place to take advantage of the grants? How do you get in what are best practices? Plus advice on three year old tantrums from a father of six? Here it all from Chris Barlow at Beeline and be a payment processing pro. You’ll keep more of your online gift if you make informed decisions about online payment processors. They’re not all the same are 20 and TC Panel gets you where you’d like to be. They’re Christina. Snore with American Near East Refugee Aid Lily Aiko from every action and Maureen will be off at practical wisdom for non profit accidental techies. Tony Steak to a free how to guide were sponsored by wegner-C.P.As guiding you beyond the numbers wegner-C.P.As dot com and by turned to communications, PR and content for nonprofits. Your story is their mission. Turn hyphen. Two dot ceo. Here is Google ad Grants

[00:01:50.14] spk_4:
It’s

[00:02:23.09] spk_1:
my pleasure to welcome Chris Barlow to the show. He is the director of Beeline, a marketing firm that helps nonprofits further their missions and grow their supporter bases through Google ads. The man, the main the main hat he wears is being a father to six kids, six kids and trying to raise them bilingual. Although most of the credit for that goes to his German wife. The company is at beeline dot marketing, and he’s at Beeline. Underscore, Chris, Chris Partlow. Welcome to the show.

[00:02:24.94] spk_0:
Thank you very much, tony.

[00:02:26.54] spk_1:
Pleasure to have you six kids. How old do they?

[00:02:30.04] spk_0:
My oldest is 13 and just start 13. My youngest is 18 months.

[00:02:41.09] spk_1:
Okay, That’s Ah, that’s a lot of kids by today’s standards. 60 s. Yeah, right.

[00:02:48.59] spk_0:
We’ve learned that we’ve learned a thing or two about how to do more with less by the share. I think that helps helps with the understanding what nonprofits after that make do it.

[00:02:58.56] spk_1:
Okay. And and eight people together during a pandemic. No school. What the, uh, were the prospects for school in Fort Collins, Colorado, this fall.

[00:03:32.84] spk_0:
Um, so they as of yesterday, they closed schools and, Ah, but we weren’t too worried about it. Our kids go to we’re just doing, ah, once a week school and and home school the other day. So we’re used to having him around. Yeah. Uh, OK. They were sad to have that. Their their enrichment classes canceled, but yeah, I’m sure, But we’re we work. We’ve been doing pretty well. It’s, uh that’s all. Things considered eight

[00:03:34.94] spk_1:
people eight people together is a lot. Yeah, and one is the youngest is with 13 months.

[00:03:40.07] spk_0:
18 months. Yeah,

[00:03:43.54] spk_1:
OK, OK. All right. I don’t Maybe this is a distraction for you from from family. No, no, not at all. Okay. Google ad grants. So the company gives up to $10,000 a month for advertising, which for most of our listeners, at least many of our listeners, that’s a lot of money and maybe even too much. So how’d oh, Adam people know if if the grants or something that they should even apply for

[00:05:19.37] spk_0:
that’s a really good question. Um, right. Cause the one thing that separates Google ad grants from any other kind of grant that I know off is, um if you’re eligible, you’re pretty much guaranteed to get in the program. If you can get through the application process, it’s not a matter of whether you’re gonna win the craft or not. So the more important question is is our non profit positions to make use of this? Is it going to be worth our time? Um, and there are four main things that, um, I would consider as a non profit to help you decide. Help me decide whether this is a program I should apply for. Um, I’ll just list them real quick, and then we want to look at talk about each one we can is how how big is our region that we serve or the or the our donor base? Are people actually searching for what we do on the Internet? Um, how strong is our website and our digital presence and forth? Do we have announced expertise or some budget to to help manage this this grant program in the ads? Okay, um, I can list those region,

[00:05:20.68] spk_1:
right? Right. Your region. And are people searching?

[00:05:24.54] spk_0:
Yeah. How strong is our digital presence or the website? Right broker and then in house expertise or budget.

[00:05:30.64] spk_1:
Okay, so let’s talk about the region. Why is why is this important?

[00:05:55.54] spk_0:
So it you can if you are a local non profit only serving within your city, you can still make use of blue black grants depending on how big your city is, or I should say anyone can apply, of course, and you can get it. But if you’re in a small city and there’s a limited amount of people searching it made, the results may not be that impactful. Okay,

[00:06:05.33] spk_1:
so you’re gonna have to put some time into creating your ad grants campaign, right? There is a potential downside if the upside isn’t gonna be significant enoughto justify it

[00:06:46.34] spk_0:
exactly. Now, I work with nonprofits in S cities, cities of you know, 150,000 people, and it’s worth it to them. Um, but, you know, if it again that the larger your region is, the bigger impact advance will be for him. So if you’ve got donors across the country or you you want to start if you if you feel like you’re going, you could have Ah, if you have a large enough mission that people could from around the nation could support you. And you want to get donors through the campaign that’ll work. Or if you serve a really large area, um, again, Then it’ll be worthwhile program. Okay, From matter.

[00:07:05.13] spk_1:
If you’re in a small community, what’s the word of mouth? People know you. Just because everybody knows the handful of nonprofits in town, there’s probably not a lot of advantage for you. Yep. Okay, if you’re not serving a broader a broader base than your small community, Okay, so so at least really to the next point. You are people searching for what you do,

[00:08:19.44] spk_0:
right? Yep. So I’m unlike a nab that you would do on social media or, you know, on a website where you put a banner you are with Google ads. You can only do keyword based ads on a Google search, and so you are limited by the number of people who are searching, So maybe you’re across the nation. But for whatever reason, what you do is very niche or people don’t think no, you even exist or even that your service’s exist. So people aren’t necessarily going to be searching for what you do or anything related. If that’s the case, you You know, I What I recommend is doing some research. There are some free tools online that you could get an estimated number of searches being done, and you could just put in different keywords and c o r people searching for this problem that we solved on. If you’ve If you find that, OK, there are, then it might be worth it. But if if if it’s really niche, you know, no one searching for what you guys do, then it’s gonna be limited. What you’re the impact is gonna be for you. So that’s one way you can kind of make the decision.

[00:08:20.84] spk_1:
Chris, can you name wanted to those sites that people can use to estimate search traffic around phrases?

[00:08:41.34] spk_0:
Yes. Um, there is one called ECM Rush s search engine marketing SCM Rush. Um, there’s another one called Spy Fu. Um, and if you just do a search, Okay? Google Google has one. It’s themselves that you can use to Google keyword planner.

[00:08:49.54] spk_1:
And how do you spell ZX by food?

[00:08:52.06] spk_0:
S s p y like you’re spying f you like, come food.

[00:09:09.51] spk_1:
Okay, I would said fo So I’m glad you said okay. SP y f you okay? Just in case listeners want to do their own the test marketing of some keywords to see whether people are searching for what they’re with their work is and then your your digital presence.

[00:10:48.04] spk_0:
Yeah, So it kind of depends on what your goal is. Um, for the campaigns. If you, um, are a local non profit and you have service is for the community a large enough community that it’s worth, um, you know, using Google advance, Um, then maybe you don’t need if you’re if you’re very service but based your in person or you’re bringing meals or whatever it might be you don’t. Your website needs to be good, but it doesn’t need to have anything particularly compelling. It just needs to really show what you guys do. And and, of course, if you want donors your goals to get donors, you need to have you need to tell your story really well digitally because you’re trying to bring new people to your site and tell your story. But if you’re just trying to help people access, your service is it just needs to really make the point clear and across and no say whether it’s making appointment with you or or showing up to one of your pop up events or whatever it might be that your non profit does. The website doesn’t necessarily need to be, you know, really, really, you know, amazing content. But if your goal is, um to get donors, yeah, you need. If you want to get people to subscribe and want to keep learning about your mission, then you have to tell your story well, and you know you have to have If you have video, that’s gonna be really important. Um, some some nonprofits, um, you know, you they provide their service is digitally they have on my courses, um, or other online resource is they’re gonna probably already have a really good digital presence. And there are a perfect fit for Google ad grants. I worked with a non profit. They do parenting resources, and so, you know they have people searching pit parents are searching across the country. How do you know sibling conflict in the midst of a pandemic and

[00:10:54.82] spk_1:
you could write those you can. You should be a contributing blogger for them

[00:11:08.59] spk_0:
Yeah, exactly. So? So they get tons of people who are finding them and go there blawg and download stuff and get on to the email list. And and so that’s what they’re great fit. Um, but you have to if you know, the stronger your online presence is stronger, website them or impact that the grants is gonna have you.

[00:11:31.68] spk_1:
Okay, cool. And then either needs some in house expertise, I guess, to manage all your campaign and or you need to have some money to spend. So I take it this is not something that say an executive director can take on and and learn and then manage when you know it’s like a one or two employees shop.

[00:11:40.44] spk_0:
I don’t think so. If you’re

[00:11:42.34] spk_4:
in

[00:11:57.16] spk_0:
the executive director with some marketing experience, are already have worked with Google, I would say, definitely, you don’t have to be running perfectly, Um, because you’re getting free ad spend. If you waste some of it, it’s not a big deal. Um, it doesn’t have to be perfect. And if you, um,

[00:11:59.24] spk_1:
there’s a learning curve to, there’s

[00:12:00.40] spk_0:
a learning curve, you have to spend a little time learning, and it isn’t the most time intensive kind of campaign you can run, but yeah, you can’t just expect you can do it while you’re wearing five other hats and you’ve never done it before. You need to have someone who can learn it in your house in house, for you have to know the higher it.

[00:12:21.84] spk_1:
Okay. Like the B line marketing? Yeah, for example, for example. Right. Okay. Okay, um, now you don’t have to take all $10,000 I guess. Or do you? Should you, Justin, may as well spend as much as you can.

[00:12:48.04] spk_0:
Yeah. You may as well spend as much. You can’t some. The thing is, it’s at 10,000 per month. 329 per day is what it actually is. So, um, you might hit that $300 million spend in our A nonprofit that really is able to spend it might hit that number really fast, and then you’re out of budget for the day. But if you’re only spending 2000 of it Hey, that’s $2000. You weren’t spending before, and now you’re getting that kind of exposure?

[00:13:03.04] spk_1:
Yeah. Okay. You may as well take the maximum and and work with it and play with it. All right, So if we feel like we’ve got our our foundation laid the way you’re just describing, how do you apply?

[00:14:28.40] spk_0:
Um, so you can just go to Google for non profits and you have tow. Essentially, you can start the application there. You have to be basically be approved by rule. As a non profit organization, they you start with tech soup, you get it verified by tech soup as non profit. Okay, that’s what Google uses to do the non profit verification process. And then applying for Google for nonprofits is really easy. That doesn’t take too much time. Um, and I have a guide. I’m happy to share with you, tony, that people can follow step by step. Uh, the checklist. The harder part is, once your angle for non profits, you have to apply for at grants. And, um, that involves setting up a campaign a start, you know, starter campaign. It doesn’t have to be what you find, you know, you can continue to work on it and change it, but you have to start with something and go will review that campaign and say, OK, you’ve done. You’ve chucked dot all your i’s and cross border tease. Your campaign looks ready to go. And now we will give you the grabs. Okay, Okay. And at the guy offer. And you could find stuff online. Two guides to to apply. What does you know Kind of give you those steps, but it doesn’t tell you how to do the campaigns that, but Google also does some of that on their site.

[00:14:39.74] spk_1:
Is this guide at your site be lined up marketing guy? Do you have?

[00:14:40.56] spk_0:
Yeah, it’s some. Yeah, it’s just under my service is tap. Um, but I’m also happy to send it to anyone who asks.

[00:14:52.64] spk_1:
OK, OK, well, people can go to your website. I don’t want you to be burdened with 1000 emails.

[00:15:22.29] spk_2:
It’s time for a break wegner-C.P.As paycheck protection program. Loan forgiveness. This is still out there looming. You need to get your forgiveness application in. Wegner has you covered? They’re free. Webinar explains p p p loan forgiveness. Go to wegner-C.P.As dot com. Click resource is and recorded events. Now back to Google ad grants with Chris Barlow.

[00:15:35.04] spk_1:
If we’ve now we’ve applied, we’ve been approved. What are some good practices. Let’s start off with what’s your top tip for using this? This $10,000 a month?

[00:17:07.23] spk_0:
Yeah. Obviously, this is kind of an obvious thing, but you want to think about what your goal is and decide what it conversion ISS, and you might have more than one goal or war. The one conversion, a lot of non profit Start with, um, how can we further our mission and help more people find us? Just that we that we conserve because those people are a lot more likely to convert, um, those that that requires less effort because you’re there to help them already and whether you’re serving them physically and you’re just making them helping them avail them of your service is or they can get something online digital from your block or whatever. Um, that is a much quicker win. Um, if you want to grow your supporter base, um that, you know, again, just being aware of what your goal is and deciding what is the smallest step a person can take toward that goal, like of my ultimate goal, is to get supporters and donors. Then what’s the smaller step that someone can take, you know, the first time they come to our site, they’ve never heard of us. The smallest step they can take is to watch one of our videos. Or can we get them to sign up for our analyst? Because if they just come to our site one time and go away, we have no way to reconnect with those people. We don’t know who they are. So the importance of realizing that Google ad grants is great for getting people to your site. Um, but you need to really know what their next step is gonna be. And the smaller that is, the easier that is, the more likely they’re going to take that step.

[00:17:15.53] spk_1:
Did you have a specific landing page of what? Your advance? Incoming traffic?

[00:17:43.81] spk_0:
Yeah. Depends. I think, you know, having a landing page is great if you have a very specific goal in mind. Um, you know, I want to offer this this resource, um, five ways toe to apply to, You know, maybe you help low income people, families or individuals, you know, get a job or whatever at my career Resource is

[00:17:48.76] spk_1:
or sign a petition or something.

[00:18:29.50] spk_0:
Yeah, sign a petition, Right. So So you have a landing page specific for that goal. It could be great. Also, just to send for people to your website, your general website, as long as there’s an easy way for them to take the next step whether that stopped in or call you or whatever it is, The main thing to consider there is I want a match. The page that I sent people to to the key where they searched as closely as I can. The more relevant, um, you know, if they’re searching for, ah, something related to, um, you know, gruel, you know, hygiene kit for homeless. You know, you wanna you want to make sure that we’re, you know, as close as you can you match. So if you just send them to your home page website, that’s a very generic place to send them. So if you have a block post addressing that specific question, that’s a great place to send them.

[00:18:50.14] spk_1:
Okay? And this all goes back to your goal. Exactly. Go is donor acquisition? Then they should get to an information page. That’s gonna Or maybe maybe they should just be right that the donation page. I don’t know what that

[00:18:54.01] spk_0:
donation page can work. A ZX long as your donation page has videos and things that will get people excited.

[00:19:22.00] spk_1:
Okay, They need a little bit more information that quite radio give you the credit card number. Yes. But you also don’t want them wandering around reading block posts. Yes. You distracted by the petition, et cetera, when you know that they searched for, you know, giving or you’re confident that whatever brought them in, they are in the mind of donating.

[00:19:25.65] spk_0:
Yeah, Yeah, you’re a ghoul Cares about relevance. And that that the relevance is what you’re abscess and how relevant are at is to the what they searched. And then the page two and goodwill measures that by

[00:19:36.84] spk_1:
oh ho hos that Google knows that your head sends people do. And they

[00:19:41.46] spk_0:
well, they know how long people stand the page. If you have Google analytics on the site, they know that. And so the longer people stay, that’s a better user experience,

[00:20:03.74] spk_1:
right? All right, maybe this is maybe this is obvious, but I’m trainable. So Google Analytics works both ways. It gives you gives you data, but it also gives feedback toe Google. Okay.

[00:20:04.52] spk_0:
And I mean, maybe

[00:20:09.91] spk_1:
that maybe that’s commonly known among Google analytics users. All right, I didn’t know that. Yeah. Let your surrendering data as well as retrieving it for yourself.

[00:21:03.91] spk_0:
Yeah, well, it’s It’s so that, you know, because if your users are having a good experience, Google will show your ads will give you give you more ad impressions because people are having a date. They won’t care about what the user experiences when they click on your ad and stuff. And so, you know, give him a good experience. If they take that, they convert. Maybe they don’t spend a lot of time on your site, but they convert. They give you guys a call or fill in a form, and that’s what you said as one of your goals. Google. You know, that gets measured into your at, um at data and Google says, Okay, we’ll show your adds more often, or, um, you know, you know how Google as is it is an auction. Well, will be it higher for this ad to show on these keywords because people tend to convert, and that’s a good experience with user. So we’re gonna make sure your ad gets shown because people are converting.

[00:21:05.74] spk_1:
Okay, Okay, is excellent advice. What else? For using this grant money.

[00:21:43.44] spk_0:
Um, if you can focus on traffic first, um, it you don’t want to ignore conversions and ignore getting people to take the next step. But higher traffic, the higher traffic you have the more of that grant or spending that it’s faster and easier to to test what? You know that conversion. Maybe you’re trying to get donors. And, you know, if you’re getting 100 people to your site, um, that’s gonna take a lot longer than if you get 1000 people to your site to figure out OK, people are really responding to this video. Are there? Are there are they’re signing up for our list or they’re donating.

[00:21:46.44] spk_1:
It’s a matter of more validity in a larger sample size. Exactly. You could drop more conclusions from 1000 people than you can from a population of 100

[00:23:20.50] spk_0:
yet, And so to get more traffic, um, I mean they’re number ways, but one of the best things you can do is to, um, add, keep adding he works, and because it’s at grants. They don’t have to be the perfect keywords that, um, are are your absolute ideal donors. They could be people who are searching for kind of related topics that they’re still, you know, related to what you do. And, um, you can, you know, get people further, further away from the final, you know, instead of the very most qualified people. So adding keywords and then another good practice is along with that, um, when you organize your campaign, people typically take a pool of keywords, say, 20 keywords, and then they create and their related to each other. And then they create one app for those keywords. Um, because they’re fairly related keywords. And I recommend using single theme or single keyword ad groups where you each at each keyword has a unique first headline. So you work. That ad is close to that. This is the key word s possible, or Hubert phrase. Or maybe you have just three or four different keywords cubits radio phrases for at so just having much smaller groups because that makes sure that the ad the first headline that people see and your ad is as close to what they actually search.

[00:23:23.58] spk_1:
Can you give an example of that?

[00:24:55.04] spk_0:
Yeah. Um, so if someone searches for it, got using this example that I mentioned before of parenting resources. If someone searches for, ah, three years, three year old tantrum, Um, the standard philosophy might be three year old tan drum, five year old tantrum child hand drum. You haven’t ad about tantrums with single keyword or single theme at groups. You instead say, three year old tantrum as the headline, and then you have a different at for five year old tantrum because it matches exactly what the person searched. Um, you don’t necessarily have to get back granular by creating that many different, unique first headlines, but you can try to make it as narrow as possible. Um, and that way, people, because here’s another best practice or way to think about Google ads as opposed to like Facebook or another kind of ad platform. It’s not about like having the ideal branded like emotional trigger that really draws people in. People do a Google search, and they look at the search results and then make a split second decision. Um, and it and you really just want to make show people. I understand your intent and I match what you’re thinking. And so the relevance that could match of the key word just getting that is as close as possible is what helps ensure that you can have a really high number of people who are clicking on your abs.

[00:25:07.34] spk_1:
Do you have a three year old?

[00:25:09.34] spk_0:
I’m a four year old.

[00:25:21.34] spk_1:
So you’ve been to you’ve been down a three year old a few times. Eso eso alright, don’t told aggression. What’s your top top top tip for three year old tantrums?

[00:25:56.04] spk_0:
Um, you’ve got Teoh. Do you show show empathy. You gotta show You have to show empathy on and telling a while that is Are you are feeling really mad about that and validate a feeling, Um, and you have to you have to be calm yourself. You have to. Sometimes you have to step away and calling yourself first. That’s probably the most important thing. And then you can show empathy and how you are feeling something really strong and back. Tens toe helped start just yet.

[00:25:56.93] spk_1:
Okay, because your your father expert as well you have six Children.

[00:26:00.40] spk_0:
I have a lot of a lot. You know, what I found is more kits I’ve had, you know, other more. I need to work.

[00:26:20.70] spk_1:
Well, yeah, OK, but there are people with one or two. You could learn a lot from a guy. Time six. So All right. Um, thank you. Topping up three year old tension, Right? So, yes, you gotta deescalate yourself. You got to take a deep yourself, then. All right, then show your empathy. You got to get yourself under control.

[00:26:25.28] spk_0:
That’s right. Yeah. If you if you’re not safe in terms of just your if your flight or flight is going off, If you’re feeling really stressed out, it’s gonna come through and how you address it. Um, that’s really how I feel. Like that’s half the battle. You can calm yourself down. You’ll be able that manage the rest.

[00:26:43.84] spk_1:
OK? All right. We still got a couple minutes left, so don’t hold out.

[00:27:13.74] spk_0:
S o. One interesting thing about adds to with Google is, um, low. The lowest common denominator. Um, with the ad itself is good, like, unfortunately, but it’s it’s just a fact like your would have your ad written at a level that third grader lower. Okay. Use really simple words. Use you. So, you know, um, you’re not trying to sound really sophisticated, because again, people aren’t reading things in death

[00:27:34.54] spk_1:
way. Think about our own behavior. And a The page of Google Search results were scanning. We’re looking for the the most closely related to what we want, and we’re grabbing it. So you do have to keep it simple.

[00:28:23.54] spk_0:
That’s right. Um, another thing that’s kind of worth trying is, um, Google Ghoul really wants to keep growing their use of machine learning and ai ai, and they have two kinds of ads that take advantage of that. There’s one kind of ad called Responsive, sir. Chats R S A. This is where you write headlines and descriptions and then Google intelligible. You mix and match and find what works best. I think this is a great advocate, great kind of way to do it because you control what and says, but Google decides what it shows instead of you writing. You know, I’m Here’s the first headline. Here’s a second and buying Here’s the description. I want you to show this exact thing. You just give it. Here’s your toolbox and you find what works best?

[00:28:27.32] spk_1:
Oh, really? And then Google chooses

[00:29:04.74] spk_0:
you. Go chooses, Um, and then another one, which is, um, has its It’s worth trying. It can work well. It can also work really merely and poorly. Um, and it’s getting It’s getting better. It’s called dynamic search Jets, and basically you just set up a campaign that’s the dynamics or Jack campaign. And Google scans your website, and it does everything. When someone does a keyword search, it picks the landing page. It writes the ad and shows the ad. So it it does the whole of

[00:29:06.75] spk_1:
your surrendering, your surrendering, training, everything. So what do you What do you give it to chips from?

[00:29:15.11] spk_0:
Um, your website? Okay, that’s it.

[00:29:16.19] spk_1:
Falls, That’s That’s this Ball Z.

[00:29:17.78] spk_0:
Yeah, so I mean,

[00:29:19.19] spk_5:
you can experiment. You can

[00:29:34.38] spk_0:
experiment, you can absolutely experiment. And, um, you know, sometimes that Google rights and add that really isn’t so good. But it does a pretty good job of matching the page that they send people to to the terms that they searched because that’s what Google does best.

[00:29:37.93] spk_1:
All right, now that was dynamic search ads. What’s the What’s the R s a

[00:30:56.74] spk_0:
responsive search at. Okay. Okay, um, and then another thing, no matter what your goal is, you really need to have you have in mind follow up. Um, especially with donors you need tohave, you know, email marketing, or have something in plant but in place where you can continue to reach out to people. Um, if you’re serving clientele, um, you know, maybe people aren’t ready to come in, like if there, if they need to make an appointment with you or our work with you directly. One on one. Maybe people searching on Google aren’t ready to do that, but so instead, you offer a non online resource where they get it for free, and then you follow up with him via email and address some other questions they might have and encourage them that now you can come in and take advantage of our service is our or whatever. It might be our you know, if it’s a petition like okay, you’re not ready to sign the petition. Here’s some questions to Beacon thinking about, you know, and along this issue care clearly you care about this issue, and so then you can follow up with them with with over email. Exactly. Now, when you consider how we asked questions why you consider signing the petition? So that’s a, um, another really important factor. And that’s actually, um, you know,

[00:30:57.39] spk_1:
plan. You don’t have a

[00:30:58.23] spk_0:
follow up, Ellen. And it’s also another factor in whether this is the right program for you. If you don’t have the resources to be able to follow up, especially if you’re trying to get you want donors from Google ads, then it’s probably not the right program for you right now. You can’t do the follow up.

[00:31:18.10] spk_1:
Okay. All right. So, uh, I certainly don’t wanna leave it on the negative. No right program for you if you can’t follow up. So leave us with ah, motivation.

[00:32:04.44] spk_0:
Yeah, well, I mean Google ad grants once you get it set up. Um, you know, if you’re just trying to do it yourself, I would say you could get it done in one of two hours per week of maintenance. And you can definitely see thousands of new visitors to your site. Hundreds of new people signing up for your email list. Um and ah, you know it. It’s like I said at the beginning. It is one of the neatest programs in terms of from on profits, because you can no, upfront. Is this gonna be something we should try And where are we going to get it? And you don’t have to take the risk of putting all the effort into applying. And then, you know, like most rants, you’re you’re lucky if you win it.

[00:32:10.04] spk_1:
Okay? I thought of another thing that I should have asked. You tell a story. Tell a good tele good at grand story.

[00:33:11.24] spk_0:
Okay, so I’m there was, ah, a lot of of nonprofits experience. They signed up for ad grants at one point, and then it didn’t go anywhere. Um, and I had a client like this, and they, um they had tried it, paid someone a lot of money, and it gotten in, but And that didn’t do anything. And ah asked me to take it over, and I just I was just trying to help them out. And I, um no volunteer my time for a little while with them and got got got things going cause I want They said, Let’s prove this out. If we can see that this is gonna be worth our while. We be happy that to hire you long term. Well, after six months, we were spending the entire $10,000. They were getting a few 100 use of strivers per month. And, uh, yeah, so it’s That was definitely an ink encouraging, uh, story.

[00:33:19.14] spk_1:
OK, yeah. A couple 100 new, quite newly acquired donors. That’s all right. He’s Chris Barlow at B line. Underscore Chris the company again. Beeline dot marketing Thank you very much, Chris. Real pleasure. Thanks for sharing.

[00:33:27.16] spk_0:
Thank you, tony. Great to be on

[00:34:46.37] spk_2:
absolutely time for a break. Tony’s take two. I’ve got a free how to guide for you to get your planned giving program started. It’s time. It’s time you can do this. The download is unleash the game changing power of planned giving at your non profit. It’s my ideas for how to get your program started. You don’t have to spend a lot of money. You don’t need expertise on your board or on your staff. You’re not talking to donors about their deaths. This is not going to cannibalize your fundraising. All these misconceptions, myths around, planned giving. All right, so I bust all those, and I explained how to get your program started. Step by step. You can get the free download Very simple. You don’t have to go to a site. This is It’s amazing. It’s amazing what we can do. Just text guide guide to 565 to 5 and you will get yours. It’s that simple text guide to 565 to 5. And that is tony Steak, too. Now it’s time for Be a payment processing pro.

[00:36:01.83] spk_1:
Welcome to tony-martignetti non profit radio coverage of 20 NTC 2020 non profit Technology Conference. Our coverage of 20 NTC is sponsored by Cougar Mountain Software Denali Fund. Is there complete accounting solution made for nonprofits? 20. Got em a slash Cougar Mountain for a free 60 day trial, I guess now are Christina Snore Lily Aiko and Marine Wall be off. Christina is director of digital fundraising at America. American Near East Refugee Aid On era, Lily is vice president of payments and online fundraising at every action, and Maureen is non profit digital strategist and coach at practical wisdom for non profit accidental techies. So if you were deliberate techie accident, if you stumbled in like so many. Is Marines the right person doctor? All right, um, your NTC session is resume or by knowing more, become a payment processing pro. Uh, really, Are we, uh, we getting screwed by our payment processing contracts?

[00:36:08.30] spk_0:
I don’t

[00:36:08.55] spk_3:
know that that’s the way I would phrase it exactly. But I do think that there’s a lot of folks who you know payments is not many people’s areas, expertise, understandably, and they don’t want it to be also understandably. But there’s a lot that I think folks are leaving on the table because they don’t know what questions to be asking. Um, the naturally what we’re trying to help people understand is how can they go in and ask the right questions and make the right choices so that their maximizing your fundraising

[00:36:50.43] spk_1:
Okay, so you know what? What’s possible to put on the table that looks like it may looks non negotiable from the contract that you’re reading. Okay, there are things we can talk about. OK, um so now, um, yeah, really. Your vice president of payments that I haven’t seen that in a title before. I know it’s not your full title payments and online fundraising, but, uh, you does your organization, um is every action spending a lot of money on payments or

[00:37:08.13] spk_3:
Yeah, so explain kind of what that means. So I work on our product team, so I help figure out what new things we want to build into our software. So where us? A software provider for non profits for fundraising in a number of other things. And I focus on our fundraising, uh, products and specifically the kind of nitty gritty of how contributions are processed as part of a nonprofit fundraising. How do we make sure that as many contributions as possible are being processing process successfully? Eso that’s kind of my area of expertise, both in the product in just kind of in our business. More generally, how do we help make sure that clients are taking advantage? Everything can there.

[00:37:45.96] spk_1:
I see. Okay, Christina, what is your relationship with payment processing?

[00:37:51.61] spk_5:
So I kind of oversee our database, so just making sure that all of that is set up and working with their finance team. Um, you know, since I’m also manage all of our online donation for him, So it’s important that we, you know, have that set up correctly so everything can come through smoothly.

[00:38:13.42] spk_1:
Okay. Thank you. And, uh, Marine, what’s your What’s your role around? Payment processing. Are you Are you Are you like the holistic counselor for people who are frustrated by their by their lousy contracts?

[00:38:26.32] spk_4:
Um, I make sure So So this session actually came out of, Ah, Facebook Live that Lily and I did last summer on my facebook page because people, when they’re looking at new systems, especially CIA, rams or databases that have some type of transactional functionality is part of the system. They often don’t know what they should be looking for. Can they move to a new system and keep their existing processor? Where can they look for glossary of terms? So Christina happened to be one of my my clients and moved into every action and part of what we did together was she just said, make sure that the finance team was participating because some stuff is is not going to be part of Christina’s purview, you know, deciding and signing contracts and things for processors. The other thing that we’re finding comes up a lot is peanut types. People want to be able to offer Apple pay or Google wallet or Bitcoin. And how does a non profit accidental techie or fundraiser kind of navigate those waters most of the time? Folks on the ground or doing fundraising really don’t understand. And I certainly didn’t. What happens once a donor puts their pardon? You know, we know that everybody takes a little bites, but really, what happens? What is the non profit themselves responsible for? What’s the process of responsible for what’s the tool provider responsible for? And that’s why we wanted to submit this session to NTC this year. Teoh clear some of that up. What’s the ownership? How does it all work? And how do I take control of my pieces if I’m working exciting organization.

[00:40:29.49] spk_1:
Okay, Maureen, since have, uh, hosted something on exactly on this. You and Lily. I’m gonna deputize you as co host of this episode because it’s so you know, it’s so niche. And I don’t wanna want to focus on the wrong area. You know, I keep saying contracts or crummy, but maybe I’m over over overemphasizing that part of it. So, um, you know, I’m not giving you carte blanche about believing leading but ah, deputized you get the idea. So, Dio where where should we start with this? But I

[00:40:54.78] spk_4:
think I’ve loved going on that we talked a little bit about, you know, some of the some of the terminology. And in my favorite phrase, lily that I learned from you that I’d love to have you talk about today is meat or beach. The the rates. So I’m not gonna be tony, because I could never be tony. But But it would be great for you to just share a little bit about the didactic ce that we were hoping to present

[00:41:23.16] spk_1:
our tactics. That’s a big word. Or see, I would never use that on. Believe me, you don’t want to be tony. It’s no place to be. Um, all

[00:41:32.28] spk_4:
right, how about definition of terms? How about that?

[00:41:35.31] spk_1:
Okay. No, didactic is wonderful. No, um, the only thing we have to bear in mind is we’re doing this in about 25 minutes. Okay? Roughly. Okay. Please go ahead. Really

[00:44:37.04] spk_3:
great. Yeah. So I think I think that’s a great point, Maureen. And I think this is often, you know, one of the first places where nonprofits run into questions on dhe feel a little bit stuck is when they’re talking to potential vendors. Often you’re talking Teoh, a digital tools provider or digital C R M. And and that’s where the payments piece of the conversation comes up is OK. What what payment provider you’re going to use with your online contribution forms may be your A digital vendor has a payment provider they work with. Maybe they have an insurer. Maybe they have, like an in house team it provider that they kind of built, and that’s that’s their offering. Maybe there’s a whole bunch of different processors that you can integrate with, Um, and I think that’s often a non profits first. Start running into these questions, and it’s hard to understand sort of the different the different pieces that you need lined up to make sure you can successfully profit contributions online alone with, You know, obviously the vendor that’s providing you’re helping you build your online contribution forms. You need a merchant account. Eso you’re gonna need a merchant account provider, which is a vendor that helps that will set up that account for you, into which you can accept donors purchase or donations online. Um, money from that merchant count will go right into your normal bank account, but it always has to a first into a merchant account that’s just sort of part of online credit card processing. That merchant account also needs a payment gateway, and this is again where it can get a little confusing For some nonprofits. Many providers can be both your payment gateway it and you’re merchant account provider. But some are not some vendors or just a payment gateway or just a merchant account provider on nothing that you know your digital tools better should be able to help you navigate that conversation. They should be able to tell you what your options are there and help you understand what you know, what accounts you might need to go out and get and help set up that conversation for you and then that merchant account and that being the gateway or at the end of the day, gonna be connecting to a payment processor. That’s the service that actually accepts the transaction, authorizes it with the credit card provider and provides a response to you and again that could be yet another vendor or it can be a part of one of those other kind of two pieces that I already mention the team, a gateway in the merchant account that’s more in the weeds than nonprofits typically need to get. Usually again, you can go to a digital service is provider like every action that can help. You kind of figure out which of those pieces you need to worry about. But those are just some terms that are often gonna come up, and it can be a little bit confusing in those initial conversations. Um, and all of those tie into the pricing fact. Ah, factor here because obviously it’s a boring allude to kind of the more vendors you have in the chain of your payment processing. Each one of those vendors is taking their own piece of every transaction. So the more vendors that you have there, but the more you have to kind of think about that and make sure you understand what fees are being taken out of each point. So again, the more you can kind of work with one provider, and they can just give you one clear fee that ties everything together. It makes it a little bit easier for you to understand what you’re actually letting from those contributions. At the end of the day,

[00:45:06.89] spk_1:
I’ve been binge watching The Sopranos, and they would call that the the big That’s right. Every three, every different level level of vendor gets, gets their big

[00:45:12.68] spk_3:
Exactly. Yeah, that’s pretty much pretty much for payment. Processing is. Unfortunately, it’s, you know, there’s one transaction and there’s just lots of little pieces that get split out to lots of different people.

[00:45:22.94] spk_1:
All right, hopefully the consequences of not quite as grave sopranos if you don’t pay your

[00:45:27.63] spk_3:
yes, hopefully,

[00:45:31.09] spk_1:
um, all right, so, Marine, please jump in. Well,

[00:45:35.75] spk_4:
one of the things

[00:45:36.69] spk_1:
that our definition of time one of

[00:45:38.71] spk_4:
the places that this gets rial for non profits, and I know it got real for Christina was, if you’ve got sustaining donors, so let’s say you’re using a system that is connected to your online fundraising system. It’s one tool, and so you’ve got You’ve built up these monthly donors for years, right? We’ve all really worked hard to get our sustainer programs up and running and healthy, but when you move, those transactions need to go somewhere and continue to be processed if you stopped. And you said, Hey, all my monthly sustainer is I want you to go sign up again on my new donation form. You could lose up to 75 or higher percent of those monthly gifts. So you’re sort of starting that program over again? Christina needed to spend quite a bit of time thinking about this in her move. So I love to hear Cristina tell her sustain sustainer story.

[00:47:26.14] spk_5:
Sure. So we actually did have our sustain er’s spread out. Unfortunately, since our program is pretty established, this happened. Unfortunately, before I, um, started working at it Neera. But we had it in them in three different places, um, two of which were easily migrate herbal, and one of which we had Teoh speak with the donors, and it was only about 40 people. So it wasn’t so bad out of our, like, 500 plus, um, monthly donors. So we had to tell them Hey, we’re moving up opportunities system, and unfortunately, we can’t migrate you over there, so we’re gonna have to cancel your gift, and will you please restart? So, um, it was a little frustrating trying to get in touch with all of all three of those and figure out how to do that. But, um, in the end, we got it done, and it was It was fine. And it was much easier than having people start and restart.

[00:47:34.48] spk_1:
Did you? Did you find a lot of attrition?

[00:47:39.78] spk_5:
Um, it wasn’t so bad. Yeah, it was okay.

[00:47:42.85] spk_1:
All right. It wasn’t the 75 or more percent that Maureen said is possible,

[00:48:21.03] spk_5:
right? I think because the majority of ours were in a system that were easily able Teoh migrate from one Teoh the other, We didn’t really have any problems. And we had previously a credit card up of data, um, with them. So those credit cards were ready, ready to go, and we had no problem moving them over. There were a couple, I want to say a handful of people with a CH monthly donations and those are easy enough to move over as well because those never expire. Um, that’s

[00:48:21.86] spk_1:
coming from their bank accounts, right?

[00:48:35.21] spk_5:
Right. Yes. Sorry, but I think there’s a lot of those 40 people are 47 people that we had Teoh to worry about, and I think where we were able to get a little over half of them to restart their gifts, so we were really happy about that.

[00:48:38.46] spk_4:
But everybody else, the lion share kind of got somebody came in with very protective gloves on, kind of, because that’s that’s data that the non profit doesn’t want. You know they don’t want to store the credit card. They don’t want to store this the, um, the Cvv, because that’s banking information and no non profit anywhere, I think, has the security in place that they need to actually keep that locked down. So that’s where Lily and her team kind of came in and helped to facilitate the transfer of that protected data from where it waas in Christina’s legacy system into the new the new database.

[00:49:56.97] spk_2:
Time for our last break turn to communications relationships. The world runs on them. We all know this. If you’re a fundraiser, you especially know it turn to is led by former journalists so that you’ll get help building relationships with journalists. Those relationships will help you when you’d like to be heard so that people know you’re a thought leader in your field. They specialize in working with nonprofits. They’re at turn hyphen two dot ceo. We’ve got but loads more time for be a payment processing pro.

[00:50:54.64] spk_3:
This is a definitely an area where I would encourage people to actually dig in a little bit more on that payment processor contract, because it’s really important that you make sure that you own your data, especially when it comes to sustain Er’s. And it’s as boring said. You don’t want to be storing that data. You don’t want to be storing the credit card numbers because there’s a lot of security PC I compliance concerns that come along with that. But you do want to make sure that at the end of the day, if you walk away from a vendor Onda payments provider that you can take that deal with you. And we say that data, really, what we’re meaning by that is the credit card tokens. So it’s the secure token that represents the credit card number, and as long as you have in your contract that you own that data, you should be able to work with your current under. If you ever are transitioning off of them to have them securely, send that data to your new vendor, your new payment provider, and they will re token, eyes it into another secure soak in that lives in their system and can then be charged to your new vendor. So that’s kind of the process of migrating sustainer is over. And so it’s really important that you make sure that at the end of the day, you are the one that owns that data. Obviously, it can still be a little bit of pulling teeth to get the thunder that you’re leaving to feel incentivised to give it to you. But you want to make sure that you know that you have that

[00:51:25.46] spk_1:
right? So So that’s there’s terminology. There’s language should say language in the contract that will specify who owns. Is this organized data?

[00:51:27.92] spk_3:
Exactly, exactly. And that’s something again where if you’re depending on kind of a model that your digital tools provider has, they can often kind of answer that question for you because it’s often written into their contract with the femur provider that they partner with eso. It’s often not something that you know. The non profit themselves has to, you know, get out there. Ah, red pen and they go through the contract for. But it’s a question you want to make sure you’re asking.

[00:51:52.11] spk_1:
Okay, Lily, do you feel like this is something that a new organization should have an attorney review? These different agreements? Or is that is that you don’t think is necessary?

[00:52:46.15] spk_3:
I mean, I don’t ever want to say you shouldn’t have been assured the review a contract before you sign it. Um, you know, I think I think again, this is where it depends a little bit on how much a non profit is going out and contracting for the service is on their own versus how much they’re going through a provider. If you know, for example, if you’re working with a digital vendor that kind of handles payments in a house, this would likely be part of your contract with vendor, as opposed to a contract with an external payment provider. A lot of digital vendors don’t handle humans and house, but then partner with someone who does, and so they can kind of help you through that process a little bit. But is it a best practice, you know, Probably have having attorney. Look at it. I would say, Yeah, it was saying this.

[00:52:58.15] spk_1:
Any advice on how we know whether the fees that were being charged are within a normal range?

[00:53:00.91] spk_3:
Yeah, that is a great question. Um, so

[00:53:04.07] spk_1:
we’ve got a good morning. Okay? Medicine. All right.

[00:55:41.12] spk_3:
Um, yes. So the first thing I would say about pricing and is that there are different models. There’s kind of three main models that you’re going to see when it comes to payment processing fees. So the first is a flat rate. This is the easiest for anyone to understand. It is We’re gonna get charged X person and X number of sense on every transaction, no matter what. That’s obviously you know, it’s it’s very straightforward. It’s easy to calculate that, um, there’s also gonna be a tiered pricing model. And a tier pricing model is meant to kind of take into account the fact that different transactions do have different fees associated with them. Um, so when a human is processed online, uh, the credit card fees are gonna vary and a very pretty significantly, depending on a number of factors. Eso There’s what’s called interchange interchanges. Basically, the combination of fees that credit card companies charge there’s they’re gonna very depending on the credit card provider they’re gonna do very depending on the type of card. For example, rewards cards have a very big effect on processing fees. It’s actually why a lot of folks have seen their processing fees go up is because is more and more and more of us have rewards cards. Those usually incur higher processing fee. So this this kind of why instead of seas and it’s hundreds of different categories for disease, it makes up what’s called interchange. And so the tiered pricing model is usually mention to kind of it. To account for that, it’ll usually mean that there’s, you know, maybe three buckets or so where the femur provider has kind of taken every possible interchange, price and category, and it’s put it in one of these three buckets, and they charge a different rate. Based on that, it’s still not exactly what the credit card company is charging for that colored, but it it kind of balances that out more as opposed it a flat rate, which is just one number, and it’s sometimes the providers actually gonna be losing money on that transaction because they’ve had to pay more than that to the credit card company to charge it. In some cases, they’re gonna be making money on it. They just sort of, you know, they find what they think is a balancing between. Okay, and then the third model. It’s called Interchange Plus on. But that basically means is that your provider is just passing on those credit card company fees directly to you. And then they’re adding on some percentage for their own profit. That one. There’s a certain used to it and that you know exactly what you’re paying that provider. They’re not obscuring that profit for you. Um, but it’s also very hard to predict because obviously, again, interchange fees from the credit card companies very on every transaction. So you don’t You don’t know what you’re gonna pay on any transaction until it happens.

[00:56:14.48] spk_1:
Okay, Lily, if you ever leave every action, you have a niche consulting practice with payments transferrable to a private practice. Maureen, What else? What else? We

[00:56:22.53] spk_4:
way. I’d love to get Kristina to speak a little bit about those ranges and fees because you were using, as you said, a mix of different processors at a narrow before you major big move. And I think you saw awesome rial fluctuation between digital tool provider. Yeah. Yeah.

[00:57:48.13] spk_5:
So we were using 1/3 party, a peer to peer tool, um, whose prices were or their their fees were a lot higher than our main processor. So we definitely wanted to get away from that, Um, went looking at any system, and we also just wanted to find something. Of course, that was all of one. So we wouldn’t have to worry about having so many different processing fees for all these different types of tools. So, um, it’s another thing to consider to, um So, yeah. I mean, because we those 40 people that we had to cancel, they were kind of a mystery, and it took us a while to hunt them down. I don’t I’m not even sure what those processing fees were because they were just in there for so long and, like, had transferred over to, like, our old system. So, um, but yeah, I think I think what? You know, when we were looking for a new system, we wanted to find something because we were happy with our current processing fees. And so we wanted again something that either you know, meter beat, type of thing that we were saying before. Um um, Plus, you know, what are the things that you really like? Like the credit card update? Our was something we had to have. And then we also you did something that offered different pain and types as well. So, like, apple pay pay, pal, You know all the major credit cards. Um, so, yeah, that was that was an important thing for us.

[00:59:13.53] spk_3:
And that’s a really great point that you bring up to. Is that all those kind of additional things that you’re talking about? The other payment types, credit card update or card account update? Er, those often comes with visas. Well, they may be monthly, set up fees, then maybe per transaction fees. But they made very a ch, for example, different feed and credit cards. Typically. So those are all kind of questions you wanna ask when you think about you know, what are the must have features when it comes to my own life fund raising and my peanut processing? Make a list of those and then go talk to every vendor that you’re talking to and find out what the fees are for those because it’s really easy for blunders, especially on the reason that flat rate model you just hear what number and you’re like, Great, that’s that’s in the range I want to be in like I’m good and it’s it’s easy to like, not realize kind of all these other things that may seek in there. So it’s good to kind of get that get together. A list of questions when asked the same questions of every 100 it might be talking to, um, and there’s a fair amount you confined, you know, even honestly, just doing a quick Google search for some of the processors that you may know of names that you’ve heard in the past or vendors that you’ve worked with. You can often see some pricing information right on their site. It’s not necessarily gonna tell you everything, but if you’re just kind of looking for a ballpark, that could be helpful as well. And non profit should also know that some writers are able to give them discounted rates as non profit. So that’s always you should ask.

[01:00:41.14] spk_4:
Yeah, I think this is one of those those places where nobody owns it inside an organization, you know? Does your CFO or your accounts payable person own it? Does your operations person own it? Just someone like Christina was managing all the digital fundraising. Own it. Um, So the first step, whether you’re moving or not, is to kind of huddle eternally and tap someone to be the person who’s going to own this, learn about it and kind of Carrie Carrie. Things forward, re negotiate or influence rates when you’re when you’re moving. There’s just a lot of people switching systems. Right now, there’s a ton of different products on the market, and this is one of those things that you think you know. Like Lily says. You ask your questions, you check all your boxes and then six months in. You have this horrible discovery because I’ve raised X, but only why has hit my bank account. And now what do I dio? So it’s It’s a good thing to pay attention to, even if you don’t quite know what to ask, you’re not quite sure how to go about it. At least start the conversation internally, and then you’re a little bit more empowered to go talk with your your payment processor or your tool provider.

[01:01:16.49] spk_5:
I know another thing for us was the ability to process international donations as well. So, having knowing what they’re, um, what kind of security measures they take to for that as well, and then like, how easy is it for people to donate, if their overseas, whether they’re, you know, us people traveling overseas or residents or citizens that are living in other countries,

[01:01:18.84] spk_3:
I think a great way to think about it is kind of like inventory, what your current system is doing and what you’re program looks like today and then think about where do we want to grow our program? Where do we want for him to be in a year or two years? And, you know, maybe I talked to a lot of people, for example, who they want to get more into international fund raising. They’re not doing it now, but it’s a goal. What? That’s a goal. You should make sure that you’re thinking about that. When you switch to a new vendor or payment provider. Make sure that’s making supports that as you grow your organization you could help meet those goals and that you’re working with a provider that can help you do that.

[01:01:55.71] spk_1:
Right, Marine? Uh, you think Anything else pressing?

[01:01:57.98] spk_4:
I feel like we without getting into the super Weeds, E I think we’re there. I think we got it.

[01:02:34.60] spk_1:
Okay, then, uh, we’re gonna wrap it up there. All right? Thank you. Thanks. Thanks to all three of you. And I know you reach well and safe in your own locations. I’m very glad of that. I’m glad we were able to get together. Um, it’s Christina Snore, director of digital fundraising for American Near East Refugee Aid a nera Billy I, co vice president of payments and online fundraising and future payment processing consultant. Uh, she’s currently remaining at every action. Is

[01:02:40.48] spk_3:
a guest as CEO. Something that,

[01:02:42.44] spk_1:
um, and Marine will be off non profit digital strategist and technology coach. Practical wisdom for non profit accidental techies. Marine, this was unprecedented that I had a co host in any show. Um, I don’t know exactly. Well, we’re and I do know exactly I’m like your 480 or so 500 is coming up in July. I’ve been doing this 10 years never had a co host.

[01:03:04.64] spk_4:
I am honored. I’m

[01:03:06.80] spk_1:
absolutely I knew I could trust you from from your contribution first, The first session yesterday. So but don’t get carried away. Don’t come back.

[01:03:15.05] spk_4:
I won’t let it go to my head. And

[01:03:17.04] spk_1:
you know weekly. Not quarterly. Not semiannual. Carried away. All right.

[01:03:22.01] spk_4:
Sounds good. Alright,

[01:03:23.96] spk_1:
Thanks, Teoh. Thank you. Especially Maureen. Thanks to all three of you

[01:03:47.20] spk_2:
next week, let’s have more 20 and TC smartness. If you missed any part of today’s show you know what I beseech you Find it on tony-martignetti dot com were sponsored by wegner-C.P.As guiding you beyond the numbers wegner-C.P.As dot com and by turned to communications, PR and content for non profits. Your story is their mission. Turn hyphen two dot ceo.

[01:04:16.02] spk_1:
Our creative producer is clear. Meyer shows social Media is by Susan Chavez. Mark Silverman is our web guy. And this music is by Scott Stein of Brooklyn with me next week for not profit radio Big non profit ideas for the other 95% go out and be great

Nonprofit Radio for August 7, 2020: Donor Surveys & People-Powered Movements

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Crystal Mahon & Christian Robillard: Donor Surveys

Make the most of the donors you have by discovering their potential through surveying. Crystal Mahon and Christian Robillard talk principles, best practices and goal setting. Crystal is with STARS Air Ambulance and Christian is at Beyond The Bake Sale. (Part of our 20NTC coverage)

 

 

 

 

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This 20NTC panel helps you build more effective and more inclusive movements by encouraging you to think about communications, power and privilege. They’re Celina Stewart from League of Women Voters U.S. and Gloria Pan with MomsRising.

 

 

 

 

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[00:02:40.44] spk_1:
on welcome tony-martignetti profit radio big non profit ideas for the other 95%. I’m your aptly named host. Welcome to our first podcast only show. Oh, I’m glad you’re with me. I’d get slapped with a diagnosis of in Texas itis if you inflamed me with the idea that you missed today’s show Donor surveys. You’ll make the most of the donors you have by discovering their potential through surveying Crystal Mahan and Christian Robot Yard talk principles. Best practices and goal setting Crystal is with stars, Air ambulance and Christian. Is that beyond the bake sale? This is part of our 20 and TC coverage and people powered movements. This 20 NTC panel helps you build more effective and more inclusive movements by encouraging you to think about communications, power and privilege. They’re Selena Stewart from League of Women Voters. US and Gloria Pan with mom’s rising on tony steak, too. Planned giving accelerator were sponsored by wegner-C.P.As guiding you beyond the numbers wegner-C.P.As dot com and by turned to communications, PR and content for nonprofits, your story is their mission. Turn hyphen two dot ceo. Here is donor surveys. Welcome to tony-martignetti non profit radio coverage of 20 and TC 2020 non profit Technology Conference and 10 made the excruciating decision to cancel the non profit technology conference. But we are continuing virtually. You’ll get just as much value. We don’t have to all be close to pick the brains of the expert speakers from From N 10. Our coverage is sponsored by Cougar Mountain Software. The Knowledge Fund. Is there complete accounting solution made for non profits? Go to tony-dot-M.A.-slash-Pursuant Mountain for a free 60 day trial. My guests now are Crystal Mahan and Christian Robot Yard. Crystal is manager of annual giving at stars Air Ambulance and Christian is founder and chief podcaster at Beyond the Bake Sale. Crystal Christian. Welcome. Welcome to non profit radio,

[00:02:44.19] spk_2:
tony.

[00:02:45.00] spk_0:
Thanks, tony. Great to be here.

[00:02:46.42] spk_1:
It’s a pleasure to have both of you. You are both in ah, in Canada. Crystal. You are in Alberta and Christian. Remind me where you are.

[00:02:55.54] spk_0:
I’m in Ah, beautiful, Sunny Ottawa, Ontario.

[00:03:00.02] spk_1:
Ottawa. No other capital? Yes, in

[00:03:01.23] spk_0:
your nation’s capital. Not be not be disputed with Toronto. Who likes to think that the capital

[00:03:29.66] spk_1:
I know well and many Americans think it’s either Montreal with Toronto? Yes, but, uh, Ottawa Capital. All right. I’m glad to know that you’re both well and safe. Um, and glad to have you both with us. Thanks. Um, we’re talking about donor surveys. Your your NTC topic is ah, Dorner surveys your untapped data goldmine Crystal. Why are surveys a data goldmine?

[00:03:45.11] spk_2:
Well, we have the fortunate launching a survey. We’ve never done one prior to 2016. And when we did it, we were amazed at what we found. So we learned a lot about our donors. Education preferences. We made money, like, usually made that on that. And I’ll talk about. We actually ended up learning a lot about I’m getting prospects. And turns out that there were a lot of donors that we had no idea name Justin there will ever interested in the will. So there was a lot of revenue like hidden revenue that we were finally getting access to you. So that’s are where that line is moving your wits, but it’s preparing to you.

[00:04:23.61] spk_1:
Interesting. I’m looking forward to drilling into that more because I didn’t plan to giving fundraising as a consultant on sometimes asked by clients about doing surveys. So I’m interested in what you’re doing as well. Um, and and you’re getting gifts. You said you’ve made money back from them. So people do send you gifts of cash along with their surveys.

[00:04:53.69] spk_2:
Yes. Like this year we get. Because last year, 2019 are stars. Allies there, maybe $300,000 And that all the you people have been found for giving what? We’re looking at dollars. So it’s you cannot do a survey to seem like you. Point?

[00:04:54.30] spk_1:
Yeah. Did you say billions? With a B?

[00:04:57.21] spk_2:
No millions and

[00:05:08.78] spk_1:
millions. Okay, the audio is not perfect, so it almost sounded billions. So I want to be sure, because I’m listeners have the same question. Okay, Millions, millions is still very, very good. Um, Christian? Anything you want to head to about Why these air Ah, such a gold mine for non profits.

[00:05:14.81] spk_0:
I mean, besides the fact that you’re using data, obviously, to reinforce certain decisions and Teoh highlight certain wealth elements, I would say in terms of your sponsorship potential, I know a lot of organizations are looking more so into the corporate sponsorship corporate engagement side of things. And I think with your donor surveys, you could really reveal a lot around where people are working there levels in terms of positions within a certain company or organization. And that can lead you down some interesting pass from a corporate sponsorship perspective.

[00:06:05.94] spk_1:
Okay. Okay, um, your, um your description of the workshop said that make the most of the donors you already have. And it sounds like you both obviously are going there. Is there anything you want to add about sussing out the value that’s in your that you don’t know? You have among your current donors?

[00:06:31.20] spk_2:
Well, from our perspective, like it’s given us an opportunity to get to know our donors better in terms of what? What are they actually interested in learning about the organization or why are they choosing given that allows us to tailor messages, just be a lot more personal with them and act like we really know that was supposed to them just being a number. This is an opportunity to really cultivate that relationship and just continue bring them on war.

[00:06:41.08] spk_1:
Okay, um, is most of your content in the workshop around as practices for surveys? Is that what we’re gonna be exploring? Mostly

[00:07:05.94] spk_2:
Christian feel free to jump in and say that we were looking a lot of fast. Her best practice, then also, case studies. People would have some tangible examples how to actually launch one with consider. And what would actually need to do once they got

[00:07:24.46] spk_1:
OK? All right, well, let’s, um let’s start with, Like, where? Where do you get started? Who, Who who were the best people to send surveys to our What types of information are are you finding our most responded to or what types of questions are most responded to? How can you help us sort of frame? Ah ah, an outline of what we were to get started.

[00:07:55.62] spk_2:
Well, Christian and I talked a lot about building the proper spoke of your surveys of figuring out. Why exactly are you? What do you try to find out? And once, you kind of I guess you were down exactly what you’re trying to learn, what you’re trying to cheat, That sort of helping bigger. You need to actually reach up to what? The audience. You need to know that before.

[00:08:06.93] spk_1:
Okay, So, starting with your goals, what was the purpose of the darn thing? Yes. Okay. Okay. Um Christian. You want to jump in around, you know it’s starting to get this process started.

[00:08:15.29] spk_0:
Yeah, absolutely. And I think as crystal, I were kind of building this piece at whether you’re talking about more of a philanthropic, focus for your surveying or whether you’re talking about more of a corporate sponsorship focus of it. You only want to ask yourself, I never different questions before you even get going things around. What do you ultimately want to know about your donor base? Or about this particular audience population that you’re ultimately looking for? More information on? Why are you doing this in the first place? Is, Is this more responsive? Isn’t it more of a proactive type surveyed that explore new avenues? Would you ultimately need to know? I think that’s an important element to focus on Is not asking everything but asking the right things? Who do you need to ask? So who is the actual population that you’re targeting at the end of the day? What would you do with the information? So don’t just collect information for information, say not that that’s not important. But what’s the actual actionable pieces for that? And how are you gonna protect that information? I think with today’s sensitivities around around data privacy, it’s really important for charities and nonprofits to Stuart that data as they would any type of gift that they ultimately get.

[00:09:27.71] spk_1:
Yeah, in terms of the data stewardship that that may constrain what you asked as well, because now you have, ah, conceivably a higher level of security that you need to maintain

[00:09:32.60] spk_0:
absolutely tony and even just in terms of sensitivities, of phrasing, certain questions, and that it’s important for you to think about how you phrase certain things and how intimate your ultimately getting. And if you do get that intimate, like you said, how do you protect that data? But also, what’s the purpose for collecting that particular piece of data side from? Well, it might be a nice toe have someday, instead of this actually contributes towards our bottom line.

[00:10:00.13] spk_1:
You’re doing surveys around corporate sponsorship, right? That’s the example you mentioned. So you’re getting to know where people work so that you might use that information for potential sponsorships.

[00:11:02.31] spk_0:
Yeah, I mean, when you look at sponsorship, ultimately it it’s very much a business transaction. If you look at how Forbes just define sponsorship. It’s very much the cash and in kind fee paid to a property, a property being whether it’s ah terrible run or some type of adventure conference in this case, um, in return for access to the exploitable commercial potential associate without property. So anything of any other type of exploitable commercial potential, which is the most buzzer and definition you possibly could. If you think of any type of advertising medium, whether it’s TV, radio print, you want to know ultimately cruising your audience. And one of the best and most effective ways to do that is to conduct some type of survey to really tease out who are some of your very specific or niche audiences. Cannabis a niche. So it’s a bit of a cringe for for us up here in the North. But, uh, having a survey to really tease out who are who’s in your audience. And some of the more behavioral psychographic demographic features of that audience are particularly important, toe have to really make a compelling case toe corporations looking to use sponsorship with your organization,

[00:11:20.18] spk_1:
the, um what four matter using Christian crystal, I’m gonna ask you the same thing shortly. What? How are these offered to people?

[00:11:28.33] spk_0:
Yeah, so we so in the experience of I’ve high, we usually use ah surveymonkey survey of some kind that allows for a lot of cross top analysis to be able to say that people who are in between the ages of 18 and 29 this particular set of income, they have these particular purchase patterns. They care about your cause, toe ends degree. They, um, are engaged with your cause or with your property and whether it’s through social media or through certain print advertisements or whatever that might be. And we usually collect around 30 plus data points on all of those on all those elements, ranging from again behavioral to the demographic to psychographic Teoh. Some very pointed, specific questions around the relationship between your cause and the affinity for a certain corporation based on that based on not caring for that cause.

[00:12:39.89] spk_1:
Yeah. So you said collecting around 30 data points, does that? Does that mean a survey would have that many questions? Absolutely. Okay, now I’ve heard from guests in the past. May have even been ntc guests. Not this year, but, you know, the optimal number of questions for surveys like five or six or so and people bailout beyond that point.

[00:13:58.37] spk_0:
Yeah, and and usually before I had actually sent out a survey of that magnitude, I would agree with you. Tony and I agree with most. I think that the important differentiators one is that you frame it as it’s very much for improving the relationships and the ability for the cause properties, whether that’s your run, your gala, whatever that might be to raise money and usually the audience that you’re setting. That, too, is very receptive to that. I think you want to frame it also as your only collecting the most important of information. And you’re also looking at ah again like you’re incentivizing in some way, shape or form. So usually when you tailor it with some type of incentive Buta $50 gift card opportunity Teoh win something like that. Usually people a lot more or a lot more receptive. And in the time that we’ve done surveys, whether it’s in my my past days, consulting in the space or now doing a lot of work with charities nonprofits, we sent it to tens of thousands of respondents and get a pretty a pretty strong response rate and a really nominal, if negligible, amount of an unsubscribe rates. So people are not un subscribing from getting those questions, and in fact, they’re answering a lot of them and an important element, as well as making them optional. So not forcing people to house to fill out certain pieces but giving them the freedom to answer whatever questions they feel compelled to. But when you’re doing it for the cause, people are pretty are pretty compelled to respond to those states of questions.

[00:14:01.77] spk_1:
Okay, Crystal, how about you? What? What format are your service offered in?

[00:14:31.04] spk_2:
Did you both offline and online? So our donor base tends to skew a little bit older, though for us, a physical mailing is absolutely I’m only deals online, burgeon for, I guess, other parts of our donor base that are different. The graphical, just based on that person’s preference, is giving them that opportunity. But what we did find is that in terms of our offline responses, we had a lower was off rate of responses to the survey, but exponentially more donations coming through offline as online and then for online responses of the online certainly had a lot more responses to be online. Survey. There are fewer donations, so I found that there was an inverse relationship there about that very thing.

[00:15:41.08] spk_1:
It’s time for a break wegner-C.P.As paycheck protection program. Loan forgiveness This is still a front burner issue. You have got to get your loan forgiveness application in. Wegner has the info you need. Their latest free wagon are explains the state of P P P Loan forgiveness. What is forgivable? What documentation do you need? How to work with your lender? Go to wegner-C.P.As dot com. Click Resource Is and recorded events. Now back to donor surveys with Crystal Mahan and Christian Robot Yard. Do you, ah, subscribe to the same opinion about the length that that could be up to 30 questions? In a survey, a ZX Christian was saying,

[00:16:17.66] spk_2:
We personally have a practice of you tiki bars between five and 10 questions. And sometimes we even Taylor that we know that some of these interested in particular programs we might take out a certain question. But in something else related specifically to them, for their isn’t variability in the surveys, but generally quite short, but I do agree with Christian for sure in terms of really framing the purpose of the survey and you to the questions around this is the whole purpose of this is to build a relationship with them and better serve them and get to know them better. And I think that really prince, And then you also

[00:16:23.41] spk_1:
just gonna ask about incentivizing, Okay? Something similar, Like drawing for a gift card. Something like that.

[00:16:33.91] spk_2:
Yeah. We get a star’s prize package. We wanted to do something about these decisions. You couldn’t get something but elsewhere. So yeah, way start for merchandise. So that’s

[00:17:18.04] spk_1:
okay. I’m gonna thank Christian for not having a good, uh, good video appearance because, you know, I’ve done 10 of these today, and they’re all gonna be all the video’s gonna be preserved. Except this one. Because Christian, um, as a very extreme background is really just a silhouette ahead with headphones. Really? Little I can see. But I’m grateful because my background just fell. I have a little tony, I have a tony-martignetti. You watched other of these videos which you’re gonna be available. This tony-martignetti non profit radio. So the easel you know, what’s that for? A form core, you know, sign. And it was behind me. It was, and it just fell while Crystal was talking. So thank you, Christian.

[00:17:29.66] spk_0:
It was just so surprised that you could ask 30 questions on a survey and get some type of degree of response.

[00:17:38.43] spk_1:
Only it shook my house that I’m

[00:17:40.42] spk_0:
30 data points. What madness is this? I’m

[00:17:58.70] spk_1:
so a gas man. Yes. And then also the fact that you the two of you disagree. Um, all right, so but I’m shouting myself, calling myself out as having a flimsy background lasted through. And that’s through, like, seven hours of this. I

[00:17:58.85] spk_0:
love it. Also, we don’t necessarily disagree, but I think different surveys serve their different purposes. So I agree with Crystal that in that particular case, you only need descends. One that has 5 to 10 questions rise in this case, your public sending it to in a slot strip case, you’re probably sending it to a larger population of people. And you only need a certain amount of people to fill it out.

[00:18:18.73] spk_1:
Crystal, I had asked you, and you probably answered, but I got distracted by my collapsing background. What? What kinds of incentives do you offer?

[00:18:40.21] spk_2:
We offer stars prize pack. So it’s stars over two nights that we want to talk or something a little bit different other than my gift card that they could get through any other. Yeah, it’s so different Angle

[00:19:00.18] spk_1:
personalized two stars. Okay, Okay, Um, now, was yours specifically Ah, planned giving survey, or did you just have a couple of planned giving questions? And that’s where you discovered this data goldmine of future gift. And all the wheels that you found out that you’re in was

[00:19:27.84] spk_2:
it was it was not specific to plan giving, so it was more just a general survey. And then we did have a question about plan giving and that we were stunned. But subsequent years we kept asking mad, and right now we’re sort of in the middle of doing that whole. I’m giving strategy and trying to really build that out. Now that we know that there is this whole core people that are interested in this. So it’s really opened up the water opportunities President organization after all.

[00:19:43.23] spk_1:
Yeah. Interesting. Okay. All right. So you learned from the first time this is you’re in a lot more estates than you had. Any idea? Um, let’s let’s talk about some more good practices for surveys. Crystal, is there something you can one of two things you want to recommend and then we’ll come toe go back to Christian.

[00:19:53.81] spk_2:
Yeah, One of my major things is that if you’ve been asked a question, you have to know where you’re going to do with that data after the fact that you were people just ask the question to ask a question for whatever reason. But then they don’t action. Anything out of it to me is very important that if our donors are gonna spend the time actually breathe through your survey, respond, mail it in or submitted online, that we actually do something that that information is the weather bats killer. It’s a messaging or changing communication preferences or whatever it is you’re asking us to do, you were tell has I think that’s so important that you have to have all a plan once these losses come back. And what are we gonna do with them? Who was going to take action? How are we gonna reason with this? How are we going to use information.

[00:21:15.77] spk_1:
I think of date of birth is as a good example of that. If you’re gonna, if you’re gonna develop a plan to congratulate someone for their birth on their birthday each year, then that could be a valuable data point. Um, but if you just, you know, if you’re just asking because you you don’t have a purpose, you just interested in what their ages? For some vague reason, then there’s no there’s no value in asking. And if it is just to follow up, if it’s just to know their you know when you want to send a card, maybe you don’t need the year. Maybe just need the day in the month. But if there’s value to your database for knowing their age and you would ask for a year

[00:21:23.72] spk_2:
exactly how he felt down, what do we need to know? I really asking

[00:21:30.90] spk_1:
why, Kristen, you have a best practice you want to share.

[00:21:33.84] spk_0:
Yeah, I would say Consider the not just the population size that you’re not just the population that you’re serving, but also the representative makeup. So if you know that your database is predominantly on more, the senior side of things, but you’re getting a disproportion amount of more individuals who are on the younger side of things. In terms of respondents, that’s something important that you have to take into account. So the makeup of the actual population is is more important. I would argue that the amount of responses you could get a crazy amount of responses. But if it doesn’t represent the population that you’re serving and that who make up your donors, it’s it’s not gonna be valuable dated to you. I remember one time we had a ZX instance for an organization wanted Teoh do a survey for sponsor purposes, and in other cases, it’s been from or donor specific, like, I will just put it on on Facebook or Twitter or something like that. It’s not necessarily your population is not necessarily the group that you’re looking that you’re actively engaged with a fundraising perspective. You get information to the otherwise and then obviously reflect on that and use that. But be really clear about the breakdown that you need to have in order to make the information, actually, representative of the rest of your database,

[00:22:47.24] spk_1:
Um, what kind of response rates what’s what’s a decent response rate to, ah to a survey?

[00:23:06.51] spk_0:
I think it depends what type of server you’re sending. I will let Crystal speak to this more, but I’d say if it’s philanthropic. Eikenberry on the sponsorship side of things you’re looking for a response rate that coincides with the 95% confidence interval with a 5% margin of error. Let’s get market data to calculate that there’s a bunch of big captain complicated formulas that we probably have all repressed from our time in. In statistics Citizen that in university there’s ah company called Surveymonkey that actually has a calculator for its. If you go to the Surveymonkey website, you can actually just plug in a what the sample side of what the actual size of the database you’re sending into. And you can plug in what confidence interval that you want. And then what margin of error that you’d like, and it will pump out a number of a minimum that you need to have. I would say that’s a good starting point. But again, as I talked about before, make sure you have the representative break up breakdown of, ah, who’s actually within your audience reflected in the survey results and don’t have it disproportionately skewed towards a particular demographic that might be just more inclined. Teoh, respond to surveys.

[00:24:25.04] spk_1:
Okay. Okay, um, Crystal, Anything you want to add about the confidence, it’s different, but yeah, I withdraw that. That doesn’t make sense for you because you’re doing individual philanthropic surveys. So each response you get is valuable. You find out that someone is interested in planned giving already, has you in their will. That one response has has great value. Yes. Okay.

[00:24:39.74] spk_2:
Our purpose of our surveys a little bit different. We don’t worry so much about that, but I actually meeting how like that in your mind. Reaching out to you?

[00:24:44.24] spk_1:
What? What kind of response rate to use for the crystal is still you know, these things? Things take time and you’re doing Some of them are offline. So there’s postage and printing, et cetera. What kind of response rate do you consider good for? For a NH effort like that

[00:25:40.43] spk_2:
in terms of financial reform? Three. So don’t verify that for us, a response to the survey doesn’t necessarily mean a gift, and it gets to the survey, doesn’t necessarily mean that they responded to a number. Yes, we usually eight or 86%. But in terms of actual response to the survey, we’ve seen his lower 2% for the highest 7% a year of channel. So either way, like we have, quite like we have quite a large database. So any of you to be So get this information, your father.

[00:25:42.89] spk_1:
Okay. Okay. Um, for your online surveys. Crystal, are you using surveymonkey? Also, did you say

[00:25:48.80] spk_2:
use a couple leased surveymonkey last year? It is very user friendly. What? I would caution people are always print about whatever price package designed for because, like you discussed for our surveys a big focuses financial tournament. So we needed to price plan that involved being able to redirect right from surveymonkey page to our donation form. So you had to be really mindful things like that. So in some of the basic packages, they don’t write redirect donation form in that you can’t Do you have a really negatively impact your

[00:26:27.94] spk_1:
Is there another online tool that you like? Also you?

[00:26:52.64] spk_2:
I used Teoh from cold response. Ter. We’ve there be start a sweetener somewhere in Europe, and they were very good, though there are some limitations is well with them in terms of what the packages offer. But bring out we’re using serving Look, you know what was sending out like, for example, looking at surveys. This any surveymonkey already of our to be rich 8th 1 So that’s what we’re using.

[00:26:56.04] spk_1:
Okay, how about you, Christian? Is there another one besides Surveymonkey that you could recommend?

[00:27:22.01] spk_0:
I I think it just depends on what you’re looking for. A tony. So if you’re looking for a lot of, let’s say, more qualitative answers, I’d say even a Google form would would be more than would be more than acceptable. It really just depends on what functionality want to get out of. I used every monkey pretty religiously, just cause it’s like Crystal said. It’s very user friendly. It has the functionality that I need, and it’s and it’s relatively reasonable in terms of in terms of price point for what you get. It’s also gonna depend, and it’s up to you to do due diligence on what types of functionality you need. You need to integrate with your database for other software. Do you need certain functionality. Do you actually know how to use a lot of those things? Is there gonna be support and again, like what? What are they going to do with your data? Like, do they have access to your data? Whether it’s metadata or otherwise, Are there other rules of jurisdictions you have to consider with that data privacy? So I use every monkey by lots of considerations to make.

[00:28:04.85] spk_1:
Okay, Okay. Thank you. And Kristen wanted to, uh why don’t you lead us out with some Take us out with some, I guess. Motivation. Closing thoughts like to end with?

[00:28:05.97] spk_0:
Absolutely, I would say from a sponsor perspective, whether you’re a large organization or small organization, the riches during the niches. So to do good sponsorship, it requires good data, and it requires those 30 plus data points. But whether you’re a big group or a small group, you can compete at the same scale, especially with the amount of money that’s being spent on cost sponsorship over $2 million a worldwide, which is no small amount of money. That’s that you can get access you whether you’re $100,000 a year, order a $1,000,000 plus requires good data. So make sure you’re collecting good data. Make sure you’re clear on what do you want to use your information for? And, uh, not just the diligent in ah, making training step, but the data is actually protected.

[00:28:50.64] spk_1:
Okay, um, I was I was I was gonna let Christian end, But since the two of you have such divergent purposes, which is fabulous for it’s great for a discussion Divergent purposes around your surveys. Crystal, why don’t you take us out on the on the filling topic? The individual donor side?

[00:29:51.64] spk_2:
Yes. So play for discussing. Don’t be afraid to fundraise just because survey doesn’t mean that you can’t make money off of it. People are supporting you enough that they’re willing to fill out the remainder onto you. They may be going to donators alone, and then I’ll help without it said you have to know why you do what you do with that information. It’s really important in terms of respecting your door time and back. That there giving you this information, you need to be able to use it and sort properly and safely. And then last may I just say please, please please test your survey before you actually sending out Senator One other part fans are other people that are not in the midst of building the surveys that you can find out. You phrase things appropriately. You’re actually wanting what you want to functionality is appropriate. I think that’s just so we don’t have one chance of finding out. So just make sure that

[00:30:01.59] spk_1:
okay, thank you very much. That’s Crystal Mahan, manager of annual giving at stars Air Ambulance. And with her is Christian Rubber Yard founder and chief podcaster at Beyond the bake sale crystals in Alberta. And ah, I’m sorry, Crystal. Did I just say Crystal? Yeah.

[00:30:21.02] spk_2:
You know, yesterday

[00:30:23.48] spk_1:
I say, Chris Christie, Mr Just all I know is in Alberta,

[00:30:25.30] spk_0:
you know, we don’t make it easy on your tony

[00:30:36.35] spk_1:
on, and I got through 25 minutes. So well, and I know it’s a lackluster host. I’m sorry. This is stuck with in the Christians in the capital city of Ottawa. Thank you so much, Christian Crystal. Thank you very

[00:30:40.72] spk_0:
much. Thanks, tony.

[00:33:31.93] spk_1:
Thanks to you for being with joining martignetti non profit radio coverage off 20 NTC, the non profit technology conference Responsive at the conference by Cougar Mountain Software Denali Fund. Is there complete accounting solution made for nonprofits? Tony-dot-M.A.-slash-Pursuant Mountain will get you a free 60 day trial. Thanks so much for being with us now. Time for Tony’s Take two. I am still very proud to announce the launch of planned giving accelerator. This is a yearlong membership community that is going to get your planned giving program started. I’m going to give you exclusive webinars Exclusive podcasts. Yes, beyond tony-martignetti non profit radio, there’s gonna be the exclusive podcast for accelerator members. Small group asked me anything. Sessions over Zoom I’ll have Resource is like templates and checklists. All of this is to get your planned giving program started. You’ll join for a year. I will keep you filled with exclusive content, and you will get your program started. I promise I will make planned giving easy, accessible and affordable. You can check out all the information at planned giving accelerator dot com. If you may not be quite ready for membership, you don’t want to look at that quite yet. You just want to dip your toes in the water. I have a free how to guide about getting your planned giving program started to see a theme. Here, you see, you see the consistency running through here. This is not This is not accidental. Please, please the free how to guide you Download that also at planned giving accelerator dot com, that is Tony’s Take two. Now it’s time for people powered movements. Welcome to tony-martignetti non profit radio coverage of 20 and TC 2020 non profit Technology Conference. Of course, the conference was canceled, but we are persevering. Virtually sponsored. A 20 NTC by Cougar Mountain Software Denali Fund Is there complete accounting solution made for non profits? Tony-dot-M.A.-slash-Pursuant Mountain for a free 60 day trial. My guests now are Selena Stewart and Gloria Pan. Selena is senior director of advocacy and litigation at League of Women Voters. US. And Gloria is vice president for member engagement at Mom’s Rising Celina. Gloria. Welcome. Hello. I’m glad we were able to put this virtually. It’s good to see both of you. Um and I’m glad to know that you each well and safe and in either D. C or just outside D. C. Selena, you’re in d. C and Gloria. Where you outside Washington Gloria

[00:33:46.60] spk_4:
I am actually near Dulles Airport. So, you know, some people commute from here, but because Mom’s rising is a virtual organization, I don’t. And so when people ask me for lunch, I’m always like, Okay, it takes a little bit more planning. I have to bend. I have to get my body injustices.

[00:34:18.24] spk_1:
Okay, Um, you’re NTC Topic is a revolution is coming. Top tactics, build people powered movements. Um, Selena, would you get us started with this? What? What was the need for the session?

[00:35:27.88] spk_3:
Well, I think, um, I think one of the things is right now it’s all about people power. You know, there’s everything is so politicized right now, and I think that there is often a conversation about how people are involved with what government actually represents or what the government is representing. So I think that that’s really, really important. Um, we also saw, like, a 2018 mawr voter turnout, more voters turning out to vote and things like that. So I think that that also is a part of us people conversation like what is compelling people to participate, even mawr, or at a greater extent in their democracy. But all of these things kind of work together to figure out. Not only do we have people engaged now, but what is important. What just community is more people become engaged. How does how does our definition of our community and communities in general changes? More people are included and participating all of those things. So I think that we’re at a very interesting and crucial moment in time. And so people powered and people involved movement. It’s it’s, I think it’s always happen. But it’s just a coin phrase. I think that’s especially prevalent right now.

[00:35:56.69] spk_1:
Good, Gloria, even though participation is is very high, were also largely polarized. So how do we overcome the opposite ends of the spectrum to tryto bring people together and and organize?

[00:36:01.33] spk_4:
Are you talking about everyone or are you talking about voters?

[00:36:17.39] spk_1:
Uh, well, I’m talking about the country. I don’t know. I don’t know whether I don’t know where the people are voting, but I’m talking about our political polarization. I don’t know if they’re necessarily voting. I

[00:36:20.97] spk_3:
I talked about voting, so I probably threw it off a little bit. Glory. They act like I’m asking for

[00:37:19.89] spk_4:
complication only because, like some of the most talented and I think unifying on politicians in recent memory. For example, Barack Obama did not succeed in unifying all of us, right? So there are some segments of our citizenry that will just not do it. We will not be able to come together with them. But I think that for, um, people who really do want the best for our country and who are open minded enough, Teoh want to hear from other people who have different, you know, slightly different ways of looking at the world. It is possible to do it, and that goes back to what Selena was saying about people powered movements. I think that one of the reasons why that’s become more more of a catchphrase is that you know, we are in an era of information overload. We are in an era of polarization and not believing everything that we’re seeing on the Internet and in the news. And so being able to actually really connect with people on the ground, in person, over the phone, but directly and not going through the filter of social media or news movements is it’s increasingly important, and that will be one of the main channels for us to unify as many people as possible.

[00:38:16.42] spk_1:
So we’re talking about creating these both online and offline, right? Um, people powered people, centred movements. Um, how, Gloria, how do we want nonprofits to think about or what we need to think about in terms of doing this, organizing, creating these these movements,

[00:39:11.07] spk_4:
I’m First of all, it’s about inclusivity. Okay, So, um, at least from where we set Mom’s rising and me speaking on behalf of Monster Rising right now, we want to make sure that whatever we do and if it’s the most people and harms no one at all, if possible. So that’s one part of it. How we speak, how we communicate to make sure that what we’re speaking and how we communicate does not reinforce add stereotypes that creates divisions. Okay, that’s one way, another way, not way. But another thing to consider are also the tools that we’re using. Are we using your people are on different kinds of communication tools. Some people only do Facebook. Other people only do on email on dhe. There also is like text messaging there. All of these new community communications goes towards coming on and being on top of the different tools. Superb, warden, Because we need to meet people where they are. Um, because you’re just a couple of thoughts.

[00:39:36.49] spk_1:
Okay. Um so sorry, Selina. So we’re talking about diversity equity inclusion. Let’s drill down into a little bit of, like, what do we What do we need to do around our communications that is more equitable and non harming?

[00:39:57.72] spk_3:
So I think that’s an important question of us. Definitely something that has been injured in the leaks work over the last, I would say five years, but more intentionally over the last two. I’m sorry. I

[00:40:01.52] spk_1:
mean, he’s sorry. Whose work?

[00:42:09.00] spk_3:
The league. I’m sorry. I always refer to the League of Women Voters with us. Okay. Colleagues were led. Sorry. Boats that are full title is just too long for me to keep saying so. I just prefer to see Oh, I got you know, d I is very, very important for us. You know, our organization has historically been older white women. We’ve also always had members of color. But I don’t know that they were always at the forefront. So for us, our work is really centered in two questions and everything that we’re doing, who’s at the table and who should be at the table who’s missing. So I think starting all of our conversation in the efforts that we’re doing with those two questions allows us to center on our work in diversity, equity inclusion and also use our power as, um, people who have had access to legislator stakeholders, et cetera. How did we use our power and in a way that allows access of inclusivity for more people. So I think that that is really important and something that DEA diversity and inclusion work. It’s hard just versus It’s not easy, you know it. It gets very uncomfortable a lot of times when you’re talking about privilege, patriarchy and all of the talk about as it relates to d I. But it’s so important to get comfortable being uncomfortable and having these conversations that the only way I think that we can start to build a bridge towards unifying Um, CA music is at the end of the day, we may be politically, but at the end of the day, we all share many of the very same values which is historically united this country. Like right now we’re in the midst of the Corona virus. The Corona virus doesn’t care where the Republican Democrat black, white, female male does. It doesn’t matter. I’m at the end of the day, we all have to make sure that we’re doing what we can to be safe as individuals. But also our actions greatly impact the people around us. So it’s more of a It’s more of a community mindset that’s required or to tap this down. So I know that that’s like a little offset. All shoot from what we’re talking about. But I think it all placed together in some way, shape or form.

[00:42:30.65] spk_1:
Okay, um, Gloria about for moms rising. And how do you ensure that your communications are equitable on dhe? Non harmful?

[00:43:35.32] spk_4:
Well, Mom’s Rising has very intentionally built an organization that tries to bring different voices to the table. We are intersectional and we are multi issue, and so from our staff were very bad person, many, many different ways, and from the way that we choose which issues to work on, we also take into consideration which these are being impacted and how we communicate about those and then the way that we campaign is that our campaigns are always overlap. And so there is different people within the organization as well as a partner policy partners from different issue areas. They help us that our issues and the way that we communicate with them to make sure that you know you are we’re not communicating in a way that that that excludes communities, reinforces bad stereotype pipes and raises red flags, make make, make people feel bad ways that we don’t understand because of where we individuals. Campaigners. No. So everything we do is very thoroughly betters through different filters.

[00:43:48.70] spk_1:
Okay, so you re vetting. Yeah, please. Yeah, so, you know,

[00:44:55.97] spk_3:
I totally agree with what glorious said. I think that’s really important because the league is also multi issue and kind of has that you have to compete when you multiple issues. You sometimes have toe think a little differently about how you present yourself on each issue in orderto not negatively impact the whole set of what you’re trying to accomplish. And so for us and the communication speaks, I’m expressly is thinking about whether it’s appropriate who’s the appropriate messenger when we’re communicating so Is it appropriate for the league to be a leader in this space, or do we need to take a step back and be a supporter? So I think that’s one of the things that’s very important for us. Communication wise is we’re figuring out what is what space are we gonna take up in the communication in space and how we’re gonna communicate this issue and then the other pieces Who’s talking? Who is the person that we’re putting in front actually speak about a particular issue and is, Is that the right person? And are they speaking from the lens that’s most appropriate for that particular issue that’s gonna be impacted most as a result of what you’re saying or doing? So I think that’s very important. With Gloria lifted up

[00:46:14.78] spk_1:
time for our last break turn to communications relationships, the world runs on them. We know this turn to is led by former journalists, so you’re going to get their help building relationships with journalists. They’ve been there, they know how to do it. They know what the pitfalls are and they know how to do it wrong so they will steer you to the right way to build relationships with journalists. Those relationships will help you when you need to be heard so that people know you’re a thought leader in your field. They specialize in working with nonprofits. They’re at turn hyphen two dot ceo. We’ve got but loads more time for people powered movements with Selena Stewart and Gloria Pan. How do you manage the conflicting issues? If you know, I guess it’s because there are issues where you have a large constituency on one side of one issue. But something else may seem contrary to that to that large constituency. A different issue that you’re taking a stand on Is that Is that my understanding? Right when you say, you know, potential issue conflict?

[00:46:51.33] spk_3:
Well, when you have a 500,000 members and supporters and you’re in every congressional district, everybody can agree on on how to approach an issue. But what grounds? The league is our mission. Our mission is to empower voters and democracy. Power people defend democracy. So I think as long as you stay rooted in what your chin values statement is that you can find some reconciliation across, you know the most seemingly divergent issues Okay,

[00:46:58.68] spk_1:
climate change That I think would probably be a good example. I was just

[00:47:11.43] spk_4:
I was I was gonna add, okay, that just to step back a little bit. The one thing that I am super super proud of, um, is that a toll east for progressives? I think that we’re actually pretty consistent in about our agreement on your shoes. We may have different levels of intensity and what we agree with, but I think they’re very few conflicts. We may not agree on how to get somewhere, but we all agree on where we want to go. Okay, So in that way, I rather feel, at least from Mom’s rising standpoint, we rarely get. I can’t even think of a single instance where we have conflicts because we’re not agreeing with each other or with policy partners on the most important thing where we’re heading.

[00:47:45.75] spk_3:
So I think that’s a difference, because are the league is it’s not left or right leaning were kind of way. We have members who are both conservative and liberal. Yeah, have some of that conflict more in that. But I think you’re absolutely right. Do we all want the same things and a healthier, more vibrant democracy. Absolutely. So you have to find some common ground in that space. But we definitely have members who are who want to handle things. One way, versus the other. We have to find common ground.

[00:49:02.57] spk_1:
Yeah, that’s the challenge. I was trying to get it. Yeah, okay. It helps. At least it helps me to think of an example like climate change. You know, some. There are some people who don’t even believe that it’s it’s human impacted. And there are others who think, where decades behind and in our inaction Teoh Teoh, reverse the effects of human induced climate change. So, um, it’s Ah, that’s that’s quite a challenge. Really. So, um Okay, Well, where else? Well, should we go with these people? Powered movement ideas? You you, you to spend a lot more time studying this. So what else should we be talking about? That we haven’t yet. I

[00:49:02.65] spk_4:
would actually love to hear from Selena how the league is dealing with. I’m doing your work remotely.

[00:49:10.59] spk_3:
You guys are already virtual. This is like, No, no sweat for you guys, right? Well, you know,

[00:49:37.30] spk_4:
I mean, we do have, you know, our plans range from virtually all the way down to the grassroots. Right? And I think especially for organizations like your Selena, we share the, um, the common goal this year of border engagements. I am very sorry I opened the door. Family a letter out. I’m

[00:49:43.14] spk_3:
very sorry. Okay.

[00:49:45.25] spk_1:
All right. So, you know, um, terms of remote working, but yeah, but how it relates to this topic of people power.

[00:50:59.86] spk_3:
Yeah. So I think that’s really, really important. We’re definitely so it is one thing to convert toe er teleworking, right? That’s one thing. But when your work is so much advocacy, um, and especially the leaders on the ground who are doing voter registration, which requires you to be on the ground talking to people, you know, that has shifted our work. So one of the examples that we have because we have our people power fair mass campaign, which is basically trying to get redistricting reform for across the country and a positive waste that we don’t have another situation like we had in North Carolina where you’re from, tell me and also and Maryland subs we wanna we wanna make sure that you know people are represented appropriately, but a lot of the states that were working in they have a signature collection campaigns going on right now. So how do you do signature collection when you can’t actually be within three or six feet of people? So now many of our leaks air converting to digital signatures and going through their legislator to make those adjustments that they can still collect signatures and meet that need, et cetera, Our love. We have a lobby core, which is 21 volunteers that goes to the hill every month. Obviously, with the hill being also teleworking, it created what we thought might be a barrier. But now our lobbies are doing virtual coffee meetings on Zoom just like this and having those conversations with legislators, legislative staff and all of those things. So I think that the Corona virus has forced us to do our work in a different way. But it’s also being great to innovate and be creative and do the work that people love just in a different way. So we it’s not perfect. I don’t even want to make you think that this is perfect because it’s definitely not. But I think that there’s a lot of positive energy about doing our work and finding ways to do our work in different ways.

[00:52:27.38] spk_1:
Which, okay, is thinking creatively. I for our for our listeners. And I don’t want to focus just on Mom’s rising and legal women voters us. I want them to recognize how what we’re talking about can be applied by them, how they they, what they need to go back to their CEOs or whatever vice presidents wegner And what kind of like discussion items they need to be putting forward at the organization is not now thinking about in terms of, you know, again, people power revolution is coming. Yeah, you know how how how can our listeners helped create it?

[00:53:21.55] spk_3:
I think just becoming involved, like when you’re talking about people powered anything, it’s really about base building. And for me, the goals of base base building are always to grow. A base of volunteers who have a shared value of some sort and you’re coming together in orderto makes the progressive movement on that. It’s also about leadership, development, communities and constituency who turn out who are players in this issue or what have you and then putting issues to the forefront. So I think that wherever you is, what do you value? What’s important to you? You could be a simple as Hey, there’s a pothole, my street that has been fixed in the last year. Can we come together as a community and really talk with our local election officials about making sure our streets are in a position that’s not gonna record cars or have someone get endangered in some way? So I think it comes down to, as on an individual level, what is important to you. What do you value and finding and connecting with those people? Also, that you something similar? And what do you want to change? What is it that you’re trying to change or that would make your life better? And who were the people who can support you in getting that done?

[00:53:55.15] spk_1:
That’s consistent with what you said down an organization level to the same. You know what? The core values, that’s what that’s what drives all the work on, brings people together finding that commonality around, whether it’s the pothole in the street and the individual level.

[00:54:01.45] spk_3:
Whoever whatever. Here, whatever.

[00:54:08.59] spk_1:
Jim Yeah, Gloria, What? What’s your advice for how people can contribute to this revolution.

[00:55:16.50] spk_4:
Um, I think that right now we’re all sitting in our homes and we’re rethinking the way that we do our work. And even as individuals, we’re rethinking the way that we are doing our activism. You think that a very important message right now for activists personally and for organizations that organize activists and try to recruit and build the base, is that now is not the time to step away. Now, more important than ever, it is important to stand top of the issues, to sign those petitions, to speak up and to share your stories, because I will give you a very, very specific example. Right now, Congress is negotiating, arguing over all of these different critical needs in the Corona virus relief bills. While Mom’s Rising has been on the forefront of trying to influence those negotiations. And the most powerful weapon we have are your stories, people stories, what’s gonna happen to your child care center that has to close down what’s gonna happen to a domestic workers who suddenly don’t have a paycheck? Um, paid family leave. This is something that a signature mounds rising issue. We’ve been working on luck forever ever since. Our founding is one of our signature issues. But now, because of the stories that we have gathered and we’re hearing from our members about the need for pay leave and the fact that if we had had paid leave all this time that the burden of Corona virus would have been much lighter this is something that we’re powerfully bringing to the negotiating table. And we’re actually seeing We’re going on paid leave. So all organizations and all individuals, whatever issues that you’re working on, do not step away, continue to share your stories because those stories have to be brought to the negotiating table for policy. And that’s the only way we’re gonna get the policy that we need.

[00:57:30.53] spk_1:
Okay, We’re gonna leave it there. That’s Ah, quite inspirational. Thank you. That’s Ah, That’s Gloria Pan, Vice President, member engagement, engagement at Mom’s Rising. And also Selena Stewart, senior director of advocacy and litigation. The League of Women voters. Us though Gloria Selena. Thank you very much. Thanks for sharing. Thank you, Tommy. Pleasure and thank you for being with non profit radio coverage of 20 ntc were sponsored by Cougar Mountain Software Denali Fund Is there complete accounting solution made for nonprofits? Tony-dot-M.A.-slash-Pursuant Mountain for a free 60 day trial? Thanks so much for being with us next week. An archive show. I promise you, I’ll pick a winner If you missed any part of today’s show, I beseech you, find it on tony-martignetti dot com were sponsored by wegner-C.P.As guiding you beyond the numbers wegner-C.P.As dot com and by turned to communications, PR and content for nonprofits, your story is their mission. Turn hyphen two dot ceo. Our creative producer is clear, Meyerhoff shows Social Media is by Susan Chavez. Mark Silverman is our Web guy on this music is by Scots Dying with me next week for not profit radio big non profit ideas for the other 95% go out and be great.

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[00:00:57.60] spk_1:
Hello and welcome to tony-martignetti non profit radio. Big non profit ideas for the unlearned. 95%. I’m your aptly named host. That live music can only mean one thing our 5/100 show. Oh, I’m glad you’re with me. I did get slapped with a diagnosis of Corretta Conus. If I saw that you missed today’s show the 5/100 it’s non profit radios, 10th Anniversary and 5/100 show. It’s also our last live stream. After today, we’re gonna be podcast only to celebrate all these milestones. We’ve got the whole gang together. Claire Meyerhoff are creative Producer is co hosting. We’ve got the live music from Scott Stein, composer of our theme music. Each of our esteemed contributors will be with us. Jean Takagi, Maria Simple and Amy Sample Ward, and we have a bunch of surprises.

[00:01:44.64] spk_2:
Our 5/100 show is sponsored by Cure Coffee connecting coffee lovers with coffee farmers and their families. Kira coffee dot com. We are also sponsored by wegner-C.P.As guiding you beyond the numbers wegner-C.P.As dot com by Cougar Mountain Software Denali Fund. Is there complete accounting solution made for non profits? Visit tony dot m a slash Cougar Mountain for a free 60 day trial. And we are also sponsored by turn to communications, PR and content for nonprofits. Your story is their mission. Turn Hyson to dot co. That’s turned hyphen two dot co.

[00:01:50.24] spk_1:
That professional voice can only be one. It’s clear. Meyerhoff. Claire Meyerhoff, Welcome,

[00:02:01.24] spk_2:
tony-martignetti. This is the first time for us on Zoom. But I feel like you’re right here because you’re right there on my laptop.

[00:02:14.71] spk_1:
It feels it feels close. Yeah, Every every anniversary show has been, ah, in the studio. This one, of course, can’t be. But we pull it together because it’s the 10th anniversary and I’m grateful to you because you’ve been creative producer of this show since, like Episode one before that Episode zero You were creative producer.

[00:02:20.81] spk_2:
Yeah, about a little over 10 years ago, you and I had a dinner and you said, You know

[00:02:24.64] spk_5:
what I want to do. I want

[00:02:25.37] spk_2:
to do a radio show and I said, Do

[00:02:27.19] spk_5:
you have any idea how hard it is to do a radio show? And you’re like, No, I don’t care. I’m doing a radio

[00:02:32.22] spk_2:
show. Will you help

[00:02:33.62] spk_5:
me? And

[00:02:33.97] spk_2:
I said, sure. And here We are 10 years

[00:02:38.63] spk_1:
old playing love it, love it and you have that professional radio training to so that. But also

[00:02:43.96] spk_2:
I have a background in radio

[00:02:45.39] spk_1:
indeed, indeed. So how have you been? How are you managing what’s going on at the PG agency?

[00:02:51.53] spk_2:
Well, you know, I help. I help nonprofits of all shapes and sizes with their plan giving. And so that’s been fun. And I’ve been honing some of my skills at home like learning GarageBand and some different things that I didn’t have time to learn before. So that’s been that’s been quite interesting of a few new little endeavors, and I have some nice clients. It’s been interesting because I started out 2020 with this list of five clients I was working with, and then all of a sudden in March, like it all just changed and some went away, and one that was like a little project turned into now, like my main client, because they were in a different situation. So it’s really shown us sort of the fluidity of things in the nonprofit

[00:03:31.95] spk_1:
world. Well, that’s very gratifying. They love your work so much that they brought you in to do more.

[00:03:38.24] spk_2:
Yes, well, they had they had more need, and then other people had less less need and less money. So, um, I like more. More money and more need. That’s always That’s always good. When you’re independent person like we are,

[00:03:49.44] spk_1:
money follows expertise. That that’s you. And you. Um hey, Scott’s dying. How you been? I’m good. How are you, tony? Oh, fabulously Scott Stein, of course. The composer of cheap red wine, which you’ll be performing shortly. What’s been going on musically for you since, uh, late march?

[00:04:37.11] spk_3:
Uh um, Well, it’s certainly been a little slower than usual, as you can imagine is not a whole lot in the way of live music. Um, but finding ways to stay busy. Um, I teach and said my teaching it just has just gone online. Um, I have a couple of choirs that I conduct, and we are finding new and creative ways to stay active and stay connected and keep making music online. Ah, we all miss each other very much, but this is a good way to stay connected and, um, actually doing a couple of gigs here and there, mostly via zoom occasionally have been able to do an outdoor, socially distanced concert, Um, doing one a week from Sunday in Brooklyn, where I live, and, um so that’s always good. It’s just it’s just you just have to stay busy and stay active and and And that that keeps you motivated keeps you moving

[00:05:01.47] spk_1:
the online concerts. That sounds like an interesting idea. Yeah,

[00:05:10.88] spk_3:
it Ah, it works. You know, Um, it’s, um I think it’s probably gonna be with us for for a while, and but

[00:05:14.84] spk_5:
it’s, you know,

[00:05:47.00] spk_3:
it’s a nice way to play. It is a little weird. You finish a song and you’re used to hearing some sort of a pause and you just hear nothing. And so I mean, you hear you see people on mute clapping. It’s very And also when you banter, that’s the thing. Like, you know, we try to keep things light. And if you make a comment that you think it’s funny and you don’t get a response, it’s like I don’t know that was funny or not. I have no idea. I’ll just assume it was It’s strange, but it’s ah, you know, it keeps us making music, and that’s you know that’s the main thing right now.

[00:06:34.57] spk_1:
I attended a couple of online stand up comedy shows, Onda 1st 1 The producer kept this audience muted because he was afraid that people would be charming, intimate. But that was very disruptive to the comics to not know your I’ve done some some stand up, not to the caliber that these folks have, but you’re playing to the audience when the audience, when the laughter starts to subside, you know, you start talking, you don’t you don’t want a dead zone of no laughter, you know, and you got a time it. But they couldn’t do that because they don’t have the feedback. So but the producer learned, and then all the other shows. You know, the audience has been un muted, and they’ve been respectful and no hecklers. But it’s important for that. That feedback, you know, for a comic, just like you’re saying for a musician to get feedback.

[00:06:46.34] spk_3:
Yeah, And the best part about about doing this via Zoom though, is you do get a heckler. You can mute that person. Yes, you can. You can do that in a club. So? So there is that advantage. The

[00:06:57.07] spk_1:
equivalent would be like cutting off their head or having having I think security bounce there bounced their ass out, right? Yeah, In a live setting,

[00:07:05.47] spk_3:
it’s It’s a much less it requires a lot less aggression to just hit mute. Yeah, I kinda like that.

[00:07:20.24] spk_1:
Claire, did you do any any, um, performances by type, like your You void with that professional voice of yours, you have a podcast.

[00:07:21.77] spk_2:
I do have. I have a new podcast and I’ll be happy to chat a little bit about it. And that’s appropriate because the name of my podcast is charitable chitchat with Cathy and Claire

[00:07:34.91] spk_1:
considerations as much as I do. Well,

[00:07:36.54] spk_5:
it all works out

[00:08:23.10] spk_2:
cause it’s also Cathy with a C and clear with the sea. So we really like all our C. So I do it with with my friend and colleague Kathy Sheffield from Fort Worth, Texas, and she’s a very experienced, planned giving person, and she and I have talked about doing it for a while. And then when Cove it hit, we said, Well, we have no excuse. So I learned how to do garage band and record stuff, and I do all the editing and production, and Kathy and I do a podcast and it’s planned, giving focused. And each episode we have one guest, and we’ve had some awesome guests on from the California Community Foundation and North Well, Health Um, Nature Conservancy and a wonderful volunteer from the Girl Scouts of America who’s helped bring their plan giving program in less than 10 years from 400 plan giving donors to 4000. Yeah, nine years, so very successful programs. So we have a lot of great shows coming up, and, uh, it’s charitable. Should check dot com with Cathy and Claire.

[00:08:34.27] spk_1:
Is that that’s Is that what prompted the GarageBand learning that you talked about?

[00:08:43.04] spk_2:
Yes, it definitely prompted the GarageBand learning, and I had plenty of time to learn that. And, you know, I have a production background, but I had never worked with GarageBand, so some of it was intuitive and others. I was looking all over YouTube for tutorials and found some really helpful things. And hey, if I can do it, anybody can do it. So it’s It’s been a lot of fun, and it’s, you know, it’s nice to have a new project during Cove it because there’s nothing new, right? It’s like the same same house, Same different day.

[00:09:05.24] spk_1:
I did something similar. Other and audacity.

[00:09:07.64] spk_2:
Well, that’s great. Yeah, Audacity is a great A

[00:09:29.43] spk_1:
comparable GarageBand s. I knew so little about audacity when I started. I was ready to write a big check. I figured this is such a popular program app. It must be like 200 or 250 bucks. And that’s how little I knew about it. It’s free. Yes, audacity is absolutely. But I didn’t know that’s how little I knew. Right now I’ve gotten familiar with it.

[00:09:30.72] spk_2:
Well, there’s a lot to do when you learn like podcasting on your own. There isn’t sort of one solution out there That’s kind of like, Oh, the podcasting solution. No, you have to like, you have to record your interview on something like Zoom and get that into an MP three. Then you jump that into GarageBand or audacity. You cut that up, you add your music. That’s another situation, and then you have to up. I uploaded to Buzz Sprout after I’ve produced it, and then from Bud Sprout, you have to subscribe to the different service is like apple podcasts and Spotify and I heart radio and do that and and then you do it over and over, and it’s It’s a lot. It really is a lot to learn. There is a learning curve with do it yourself podcasting.

[00:10:21.69] spk_1:
Yeah, yeah, for sure. Yeah, You said you said you bring in the music. Let’s let’s bring in the music. Hey, Scott, remind us. Cheap red wine. Now, this is Ah, been our theme song for many years at ATTN. Non profit radio. Remind me the genesis of rind us the genesis of cheap red wine, please. And then and then play it for us.

[00:11:10.94] spk_3:
Sure. Ah, song Ah, I recorded it on a record back in 2009 record called Jukebox, and I’d wrote it probably about a year before that. Um, I like to describe this is coming from my angry young man phase. You wouldn’t know it from maybe from listening to it, but ah, yeah, I was. I was living, um, on the Upper West Side of Manhattan and, um, social circles that Iran in when I wasn’t playing, which was to say, my roommate’s friends Ah, there was a lot of people who worked in law and Finance. And I think they didn’t know quite what to make of me. They didn’t kind of understand that you could play music for a living, and, um and so and it’s also a big single scene up there. And I was single at the time, and I got a little cynical because I sort of felt like I was just in the wrong profession to be dating. So this some kind of grew out of that? Um I will add that I have been happily married for seven years now with, uh, with a wonderful son. So it all worked out, but anyway, so that’s where the song kinda had its origins.

[00:11:34.88] spk_1:
Alright, Please, Scott Stein. Cheap red wine.

[00:14:43.24] spk_0:
Just keep on talking sooner or later off around. What you mean a TV screen way in each other? You know, I used to find a charming can hands now promise diamonds. They won’t tired of the cut of clothing that I will wear good stuff too easily distracted. Teoh, I got too many options, so I’m gonna My goodness. But maybe you have some competition with radio. A wealthy man. I got used promises on the way for Heaven’s national victor Sound. Nobody else. No way You used a charming but

[00:14:45.88] spk_2:
I can’t

[00:14:46.43] spk_5:
think

[00:14:49.46] spk_0:
how. Never mind it.

[00:14:50.32] spk_5:
Don’t matter now

[00:14:56.71] spk_0:
Your time promises.

[00:16:03.74] spk_1:
I love that song, Scott. Thank you. Thank you so much. Thanks. There’s nobody waiting in line. We’re just, like, cheap red wine. Thank you. I love it.

[00:16:07.77] spk_3:
I I remembered those lyrics

[00:16:14.04] spk_1:
I don’t worry about that happens. So, Claire, I got this. I got some new venture planned giving accelerator

[00:16:19.38] spk_2:
s. It sounds very, very exciting.

[00:16:21.78] spk_1:
You in the plan? Giving space. So, yes,

[00:16:23.44] spk_2:
I am

[00:16:31.68] spk_1:
in the, uh, arena of shameless self promotion. Uh, okay. Planned giving accelerator. It’s, um it’s a membership community. I launched it two weeks ago. Nonprofits joined for an annual membership on, and I will teach them everything I know about starting and then growing. Yes, Land giving programs.

[00:16:45.73] spk_2:
That sounds great. So is it a month? Do people come on a webinar monthly or how do what do What do people get for their yearly subscription? How does that look to the to the non profit person hoping to grow their plane giving program?

[00:17:04.08] spk_1:
No, I hadn’t thought through that? No, they, uh, like tony get we’re gonna have ah, got

[00:17:05.89] spk_5:
a nice

[00:17:08.43] spk_1:
poster. There’s exclusive. Yes, there were exclusive webinars. We’ll probably get to a month. Will be exclusive podcasts. One or two of those a month. I’ll be doing small group asked me anything. Sessions on zoom Very nine. Talk through individual potential donor challenges, Suspect challenges or Doctor, you’re marking materials in their small groups. Um, there’s a Facebook community. Very nice. All exclusive, Just two members. It all kicks off. October 1st 1st group starts October 1st, and that’s what we’re promoting for. And it’s that planned giving accelerator dot com.

[00:18:07.44] spk_2:
Well, there’s a lot of Nate out there. A lot of non profits are not in the plan giving game or in the playing giving space. They think it’s too scary. They need technical knowledge. They can’t do it. They need too much staff, whatever. But frankly, any non profit can do something with plan giving and bring in those all important planned gifts. Also, I think you’ll be helping to educate people about like asking for non cash assets and things as well, like how toe you know, do more a little bit more complex gift giving.

[00:18:25.51] spk_1:
We will eventually we’re going to start off with getting bequests, Yes, but there’s only the whole groundwork. As you’re suggesting, there’s old groundwork that’s got to go before you start. Before you start promoting, you gotta promote to the right people on. Then give them the right message.

[00:18:43.84] spk_2:
Yes, and you have to have a back end. That’s the first thing that I help my clients with. It’s like, Well, what did they have? Do they even have information on their website? Like some plate people have nothing on their website and in, um, our most recent episode of our of our charitable chitchat podcast. We had a great this volunteer from the Girl Scouts, and she got started because she had updated her estate plans about 10 years ago, and she included the Girl Scouts. And then she happened to be in New York City not long after that, where the headquarters are. So she went to go meet with the development person, just a drop off like a copy of her, whatever her paperwork and the development person wasn’t there. So she met with the CEO and she sat down with the CEO and she said, Well,

[00:19:09.89] spk_5:
you know, I was updating my estate

[00:19:11.77] spk_2:
plans and I went to go find someone for

[00:19:13.81] spk_5:
I couldn’t find any information

[00:19:38.64] spk_2:
on your website about that. Why is that? And the CEO was like, I don’t know why. And then they from there they created a whole good, great plan giving programs. So, you know, the back end is first off. You need to have some information on your website. You need a dedicated page with some request language with your contact information with your tax I d. Just a couple of things. And if you have that Web page, then you can start getting in the plan giving game.

[00:19:40.37] spk_1:
That’s the beginning. And that’s the kind of stuff we’re gonna be talking about. Easy promotion.

[00:19:44.49] spk_2:
You gotta get in

[00:20:01.38] spk_1:
identifying the right people to promote to and giving them the right message and how to do that. And then how to follow up how to talk to your board about planned to give an all important, all all to get planned giving program started in the audience that I’m always most interested in. Small and midsize shot

[00:20:12.57] spk_2:
Me, too. I love I love the small nonprofits and there’s you anyone can get started in plan giving. So I think that your program is is really great, because if if you have, don’t your small non profit you have donors and they’re gonna leave. Some charities in there will, but they’re not gonna leave your charity in their will if you’ve never promoted the idea. And you’ve never communicated the idea

[00:20:25.96] spk_1:
absolutely right that absolutely, you need to be asking. So we

[00:20:28.95] spk_2:
need to be asking

[00:20:32.04] spk_1:
if you’re ready to get plan giving Started, Planned Giving accelerator

[00:20:33.77] spk_2:
call. Well, I’m looking forward to seeing the evolution of of this, and I think it’s a great it’s much needed in the space, and I think you’ll be successful and help a lot of people along the way. And that’s that’s what we’re all about. Helping helping nonprofits, especially the little ones,

[00:21:09.74] spk_1:
and someone who’s helping me toe promote planned giving accelerator is is with us. These Peter Panda Pento is part of a partner in turn to communications just renewed their sponsorship for a second year, which we are very grateful for. I’m very grateful for Peter. Welcome to the show. Great to be here, tony. Great to be back

[00:21:13.06] spk_4:
here. Tony, we’ve been checking in very regularly over the years. Excited to be part of this milestone episode.

[00:21:29.48] spk_1:
Oh, thank you. Yes, 500 shows. 10 years on. I’m grateful for your sponsorship. You and your partner, Scott turn to what? What? What’s on your, uh, what’s on your plate these days? We’re doing a

[00:22:07.83] spk_4:
lot of media relations work these days. A lot of nonprofits and foundations that we work with are really looking for to try to break through the clutter right now and get their stories told in the media, which is a really challenging thing right now during Cove in 19. I mean, it’s always challenging, but right now we have so many media outlets that are, um, operating with with furloughed staffs and with people kind of playing out of position, covering different beats. And, ah, nonprofits are really looking for extra support and trying to figure out who they need to connect with, how they can connect with them and how they can connect what they’re doing to the prevailing story lines of our time, which are Cove in 19 and racial justice and equity. And so we’ve been spending a lot of our efforts there, in addition to working with you on the plane, giving accelerator and other things tell

[00:22:33.19] spk_1:
indeed, yes, challenging times indeed, to get your voice heard. But it’s doable. As I say in the sponsor messages. You know, if you if you have those relationships with journalists, if you have the right hook, you can you can be heard even in the in the Corona virus cacophony.

[00:23:06.21] spk_4:
Absolutely, absolutely. And the relationships are really important. And, um, what I think a lot of nonprofits and really all organizations still make. The mistake in doing is thinking they can kind of spray and pray their way to, ah, success with media relations by spray and pray Amin kind of spraying out press releases to everybody and hope and praying that somebody picks it up. What really works is when you have some relationships with journalists who really cover the topics you care about and that they’re actually thinking of you when they’re looking for sources rather than the other way around.

[00:23:12.07] spk_2:
Yes, and as a former reporter, I wholeheartedly agree, because back in the day, as a as a news reporter for working in all news radio and working in television. You would get these, like, spray and pray, kind of like press releases and stuff that had nothing to do with anything you normally cover. And you know, you really need a more targeted approach and build a relationship. And I think nowadays it’s easy to build a relationship with news people because they’re all on Twitter and they’re all on Facebook and you can follow them and comment on their on their things and get to know them a little bit that way.

[00:23:41.84] spk_4:
Absolutely. I think investing in in a handful of those relationships and really trying to make sure you’re nurturing the journalists who actually care about what and and reach the people you need to reach. There’s so much value in doing that. You’re absolutely right.

[00:23:58.68] spk_1:
This and Peter, thank you again for your sponsorship of non profit radio.

[00:24:03.74] spk_4:
I love the partnership. I’m really glad to support her head, and I really believe strongly in what you do, tony. So we’re happy Teoh to be sponsors and to be part of this great community.

[00:24:13.75] spk_1:
Thanks so much. Turn hyphen to you. Want Check them you want? Check them out. Turn hyphen too dot ceo. Thanks so much, Peter.

[00:24:20.79] spk_4:
Thank you very

[00:26:11.18] spk_1:
much, Peter. Thanks, Claire. I have a story I want to read from from one of our listeners milled, uh, Mildred Devo. I’m the founder and executive director of Penn Parental, a small literary non profit that helps writers stay on creative track after they start a family. I got into non profit work because I had the idea for this collective of supportive writers running programs to defy the stereotype, which was rampant in nearly two thousands, that having kids would kill your creative career. I was already running a salon, Siri’s, that featured the diversity of work by writers who had kids. And I wanted to do more to prove to women and men that parenthood was just a life event and not an alternate alternate career. I self funded a fellowship for writers who were new parents and a lawyer approached me and asked if I had considered turning my ideas into a non profit I never had. She helped me pro bono. Now it is 10 years later, and pen parental has helped countless writers finish their creative projects despite the challenges of raising kids issues heightened to epic levels during the pandemic. We have one arts grants from New York City as well as New York State Council for the Arts. As a writer with two kids, it makes me laugh that all the encouragement I give to other writers has just now finally come home to my own career. I finally finished writing my first novel. I Want to Thank You. This is the touching Thank you so much. I want to thank you and and your non profit radio feel that inspiring. I feel that listening to recordings of past live streams, I’ve been exposed to some of the top minds working in non profit. Today. It’s like having an M B A in arts administration right at your fingertips, or at least the faculty of one. I’ve gained a lot by listening. So thank u s touching and, uh, milled, uh, milled is with us. Well, welcome to the show.

[00:26:18.21] spk_5:
Thanks. Thank you so much. It’s really exciting to be here. Did you see me taking notes?

[00:26:22.49] spk_1:
I was already took. I was like, clock town

[00:26:26.09] spk_2:
milled. I love milled his hair. That’s beautiful. Thank you. It looks very nice.

[00:26:54.44] spk_1:
That’s got beautiful bang. Great. Did I pronounce your name? Right? Okay. Have you been listening to non profit radio for a while? I have For forever. Yeah. Yeah, I frequently when I googled something that I don’t know, I will find a link, you know, on Facebook or somewhere, I’ll find a link to a show, and

[00:27:00.51] spk_6:
it s so it works like I don’t know, because I really, really, really learned

[00:28:37.84] spk_1:
this from the ground up, just sort of as I was doing it and Ah, yeah, it’s really so we’re gonna put on a plan giving page pretty much, yes, but it’s really it’s really wonderful that you bring all these experts together and when you interview them so so many of them are so generous with their time with their contact information, like it’s kind of spectacular, But I really kind of got into your show after you did the foundation center. I love the foundation center and motivated that can with them all their candid now candid. Well, they were there were the foundation center. You’re not wrong to call them that. They were that they were that back then when But for the you did I think four sessions or some Some amount of sessions, please. And you could go there and be a live audience, or you could watch it after it. So, yes, it was. It was non profit radio month at the Foundation Center and the Foundation Center month on non profit radio. That was very cool. Very cool partnership with the Roman. Thank you. I also like all the partnerships that you have with all the different companies. Like everybody said. Just what? Um, the guy that was just on Peter was saying that you develop these relationships. Well, I think I feel like I learned something from that from you. Outstanding Milton. That’s why I do the show. Thank you so much. So, for your for your generosity, do non profit radio and for sharing your how I got into nonprofits story we have Ah, we’re gonna send you a bag of cure coffee. Uh, I love coffee. Bring me coffee. It’s

[00:28:40.70] spk_2:
a wonderful prize. How you want to hear more about it? Cure a coffee directly connects coffee lovers with farmers and families who harvest the finest organic coffee beans. With every cup of cura, you join our effort to expand sustainable dental care to remote communities are around the world. We are direct trade coffee company with direct impact brought directly to you creating organic smiles beyond the cup cure coffee dot com. And that is your prize. Thank

[00:29:22.78] spk_1:
you. Listen, thanks so much again for sharing your story and for being a loyal listener. Really? It’s touching. Thank you. It’s so kind of you. I’m really grateful. And I love how you’re Musician nodded when he when I talked about having kids at home and being creative. That’s why I run a non profit for that reaction. I

[00:29:26.56] spk_3:
e that so much? Yeah,

[00:29:30.78] spk_1:
creatives are trying to create. So anybody who wants to pin Prentice said word we’d love the Have you come and find out what we dio and thank you again. So much for having me on the

[00:29:40.42] spk_5:
show was a

[00:29:50.34] spk_1:
place. Enjoy your coffee. Yeah. Yes. Pen parental as got or thank you. Thanks along, Claire. You’re You’re creative. You you’ve been writing.

[00:30:56.94] spk_2:
Yes, I am. I am, I am. It’s a It’s a blessing and a curse being a creative person because the brain just never shuts off. So we’re always making stuff from a tender age. I was like sitting on my front lawn with a basket of crayons and my mother register like an old egg carton or something in a pipe cleaners. And before you know it, we had, like, costumes and putting on a show. So that’s that’s my childhood. So I have written for you a special 1/10 anniversary problem for non profit radio. So would you like me to read it? Toe. Okay, here we go. Let’s celebrate a decade of the show by tony-martignetti. Here’s my poem. It’s goofy, so you better get ready. Tony had an idea. Tony had a vision. Tony wanted a radio show, so he made a decision. He started his show. He booked his first guest. He worked on a format, and then all the rest production with Sam Music with Scott sponsors and quizzes Man, that’s a lot Top trends and Tony’s take to non profit radio We love you. 10 years later, and 500 shows your silver anniversary, your listener ship grows your tony-martignetti non profit radio top trends. Sound advice. Should I end this poem? Yes, that sounds nice. Happy anniversary, tony.

[00:31:13.55] spk_1:
Should I send this up our mess Sounds like Thank you. Clear my raf. Sweet. Thank you very much.

[00:31:18.82] spk_2:
You got in somewhere.

[00:31:20.32] spk_1:
What a creative. I love it. Thank

[00:31:21.94] spk_2:
you. You know, it’s fun. Thank you. Something to do? It’s coverted.

[00:31:24.34] spk_1:
That’s very sweet. I am not gonna keep doing things that silver anniversary. I don’t think I thought of that. That’s right. The silver silver anniversary. Well,

[00:31:31.63] spk_2:
you know, I was thinking of ideas. I was like, What can I do for tony? Silver anniversary. And I was like, I was like, Well, it is the silver anniversary. That’s 10 years. It’s silver. So maybe I should send him, like, an engraved set of silver candlesticks. Or maybe I’ll write him a poem.

[00:31:45.52] spk_1:
Well, you could do the candlesticks to know they don’t have to be mutually exclusive. What?

[00:31:59.08] spk_2:
Amy, like those? I could do like 11 Right. You could do it for your in Amy’s tent. That wins your 10th anniversary. Did you have it? You missed it. Yeah, I missed. Okay. We’ll catch on the next one.

[00:32:00.28] spk_1:
Catch me on this one. It’s not

[00:32:01.43] spk_2:
old. Wait for your gold wedding.

[00:32:08.99] spk_1:
Oh, no, no, no. Wait. Office engineering by mere numbers it, Z, I’m gonna send you

[00:32:13.50] spk_2:
something really funny.

[00:32:22.95] spk_1:
That silver gift. I will. Then the expensive silver gift. Don’t don’t be constrained by by the artificiality of numbers. So, you know,

[00:32:24.04] spk_2:
I’m gonna go to Bloomingdale’s and register you.

[00:33:04.44] spk_1:
We got we got all our all our contributors there. Will our esteemed contributors air here? Nice. Yes, Absolutely. I see. Um, I see them. Indeed. I see Amy Sample Ward, our social social media technology contributor, and Jean Takagi, of course, our legal contributor and the brains behind the wildly popular non profit law block dot com and Maria Simple, the Prospect Finder at the prospect finder dot com. Welcome, Maria. Gene and Amy. Welcome. Hey. Hey, there. Thank you very much, Amy. See also Amy, of course, besides being our contributor and technology and social media, CEO of N 10. I was intend doing. How you doing, Amy?

[00:33:14.94] spk_5:
Um, I’ve recently been answering that question by saying that I am alive and awake in 2020 and all that that means on

[00:33:24.57] spk_1:
being in Portland, Oregon, as well,

[00:33:26.23] spk_5:
being in Portland, Oregon being at the intersection of, I think, a lot of opportunity to positively change the world

[00:33:36.84] spk_1:
Well, you three have never been on a show altogether. So I want to say

[00:33:45.34] spk_5:
I know Jean and I have definitely been on at the same time before, but I don’t think all three of us

[00:33:56.54] spk_1:
no threat. No. All three have never So. Maria, meet Jean Jean Maria. Amy, meet Amy. Meet Maria Maria, Meet Amy. Gene already knows Amy. Amy knows Jean. Oh, meet each other. Welcome. Welcome. Hey,

[00:34:03.54] spk_6:
you know, tony, I had suggested a long time ago that you should fly us all into that New York studio at some point, and so

[00:34:10.82] spk_5:
we would not have fit altogether.

[00:34:12.98] spk_6:
Since you never did that way

[00:34:16.41] spk_1:
are fly you all to the beach Now it’s much, much safer down here.

[00:34:19.80] spk_6:
Yeah, well, until this coming storm, that is. But

[00:34:37.43] spk_1:
uh huh. Yeah, Well, not this weekend. Let’s not get carried away. Like cat seven or something. We’re not doing it this weekend. No, it’s not that bad. It’s Ah, it’s like a to the one that so far it’s a one or something. Some of it’s we live, you know, that’s that’s part of our life. Living at the beach hurricane season,

[00:34:41.46] spk_2:
coming straight to your house. Tony,

[00:35:05.25] spk_1:
I got I got a metal roof. They’re gonna finish tomorrow’s good metal. Rudy’s air. Great. Two days before the hurricane, they’re gonna finish my metal roof. What color is it? It’s Ah, it’s a gray. It’s a pale grey. Very nice. It z neutral, neutral tone. Nothing. Nothing outlandish like those Clay. You know, there’s red clay colored anything but getting to cocky. How are

[00:35:05.99] spk_5:
you

[00:37:07.47] spk_1:
doing? San Francisco? It’s Jean. I’m pretty. Well, all things considered Azamiyah kind of reference does. Well, a lot of folks hurting. So happy to. To be in good health with the my family is well and good to see all of you and congratulations, toe. Oh, thank you. Thank you, Gene. And your practice has been very busy of late as nonprofits. Ah, non profit struggle bit. Yeah, a lot. A lot to deal with, obviously the pandemic and a lot of racial equity movements, which is a very positive sign. So, like Amy and trying to see some of the the silver linings and what changes and re imaginations may come out of this indeed. Quite a bit. I was I was talking to somebody earlier today that Ah It’s a good time for introspection. No. And that maybe on an organizational level two. And it may be that it’s Ah, not all. It’s not all voluntary, but, you know, some things have been foisted on us, so it seems like a good, introspective time, like on an individual level. And on a organizational level two seen a lot of that. Yeah, Absolutely. Um, and, uh, I think it’s really helpful for organizational leaders to sort of get together and start to think, um, sort of back to basics and say, What’s why we hear? What are we doing? Who are we serving? What are we trying to do? And how are we really walking the walk and not just talking to talk? Yeah, for sure. Right back. Back to basics mission for important for the board to focus on. I love actually adding values to that as well. So just saying we further admission that the mission, of course, that that’s important. David. Mission focus. But I think it’s now equally important to be Valdez focused. What we stand for. Yeah, Amy. You feeling that it Ah, 10. 10.

[00:38:18.12] spk_5:
Yeah, for sure. I mean, I think just gonna extend what Jeanne was saying. I think we see a lot of organizations, at least historically, Um, who hide behind a mission statement that doesn’t name inequity. Of course, mission statements are often like aspirational where you’re going and like, why you exist and because it’s those things aren’t named. They use that to sidestep accountability to those issues, right? Like because racism isn’t named in their mission. They don’t have to talk about racism. And maybe they get to say that they don’t perpetuate any of it. Right on Dhe. Now, this moment kind of. I think what you’re alluding to tony with, like it being foisted upon folks, is people understanding or at least demanding, that organizations don’t get to sidestep that, that there’s no way any of our social missions could be advanced if we aren’t ever talking about racism, right? Like that’s a root of why many of our issues even exist that we have a mission to address. So there needs to be less fear of that because the fear has really just got us to a very entrenched place of oppression. So can folks be willing to talk about that so that they can move forward and actually address that emissions and serve their communities and really be part of the change that our communities need.

[00:39:02.76] spk_1:
And we’ve had ah, good number of guests on lately talking about all those subjects on and more toe. There’s more to say about it. There’s more to the organizational journey to achieve racial equity and social justice. And I’m glad that we’ve been ableto have a good number of guests on, and I’m always looking for more on those kinds of subjects. Yeah, yeah, I agree with you. Maria Semple. What’s going on? Your practice? The Prospect Finder?

[00:39:15.16] spk_6:
Well, you know, you still have no profits who are thinking about their major gift programs, obviously. And, um, it has been a good time for some of them to kind of sit back and do some research on those donors that make you know, maybe they haven’t really focused on quite a ZX much, Um, and thinking about, you know, how is the the approach to them going to be different? And so you know, a lot of a lot of interesting things going on in the prospect research and major gift

[00:39:39.16] spk_1:
world. Very simple. Of course she’s about six miles away from me or so maybe it’s a little more. I’m not sure. Except

[00:39:46.48] spk_5:
some. I didn’t realize you to work.

[00:39:48.48] spk_1:
We’re on. We’re on the same island, different towns. But we’re on the same island. Thanks. Same barrier island in North,

[00:39:54.98] spk_6:
same Barrier Island that’s being targeted by this

[00:40:01.16] spk_1:
story. Support of life, Any of us

[00:40:02.67] spk_6:
pronounced story is, you know, but

[00:40:05.62] spk_1:
what’s the name of the name of the storm? Had Allah wishes? It’s like

[00:40:09.36] spk_2:
it’s with an I

[00:40:10.94] spk_1:
I I z o or

[00:40:12.53] spk_2:
something? Yeah, I don’t know.

[00:40:13.91] spk_6:
How does that help

[00:40:18.78] spk_2:
broker? Al Rocker said it really nicely today, but the job he gets paid, like $3 million.

[00:40:22.28] spk_5:
What the Who’s so seen?

[00:40:39.85] spk_1:
Some, uh, some interesting, Which could be, ah, good or bad, I guess. Funny, like Zoom Zoom backgrounds. You’re all we’re all talking. Yeah, we all have lots of zoom meetings. All of us. He’s got He’s got a good zoom background that you saw. Wow, like I see Scott Stein right now is curious. George,

[00:40:45.21] spk_2:
he’s got That’s the best one, and I just I just put that up on lengthen, so

[00:40:48.69] spk_3:
that’s not a background. This

[00:40:53.28] spk_1:
is not about. Well, it is now my toddler’s part of your background. It’s

[00:40:55.57] spk_5:
part of your

[00:40:55.92] spk_2:
background or your back. Oh, I think you should sell that to Zoom.

[00:40:58.91] spk_3:
I thought that curious George would just lighten the mood a little

[00:41:01.88] spk_1:
bit. Absolutely. Does

[00:41:03.44] spk_2:
my love curious George

[00:41:04.92] spk_1:
is inspired me to ask. Well, who else has seen something funny?

[00:41:09.25] spk_5:
Are you saying that the virtual backgrounds are you talking about just people having things in their background?

[00:41:13.38] spk_1:
I mean more like people in their backgrounds, in their home,

[00:41:18.14] spk_2:
their real backgrounds? Well, I’ve really enjoyed watching, like I watch the Today Show on NBC Watcher And so I really studied the backgrounds, and I like to read the titles of the books on the shelves behind the people, and that’s kind of interesting. And then sometimes, like if they have their own book that they wrote, there’s like 10 copies of it. So they have, like, four other copies, and there’s like 10 copies of their book and in a couple of more copies. So I like to look at the titles like Colbert has it, and it’s funny cause Colbert’s like in his basement and non allaying and It’s just, you know, nothing fancy. And it’s like an old desk and stuff. And so I like to look at the stuff on his on his shelf. Everybody likes, you know, history books and biographies.

[00:41:54.60] spk_3:
I was you were mentioning People’s books like You can always Tell the sign of an independent musician because somewhere in there place they have boxes and boxes of unsold CDs. Right? Right. It’s, Ah, one of my band mates referred to them as a very expensive caught coffee table.

[00:42:12.29] spk_2:
Well, that’s funny.

[00:42:13.00] spk_3:
It’s kind of what they’re doing,

[00:42:14.42] spk_2:
right. You could do Wall Art with them. Like to a whole.

[00:42:17.52] spk_3:
A tribute to me.

[00:42:29.02] spk_2:
Yeah, I my one narcissists. Come on. You got plenty of time. Don’t just got the’s. No. Now with the baby and curious George.

[00:42:33.65] spk_1:
Anybody else? I’m missing Something funny. Mark Silverman just had Mark Silverman is our web guy. He just had his, uh Well, that was That was a fake background. His driving. He’s driving background, but nothing. Nobody’s, uh I don’t think I sauce. I’ve seen good lighting. People have. I see people using light to good effect. I think people have realized that turned on light makes a much nicer back. Have

[00:42:55.26] spk_2:
light on your face to like this. There’s a lot of things for when you’re lighting an interview. You know, you put light on the person’s on the person. Stay so you’ll notice Everyone has diesel around rings, and sometimes you can see it reflected in their glasses. Yeah,

[00:43:06.93] spk_1:
that’s a problem. Light rings right. The glasses. You got it. You got to be careful with the glasses, because even just your screen will reflect into the glasses,

[00:43:13.38] spk_2:
right? Like, right now, I turn that way. Exactly. Turn that way.

[00:43:24.40] spk_1:
Yeah. Now your alien, your google eyes. Yeah. Yeah. Um uh Well, what else? I feel like I feel like it’s a cocktail party.

[00:43:28.30] spk_5:
Didn’t you say we were supposed to all answer some questions? I didn’t write down the question, Waas. I don’t like what? I didn’t think about the question, but I did make the mental note of tony Has some question we’re supposed to answer. Well, how you got into nonprofits? Yes, I like that. Like, what was your reverse non profit job? You know what I like

[00:43:45.85] spk_2:
to know? What did people do before they worked in the non profit because everyone has a different story. So what did you What was your last job before you entered the non profit space? And what was your first job in the non profit space?

[00:43:59.20] spk_5:
I only have one job, not in a 1,000,000 profit space. And that’s what I was 15 and I worked in a coffee shop. Okay.

[00:44:05.52] spk_2:
And then So your first job was your non profit job.

[00:44:08.63] spk_5:
My first job was working in the in the coffee shop?

[00:44:10.82] spk_2:
No, but I mean, your first non profit job was your current Is your current job?

[00:44:14.19] spk_5:
No, but I just always worked in a non profit sector.

[00:44:16.31] spk_1:
Right? At 16 years old, she was CEO event in its inquiry. I

[00:44:20.34] spk_2:
know. Easy. That’s

[00:44:24.10] spk_5:
cool. That’s a good idea. Jean, what do

[00:44:25.46] spk_1:
you do? Before you were a non profit attorney, you were hung fancy fans. Now I bounced a lot iced. I sold insurance. I worked in a beauty salon. No retail, but the last job I had was I was operations manager for duty free retailer in San Francisco. So we’re about a $50 million a year business in the early nineties, and I had to lay everybody off cause, uh

[00:44:48.98] spk_2:
oh, man,

[00:45:11.59] spk_1:
But Bender purse ity on. So it’s 150 people gone. I continued to work doing sort of national expansion for this huge global retailer, but, uh, it made me decide I wanted Teoh work. It’s something more meaningful. So I saw this little newspaper ad for what I believe was the first non profit graduate degree program in the country at the University of San Francisco. And so the two year program in the evening. So I jumped, shipped them, left my job, work for a tiny social service organisation. Azan office manager. And, yeah, that’s schools.

[00:45:30.32] spk_5:
That’s a

[00:45:30.56] spk_2:
great story. How about you, Maria? What did you do before you got into nonprofits?

[00:46:25.21] spk_6:
I was working for a French investment bank in Manhattan per five years out of college and, um, buying and selling and trading securities and French and, um, so very different from working in our profit space. Um, didn’t enjoy it very much. Was having dinner at my father in laws who owned a fundraising consulting firm based in Nutley, New Jersey, and complaining about my job and hating it. And, um, he said, Well, I am looking for a campaign manager for a Salvation Army capital campaign Wow in New Brunswick, New Jersey, and I raised my hand. And, like you said, who said to Jean just said, Jumping ship right, I jump ship and, um, landed in the non profit space that way and in consulting for him and then branched out on my own when I started a family and decided I could do prospect research from home. So I’ve been doing I’ve been doing this home based thing and yes, for long Talking’s yes, since, uh, since the early nineties,

[00:46:48.38] spk_2:
that’s cool. So, tony, before you worked in nonprofits, you’re in the service, weren’t you?

[00:46:59.88] spk_1:
Yeah, that was That was long before I was in the Air Force left. There is a captain, and then I went to law school and hated practicing law. And then I started my first business, which did mediocre. So I ended it and became director of plan to give him at Iona College.

[00:48:12.37] spk_2:
Everyone has a great non profit story. I worked in broadcast journalism. I worked in all news radio in Washington, D. C. I worked at CNN as a news writer worked it except satellite radio in D. C. And I covered a lot of nonprofits when I was a reporter. Because you you know, if there’s this, it’s cold and you do it. Music historian. A homeless shelter You end up at a non profit. You interviewed the director, that kind of thing. So I was like the non profit space and then later started doing like a little PR for non profits and things like that, and then eventually worked my way into the wonderful world of plan giving. We That’s how I met tony-martignetti because I read an interview that you had done, and I was needed some content for another publication. I was editing and I said, Can I take your article and turn it into a Q and A. I emailed you and your like sure, and we talked on the phone. And then if I had questions about planned giving stuff for this writing I was doing, I recall tony and he was so generous with his time and we became phone friends, and then, ah, then he wanted to do a radio show, and I’m a radio person. So 10 years ago, tony started that

[00:48:16.84] spk_5:
I can’t believe no one else spent years making espresso drinks and serving sandwiches to people like What kind of non profit group of people are waiting? The only person that did that? Well, if you

[00:48:24.52] spk_2:
go that far back I worked at Roy Rogers on Long Island and you know I said, Howdy, partner. May I help you? Thank you very much. Happy trails. I worked at Friendly’s. I was an ice cream scooper it friendlies. I was awake.

[00:48:34.37] spk_5:
Nice, nice.

[00:49:16.64] spk_1:
My only espresso experiences. Where? When I was waiting tables when in my restaurant the waiters had the create the oppressors and I always cringe when people ordered them because I could never get it right. Allow when one table order an espresso, everybody else was Wait. Everybody else was late. Their entrees. Cold salads didn’t come. I cut out the suit to get to the entree and tell him I Telemann was through the kitchens. Fault I couldn’t get a Nespresso built was never right. It was too foamy, right? Old Mr Hot. There was too much steam. There wasn’t enough steam. The coffee grounds were to compressed. They weren’t compressed enough. Wow, the curses. Espresso was a 20.

[00:49:17.49] spk_2:
Tony has nightmares about espresso. Hey, that that was an Italian restaurant.

[00:49:21.63] spk_1:
It wasn’t Italian restaurant. Yes. Had to been in the example. Ward, You did many more espressos. Like I’m sure you have it better down much better down there. She’s

[00:49:28.90] spk_2:
great at it.

[00:50:36.51] spk_5:
Yeah. I mean, looking back, it just seems so interesting. I mean, you know, I grew up in a very small town, so I guess that came with dressed. But like, you know, to 15 year olds, we were alone in the shop, running the entire shop, closing it, doing all the bank deposits, you know, like so I guess it helped instill from a very young age like responsibility, this and all of that. But it also was like we we didn’t have anyone else. They’re telling us, you know? Oh, you have to do whatever this customer says or whatever is just like, you know, to 15 year old people. And we were like, No, you don’t get that thing. That’s not fair. You just demand. Like I saw you put your gun. This person did this regularly. Take their gum, put it on the side of their play, eat their food, and then mix the gum into the rest of their salad and then come up and say there was gonna salad. I’m not paying. No. Yeah. And so we would just say Like Like, we don’t know. For adult manager telling us, the customer’s always right. No, no, that’s your gun. Back to your gun. You start getting your money back, you eat.

[00:50:54.51] spk_2:
We’re gonna swallow that gum. I’m 15 and I’m in charge. Yeah, well, that’s good. You learn assertiveness. You learn responsibility. Yeah, that’s great. That’s a That’s a great story

[00:51:00.08] spk_5:
we learned far better than tony. How to make espresso drinks. That was my first exposure to people. Like to melted cheddar cheese on top of their cold apple pie. Like, you know, I learned a lot about humanity in that

[00:51:12.53] spk_1:
herd. Yeah, I’ve heard of that one.

[00:51:14.67] spk_2:
Yeah. Yeah. I worked at Marie Rogers on the island man there. I learned a lot about humanity.

[00:51:21.92] spk_1:
We get into before we get to gross beef stories. Way we got to move on. Neighbor Maria, Maria, Amy and Jean. Thank you so much for what you contribute for you. I don’t want you to go stay if you can stay because Scott’s gonna perform another song, but I want to thank you. Thanks. Thanks to each of you. For all the years you’ve been contributors. Many, many years for each of you. Thank you so much for what you give to our listeners.

[00:51:47.11] spk_5:
Thanks for having a platform that’s open toe. Lots of people. Tony.

[00:51:56.98] spk_1:
Yes. I’ve seen the regulations on 500 100. It’s amazing.

[00:51:59.83] spk_6:
Amazing mission, you 10 More wonderful years.

[00:52:02.14] spk_1:
Thank you. I will do it. I’ll do it. It’s got Let’s get Scott back. He’s got ah, that’s gonna do singing Spanish blues.

[00:52:18.84] spk_3:
I am got starting. All right, here we go. Uh, this song, like the other one, has a lot of words for me to remember. So here we go.

[00:55:58.52] spk_0:
Morning with New York. Finishing way. My doctor asked for his Is it son? I think it just man. It’s somewhere in the east of Spain where Jonathan here requires a voice like church bells rang Way No way, man Stature way to my hotel. Try to rest my head with a familiar voice Reverb woman from my bed I jumped up and ran to the window. I could not believe my ears. I believe my eyes. Neither. She stood there in the clear now had no weapon type romance. This was much downstairs. And now there’s a lady in waiting way drains. Booth door process is an engineer. And when the Paschen shots last, she went back to back way missing in this gots time.

[00:56:04.70] spk_1:
Wow. Amazing. Thanks. Outstanding singing Spanish blues. Thank you. Thank you. I love Scott Stein. Thanks so much. Scott. Yes. Scott Stein music dot com. Right. Do have that right?

[00:56:11.81] spk_3:
Yes. Yeah, that’s correct. And and thanks again for having me, tony. And congratulations on 500 yeah, always always a pleasure to to do this with you. Here.

[00:57:45.03] spk_1:
Thank you, Scott. I love I love having cheap red wine is part of our show. You’re with me every every hour. Every intro, every outro, every show. Cheap red wine is with us. Thank you. Thank you. My pleasure. Check him out. Scott stein music dot com. So I said earlier this is gonna be our last live show. Friday 1 to 2 p.m. Eastern has been my slot at talking alternative. Now, talking radio dot N.Y.C. since July of 2010. And this is gonna be the last one. We’re We’re going to be live streamed. The show is just gonna be a well, not just gonna be the show is gonna be a podcast only from from here on. Um, and what that has meant for these 10 years is working with Sam Liebowitz Every show I’ve credited him. Sam Lever, which is our line producer. Um, and so it’s been just Ah, wonderful run with Sam. Hundreds of shows in the studio every anniversary show, which is every July, every 50 shows in the studio before this one. Um, and I’ve just been grateful for the partnership with Sam and and the network. The talking alternative network, which is again talk radio dot N.Y.C.. Sam, you’re not able to join us by audio. It doesn’t. I see you, but Ah, you can’t, um you have

[00:57:53.07] spk_7:
to keep switching. I can come on, but I have to switch back. Otherwise the rest of the audio doesn’t go out. But I don’t think I’m being recorded right now.

[00:58:04.60] spk_1:
Okay. All right. So, Sam, just Sam just spoke. Yes, we hear him, but he thinks he’s not being recorded, and we see him. So what? He said was tony has been an outstanding host, has been exemplary. He’s so handsome. I’m blushing on the

[00:58:16.77] spk_2:
ledge of color like notion on, um,

[00:58:18.88] spk_7:
and tony does remain the into the honor, having the honor of being, besides my own show the longest running show on work. Um, there was a period of time when we had several shows that have been with us for about five years. But out of all those shows, tony is the only one who has stayed consistent over all this time and to stay with this this long. Thank you so much, tony. I appreciate you know, all of the time that you’ve spent with us. I appreciate all your support and I love your mission. And I wish you the best of luck and only the best things moving forward.

[00:59:32.36] spk_1:
Thank you, Sam. I hope listeners were able to hear that we’re not. Sam said he’s not sure if if it was recorded, but, uh, I hope it was. Thank you, Sam. It’s been just Ah, lovely, wonderful fun collaboration for these 10 years? Absolutely, absolutely so. But where, Of course, the show continues. As I said on podcast every Friday, I’m gonna keep Teoh every Friday schedule. There’ll be a brand new show every Friday. Um, available to ah are 13,000 listeners a lot of this out of. Thank you. Thank you, John. So we got to wrap it up and I want a sky. I want to thank very much Scott Stein so much. Scott stein music dot com Scott, Thanks so much for being with us.

[00:59:43.45] spk_3:
Thank you for Thank you for having me.

[00:59:47.12] spk_1:
I want to give a shout out to our our web guy. Uh ah. I always I’m always crediting him on our Mark. Silverman is our Web guy. So Mark Silverman has been has been in the background for the show. I want to say hello. You’re not You do speak. I love the background on the background guy, but you know, I made if you will, tony, don’t make me stand up alive. But here I am, tony, it’s been great. I’m there every friday for you. I put the podcast up on to the website. It’s been a long and wonderful relationship. And 10 more years make it 20. I’m happy to be there for you and congratulations. Thank you, Mark. Thanks And thanks for all your help. It’s been many, many years. You’ve Well, you’ve been since the beginning. Yeah. Being doing the back end for us. Thank you so much. I wish I was on that submarine

[01:00:35.10] spk_4:
with you when you were the captain. That would have been even

[01:00:46.84] spk_1:
more fun. Submarine? I was underground, but I was close. I was I was underground, not underwater. But you were. So Yeah, I was subterranean. Claim Meyerhoff. Thank you so much. 10 years collaborating, creative producer, co hosting every single anniversary show.

[01:01:16.17] spk_2:
Thank you. It’s really, really been a joy. And, you know, normally I come up to New York and we did this great New York show in Sam Studio and Scott lugs in is you know, sometimes I meet Scott at the door and I carry in some gear for a minute. It’s always such a tree. And then afterwards we go out and we get a bagel or something in the city and Ah, but this on Zoom was really, really nice. And I’ve enjoyed it greatly. So if you needed a guest sometime, just hit me up and zoom away. We will. I’d love to. It’s been really fun,

[01:02:19.09] spk_1:
Thank you. Our 10th anniversary 500 show. Thank you so much for being with us. I’m grateful. I’m grateful for all of each of our listeners, and I’m glad that non profit radio helps you in the important work that you are doing. The feedback I get is, um, it’s touching. I know, I know. We’re helping nonprofits with their missions and their values. That’s why we do the show. Great job. Next week we’ll return to our 20 NTC coverage with more of anti sees smart speakers. If you missed any part of today’s show, I beseech you, find it on tony-martignetti dot com were sponsored by wegner-C.P.As guiding you beyond the numbers wegner-C.P.As dot com Like Coca mapped in software Denali Fund, is there complete accounting solution made for non profits? Tony-dot-M.A.-slash-Pursuant er, Mountain for a free 60 day trial and my turn to communications, PR and content for nonprofits, your story is their mission. Turn hyphen two dot ceo,

[01:02:32.87] spk_2:
and we’d like to thank Sam Liebowitz. He’s our line producer. The show’s social media is by Susan Chavez. Mark Silverman is our Web guy and this delightful, fantastic, marvellous live

[01:02:45.51] spk_0:
music by the Super town, too. That’s mine on

[01:03:06.49] spk_1:
your creative producer. That’s me with me. Next week. Big non profit ideas for the other 95% Go up and be great. Great show. Thank you. So

Nonprofit Radio for July 24, 2020: Black Philanthropy Month & Collaborations: MOU To Merger

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Jacqueline Copeland & Valaida Fullwood: Black Philanthropy Month
BPM 2020, in August, examines how all forms of funding can advance the economic justice so essential for racial equity. My guests are BPM founder Jacqueline Copeland and co-architect Valaida Fullwood.

 

 

 

 

 

Gene Takagi: Collaborations: MOU To Merger

Gene Takagi

Gene Takagi is seeing more interest among nonprofits in exploring co-ventures of some sort. We talk through how to start that journey internally and externally, and what form your collaboration might take. He’s our legal contributor and principal of NEO, the Nonprofit & Exempt Organizations Law Group.

 

 

 

 

 

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[00:03:13.34] spk_0:
on Welcome tony-martignetti non profit radio big non profit ideas for the other 95% on your aptly named host. Oh, I’m glad you’re with me. Id. Bear the pain of familial, benign Pem Fergus If you got under my skin with the idea that you missed today’s show Black Philanthropy Month BPM 2020 in August examines how all forms of funding can advance the economic justice so essential to achieve racial equity. My guests are BPM founder Jackie Copeland and co architect Valetta Fulwood. Also, collaborations MoU to merger Jean Takagi is seeing more interest among nonprofits in exploring co ventures of some sort. We talked through how to start that journey internally and externally, and what form your collaboration might take. He’s our legal contributor and principle of neo. The non profit and exempt organizations Law group on Tony’s Take Two planned giving accelerator were sponsored by wegner-C.P.As, guiding you beyond the numbers wegner-C.P.As dot com by Cougar Mountain Software Denali Fund. Is there complete accounting solution made for non profits tony-dot-M.A.-slash-Pursuant Ger Mountain for a free 60 day trial and by turned to communications, PR and content for nonprofits, your story is their mission. Turn hyphen. Two dot ceo. Here is Black Philanthropy Month. It’s my pleasure now to welcome Jackie Copeland and violate a full would to the show. Uh, anthropologist Jackie Copeland is co founder of Pan African Women’s Philanthropy Network, a global association of African descent, and allied women leaders, donors and activists of all backgrounds. Idea Whisperer. Wait, no, there’s more to say about Jackie. Sorry about that. Jackie founded Black Philanthropy Month in 2011. She’s founder and CEO of the Wise Fund, promoting human rights through equitable funding and technology towards a just society and sustainable planet. It’s at the wise fund dot, or GE, and she’s at Jackie Be Copeland Idea Whisperer. Valetta Fulwood has a client base that ranges widely and her interests center on social innovation in philanthropy, education and the arts. She helps people and organisations Dr Bold ideas forward by guiding their projects and by writing their stories. She’s at Valetta dot com v a l a i d. A. And at Valetta F Jackie Vallejo Welcome. Welcome to non profit radio.

[00:03:16.23] spk_1:
Thanks me.

[00:03:19.78] spk_0:
Absolutely pleasure to have you, Jackie. Let’s start with you. You’re the founder of Black Philanthropy Month. What’s it all about?

[00:07:00.44] spk_1:
Well, um is inspired by all of the diverse people I’ve worked with from the U. S. African Americans, but also to black diaspora worldwide for 30 years. And it’s clear that people give and give abundantly, but often do not fully recognize the power and impact of their individual giving and don’t even necessarily see themselves as philanthropists. So it was specifically inspired in 2011 by a very diverse group of black women in Minneapolis. At the time, it had the most ethnically diverse black population in the country, and everyone was giving. There were ancient giving circles that were being replanted and adapted to the U. S. All kinds of social enterprises. And I became like the pro bono adviser, and I knew it would be powerful. Even I knew all these women, but they didn’t know each other. And at the time I was teaching philanthropy at the University of Minnesota, which hosted the formation of this this group Pan African Women’s Philanthropy Network that I started and based on that experience, I thought it would be helpful if there were actual month where we step back. Ah, as a global community and recognize are giving is import and how to do it better, better and more collaboratively so that we can have a greater influence on the social and economic and environmental challenges that face black people wherever they are on the planet. So that was the genesis of it. It was also inspired by the U. N. Had an international decade for people of African descent. Also recognizing that there were these common, this common threat of history in common challenges that require more visibility and social action. It became a decade recognizing, um, people of African descent. And so now the U. N has recognized black philanthropy mom as an important pillar in um, acknowledging a celebrating black culture globally and now third, I think 30 plus different government entities from cities, towns and states have recognized Flat Philanthropy Month, and I think we’ve counted 17 million or so people engaged so far. So it’s becoming a global movement, which is part of what I was hoping for. But Valetta will tell the story of how they she got involved, and there’s another woman who couldn’t make it today who I always want to acknowledge. Tracey Webb, who was a pioneer in her own right. She created the first black philanthropy blogger I’ll call Black Gives Back. And she also is the founder of a prominent giving circle called Bled Black Benefactors. And so that’s kind of the story that was me as founding it. And I, um, for three years was doing it, um, largely alone and with some of the women from Minnesota and inflate a in Tracy.

[00:07:06.43] spk_0:
Okay, a poignant that it’s founded in Minneapolis.

[00:07:10.94] spk_1:
Uh, yeah, for obviously genesis of our whole reasons. Yeah,

[00:07:15.70] spk_0:
Genesis of our old racial conversation. Now, after the murder of George Floyd in Minneapolis.

[00:07:35.28] spk_1:
Well, Minhas Minneapolis is a unique place where the best the greatest social challenges of America and some of our best opportunities are sort of concentrate it. And so, as I look back, is not surprising that this new phase of the global racial justice movement would have come out in Minneapolis

[00:07:45.24] spk_0:
before we turn to Valetta doing Do you know the the impact of the rough dollar amount of black philanthropy in recent in last year? 2018?

[00:08:27.37] spk_1:
Well, there haven’t been studies recently. Eso Most of us are citing data from 2000 and 14 and for about 20 years there’s been research on US black philanthropy, and all of it confirms that African Americans continue to give the highest proportion of their income to philanthropy, and that’s even in recessions and effect. Our philanthropy goes up in a recession.

[00:08:28.64] spk_0:
There are

[00:08:45.64] spk_1:
always communities. Philanthropy goes down in a recession, but for a lot of cultural reasons, and people don’t realize this is like a hardwired part of the culture is how you become grown and recognized as an adult you have causes

[00:08:48.07] spk_0:
does. It doesn’t

[00:08:48.90] spk_1:
start ever amount that you are giving to and supporting with your time, talent and treasure as part of being black.

[00:09:46.64] spk_0:
It’s time for a break wegner-C.P.As paycheck protection program. Loan forgiveness. I got a message from my bank that they have presentations on this, but they’re only for bank clients. That’s fine for me. But what if your lender doesn’t have resource? Is if they just send you a link to their form? Wegner has you covered their latest free wagon are explains the state of P P P loan forgiveness. What’s forgivable? What documentation do you need? How to work with your lender? Go to wegner-C.P.As dot com Click Resource is and recorded events now back to Black Philanthropy Month with Jackie Copeland and violate a full would. Does it start or did? It doesn’t have its roots, its roots in churches.

[00:10:02.24] spk_1:
It has his roots in churches, but in part because the church is such an important social institution in our multi century history in the US But if transcends churches, it is also a voluntary associations is wherever two or more black people are gathered, they figure out something to give

[00:10:21.99] spk_0:
to, however later. Lett’s bring you in. Um, if you wanna talk a little about the black philanthropy months. But then I also want to talk about the summit that kicks it off on on August 1st.

[00:12:44.77] spk_2:
Oh, yes, great. So I was there in 2011 in Minneapolis when Jackie convened the Pan African Women’s Philanthropy Summit and um was really elated when she announced August is Black Philanthropy Month, in part because at that same time, I had just finished on my manuscript for the book, giving back a tribute to generations of African American philanthropists, and the book was gonna be released in October. So this convening in August in Minneapolis was some timely and to be gathered with other black women from across the globe to learn and also to share about. My forthcoming book was, um, really It’s for inspirational and just great timing. So I continue to follow Jackie’s work with black philanthropy months as I rolled out the book and engaged in book talks around the country. And then in 2000 and 2013 I reached out to my friend Tracy Web, which Jackie Jackie mentioned earlier. And Tracy had a huge following with her Blawg like It’s back dot com and also was building a network through my work around the book and thought, Hey, you know, we can really amplify and magnify black philanthropy. It’s the three of US war to join forces and use our respective networks and collective networks. Teoh, you really take Black Follansbee months to another level. So I reached out to Jackie, pitched the idea, uh, which I thought was pretty awesome. But I really hope she might see the same. And she was gracious and oh, saying yes to women that she only knew slightly and, um, when we rolled out, let Philanthropy Month in a new way, particularly leaning on social media engagement and our connections there. It really did take off and go to a whole, another level nationally and globally, which gave us a glimpse into the possibilities. So ever since then, we’ve been working in collaboration.

[00:12:47.90] spk_0:
Was just saying, I’m looking forward. Next year’s your 10th anniversary,

[00:12:50.74] spk_2:
you got

[00:13:19.02] spk_1:
way. I believe it because let’s just say this has been a labor of love and our own pocketbooks, Okay, because, um, this is not, Let’s just say this is amount of money making enterprise, but it is just there so much challenge in our community. And a lot of the media only reports what’s wrong with us. And as a social scientists and activists, I committed myself focusing on what’s right with us. So look over a week, and that’s what philanthropy is. And I forgot to mention you ask, how much for African Americans is at least $12 billion a year? Okay. And some people count the Remittances of African immigrants

[00:13:40.02] spk_0:
right going

[00:14:08.64] spk_1:
because a good portion of those gold to build schools and for healthcare scholarships, and so that’s $11 billion. Just so we’re talking about just the us $23 billion nobody has a true global number. That would be a great research project. I’m working on a proposal for it. I hope somebody funds it because you really do need to know globally, how much by country and then on aggregate global level is black black giving

[00:14:14.74] spk_0:
later. How about the summit that kicks off Philanthropy Month, August 1st black giving and beyond Virtual summit? Tell us,

[00:14:23.48] spk_2:
Yeah, we’re thrilled about it. It was Jackie’s brainchild that she shared with me and Tracy, I think, late last year, and we’ve been building on it again. It was before the pandemic before the outcries against racial injustice, but it seems right on time. So the idea is to host a global virtual convening on a high tech event platform that invites participation from all across the world. And we have, ah, really stellar lineup of speakers and Panelists, and discussions will focus on how we can aggregate funding and resource is in capital to help in the recovery and rebuilding of black communities. In the wake of these twin pandemics. As Jackie often says, any black racism and Corona virus

[00:15:21.78] spk_0:
info info on all this is that black philanthropy month dot com, right?

[00:17:06.79] spk_1:
Yes. Please. Thank you. We want to commercial. We want people to people to go to black philanthropy month dot com Learn about this summit and register and under build on what violator was saying We’re trying very. We missed being able to come together in person. I mean, I think that is one of the most difficult aspects of this whole Corona virus period. So we’re trying our best to simulate a, um a real life in person conference environment with this platform there. Four days August 1st is to kick off with Soledad O Brien Bakari Sellers, Benjamin jealous and a activist on racism and technology named Joy Belluomini. Um and then all his fourth and fifth are in Africa. We have the Kim Daymo Trumbo as a keynote speaker, along with a very prominent philanthropist named I Show Mohammed or you’re both day. Ah, and then we are having on August 29th a women’s rally and that will be headlined by some of the top women leaders of philanthropy. Like most communities, black women do a lot of the heavy lifting for giving funding, care giving, and let’s just say we’re under some really special stresses in this Corona virus period and with this severe economic downturn has got 20% at least 20% black unemployment, 40% of our small businesses, clothes closing and 1/3 of all Corona viruses. The virus deaths in the US are black on a lot of that

[00:17:10.90] spk_0:
is proportionate again.

[00:17:32.21] spk_1:
Yeah, a lot of that care giving and community giving falls on us. So we’re trying to also revive our ideas in our spirits through this entire summit. Siris for four events Let’s let’s talk

[00:18:03.91] spk_0:
some about some of the racial inequities around around broader philanthropy. I know black flan. Three month is devoted toe elevating black philanthropists and funders and investors. But I want to go a little broader and talk about some of those inequities in philanthropy generally. And, of course, you know, tie it to the the conversation that we’re all having about systemic, institutionalized racism. What’s the, well, the later listed contento? Later for Okay, please.

[00:18:52.34] spk_2:
Yes, The data says that roughly 2% of ah foundation funding from the country’s largest funders go directly to black led organizations and black communities, which is, you know, really shocking figure when I first learned of that. And so that is evidence of the chronic underfunding and also some of the racial bias that exists. The conscious and unconscious bias that exists in the philanthropic realm and black philanthropy Months and discussions at the summit are all centered around, uh, making things right and more equitable, and just in the philanthropic and just general funding round. So,

[00:18:53.18] spk_0:
Jackie, what’s the what’s the role then of black philanthropists and and funders, et cetera, In bringing about that change,

[00:20:58.39] spk_1:
right? Well, I want to note that the reason the summit is called black giving and beyond is we realize that there are Eddies and equities that we have to talk about our own philanthropy, our own giving his black people. But we also have to talk about the responsibility of institutional philanthropy to our community and address some of these longstanding disparities are delivering. In 19 eighties, when we were when I first started, we grabbing the same conversations. It is like deja vu all over again, cause it hasn’t gotten that much better. And so, um, philanthropy is a key piece of it, but with the figures, I just shared with you around Really, the decimation of black communities in this cove it era is going to take more than fully. And the truth is, when we look at social investment and venture funding, we get about 1% of those funds as well. So there is just there’s a problem with private sector funding toe black communities, whether we’re looking at philanthropy or business funding, and our nonprofits and our businesses have to be strong to rebuild what we’ve lost. Win had it much anyway, and we’ve lost so much just in the recession has just gotten started that this summit is inviting philanthropists. Community and institutional toe have this question discussion about equity, but also VC funders and social investors. And so, in fact, every session we have tried to have health care expert who can talk about the impact of Corona virus, but also institutional or community philanthropy and activist as well as a V, C or social investment funder. And so our model, our hashtag we have a couple of them. We call ourselves the Fund Black Summit. That’s our nickname and black funding matters. And in that statement is not just philanthropy. Of course, that’s that’s what’s driving us. It’s part of our culture. But our for Ray into the social justice movement, our current racial equity movement is to say, Look, there’s a serious problem with funding overall, what are we going to do about it?

[00:21:30.43] spk_0:
And so you need to be talking and not just you. We all need to be talking beyond the black philanthropy and funding and investing community. I mean, you do

[00:21:35.55] spk_1:
you want me? Oh,

[00:21:54.64] spk_0:
you won’t be talking more much more broadly because every $3 billion is sizable, although, you know, roughly half of that is leaving the U. S. We have is valuable, which has its as its place. But but roughly only half is staying here. And in the big scheme of of giving, you know, that’s a that’s a small amount. So

[00:22:58.79] spk_1:
in the big scheme of get funding, we’re talking trillions when you air in. I’m venture funding and you add in social investment. And so we really are talking about how do black folks get fair Access to the capital doesn’t necessary to sustain any people or community. And so it’s an economic justice summit as well, and we hope that the practical outcome and belated alluded to this is the’s on just fund black new black funding principles that include philanthropy but moved beyond it to ask the hard questions of veces Why do you have why is it OK to funding young man who dropped out of college and had a good idea but has no track record? Give him millions and millions of dollars and dope hold him accountable for it. But then you can have Ivy League educated black business leaders who have created a profit proven themselves, and they have to jump through all kinds of hoops because of this hoops on

[00:23:06.14] spk_2:
fire at that.

[00:23:48.44] spk_1:
Now this implicit bias you have around how women can’t do certain kind of business or how you know black people aren’t good with numbers, even though people aren’t doing that on purpose. That that’s what implant implicit bias is sure, Um, and it really has an impact in our communities. Folks in Minneapolis, we’re saying we don’t own anything. We can’t own it. We can’t own our businesses. We can’t on the house because of the price of living. When you have a whole group of people who feel like they have no stake in the future of the community and the country cause they can’t get fairness is back for democracies. That’s what we’re partly up to. Yeah, later you have Valetta Door has something to add to that

[00:24:36.91] spk_0:
I was gonna go. I was going to say bad. It’s devastating way We were nowhere near realising our full potential as a country where, what 1/4 of the population is It has just been victim to institutionalized structures, processes racism times Well, 400 years if you want. But certainly I’m thinking even just of more modern times. But, you know, of course, the tragedy goes back. 401 years were nowhere nowhere near reaching our potential as a country. When when that kind of that kind of proportion of the population is not ableto not able to achieve what the other 75% can. Yeah.

[00:25:46.04] spk_1:
Yeah, And I think that George Floyd video as tragic as it is and I still haven’t seen it because I don’t have the emotional I can’t really say I will not see it because I know it. I live in I can’t see it and continue to focus um but I’m glad the world saw it. And it was a very, very brave young woman. Darnell afraid her in Minneapolis recorded it because I think it was a wake up call for the country on the planet. Look, something is seriously wrong. We can’t just keep our heads in the sand and say that, you know, we’re often told. Well, you got a chip on your shoulder. That was the old days. The civil rights movement has come. You have overcome. But that could have been that could have been President Obama. I hate to say it. It could have been any black man or woman with the U. S. Who was subject to that kind of treatment that our education levels are. Achievement are meritocracy does not protect us or give us equal. It’s all off my soapbox. But you asked.

[00:25:48.77] spk_0:
All right, put Europe. Now I put you up there. I want to hear it. Yeah,

[00:27:26.64] spk_2:
Particular points I wanted to add about the summit specifically is one point we always like to make. While liberation is not free, the summit is so it is open to the public and free to register. I’d also like to emphasize the global aspects of it. As Jackie mentioned, It’s a summit series that kicks off, kicks off on August 1st and continues on the 4th 5th and 29th. And I think, um, you referenced 16 19 and the 400 now 104 101 years of documented black life in America. And the fact that this summit is inviting a global conversation I think is significant, particularly at at a time when black people all over the world are recognizing. Or, uh, I guess that we know. But their headlines and media stories from China to Europe to, you know, here in the States and Brazil about anti black racism and the disparities in health and economics that exists. And so we all recognize our connections wherever we are. And there’s also the fact that, um, kind of the the year of the return that 2019 marked for many of us. Many, like people and families, return to Africa to connect to their roots. Um, ancestry dot com and other DNA testing companies have made popular people finding their roots and tracing it back to Africa and being curious and interested in reconnecting with communities there. So the fact that this year’s BPM has ah, very specific global focus and invitation is a significant variety ways. And so we’re excited about that.

[00:29:34.11] spk_1:
Yeah, I will say that the black I asked for was always involved in part because of those Minneapolis roots there were when Minneapolis had, at the time, the largest populations of Liberians and Somalis and Kenyans in the U. S. And they were. It’s still our cause. That coalition is still alive and, well, part of this coalition of women. Um, that put on the first summit. Okay, but now actually having an Africa base, especially for like, for me as an African nous anthropologists focusing on Africa and a diaspora it’s sort of our track into the global economy as well. Global economy. Israel You can’t just focus on your backyard. We all have to figure out how to collaborate across borders is just and do business. And so it is really, um, an act of also, um, not just solidarity for practical economic empowerment. We’re asking the question. How could we support each other’s issues? No matter where you go, black women tend to have the highest rates of maternal mortality in their communities. And that’s triple in Africa that strictly Europe. That’s true in the U. S. S. So there are these global questions about our future, and we can Onley come up with the answers is if we’re collaborating across the lines of national origin, ethnicity, religion, and we define ourselves in many ways, just like Asian or Jewish people. There’s a lot of diversity within. Diversity is beautiful to bring it all together in this summit experience.

[00:30:13.70] spk_0:
Are we gonna leave it there then? All right, that’s beautiful. Wrap up Black Philanthropy Month Black Philanthropy month dot com kicks off August 1st we all well, we all are wanted to participate. We all are sought after so black philanthropy dot com We didn’t say it, but I’ll just shout out quick. The theme for this year’s Black Flam three month is Foresight 2020 which is cool. That’s very good. Thank you very much. Jackie. Jackie Copeland. You’ll find her at the Wise Fund dot or GE and at Jackie, Be Copeland and later Fulwood Valetta dot com. And at Valetta F Jackie Valetta. Thank you very much.

[00:30:21.39] spk_1:
You can tony and later

[00:32:36.04] spk_0:
we need to take a break. Cougar Mountain Software. Their accounting product Denali, is built for non profits from the ground up. So you get an application that supports the way you work that has the features you need and the exemplary support that understands you. They have a free 60 day trial on the listener landing page at tony-dot-M.A.-slash-Pursuant non. Now it’s time for Tony’s Take two. I’m very proud to announce the launch of planned giving accelerator. This is a yearlong membership community where I am going to teach you everything I know about how to start and build your planned giving program. Just like this show. It’s designed for small and mid sized nonprofits. I’m gonna produce an exclusive podcast for members. Exclusive. Webinars. We’ll have asked me anything Sessions on Zoom in small groups. There’s gonna be a Facebook community that’s private. Just for members will have all kinds of resource is checklists, templates, everything you need, and I’ll share everything I know on how to start your planned giving program. It’s planned giving accelerator go to planned giving accelerator dot com. You’ll find all the info there. That’s where you sign up to join the membership. Our yearlong membership community. I hope you’ll join me if you don’t have a plan to giving program. This is the time to get started. You’ll pay a lot less for a full year. Then you’d pay to work with me directly in just a month. Everything you need is that planned giving accelerator dot com that is Tony’s Take two Now. Time for collaborations. Mou to merger It’s my pleasure to welcome back Jean Takagi. It

[00:32:38.49] spk_1:
always is. You know

[00:33:00.14] spk_0:
him. He’s our legal contributor and managing attorney of Neo, the non profit and Exempt Organizations Law group in San Francisco. He edits the wildly popular non profit law blogged dot com, and is the American Bar Association’s 2016 outstanding non profit lawyer. He’s a part time lecturer at Columbia University. The firm is that neo law group dot com, and he’s at G Attack. Welcome back to the show, Gene. Always a pleasure to see you.

[00:33:07.84] spk_3:
Thanks so much. Great to see G tony

[00:33:10.02] spk_0:
doing okay out in California. So

[00:33:11.80] spk_3:
I am thinking Okay. Um how about how about you?

[00:33:15.04] spk_0:
Yes. The beach on the ocean are still across the street from me, so I mean,

[00:33:19.09] spk_3:
that’s fantastic. Very angry.

[00:33:26.34] spk_0:
I wake up every day with a notion across the street. And how bad can it be? Thank you. Yeah, I’m doing fine too. Thanks.

[00:33:29.64] spk_1:
So we’re talking

[00:33:58.99] spk_0:
about, um, you know, joining forces on and there’s Ah, there’s a broad spectrum of possibilities that this can take on, but without getting too technical on before we get to some of the summit of possibilities, you’re seeing an uptick in your practice and research is showing their stats. They’re showing their arm or not profits considering or exploring some kind of collaboration. You know what’s going on? What are you seeing?

[00:35:42.54] spk_3:
Yeah, and, um, I appreciate kind of being able to tell you that I’m doing well, but I know that there are a lot of people out there that are going through some pretty tough times right now, and there are a lot of organizations that are going through some very tough times, and that’s definitely not restricted the for profit sector. It’s hitting the nonprofit sector very hard right now as well. On top of that, the demand for many non profit service’s are higher than ever, as a lot of people are struggling through these times, so, yeah, non profits are getting hit hard on the revenue side. They’re getting hit hard because of the man, for their service is on their limited ability to deliver them with all of our shelter and place orders. So, through all of that, um, you know, there have been some conjecture that that many, many nonprofits are not going to survive. Over the next year on, we’ll see the loss of many nonprofits. And there’s this desire that many of these nonprofits air serving communities that are not getting the attention that they might from larger, stronger, financially organizations it might go under the radar and looking to see how their programs and what they’re trying to do is going to fit in. And in this time, where we’re also seeing this huge movement towards greater equity, racial equity, social justice, picking up these small nonprofits and their programs, and saving them so that the beneficiaries who are most impacted by the pandemic and all of the associate ID bad things that happened around it has become important. So nonprofits were struggling looking to save programs may be looking for some sort of collaborative partner to help them through and some of the bigger funders and bigger organizations are saying yes, we want to do more of these severely impacted communities that we’re not reaching as much as you know, some of these smaller organizations are. We want to collaborate with them and keep those service is alive.

[00:36:28.23] spk_0:
So if if we feel like we’re in that boat, uh, I mean, I guess it could be either were way. You feel particularly, um, strong in our community, or we feel like we’re at risk and vulnerable in our community. Um, where would we start this? Where would we start the possible collaboration conversation? We said we start internally. I’m sure what? What we need to be talking about among our C suite and are board.

[00:37:59.43] spk_3:
Yeah, it’s a great question. And hopefully there’s a sense or ready with some organizations that you do know your allies in the space. They may not exactly overlap with you. Probably they shouldn’t, you know, for reasons of competition. But you generally know who your allies are, and I’m marrying you. Want to call collaboration? If you want toe equated to a marriage in some form, you don’t want to marry a total stranger. There’s, um, a huge risk to that. But if you do know some organizations out there that are allied with you, um um, or if you go to your community foundations if you kind of know about them but don’t really haven’t inside sort of a deeper relationship with with some of their key stakeholders and board members and C suite officers getting introductions from community foundations from large funders who being be funding multiple organizations in the same area. That’s kind of how how I would start to get started. Teoh first have the executives start to just talk about it in general, hopefully from a position not like a urgent panic, Um, but from a position of well, let’s see how we can best serve our communities that we’re both trying to do well it and do it in the best way possible.

[00:38:53.57] spk_0:
I read an article that you suggested, written in response to ah question that was submitted by a museum that was on the stronger side in the community and wanted to open conversations but didn’t want to appear predatory. And as I said, you know, there are there are a lot of ways to work together short of merger. There are different, just sort of service agreements and mutual understandings could be a contract or that’s legally enforceable or not. But there are a lot of different ways to work together. So at this early stage, you’re just asking or inviting. No, we all know that we’re struggling. Would you be open to, ah, a conversation about how we might work together, how we might collaborate to serve the community in this, you know, increased time of need.

[00:39:17.03] spk_3:
I think that’s exactly right, tony. And the greater emphasis that you could put on your common missions and forget about, at least in the initial discussions, forget about, like, power dynamics and all of that. But just go in two people talking about their organizations and what they’re trying to do to strengthen their communities and say, What are we trying to do? Where are risks to those communities? How is our missions are common mission at risk? And what can we do? The best address that as we’re facing these unprecedented forces right now, um that are really hurting on the communities were trying to serve and could eventually you’re gonna enter into the discussion that it could, you know, possibly, uh, cause a cut in service is or possibly three eventual shutdown of a program or a worst case, the dissolution of an organization. And I wouldn’t lead with that. But that’s something that that both parties want to be transparent about as they continue their discussions.

[00:40:58.51] spk_0:
Right, Right. But initially, you’re just exploring. That’s right. We’re not talking about shutting down here program or us shutting down hours. We’re sharing about where we’re struggling and where we’re succeeding. Know some organizations are doing well in fundraising in the midst of this triple crisis dream, healthcare, racial equity and and recession and others are not. So you’re just that the exploration stage, I guess, is what I’m is what I’m saying and then going beyond that is that when you would start to draw your board in? You know, I’ve had a couple of conversations with the CEO over at whatever agency we’ve been exploring some some ways that we might be able to help each other. You know, is that the stage you would start to bring this conversation to your board?

[00:41:27.81] spk_3:
Yeah, it depends upon or soon, yeah, it depends upon the board that you have. So it might be bringing in the board chair if that person is particularly strong, um, in their leadership on maybe is well connected if you have some board members who are who can take that role without necessarily bringing the full board in,

[00:41:35.88] spk_0:
right. Oh, I’m sorry. I just meant when I said bring the board and I meant make him privy to your conversations. Yeah, bring them to meetings with the other agency.

[00:42:35.97] spk_3:
Yeah, even even in the conversations before you bring it out to the full board. Because sometimes confidentiality is hard, especially with larger boards. You may want to keep it to a smaller group until you feel like you’ve got something serious. Um, so sometime I was blowing confidentiality because you shirt with too many people off the coffee meeting, Yeah, can kill the whole deal. So just to be careful about, then it depends upon your board. If you have a board of three people, you’re probably best to shirt with the whole three board members right away and make sure that they’re going to keep it confidential. If you have a board of 25 people, maybe not sure with them your first conversation, but take it to the board chair executive committee level. I feel like if there’s something there, then bring it to the board. It’s The board will come in early. But after maybe a couple conversations

[00:43:52.25] spk_0:
time for our last break turn to communications relationships, the world runs on them. We know this turn to is led by former journalists so that you get help building relationships with journalists. Those relationships will help when you need to be heard, so that people you know so that people know you’re a thought leader in your field and they specialize in working with nonprofits. They’re at turn hyphen two dot ceo. We’ve got, but loads more time for collaborations. MoU to merger You have an excellent post at non profit law block dot com that lists a lot of different possible alliances from the least least legally in encumbering, I guess, which is the MOU, or memo of Understanding through merger, which is a total sacrifice of independence on the part of one non profit in favor of another. Um, so there’s a there’s a broad spectrum of possibilities, and at this exploratory stage, we’re not No, we don’t have anything particular in mind. We’re just trying to find out how we might be able help each other.

[00:44:02.89] spk_3:
I think that’s right, tony in and for people to just make it a black and white decision of like, whether we merger, we don’t merge. That’s you know that’s just too serious, that that’s like proposing marriage on your first date,

[00:44:35.89] spk_0:
right? Right. That’s a mistake, and it’ll scare somebody away. It might scare both parties merger, and neither one of us are ready for that. But there’s a lot of possibility. So, um, I let’s see, How can we find this article at non profit law block dot com, the one that lays out all the different methods of aligning?

[00:44:38.74] spk_3:
I I think, non profit collaborations, structural options. And so if you go onto the non profit la blogged dot com, there’s a search far. If you hit non profit collaborations, you’ll find it.

[00:45:08.19] spk_0:
Okay. Excellent. Thank you. Okay, I’m now. Okay. So now let’s say we have furthered our conversations and we see some possibility, but we don’t know what structure to take. How do we how to read procedure? Help us out?

[00:48:05.87] spk_3:
So e think you’re really aiming to see exactly what you want to do, what each party wants to do and where your meeting in common. So if there’s this idea that we want to work together, but we don’t know each other very well, Um, let’s see what we can do. That might be kind of the non binding MOU, the sort of the least amount of commitment made by either organization on that spectrum of collaborations. Um, so you know, we don’t know each other yet. Let’s get to know each other a little bit better. Let’s see if we work to work on this project together. You do this, I’ll do this on and it be their side fails to do it in the way the other side wants. Nobody gets in trouble. I mean, that’s just your your own thing. If you feel like there’s something more to it and it’s more urgent, it’s like, you know, we’re about to, you know, get to the point where we seriously might have to curtail. Our service is to this group of people. Um, and we know you’re also serving them, but in a slightly different way. Is there something we can do to help strengthen our ability to continue our service of of this group of beneficiaries through some sort of thing that we do collaboratively, you know? Can we do it jointly? Are there any efficiencies that we can have if we coordinate our activities together and in this case, one party might be or both parties might be a little bit dependent upon the other party meeting their obligations because they failed to do it, what the other party could could not be able to do their job either. In that case, maybe a simple sort of contract would be involved. T make sure that we’ve got it binding, that we owe this obligation to each other, um, and will formalize it in a contract. Um, all the way to if we know that this organization may not make it, but we want their programs. Um, and both parties want to say this single program that is essential there might be a transfer, an asset transfer of programs, intellectual property associate with the programs of employees that were working on the programs they might shift toe work for. The new employers of the program is housed in two different entities that would be some sort of asset transfer agreement and merger might be kind of at the very end of that spectrum of where we think it’s in the best interest of both organisations. It might not be that one would go away, but we think that there’s so much synergy. And after really thoughtful discussion and due diligence, we think we’re gonna be more much more powerful in delivering our mission, our common missions together rather than apart.

[00:48:10.33] spk_0:
It sounds like some legal help may be appropriate here if we’re gonna enter into some kind of collaboration with another non profit.

[00:48:59.57] spk_3:
Yeah, I like the idea, and this is a little self serving, because I but I like the idea of Brown wears in early, so you can. They can give you kind of you all of the options menu, if you will. Sometimes merger consultants, which I think are absolutely necessary as well, can come in there, and they may be trying to attain their goal. Eso if their merger consultant very thinking merger kind of because a surgeon think surgery is the response to a health issue. That’s the tool they know for the more experienced consultants who deal with these array of options. You know, if you if you’re sure you have a consultant like that, they’re probably gonna get get you far down the path as well. But the lawyer might be able to just sort of add those little tips on and steer you away from certain traps at the beginning. You don’t have to hire the the lawyer to do kind of full blown due diligence surfaces off day one, Um, but bringing them in early might lead you down the right past.

[00:50:06.66] spk_0:
There’s some psychosocial aspects to this to, like, ego and trust. We’re we’re gonna have to put aside our ego if we’re going to, if be willing to admit that we can’t continue on our own, um, and trust, you know, even if even the most stringent contract still requires trust between between the parties because no, no contract can envision everything. And if there isn’t trust going into a contract, I think you’re I think you’re doomed even with one that’s well written. So there’s some interpersonal aspects to this do

[00:50:43.06] spk_3:
absolutely, um, and trust. But to the extent you can verify, so make sure you know the individuals that you’re putting trust in, You know, when coffee meeting is great, but you’re gonna want to know that person more. You’re gonna want to know what their culture is more since culture is going to be really important in any kind of collaboration, whether there’s a culture fit if you don’t know, you know who the people are on the other side that are suddenly gonna be working together with your organization’s people. Um, that that could be a huge risk factor that you have to know how, how this is going to blend together

[00:51:08.40] spk_0:
so that if you do have the luxury of time, neither neither non profit is failing and in crisis. Then, you know, basically your advice was, hold hands before you get married, take things slowly, and then maybe you can expand the collaboration as you see whether the cultures match whether the objectives are being met. Are we actually delivering better service is or more service is Have we saved money? So, you know, have some of these goals been met cause a lot of times they’re not.

[00:51:44.66] spk_3:
I like that, tony. And so when organizations are operating both in a position of strength, even if one is bigger and what color that works out really nicely. So you can you can hold hands and get closer before you finally decide what ultimate step you want to take together. Um, so that’s what I prefer. I know, especially in these times, that may not be the reality for many organizations.

[00:51:50.56] spk_0:
What do you want to alert listeners to around this topic? Gene,

[00:51:56.86] spk_2:
I think one

[00:53:20.05] spk_3:
thing is not to be scared and not to get lost in not only your personal ego, which may mean for some people. Well, if we merge, I’m not gonna be a board member anymore because they’re the existing or surviving organization, has a board, and maybe they’re willing to take on a couple of us from the smaller organization. Um, but I’m I may not be part of that, but I’m not gonna let that drive my decision as to whether to merge or not. Because that’s now That would be about me, not about, you know, the organization and its mission. Um, the same thing goes with the name. So you know, often times people are, you know, deals get killed and mergers because the smaller organization or the disappearing organization is not willing to let go of the name. Um, And, yes, you could negotiate around naming. Keeping your name is a program and having some sort of of recognition on the website of the merged entity. But some people are so locked in on it, they’ll fight tooth and nail to make sure that their name is standing out as, like, part of the same merged entity’s name. So they combine both names, and it’s really clunky, and it just doesn’t really make sense. But, um, people get lost in that and start to make it a power play of, like, who could negotiate and exercise the most power in this transaction rather than what is in the best interests of our mission on both short term and long term.

[00:53:41.35] spk_0:
Okay. And again, merger, of course, being the extreme possibility for for collaboration. Okay. Yeah. Okay. Um, if you feel comfortable, we can leave it there. Gene, You all right?

[00:53:44.77] spk_3:
Yeah, I’m good. I’m good.

[00:53:47.95] spk_0:
Okay. Okay. Jean Takagi, find him in, uh, neo law group dot com and at G Tack and Gene talk to you in a couple weeks for the 500 show.

[00:53:56.36] spk_3:
I’m so excited for you.

[00:53:57.90] spk_0:
Thank you. Back cheese did. Thank you very much, Jeanne. So long.

[00:54:02.24] spk_3:
Okay, but

[00:55:34.44] spk_0:
next week, non profit radios. 5/100 show. It’s our 5/100 show and 10th anniversary. Live music, Lots of guests and giveaways. Send me your story. How did you get into non profit work? Hardly anyone chooses this as a career. How did you get in? Well, read the top three stories on the air. You’ll be preserved forever in our 500 show, and you’ll win a bag of Cure a coffee. Be with me next week for the 5/100 non profit radio. If you missed any part of today’s show, I beseech you, find it on tony-martignetti dot com were sponsored by wegner-C.P.As guiding you beyond the numbers wegner-C.P.As dot com by Cougar Mountain Software Denali Fund Is there complete accounting solution made for non profits? Tony-dot-M.A.-slash-Pursuant her mountain for a free 60 day trial and by turned to communications, PR and content for non profits. Your story is their mission. Turn hyphen two dot ceo. Our creative producer is clear. Meyerhoff Sam Liebowitz managing stream shows Social Media is by Susan Chavez Mark Silverman is our red guy on this Music is by Scots with me next week for non profit radio big non profit ideas for the other 95% Go out and be great

Nonprofit Radio for July 17, 2020: Mindfulness, Happiness, Well-Being Apps & Apps, Tools, Tactics

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Beth Kanter & Meico Whitlock: Mindfulness, Happiness, Well-Being Apps
From 20NTC, a survey of apps to help you increase resilience, work-life balance and calmness. My guests are Beth Kanter, master trainer, and Meico Whitlock, The Mindful Techie.

 

 

 

 

Meico Whitlock & Jason Shim: Apps, Tools, Tactics
More 20NTC panelists share their favorite resources for efficiency, raising more money and building stronger relationships. They’re Meico Whitlock, The Mindful Techie, and Jason Shim from Pathways to Education Canada.

 

 

 

 

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[00:01:08.14] spk_0:
hello and welcome tony-martignetti non profit radio big non profit ideas for the other 95%. I’m your aptly named host. Oh, I’m glad you’re with me. I’d suffer with UV itis if I saw that you missed today’s show. Mindfulness Happiness Well being APS from 20 and D. C. A survey of APS to help you increase resilience, work, life, balance and calmness. My guests are Beth Kanter, master trainer, and Miko Whitlock, the mindful techie. Also APS, tools, tactics Mawr 20 NTC Panelists share Their favorite resource is for efficiency. Raising more money and building stronger relationships. They’re Mico Whitlock again, the mindful techie and Jason Shim, from pathways to Education on Tony’s Take

[00:01:08.96] spk_2:
two.

[00:02:39.41] spk_0:
You’re Dismantling Racism Journey were sponsored by wegner-C.P.As guiding you beyond the numbers. Wegner-C.P.As dot com by Cougar Mountain Software Denali Fund. Is there complete accounting solution made for non profits tony-dot-M.A.-slash-Pursuant. Martin for a free 60 day trial and, by turn, to communications, PR and content for nonprofits, your story is their mission. Turn hyphen two dot ceo. Here is mindfulness happiness well being APs. Welcome to tony-martignetti non profit radio coverage of 20 NTC. That’s the 2020 non profit technology conference. Regrettably, the conference had to be canceled, but we are forging ahead virtually. We are sponsored at 20 NTC by Cougar Mountain Software. The Nolly Fund is there complete accounting solution made for non profits? Tony-dot-M.A.-slash-Pursuant Mountain for ah free 60 day trial. My guests now are Beth Kanter and Miko Whitlock. Beth is master trainer, speaker and author. Her latest book is The Happy Healthy, non profit co authored with Liza Sherman and Miko Whitlock, trainer on mindfulness work, Life balance and tech Distraction. And both are intend board members. Beth Miko for each of you. Welcome back. You’ve both been on multiple times. Welcome back.

[00:02:45.04] spk_1:
Thank you, tony. Happy to be here?

[00:02:46.70] spk_2:
Yeah. Thank you, tony. Thank for Fort. Thank you for fortune. Non.

[00:03:21.05] spk_0:
Absolutely. I’m glad to do it. I’m glad we could get the three of us together. And good to know that you are each well and safe mico in Maryland and Beth in California, but continue to be safe. You’re 20. NTC Workshop is mindfulness, happiness and well being. There’s an app for that, Miko, Uh, technology is a double edged sword. You’re the mindful techie. Um, this thing can be enormously frustrating, distracting, But there’s another side to it.

[00:03:59.97] spk_1:
Absolutely. So I think of technology as a tool. So you think of a hammer? Ah, hammer could be something that could be used to destroy. We can also be something to use. Teoh build something to create something. And technology, particularly APS that we’re talking about are very similar. So APs and technology are necessarily a replacement for social interaction of some of the things that we do in person. But it certainly goes a long way toward facilitating those things, particularly in context. You might have, um, some kind of disability, for example. We talk about long distance relationships. All of those are ways in which technology can be an asset, not a deficit for us.

[00:04:05.44] spk_0:
Okay. Okay. So we’re looking at the positive side today. Um, do you want to just start getting up? Do we have different categories of APS for mindfulness happiness and well being? Or we didn’t have glommed together. What?

[00:04:31.46] spk_1:
So I will start with just what I think is sort of the primary of the foundation. And I’m sure Bath will agree that maybe Beth can sort of rattle off some of the other categories as I’m going through this. But we start with the internal apse. So often times we have this discussion. It’s all about the external APS meeting, the things that you can download from an apple store or things. You’re going down from a website. But we have an internal app in the form of my opponents. For example, the breath meditation. All those are things that don’t require us to pay for anything. Things that don’t require us to pay an extra luggage fee when we travel because we have those things within us internally. And so we start with help people to understand what are your internal applications and how do you actually access those?

[00:05:08.24] spk_0:
Okay, Internal apse?

[00:05:10.54] spk_2:
Yes. And I think toe at building what Miko was saying. I think the most important one is how is your positive out outlook on things and trying? I mean, it’s unimaginable what were going on. But you can also you’re in control of your thoughts so you can try to think about positive things. Um, like, Ah, what? Where’s the blessing in this? Uh, take a look at some of the creativity that’s happening. Um, think about what? You’re grateful for, um, for me. I just adopted this in your dog. I probably would have done that, so I’m very grateful for that.

[00:05:59.84] spk_1:
Absolutely. And the one of the single most important things. People looking for a way to start with the internal apse. It’s just taking one deep breath. You know, when you find yourself rattled, you find yourself overwhelmed taking an opportunity to cause and to just take one deep breath that is actually mindfulness. Oftentimes, we think that we have to engage in Oklahoma session. That’s 30 minutes longer. You have to have a yoga mat. Have to have the right pants. None of those things are necessary for you to actually put yourself in that unmindful state in a more holistic and healthy state.

[00:06:15.79] spk_0:
Okay, just a single breath.

[00:06:17.65] spk_1:
A single breath

[00:06:18.84] spk_0:
doesn’t get any simpler. Start there. Yeah, because you want to share something that you’re grateful for. Please.

[00:07:22.55] spk_1:
I’m actually grateful for my mindfulness practice has been one of the things that actually help me to stay center during this time. That we’re in is one of the things that I used to make sure that when I’m using technology, you know, social media email, etcetera, that I’m actually using it in a way that actually advances my intentions for my work and how I want to show up on. And it allows me to actually be able to support people who are legitimately experiencing fear and anxiety and anxiousness during times like these. So I’m actually grateful to have the mindfulness practice in the half APs, for example, Like the inside timer, which I use this morning. It’s a timer app that allows you to, um, set a timer for your meditation or for the type of mindless practice their courses you’re able to connect with community of folks who are also engaged in similar practices on gives you a little time, different options at the end, what your practice has concluded. So that’s the way that I’m marrying. Um, what I’m grateful for in this moment with actually a positive use of technology.

[00:07:30.02] spk_0:
Yeah. What’s the name of that again? Fight timer in sight timer. Okay.

[00:07:48.04] spk_2:
And it can also I’ve been doing with a lot of my teams. We’ve been actually using that to start our meetings with a moment of silence. Just so everyone gets censured and we can focus on you know, the work at hand versus what’s going on outside are locked down areas.

[00:07:53.74] spk_0:
If you have an app that Oh, are we ready? Should we do it? I don’t want I don’t want to rush through the internal personal.

[00:08:00.72] spk_2:
Let’s let’s go, Teoh Weight

[00:08:03.58] spk_1:
categories. I can just ride out the categories and they may be back in China. What? She has it. That’s OK.

[00:08:30.24] spk_2:
Sure. I was just gonna go with our presentation, like health, health and fitness. And I’m Sam, uh, this happen, which is Fitbit. It’s also in your phone measures your steps, get you walking. And I’m really grateful that we can still go outside walk and I’ve been doing actually virtual walks with face time with folks and even zoom like we’re on now. Having walking for years.

[00:08:45.07] spk_0:
You’ve been doing walking meetings for a long time. Seven years? Yeah. You doing meetings? Walking view? Was that? Do you tell me you demand? Do you insist on walking meetings? Well, you still you’re

[00:08:45.84] spk_2:
never, never, never demanded because we also I call them strolling meetings now because not everybody you know is come walk. Some people stroll, and now some people Canada walk. So it’s, It’s it’s Ah, optional. But one fun thing is to actually get get Zoom on your phone and dio have everyone walk around the neighborhood. You’ll do that. Walk. Do that walking meeting. Get that exercise. The exercise and fresh air is important.

[00:09:51.78] spk_0:
It’s time for a break wegner-C.P.As paycheck protection program. Loan forgiveness has settled down. There haven’t been changes for several weeks now. Wegner has the info. Their latest free webinar explains the state of forgiveness. What’s forgivable? What documentation do you need? How to work with your lender? Goto wegner-C.P.As dot com Click Resource is and recorded events Now back to mindfulness happiness Well being apse with Beth Kanter and Mico Whitlock Best. I think the dog you just adopted was in the window. He no longer. But

[00:09:57.75] spk_2:
you saw

[00:09:58.65] spk_0:
it was in the night. He was looked like he was sitting on the window frame. He was looking out at the right. The bright sunshine outside.

[00:10:03.87] spk_2:
Yeah, there’s lots of squirrels in our backyards.

[00:10:07.76] spk_0:
You gotta give us another one before we go back to Mico, please.

[00:10:32.07] spk_2:
You Okay, So another one that’s important with health and fitness is to get enough sleep. I don’t. You know, some I’ve had plague induced insomnia. Ah, but you know, getting sleep helps your immune system and helps you focus. It helps you with your fuse. You know, you can have kids in the background. I have a college dormitory here whenever you

[00:10:33.04] spk_0:
have a life while you have

[00:10:34.98] spk_2:
a life. Yes. Right. So night shift. Um, it helps you adjust the light on your phones.

[00:10:39.27] spk_0:
Night shift on a phone. That’s a key. Yes. Yes.

[00:10:41.60] spk_2:
And don’t use your phone as an alarm clock and shut off the phone and electronics two hours before Ben. That’ll helplessly.

[00:10:48.24] spk_0:
Uh, okay. Why not? Why not use the phone as an alarm clock?

[00:10:52.81] spk_2:
Well, because you’re then looking at it. You’re looking at that bright light, and that’s what goes into your brain. And that’s what disrupt your circadian rhythms in your melatonin and the onset of sleep. And you don’t get his good night’s sleep. And we need to have we need to arrest for immune systems and for our own. Well, me?

[00:11:08.72] spk_0:
Yeah, definitely. Sleep is critical for health. Right? But if I have night shift on, does that not protect me when I set my alarm on my phone.

[00:11:33.68] spk_2:
Well, what it does, is it It makes the light on your phone warmer or less Kelvin’s, that a sunny day. It’s not scientifically proven that it doesn’t disrupt. There’s no science behind that. They say it does they? It’s a hypothesis, but I think it’s, you know, it’s a great app if you have to. Maybe a couple hours before bedtime and you’re working making a warmer light,

[00:11:40.88] spk_0:
right? Oh, night shift. Yeah, I was talking about the using of the alarm with night shift done, but

[00:11:52.54] spk_2:
well that if you use your alarm before bed, then you might be tempted to go and look at other things on your phone. You know, some people like me had poor impulse control, so I think the iPhone out of my bedroom. And I just heard I don’t get a look at stuff at least two hours before bed.

[00:12:27.54] spk_1:
And for me, it’s the impulse control has done it issues. So I actually do use my phone as an alarm clock. And so I used the feature called Do Not Disturb where essentially between nine and 9 a.m. Nine p. M. And 10 a.m. my notifications air silenced so that I’m my sleep in my morning routine aren’t disrupted by what’s happening. Now, if you’re like Beth and you have an impulse control issue and it’s getting in the way of your sleep getting the

[00:12:31.76] spk_2:
way label that you

[00:12:35.51] spk_1:
want to get a real alarm clock and charge it outside of your room or get some get the

[00:12:39.95] spk_2:
smart. You know, I have that. I have the moonlight won that wakes you up to moon beings, and I also used Do not disturb, but I still keep the phone in another room.

[00:12:47.34] spk_0:
Yeah, okay. All right. Uh, all right, we’ve established that Beth has issues.

[00:12:52.37] spk_2:
No, no, I’ve overcome them

[00:12:55.94] spk_1:
aps mindfully in order to help her with that.

[00:12:59.91] spk_0:
You used to tell me about, uh, you were obsessive with checking email. I think this was a couple of years ago. A couple interviews ago. You’re obsessed about checking email assumes you woke up.

[00:13:09.24] spk_2:
Yeah, I got over. That was a member of that, But that was part of, like, my own bad behaviors. And what I was seeing other people kind of led to the writing of the book.

[00:13:19.24] spk_0:
Okay, You’re undisciplined at the time. But you’ve recovered.

[00:13:22.74] spk_2:
Yes, because I felt the impact of being undisciplined, which was, you know, distraction, crankiness. And, you know, I didn’t get stuff done as much as I could. I would never have been able to write for books if I hadn’t started to, you know, use some of these techniques over the last seven years or so. OK?

[00:13:57.35] spk_1:
And I think the interesting thing about what I said is that the fact that many of us many more of us are actually forced to work virtually now we’re gonna have to contend with exactly what Beth is talking about. And I think it’s a beautiful thing that we have. Um we were able to put the other this session where we’ve actually, you know, going out and found these different Absolutely help you with that. And then, of course, you have the best book which provides Resource is so, um you know, fortunately for the folks now, they actually have a resource, whereas back, you know and her colleague had to figure this out on their own.

[00:14:11.64] spk_0:
Happy, healthy

[00:14:59.24] spk_2:
people say I will say though I would be totally transparent and honest. I’m a human and sometimes you know, you fall off the wagon and I must say we’ve been on in the house for a month because we started getting messaging about all the tech companies closed down. They did it before the government told them to. And there’s a lot of messaging going around here in the hot spot. You know, dunk a wild if you’re over a certain age or if you have immune issues. So so that did increase my anxiety bit. Um, and I And when my anxiety increases, I start to fall back into some of these bad habits that start to perpetuate anxiety. And I did that for a couple of days. And then I said, Get the pause button, stop and see what you’re doing stuff. Pull out all your tools and, you know, get yourself together.

[00:15:06.22] spk_0:
Alright. Self awareness. Self awareness is key. Yes, it’s an important point. Yeah. Bet they also see, uh, container of wipes in your background to just

[00:15:10.49] spk_2:
ugo you see,

[00:15:23.34] spk_0:
There it is. Yeah. Um, I’ve been looking at a lot of backgrounds recently. Doing 20 years, some of these, um there. This is interesting. What? What people choose for their background. You have Japanese.

[00:15:27.94] spk_2:
You see my pain collection, right? Next wipes are my fountain pen collection

[00:15:30.91] spk_0:
collection. I see them in a dark, dark wood

[00:15:39.44] spk_2:
k on my writing box. But that’s part of my morning routine is to write inspirational quotes and calligraphy. Alright. What? And I won’t be able to do that if I have my If I hadn’t turned my alerts off and and use Do not disturb

[00:15:45.44] spk_0:
and someone plays the cello. Is that a cello or bass?

[00:15:50.21] spk_2:
Yes, that’s my husband. And you could probably see Casey the piano. No, you can’t, but yeah, it’s a musical family to that helps to music. Even if you just use your phone, Just listen to, like, classical music or jazz, whatever. Whatever you can to

[00:16:03.88] spk_0:
Mikko, you don’t want to see your home.

[00:16:19.59] spk_1:
Well, this is my home. This is I call it the Sanctuary. And so this is one of the ways that I mentally make a shift and actually prepare for my day. And so, um, I actually started you mature coming on the virtual background that I have actually started to use that as a way to having conversations like this. People who are feeling anxious or overwhelmed to say like Hey, like, let’s have something fun to sort of take you out of your immediate state of panic or in gaiety and once ready, let’s do that. Let’s figure out how we can move forward together with this product that we have that or that we’re talking about. Um, it’s a good ice breaker. It’s a great conversation starter. And, like Beth said about starting your meeting with the moment of silence. This is not really a moment of science, but it’s a good way to sort of break the tension in the room to get the meeting started,

[00:16:50.64] spk_2:
you know, and also looking at me coz unloved what you had yesterday your beach. But this one in the mountains, it’s making me think of one of the apse that we were recommending called calm, which actually takes you into a place of nature. And you hear the birds, you hear the ocean and you know, and it can help you do, Ah, three minute technique that can help reduce anxiety, which is just a mental vacation. And, you know, more and more we’re going to be working at home, ever gonna have back to back virtual meetings, and I think we’re gonna have, like, meeting virtual meeting fatigue. And so I think, between meetings, if you could take that three minute vacation like open up calm the calm app, it’s also a webpage. And just like, listen, you know, pretend you’re walking outside the national parks now are live streaming hikes or even go for Mitt. You know, a quick virtual Nate nature walk between innings

[00:17:38.14] spk_0:
Beth is the app spelled like the word CLM? Yes, Yes. Okay, okay. We just have a couple minutes left. Let’s Is there another category of ah of app? Mico?

[00:19:52.54] spk_1:
Yes, eso. Let’s talk about something we haven’t talked about yet. So it’s like about connectivity and relationships. Eso there two things that I want to talk about here in terms of maintaining a sustaining connections, particularly since we’re spending so much time at a distance. Right? So the 1st 1 is called fabric spelled f A B R I Q. And this is an app for the iPhone for your android device that allows you to intentionally prioritize your most important relationships. So, for me, the way I will use this app is since I don’t live near my family. I live in a different state. I want to make sure that I’m maintaining those close connections. And so this app allows me to identify who those folks are. And then it gives me were periodic reminders about Have you checked in with this person? Gives me an option toe, take notes to collect my reflections. And so it’s a really good way to prompt yourself. Admit all the things that are happening to make sure that you’re checking in on the folks that are most important to you. Um, another app that similar to this is called the Five Love Languages at is called Love Nudge and is available for Apple and Enjoy. And it’s based on the five love languages framework developed by Gareth Happen. The most folks know this framework in the context of romantic relationships, but it actually applies to just any type of relationship in general, in terms of how we communicate, how we like to receive and give love, how I like to Rio receive and give I’m communication, so this particular app allows you to identify your love language, identify the love language of your partner or your colleague or whoever that might be in connection with. And then it gives you nudges throughout the week on how you actually can connect with that person using their love language. So, for example, if, um, if my partner likes to receive words of affirmation, I might be prompted toe leave a post that saying I love you on the refrigerator, for example, in a way that I’m connecting with that person. Does the weights toe really help you toe? Um, really make sure you’re nurturing the the most important relationships for you so that Greek and the five love languages app would be to that. I would recommend from this category around sustaining and nurturing and strengthening connectivity and relationships.

[00:20:50.69] spk_2:
And I would build on what Miko was saying on and talk about it from the perspective of the workplace. Well, being in the workplace is important to have this connective it Ian. Good relationships. It’s gonna be harder at a distance to do that. Um, so so one app is called Know your team, and it helps you build trust and relationships with your team. There’s assessments. There’s lots of tips for one on one check ins icebreakers and check ins for meetings. So you can. And I think I’ve seen a lot of these used over. You know, I’ve been working virtually from, like, 30 years. So a lot of these techniques really can work to help us maintain that human connection and relationship and trust in the workplace. And I think we’re gonna need that as we move forward to rebuild and move on.

[00:20:57.15] spk_1:
No more. The doughnut about is another one. That’s really interesting in this regard. So what?

[00:20:58.76] spk_0:
They again? What’s the name?

[00:21:15.83] spk_1:
Don’t at the pot. We’re going it specifically for slack. And so it’s about that randomly Paris people up for coffee dates. And so obviously, we’re sort of limiting the number in person interactions now. But we could do that to prompt people to have virtual, um, coffee dates or virtual doughnuts or virtual happy

[00:21:22.76] spk_0:
hours. Okay. Beth showing her coffee mug.

[00:21:25.99] spk_2:
Yeah, it’s Stuart. It’s too early for happy hour.

[00:21:36.84] spk_0:
All right, Beth, I’m gonna let you take us out because Miko, give us the intro. We just have a minute or so on the inspiration.

[00:22:51.49] spk_2:
Sure. Some inspiration, cause my good colleague John Heightened whose whose past, but wrote the book Donor Care Here. He did interview with Me about self care, but he also wrote about his self care techniques while he was facing his horrible battle with cancer. And one question he asked himself every day was, What rainbow am I gonna eat? And, of course, if you Google that it refers to eating healthy vegetables, a rainbow of fruits and vegetables in terms of colors. Chris, of course, having cast radio, eat healthy foods. But I thought thinking of it, There’s lots of rain bows out there in our neighborhood. Parents with the kids are drawing pictures of rainbows with colored chalk on the sidewalk. So when other families passed by there trying to find the rainbows, so we all need to look at the Rainbow’s at the end of this, it’s going to be the most horrible thing in the that we’ve ever experienced. That’s probably coming, but after that I see lots of signaling around some of the creativity and the kindness and the mutual aid and the dismantling of oppressive symptom systems in our lives that are happening, and I truly believe we won’t come back the same. But we’re gonna come back better and different and better. So we have to keep every day. Look for a blessing. Look for a rainbow. Look for gratitude. Um and dont adult well, in the darkness.

[00:25:24.34] spk_0:
Yeah, we will. We will. We will emerge. All right, I like that. Thank you very much. Beth. That’s Beth Kanter, Master trainer, speaker and author. Her latest book, The Happy Healthy non profit and Miko Whitlock, trainer on mindfulness work about work, life balance and tech Distraction. He’s ah, is the mindful techie. Thank you very much. Thank you for being with tony-martignetti non profit radio coverage of 20 NTC. Thanks so much. We need to take a break. Cougar Mountain software, Their accounting product Denali is built for non profits from the ground up. So you get an application that supports the way you work that has the features you need and that exemplary support that understands you. They have a free 60 day trial on the listener landing page at slash Cougar Mountain. Now time for Tony’s Take two. You’re dismantling racism journey. That’s our newest special episode, and it’s now out on video. You will have a long journey. So start with this single step. My guest is pretty itchy Shaw, president and CEO of Flourished Talent Management Solutions. Starting where you are with your people, your culture and your leadership. How do you gather data about racist structures right under your nose? Who do you invite to the conversation? She helps you see the way forward. The video is on my YouTube channel in the racism and White privilege playlist. Check it out. That is Tony’s Take two. Now it’s time for APS Tools tactics with Mikko Whitlock again and Jason Shim. Welcome to tony-martignetti non profit radio coverage of 20 and TC 2020. Non profit Technology Conference. We’re sponsored at 20 NTC by Cougar Mountain Software. My guests now are Mico Whitlock and Jason Shim. Miko is trainer on mindfulness work, Life balance and tech Distraction at mindful Techie. He’s also a member of the Intend Board, and Jason Shim is director of digital strategy at Pathways to Education Canada. Jason is the chair of the and 10 board of directors. Miko Jason, Welcome very much. Welcome to the show.

[00:25:27.74] spk_1:
Thank you for having us.

[00:25:28.91] spk_3:
Thanks for having us.

[00:25:41.44] spk_0:
Pleasure. Yes. Pleasure. And I’m glad to know that you reach well and safe. Jason in Toronto and Miko in Maryland outside d. C. Good to know that everybody’s well shut out. Jason’s background for those who cannot are not seeing the video. Jason is on the bridge of the Enterprise. But not the classic, not the one I know. I mean, I know the movies. I know the TV best because that’s what I grew up with. But which version of the enterprise are you? Bridge. Are you on, Jason?

[00:25:59.57] spk_3:
This would be the one from the next generation. So, uh uh, 1701 D

[00:26:36.64] spk_0:
last image of it. He knows the ship designation. Excellent. Alright. And Nico is where I saw him last week. Uh, beautiful of forest mountains and a lake in the valley. Yes. The Blue Lake? Yes, my backyard. Your backyard just outside Washington. He’s got private lake. Um, okay, you’re 20. NTC Topic is APS, tools and tactics to be a non profit Olympian. Amico, let’s start with you. What? Uh, you just you guys have Ah, You do have some basic resources that are accessible and easy to use and are gonna increase productivity.

[00:26:53.96] spk_1:
Exactly. So it’s actually based on an idea that Jason had around the Olympics. And I know Jason. You want Explain the idea and Tyler connects.

[00:26:59.18] spk_0:
Okay, Jason?

[00:27:28.64] spk_3:
Yeah. So the Olympic motto is Ah, faster, higher, stronger. And, you know, there’s always ah, ton of tools that were always coming across. And I think one of the challenges is trying to make it really easy to categorize them. And so the Olympic model came to mind. So things that will help you and organization go faster, things that will help you raise higher revenues and things that will help you build stronger relationships. So generally, if any of the tools conf it and to any of those three buckets, then that also fits very well for non profit usage.

[00:27:34.74] spk_0:
Okay, so why don’t you Don’t you start us off. You want toe, start with faster, and you’ve got Ah, a couple of laps or resource is for us.

[00:28:00.54] spk_3:
Yeah, So I I know. Kick it off with, you know, just talking a bit about some of the automation tools eso speaking to faster. You know, I’m a big fan of Ah, uh, piece of software called Toby eso. Toby is, uh, a chrome extension that you can install that will make your bookmarks very easy to access. So, you know, if you go about your day to day, you may open the same pages every morning. But instead of having to open them all manually or taking them into the oil buyer Toby will live each a group of Marx together. Second, press one button and open your five news pages that you open every morning. It’ll load it all in the background. You just browse the tabs very quickly.

[00:28:24.46] spk_0:
Okay? Is that t o B y

[00:28:27.04] spk_3:
yet? That’s T O B Y.

[00:28:28.59] spk_0:
Okay. Cool for a for, uh, grouping your bookmarks, OK? Yeah. You got another one for us?

[00:29:24.35] spk_3:
Yeah. Another tool that all share is around automation. So I’m a big fan of automation. Is that anything that you can clearly defined in a step by step kind of way you can probably out of me. So my my favorite right now is the Xabier eso. Is that a p i e r ah? And we use it quite extensively. It has over 1500 different types of integrations so specifically Well, how we use it in our organization is for revealing information into slack. So Let’s say if a donation comes in, um, that it will really a notification immediately into shared slack channel for letter staff. Know that one has come in. So you don’t have to wait for a report to be generated every week or every day that you know, the moment that comes in that you know, people are notified and you can respond quickly to folks to let them know that. Hey, you know, thank you so much for making a contribution. We really value it. And we’ve seen some great results. So, you know, the moment that someone donates, you know, weaken within five minutes, be emailing them to give him a very personal thank you.

[00:29:38.24] spk_0:
Justin isn’t, say Pierre very robust to him. You can define your own tasks. Yeah, I think you should code your own, but you want to be a coder to do it.

[00:29:47.24] spk_3:
Now you can You can drag and drop in remix everything and it’s ah, it’s a great for folks who may not have, you know, it kind of coding background or even to maybe too technical. But if you are technical, there is a lot of capability that you can integrate into it. So it’s It’s great for people of all backgrounds.

[00:30:06.84] spk_0:
We go if you got anything in ah, in working faster before we before we go to revenue generators.

[00:30:56.01] spk_1:
Well, in terms of the fast Buck and I would focus more on productivity. And so there are two things that I want to set. Some tools I recommend. The first is around calendar ring and meetings. We recognize that when we look in the aggregate at hour work weeks, we spend so much time in meetings. But one of these we don’t account for the amount of time you actually spend scheduling meetings. So for folks that have spent a lot of time scheduling one on one meetings, and now a lot of us are working virtually using things like Zoom. One of my favorite plug ins is for Google Calendar and for Outlook calendar. So it essentially allows you with the click of one button to schedule a zoom meeting and to invite people to it. So right now, if you’re not using this plug in and you want to schedule a zoom meeting, you have to create the zoo meeting. Forgot what time is gonna be have to give the link copy and paste it, then send it to the people that are going to be a part of the meeting with this plug in. Essentially, create a calendar invite like you would for a normal meeting. And you you press the, you know, turn us into a zoo meeting. But most unplugging is installed, and then the Zumwinkel automatically generated. You just pop in the folks who want to invite and you send off the invite and that saves you a tremendous amount of time. If you’re scheduling a lot of zoom meetings,

[00:31:32.24] spk_0:
is there any is there not a plugging for I, Cal, those of us in the apple using the apple calendar? Now

[00:31:43.76] spk_1:
perhaps there is. But I’m only familiar with Google and and four for Outlook. So for the aikau folks, you about this research to see if there’s anything for them, but definitely for Google and for for outlook.

[00:31:48.29] spk_0:
Okay, and what’s it? What’s it called? That we look for?

[00:31:50.90] spk_1:
Just called the zoom calendar plug

[00:31:53.53] spk_0:
in. Okay. Yes, And the three of us had enough trouble, uh, be creating meetings. But one of you would get the invitation that came from my Cal After you create a after you create a creative meeting and then zoom then answered the aikau, one of you would get the invitation, the other would not. And then I Then I just ended up copying and pasting another standard email, and it worked. But yes, I have my own frustrations around. Ah, Zoom and Aikau working together. Guys, you got another one for for calendar ring.

[00:32:36.34] spk_1:
I do. So if you schedule a lot of one on one meetings, there’s two sets of souls that competitors and you can use either one if use both. One is called acuity scheduling. So a C u I t. Y scheduling. And the 2nd 1 is called commonly, um, c l E N D. Why, captain,

[00:32:45.00] spk_0:
tellingly right? E N d l Y

[00:32:55.39] spk_1:
el y yes. Yeah. So acuity scheduling and Calvin Lee. And what both of these tools allow you to do is to save the time, save yourself time, going back and forth, and I figure out when they get time to meet, right? So how many times do you spend time trying to figure out when to meet with someone, and especially just a brief meeting you could actually spend more time trying to schedule a meeting. Then you actually you actually talking to the person, right?

[00:33:10.00] spk_0:
That can be so. These

[00:33:51.91] spk_1:
tools both of these tools allow you to with Google Calendar, Uh, and with outlook to share your calendar in your availability and allow the person to essentially you send Emily, they see your counter. They could select the time the invite goes on your calendar. It goes on their calendar. And if you have a plug in like resume install forgot by your security scheduling with zoom, a zoom link is automatically generated. It goes in your calendar goes on their calendar. And if you want to set up reminders to automatically go out for yourself for them, those things were set up. But you essentially save yourself that back and forth. It just takes you five seconds to send in the link and then you’re done is in their court. It takes, um, you know what, five minutes or less to pick a time and get on your calendar and you’ve gotten back. Um, you know that time that you feel otherwise spent going back fourth, the e mail or by phone kind of figure out when works for you.

[00:34:44.24] spk_0:
Yeah. Yeah. You have to think about the time. The aggregate time you spend setting up meetings. I mean, I don’t It can’t be done in fewer than two emails each. And that’s I think that’s an outlier that’s at the low end, you know? And then a minute the meeting cancels, then your back to it again, uh, again, at least another four, but more likely six or six or eight between the two people and then and then And then, uh, maybe it doesn’t. It certainly doesn’t increase exponentially, but it increases considerably when you bring in 1/3 or fourth people. Fourth person trying trying to flight four people trying to schedule together. Yes, I think that’s at least partly at least 10 emails. Uh, you know, between everybody 10 and again, I’m not 10. Could be low, depending on, you know. And now we’re scheduling so many more meetings. So,

[00:34:53.79] spk_1:
yes. So So both of those sets of fools, I recommend to the streamline the process and get back a little bit of time.

[00:35:44.19] spk_0:
Talk about being mindful. Rightful of the time you spend scheduling meetings. Yes, a start time for our last break turn to communications relationships. The world runs on them. We know this turn to is led by former journalists so that you get help building relationships with journalists. Those relationships will help you when you need to be heard so that people know you’re a thought leader in your field and they specialize in working with nonprofits. They’re at turn hyphen two dot ceo, we’ve got but loads more time for APS tools tactics from 20 NTC. Okay, you got one for revenue. And before we go back to Jason, you want kickoff revenue?

[00:36:42.94] spk_1:
Yeah, so I’ll shift over to texting. And so one of my one of the tools I use is called text awful on t e t e x t i f u l text. Awful. And essentially, what it allows you to do is it allows you to, um, do email opt ins via text message. So say, for example, this were presentation and you want to give people access to the recording After this prison condition, you could say OK, text, you know, non profit Olympians should this number, and we’re gonna add you to the list and When the videos ready, we’re gonna send it to you. That is one efficient way to capture email addresses for large events. Large gatherings. I do it at my workshops. So if you want the slides, text this number. If you want to stay in contact text, you know little on purpose toe this number and you’ll be added to the list on the next message on update you’ll work. You received that. And so if you tie that into your fundraising efforts, you could see how that could be a great way to identify prospects and then be able to follow with them about actually working with the donating to your organization.

[00:36:54.93] spk_0:
Awesome. Okay, thank you. Text if all Jason, how about you on the revenue side?

[00:38:32.32] spk_3:
Yeah. So one of my favorite tools is ah, the judge. So that’s the I. D. Why a r d dot com and what it is this ah chrome extension that you can install that allows you to easily record videos s so they could be videos of yourself as an individual. Or you can record your desktop or your desktop with a little circle in the corner with you can in a reading. Ah, and how organization has used it is more around the stewardship side to show people the impact of their donations. Eso because I work with an organization that serves youth believing a low income communities across the country but we’re able to do is they were able to record very personalized thank you, um, to our donors using this software. So what we’ll actually do is, you know, to get folks attention because everyone’s getting tons of email in their inbox that the thumbnail will actually be an animation of someone holding up a sign that says the person’s name. So you would get something like the sign would actually say, Thank you, tony. And it’s actually written. It’s not automated, and then you click play, and then you know, the recipient would Here, you know, high tony, thank you so much for making a donation to pathways. Education Canada. You’re making an impact in the lives of people like myself in achieving our dreams, And the impact that it’s had is that this goes into the higher revenues. But you know it. It spills over a bit into the stronger relationships part as well, because it’s um, it’s very much. Ah ah. An individualized, personalized message that cuts through. You know, you’re the general kind of stuff that people normally get in their day to day inbox, and it really helps connect our supporters of more directly with with, uh, with the cause.

[00:38:57.62] spk_0:
Okay. Cool video. All right, eyes there. Another one around the revenue side. Anything else? No.

[00:38:58.52] spk_1:
You want to mention Bun bun Juro, which is similar to video

[00:39:07.87] spk_3:
Bob on joyless. Quelle is another video platform. That is Ah. Ah, quite helpful. Similar. That is also that you can easily create a video. So as be oh, and J o r o b for banjo.

[00:39:22.12] spk_0:
Okay. Thank you. Um, all right. So, uh, our third category was stronger relationships. You got something there, Jason?

[00:40:16.39] spk_3:
So ah, flipping back onto the texting side. Twilio has many different kind of tools, their offers, and so near twilio studio is something that has helped us connect with folks in that it allows us Teoh quite easily create. And, um, whether you want to create your own, like, interactive voice response, um, or if you want to create a more complex tree for you know, someone texts into a number that you can also take them through various paths. Where to learn more about your organization. The other way that we’ve used 12 you as well is for sending out text messages generally without with updates. Eso We’ve used the TWILIO platform to send out text messages to our students directly in order to remind them that events are going on S o. You know, that’s super helpful in terms of just being there. And you know, those kind of nudges. It’s similar to what we do in person, but it’s also using the tool to extend that reach and being like, Hey, just nudge, um, that this event is going on tomorrow on that really helps improve our attendance treats at events A ZX Well,

[00:40:42.67] spk_0:
because you have something in the relationship side.

[00:41:41.55] spk_1:
Yes, I have two sets of tools that are related to how we use social media, so we know that now more than ever, our social connections are really important and social media, you know, while it has some of this downsize, it also could be a powerful way toe keep us connected, particularly if we’re at a distance right. But one of things that we find that happens is we can go down the rabbit hole of sort of losing focus on why we’re on the platforms to begin with. And so the first floor wegner recommended For folks who are using Facebook on the best top, there’s a plug in called, um Facebook news feed. Eradicate ER that you can install for your browser. And essentially, what that allows you to do is to replace the news feet when you log into Facebook with the quote. And so what’s the reason behind us? Well, many of us have had this challenge will be Log into Facebook. You wanna wish someone Happy birthday? You want response a message. You want to comment in a group? Or do some of the activities actually connected to you to someone and you find yourself 45 minutes later in this rabbit hole of watching cat videos, a cute puppies running around or watching the you know, whatever the latest news thing is right on. One of the reasons for that is that you get caught up in the sort of the newness of with in your news feed, so this particular plug in allows you to replace the new seat with a quote, and it makes it more likely that you will be able to remember to pause to reflect and actually remember what your primary intention was when you log into Facebook to begin with. So again, that one is Facebook news feed eradicate er specifically for the desktop version of Facebook and for folks who are using Facebook to the browser way.

[00:42:18.14] spk_0:
Just, uh, we just have about a minute left. So this last one you’re gonna do, um, do it concisely, please.

[00:42:26.00] spk_1:
All right, so for Instagram, YouTube and Facebook for the mobile versions, essentially, what we have are each of these has settings that allows you to monitor your usage to set Ah, a timer or just that reminders on how much you’re using. You’re using those particular applications so that you want spending all your time on those, but you’re actually able toe sustained connections. You know, uh, get worked on and live your life. So check out the settings for those If you’re using those on the mobile version, if you want to get a better handle on how you spend your time on this for us,

[00:43:14.02] spk_0:
okay? We’re gonna leave there by my count will be ticked off. You You ticked off. 10 10 Different resource is in, like, under 20 minutes. So thank you. Very efficient. Very mindful. Very efficient. Very productive. Enormously als three. So thank you that they are. Ah Mika Whitlock, trainer on mindfulness work, Life balance and tech Distractions at Mindful Techie and Jason Shim, director of digital strategy at Pathways to Education Canada thanks to each of you Very much. Thank you, Nico. Thank you, Jason. Thank you.

[00:43:33.30] spk_3:
Thanks for having us

[00:44:41.18] spk_0:
pleasure. Next week, Gene Takagi returns with joining forces M o use to mergers. If you missed any part of today’s show, I beseech you, find it on tony-martignetti dot com were sponsored by wegner-C.P.As guiding you beyond the numbers wegner-C.P.As dot com by Cougar Mountain Software Denali Fund. Is there complete accounting solution made for non profits tony-dot-M.A.-slash-Pursuant Mountain for a free 60 day trial And by turn, to communications, PR and content for non profits. Your story is their mission. Turn hyphen two dot ceo. Our creative producer is clear. Meyerhoff Sam Liebowitz managed stream shows social media is by Susan Chavez. Mark Silverman is our rep guy on this music is by Scott Stein Way next week for non profit radio Big non profit ideas for the other 95% Go out and be great