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Nonprofit Radio for August 4, 2017: Personalized Philanthropy

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Steven Meyers: Personalized Philanthropy

Steve Meyers wants your fundraising to be seriously (really!) donor-centered. What do you need to do internally? What are his 3 killer apps? How will your solicitations change? How do you count the new gifts you’ll get? Steve is author of the book “Personalized Philanthropy.” (Originally aired June 17, 2016)

 

 

 


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Hello and welcome to tony martignetti non-profit radio big non-profit ideas for the other ninety five percent. I’m your aptly named host. What a cool show last week, thanks so much to scott stein and claire meyerhoff for being in the studio for non-profit radios, three hundred fiftieth great great time laughing. Lots of callers live music loved it, loved it. I hope you caught it. Thanks so much. Oh, i’m glad you’re with me. I’d be hit with pirate. Oh, genesis! If you made me hot with the idea that you missed today’s show personalized philanthropy steve myers wants your fund-raising to be seriously really donor-centric what do you need to do internally? What are his three killer aps? How will your solicitations change? How do you count the new gif ts? You’ll get stevie, though. Is author of the book personalized philanthropy that originally aired june seventeenth, twenty sixteen on tony’s take two solitude we’re sponsored by pursuant full service fund-raising data driven and technology enabled, you’ll raise more money pursuant dot com and by we be spelling supercool spelling bee fundraisers we b e spelling dot com you should know that steve myers is no longer with the american committee for the weizmann institute of science he’s, now founder and ceo of personalized philanthropy and a member of the carter center advisory council on philanthropy. Here he is with personalized philanthropy. I’m very pleased that steve myers is here in the studio for the hour. He is vice president of the center for personalized philanthropy at the american committee for the weizmann institute of science and author of the book personalized philanthropy crash the fund-raising matrix he’s, a frequent and popular speaker. And he’s at stephen meyers eight six three s t e v e n o m e y e r s welcome stephen meyers. Welcome to the studio. Hello, tony. Glad to have you in person. I love it here. Glad you’re here. Um, let’s. Start with the basics with the title. What is this matrix that you want people to crash? Yes. The book is called crashed the fund-raising matric because it reflects what my experience was when i it was in the process of writing the book when i realised all along that i’d been living in these two cultures that were completely unaware of each other. And the matrix, the movie, the matrix is the perfect metaphor for describing these two cultures if you remember in the movie dahna you have to describe it, i didn’t see the movie in the movie, people were taken over by cybernetic implants, robots, machines that rebelled against humanity, and they existed only in ah, like in a computer matrix, and everybody in the matrix was really unaware of it. They just thought that everything was normal, they were living their normal lives, and they didn’t realize that they were kind of being held prisoners, that they were enslaved in a sense and that’s what the movie is about when this one person that called neo the one wakes up to the fact that he’s living in this synthetic artificial environment you are you are our neo am, and i’m standing in for all the fundraisers who are trying to wake up who feel the same sense of something’s just not right in my world is the fundraiser, and that was the experience that i had, andi i wanted to write the book to share that with people so they could wake up, help them to wake up and kind of escape the confines of the silos and the channels that they’ve been stuck in for so many years, okay, sometimes without even realize again. Ok, eso your neo nickname neo-sage steve neo-sage miree all right, rob was deconstructing the titles are working a little backwards. Now, what is the this model? Personalized philanthropy, personalized philanthropy is is the antidote the opposite of what goes on in the matrix? If you think about fund-raising and philanthropy when it translates into the way that we work? It’s really like there’s two cultures there’s an institutional focused culture which is focused almost entirely on trying to make campaign goals and reach objectives within the annual department or the and the major gift department. And the plan giving department and even the small organizations tend to mimic these the’s, silas and channels. So my first experience wasn’t really working, and maybe a two man organization to people and one of us was assigned this one channel and the other one of us was assigned to the other channel. And how ridiculous is that it’s a counter intuitive. So the institutional focus is set off against this personalized focus, where instead of trying to service the campaign you’re trying to serve the interests of donors, you meet the donor where they are instead of where the institution is. So you’re really talking about a whole new definition of what philanthropy is and what fund-raising is for we’ve been talking about donor-centric fund-raising for a dozen years or so, roughly, maybe, maybe more? Sure, i mean, i’ve been in fund-raising from nineteen years, i don’t think we started out that long ago, but donor-centric fund-raising donor-centric has been around for i’d say, at least a dozen years or so, why is how are you nio going toe going to make this different and actually get us to where donor-centric is supposed to have been a cz long as twelve or fifteen years ago? We’ve been talking about donor-centric this and donor-centric that for a really long time, but we really haven’t had much to do about it when some people talk about donor-centric fund-raising they’re talking about recognizing the donor or maybe finding a vehicle that they’re talking about selling a vehicle that they need to sell in order to make to bring that donor in. So really donor-centric fund-raising and that’s really a copyright it’s a trademarked on dh it it really could have to do with how you thank them, how you write to them, how you called cultivate them, but it doesn’t really have anything to do with what fund-raising and philanthropy is about which under my definition, the deafness that i’ve been working with is trying to mesh the compelling needs of interests off a donor with the compelling needs of the organization. So that changes if you start with that definition where the donor’s needs matter that’s the focus is on them. I really refer to this is stoner focus giving rather than donor-centric e-giving because the shift means that you’re focused on trying to understand the compelling interests and the passions of the donor and how they would connect to your organization. All right, that’s. Much different than the institutional focus. I hope personalized philanthropy is going toe is not going to take his long tto be really be realized. As as donor-centric trademark name. Okay, you’re thank you. You’re the evangelist for for personalized philanthropy. I believe i am, i presume. Okay, very good. We got the right person and i mean you. You brought the book all right. There’s let’s, make sure that we just have a minute or so before break, but we got plenty time to talk. We’re in, you know you’re here for the full hour. Let’s make sure that small and midsize shops know that they have this is applicable to them. And they probably have advantages in tryingto pivot too, to be personalized philanthropists philanthropies sent centers or shops, right? Yes. When i wrote the book, i was thinking of the person like me who was working in a small shop who had a background in annual giving and found themselves working in a major e-giving field. So for me, they were always connected. And i think that this is about empowering and enabling a person in a small shop to make a difference with every donor that they work with, not just the ones that there focus on for annual or planned or major e-giving you meet the donor where they are that’s the that’s, the magic of this. Okay, excellent. All right. I want that reassurance. I’m very glad to hear it. And steve and i are going to keep talking about personalized philanthropy. Stay with us. You’re tuned to non-profit. Radio tony martignetti also hosts a podcast for the chronicle of philanthropy. Fund-raising fundamentals is a quick ten minute burst of fund-raising insights, published once a month. Tony’s guests are expert in crowdfunding, mobile giving event fund-raising direct mail and donor cultivation. Really, all the fund-raising issues that make you wonder, am i doing this right? Is there a better way there is? Find the fund-raising fundamentals archive it. Tony martignetti dot com that’s marketmesuite n e t t i remember there’s, a g before the end, thousands of listeners have subscribed on itunes. You can also learn maura, the chronicle website, philanthropy dot com fund-raising fundamentals, the better way. Welcome back to big non-profit ideas for the other ninety five percent. Let’s get some early live listen love but my my voice just cracked like him twelve years old books i don’t want to summerlee live listen love so let’s say hello and send love to san diego, california, oakland, california. We got the north and north and south represented, uh, garfield, new jersey. Cool garfield. I’m not familiar with garfield used have relatives living there. I mean, you haven’t checked in before. Glad you’re with us. St louis, missouri, new bern, north carolina live listener love to each of you. I’ll bet there will be more to come. Let’s go abroad has always checking in the big three in asia, south korea, china and japan. Always listeners from each of those in south korea we got soul and actually have multiple south korea so there’s more than more than one we only see soul anya haserot and in shanghai and shanghai. And also beijing ni hao and yokosuka, japan. Konnichiwa and i learned something else from our intern ho, jon for soul i omitted so let me try this. Tio tio, south korea comes a hum nida all right, i hope i just said something like hello and welcome good my intern, our intern assures me i did. I’m glad live listener love lots of live listen love going out, okay, steve myers, you talk about in the book you mentioned a few times transformation over transaction flush that out from this two ways to think about fund-raising the usual ways to think about the donor period and have a colleague who was written a book about the donor lifestyle cycle pyramid and the pyramid you’re thinking about transactions you’re thinking about where a donor falls as a major donor at the top, in the middle or at the bottom in transformational fund-raising you’re really thinking about time, you’re thinking about loyalty, you’re thinking about relationships, and they can take place over time, and the problem with with the pyramid style the transactional is that each transaction is separate and unrelated to all the others. What personalized philanthropy does is it creates a new model where all the transactions are connected to one another so that each gift can count in a way that would never count ordinarily, and that could explain, i can give you an example. I love examples stories. Just imagine, imagine a rope. What ended the rope is the first gift. And another end of the rope is the last gift. This is the chain of value in plan giving in and fund-raising okay, and if you know all the all the value comes out of the end when the donor dies, implant given it. Well, really. And if you think about the lifetime value of a donor, the big gifts come at the end. Yes. Okay, andi, you’re looking for bumps and major gifts and special gifts gifts you make frequently gifts you make once in a while during a campaign and gives you make once when you die. So what you have is you have a long rope with a lot of knots in it what you’re gonna do and personalize philanthropy is you’re going toe move this rope around and you’re going to connect all of the knots and that’s good means that all of these gifts are going to be connected with what another and they’re going to be united around ah, common purpose that the donor has an objective, a goal that not one gift could achieve, but altogether. They can start to make a big difference during the donor’s lifetime. That’s a radical rethinking of how philanthropy works can we tie the two ends of the rope together and make a circle so that it’s it’s unending and non never breaks a circle? Or you could make a don’t want teo, don’t make a noose you make, you know, make a circle. You’re making really a tapestry like like a persian rug each age a lifetime of giving it has a different design and each donor of weaves their own tapestry of giving as they go through their life. Okay, i won’t force you to take the metaphor any further. We’re going to start making cat beds and that’s not okay, okay, now you you run at the weizmann institute, the center for personalized philanthropy. I’m betting that it wasn’t called the center for personalized philanthropy. When you first got there, you had toe make some changes. I was the national director of plan giving that i was the a national vice president for planning giving. And then ultimately we decided to abandon the title of plan given because sounds very solid and make trixie to me. Well. It what it was we came to realize that playing giving us just a cz much asylum or channel as any of these other poor paint and we weren’t working that way anymore. So we wanted to change that. Actually, what inspired the change from plan giving to personalize philanthropy was when my organization, the weizmann institute, decided to establish a center for personalized medicine. That’s, a collaborative, multi disciplinary interdisciplinary program where people are collaborating in all kinds of new ways. And when i heard that phrase personalized medicine, you mean this medicine is designed for one person only and it’s going to work the first time in their dna. Tnegative with that with their deanna. Why? You know, that just was a wake up call for me. That that’s what philanthropy and fund-raising auto bay. All right, one of the kind of full spectrum, all the building blocks should be available to you. You bring them to where the donor is, rather than trying to sell them something that you have you been instructed. Really? Basically tto bring to them and ask them, would you make a gift of x for this math building, math and science building? And it doesn’t matter if the person cares about mathos sign it, maybe they were in the art department or they were a into literature or poetry. And why would they? Yeah, but we need based on our needs space three organizations needs. But now that you had to do some cultural and organizational change, teo, to create the the the center for personalized philanthropy, what advice do you have for people who want to initiate this in their own organization? How do we start that conversation? I wouldn’t make a lot wouldn’t wait a lot for the organization to change its culture or its policies or procedures. Yeah, personalized philanthropy is something that you could begin to think about when you kind of open up your your mind first realize that there is this matrix of silos and channels that all of our fund-raising basically is in right, and you want to try to find a way to connect your current giving in your future e-giving around where your donors are at, and in order to do that, you need, like like in personalized medicine, they have the technology they have, they’re using technology in new ways they have computational biology so they can look at all this life science information in a systematic way, and this technology allows them to personalize medicine, so we have to have some tools that allow us to do this. So i developed these things that i called killer aps they are gift designs for bringing together current and future gifts that could be personalized and individually tailored to work with each donor-centric get to the killer aps, but we’re we’re we’re spawning neos throughout the throughout the world, and there are in small most of them listeners there’s, a small and midsize non-profits and they want to start a conversation about making a shift to personalize philanthropy from the matrix that they are now burdened with, right? We’re on some tips. How did they start? But they’re going to sound like a lunatic the first time they go to their vice president or their ceo executive director, personalized philanthropy, and they have rope metaphors and not since you know how maybe based on your own experience or you know you’re coaching of others, how do we get this process started in our own currently matrix to shop? Well, as i said, the first thing you have to do is wake up to the fact that you’re working in a silo. Oh, and awareness awareness, and then you need to look outside of yourself outside of your silo. And for instance, if you’re involved in plan giving, you know that one of the things that really makes that correlates with the plan gift is the donor who gives all the time a daughter who gives frequently tends to be the kind of person who wants to remember your organization in their state plans. In fact, they may already have done that, so you would think, wouldn’t it be amazing if we, without changing very much of this donor’s habit or pattern of giving they could have a much greater impact today instead of waiting until their their death, when they’re bequest, comes in so kind of realizing that it’s possible t to have impact and recognition for a donor that begins right now? Okay, we were so we’re going to look teo methods of current recognition and current value for both the organization and the and the donor, right rather than long term. All right, all right. Let’s start and and you have. The killer aps before we get to the killer aps, i think i’d like to just explain the spend rate because the apsara largely dependent on an endowment spend rate and there may very well be organization that don’t even have an endowment yet. So let’s explain, spend re this personalized philanthropy works whether or not you have an endowment or not, right? If you don’t have an endowment, you still need to have cash reserves, and you still need to be able to be financially sound so that’s an objective that every organization has, even if they’re a food bank or the kind of organization where they believe that they should not have an endowment. So there are a good number of them there’s a lot of them out there, actually smaller ones, right? But the basic principle involved here is what i would call something like like this it’s the grail of fund-raising the question that is not asked very often bye donors to the organization is what’s the best gift that i could give you if i could give you anything that you wanted, most organizations would ask for id like a gift of cash and i like it right now, thank you very much. Oh, and they would, and they would like to have it for general purposes, but the question that they don’t know to ask is, can we have a gift that will start working right away? Because we need to pay our bills? We have current needs, and we also want to sustain ourselves for the future. So we need a gift that starts now and grows and scales up for the future, and most people in playing, giving our only focused on the future and most people in major and annual giving our only focus current president, right? So this grail of fund-raising is the gift that it really is the ultimate, the kind of gift that the organization needs the most, but doesn’t even know how to ask for ok and that’s the kind of gift that were talking alright, let’s define spend rate for people, and then we’ll get to your killer aps spend spend rate, please, in an endowment on down when it’s usually thought to be the most important type of gift because a person makes a gift, and instead of being expended immediately, it goes into a bank account, an investment program and each year a certain percentage of that fundez is spent on the the project or the program or the program whatever that might be and usually it’s like five percent. Yeah, i’ve seen between, like, three and a half and five. Yeah, okay, yeah used to used to be hyre when the with economy tanked a few years ago was spending rates began to drop right? Because this is the amount that you’re spending from your endowment and your endowment is supposed to be perpetual. So when investment returns or low spend rate spend rates come down, this is typically decided by the board or maybe a committee of the board each year, and sometimes they look at the role of the average of the past three years, returns and that’s all financial stuff like if you left the idea that yeah, i’m just one of just feeling a little background, so to spend a rate so the spend rate changes from year to year. That’s the point, and typically, you see, same like three and a half to five, usually it’s around around five percent and for the purpose of conversation it’s it’s pretty good. So that if someone makes one hundred thousand dollars gift for an endowed scholarship and the scholarship is a proxy for whatever is something that’s really important to the donor into the school or the organization meshing? Yes. Then that hundred thousand dollars is going to produce, like, five thousand dollars each year we spend each year five thousand five percent of the endowment. Okay, so that’s how that’s, how the spend rate works and the goal of every fundraiser is to go out and get that endowment gift. All right, now we got the basics. Your first killer app is the virtual endowment. What is that? Well, it sounds very jargon. E virtually way. Have george in jail on tony martignetti non-profit radio. Okay, but i know you’re going to get yourself out quickly. I’ll try. I’ll try. Well, you take that. And down with that, you just talked about the hundred thousand dollars that produces five thousand dollars a year. You turned it upside down. This sounds like the veg o matic doesn’t ok. He turned it upside down. It produces the donors is giving you the five thousand dollars a year every every year say for five years or ten years, and that is going to be treated as if it were the product of an endowment that is yet to be created. So this donor has you in their will already safe for one hundred thousand dollars, and they’re pretty comfortable giving you five thousand dollars a year, and they’ve been doing that without even being asked for it. And it was maybe for general purpose, but they’re not comfortable giving you the hundred thousand dollars that’s right during their life, or at least to this point in their life. But their pattern of giving is such that an annual give her already, and they care about the organization. So at the end of the rope to the end of the chain of their living and give it is that hundred thousand dollars? So why just come a bit closer to the mike? Okay, thank you. So who is to say that getting that five thousand dollars every year? No, and then getting one hundred thousand dollars later where the program becomes self sustaining? Who’s to say that that’s not just his valuable a cz getting one hundred thousand dollars up front, right. Ok. That’s a virtual endowment, and then with the donor passes away, the virtual endowment essentially becomes a true and down okay, or if they have a life event that changes their circumstances and they’re able to fund their endowment foully or maybe even half or some, you know, big, big bump while they’re living that’s great, but in the meantime, they’re they’re giving you what you would have spent from the endowment anyway. Brilliant it’s, very simple, not too many organizations do this, though i take it they don’t do that often because they’re focused on having a separate annual campaign, and they’re gonna maintain that base of annual donors and they have a whole maybe, either they have a whole separate division, a department and a department head who focuses on annual giving and a on another department that focuses on major e-giving in another one that focuses on plan giving, and they just they don’t connect up, and they have a lot of issues about who owns the donor and speak to the donor. So and what do you doing? Speaking to the donor there? Not a plan giving prospect, right thinking, right? So if this this donor that you’re describing doesn’t meet the major gift level because here she can’t afford one hundred thousand dollars outright, then they’ll go to the maybe they’ll drop to the or be shifted over to the annual e-giving team or something, but they won’t think of it as a virtual endowment. They’ll just think of it is we get five thousand dollars a year from this person, but they’re not thinking longer term and it’s usually not annual fund silo in the matrix that the preferred gift in the matrix in districts general unrestricted gifts because we know how to spend your money better than you do on. And we needed to keep our operations go. They’re not thinking about devoting it to a purpose that might later be endowed fully that’s, right later in the person’s life or at their death. And if the purpose is central to the organization, if they had that endowment and they could do anything they wanted with it, they would most likely be funding those kind of programmes anyway. Yeah. Okay. Okay. Killer aps o okay, before we get to the killer aps two and three. What? Just make clear why they’re called killer. Aps they’re called killer aps because, like with any kind of technology, when new technology comes on, it just sort of wipes out everything that’s come before it the’s when you employ these aps and you work with them with donors, they achieve gifts that are so much greater. The donor you were talking about, who was the five thousand dollars donor-centric thousand dollars on the books, so that could be, you know, a two hundred thousand dollars done, or even a much larger donor. It just changes the way you think about how you, how you work, you really don’t want to go back to living in that silo. Once you’ve been able to span plan major on annual giving through one of these per highly personalized gifts, they really work amazingly well. Excellent. Okay, we’re going take a little pause, much more. With steve myers coming up, we’re gonna talk about the philanthropic mortgage and step up gift on how your solicitations air going to change more with steve myers coming up first pursuant midyear fund-raising reports and benchmarks air out, you’ve you’ve seen them, you’re getting them in your inbox, but what’s most important to follow what? If you’re not hitting the benchmarks, what if you are? How do you keep it up? Check out the archive of the state of fund-raising midyear checkpoint webinar with ceo trent ryker and senior vice president jennifer bilich they will help you push through your third and fourth quarters those important six months by making sense of all the data they’re dated. Driven, of course, it’s at pursuing dot com you quick resource is then webinars. We’ll be spelling super cool spelling bee fundraisers. These things are ideal for a millennial night out. People have been talking to alex greer, the ceo, because he reports back to me so ah, i’m glad more people call. Check out the video it’s at we b e spelling dot com see what they’re about music, comedy, dancing, spelling, fund-raising and then talked to alex or you could just pick up the phone. You don’t have to if you don’t want to watch the video, just cut right to the chase. Nine to nine to two four bees. That was not my idea. Now time for tony’s. Take two solitude. Did you get yours this summer? If not, you still can if you did. I applaud you. I admire that. Please do if you haven’t of reprising my high production value video from last summer called solitude. I shot it on location in some location upstate new york, full cast and crew credits solitude, it’s at tony martignetti dot com. And that is tony’s. Take two. Here is steve myers continuing with personalized philanthropy. Steve myers never went anywhere. Took a couple sips of water. Thank you for your indulgence. Let’s. Talk about another killer app. The philanthropic mortgage. What you got going on there? Yeah, i did. The philanthropic mortgage seems so intuitive, but it’s something that we would never be able to think about in highly silent and channeled environment that they call the fund-raising matrix. Yeah, philanthropic mortgage. When you when you buy a house, you don’t have to pay for it in full before you move into it, you’re not. You create a mortgage. This mortgage you are paying, you’re making like one payment and the payment goes partly for interests. And the other part of it goes, who build equity in your in your home bill’s equity principle. Yeah, yeah. Building building princessa build equity, but basically the idea. Here is that your it’s? Just same ideas, thie the virtual endowment a person can make a gift of that spending rate for the for the scholarship that they’d like to have. And so the scholarship khun start up right away and then in the virtual endemic, they’re going to make slight, sort of like a balloon payment at the end of their life. They’re going to pay it off through there bequest. But in the idea of a philanthropic mortgage, you can pay more than just the quote unquote interest. You could also pay a little more than the spending write thie operating annual cost of that on that little bit extra goes to creating and building equity in your endowment fund beautiful so over years, over time, you could build the equity in your fund, and your program can begin right away. So if you’re talking about a scholarship or professorial chair, you get to meet that incumbent, you get to get the letters from them, you get to go and play an active part and have a relationship with the organization of the people that you’re supporting. So going back to our hypothetical before maybe that donor is giving ten thousand dollars a year or seventy, five hundred years, five thousand is the spend rate, and then the surplus goes to start building up that endowment, which will be fully funded at some balloon payment with some balloon payment in future. That’s exactly what all right, there’s a there’s an even more interesting example that relates us up to a donor who’s maybe a little bit older, and they’re going to have to and they have an ira ira now that that thie permanent charitable roll over is in effect, right? We know that it’s going to happen all the time. We want to wait to the end of the year, and guests wait to the last minute so we could make these gifts whenever we want to. So that means if you’re working with the donor who is going to be seventy and a half in the next couple of years, they’re going to start taking money out on a regular basis, right? That required minimum district required to do that and let’s say that they don’t need it toe live that could become part of the, you know, both part of the virtual endowment and it can also be part of the little extra that they might have. So working with a donor who for the first couple of years is just paying the spending right to create a post doctor old chair in computer science because he loves that. But towards the end of the schedule, he’s going to reach the age of seventy, the half he’s going to get a huge for him, at least required minimum distribution of that’s going to be his balloon payment. Right. So he’s going to pay the regular amount. And then the last year he’s going to receive a much larger amount from his ira and he’s going to add that complete his thie endowment that he writes for the post doctoral fellowship in his parent’s names. I’d like to think of the the ira now, especially because the rollover is, well, it’s, actually a qualified charitable distribution. But everybody knows there’s a rollover because that’s, now permanent, we might start to see, you know, ira’s sort of become i got many foundation. You can do your charitable giving through your i r a have a count toward this required minimum distribution, which for a lot of people is more than they want or need, and then you’re not, you know, text on it. You avoid the federal income tax on that, that distribution or that gift teo to the charity so not only doesn’t have a value as a transaction, because each time, as you pointed out, you don’t have to pay a tax on the money that you’re giving away, you’re never taxed on it. Essentially you can use it strategically to grow. You’re on pay, the spending rate and the operating costs for your program so you could begin right away transformational and transaction sorted. It’s okay, we agree, it’s, not a hostile environment didn’t think you’re walking into a house down farm. Okay, um, your your final killer app is a step up gifts, sort of a hybrid talk about talk about to step up and it’s a hybrid that person might be able tio this is one of those gifts that people wouldn’t think about because they would think that i could never have a professorial chair, at least not during my lifetime, because the professorial chair cost of million or two million dollars and that’s going to be more than likely. That i’ll be in my state, but i can’t really find a way to access that money. Now, however, i can i do have that five thousand dollars that i’ve been giving every year for general purposes on dh i could continue to do that for a number of years, so i could start off by funding that scholarship we talked about earlier that hundred thousand dollars scholarship that costs five thousand dollars a year, so during my lifetime with simon older donor, i could have that masters or other scholarship that could begin right now and then upon my death, the funds for my estate, a bequest for my estate could step up that endowment to the million or two million dollar level. So basically my gift would step up from a master scholarship or a doctoral scholarship or a postdoctoral scholarship all the way up to a professorial chair through my estate, okay? And my plan would be put together s so that the totality of my plane would be understood by both myself and by the charity that i’m working with from the very beginning, right? This is a comprehensive that truly is a transformation will get it transforms from an annual gift to a major scholarship gift than to really a very substantial st gift. And they’re all tied together around the same purpose, even though there are separate gifts that function for different purposes along the way. And then, ultimately, they all go for the same purpose. How do the killer aps and the smashing of the matrix and the creation of the personalized philanthropy? How do these all come together to change our solicitations? That’s really a good question. I think it changes the way. First of all, it it changes the way that you think if you go back to the back to the movie the matrix, when people see the matrix, they sort of acquire these magical powers that could kind of see around corners and they can fly, they can defy the laws of physics because they understand the world in a in a way that was different in the way they understood it before. So if you are, if your practice becomes one of personalized philanthropy, you’re kind of working as an enlightened generalised you have all the gifts, all the building blocks of philanthropy that you could bring to bear on each person, wherever they are and that’s going to change the nature of your work. You’re going to be basically sitting on the same side of the table as the donor, really an ally, a force to help them achieve what they want to and realize what’s what’s possible that they never would have thought was possible before by connecting all these small, modest gifts that they could make during their lifetime with larger gifts that they could. Make through their estate essentially changed the whole value change, so the value can come out when they want it to come out and achieve that impact on dh begin to change society now. So that means that instead of just kind of being a hit and run kind of fundraiser like the annual fundez people come in, i’d like to get the same thing i got last year, maybe a little bit more, you know, and then move on to something else. Instead, you’re connected with the stoner through time, you’re not just looking at them at a point on the donor pyramid, you’re looking at their whole lifetime value as a donor and that that changes everything, the changes, the process for developing a personalized gift is much different. I think the solicitation of a typical asking for a regular don’t write your soul stations is going to be more questioning and what’s important to you and what what brings you joy around the work that we do, and right and more of a process than a discreet sit down? And the loser is the one who talks first after the ask is made and then in four. Days there’s a follow up phone call. What are your thoughts about what we pitched, right? Very different. It’s it’s really completely utter lead. So what are some of the things that you ask about in your solicitation meetings? Well, it’s not that i ask any pursuit, different questions than other fundraisers would just when i when i huh we’re thinking is different, i’m listening, i’m listening in a different way. And so what are you doing? Let us into that neo brain. Okay, well, what are you doing? What i’m trying to do is some trying to discover what what matters to them and what i have that other fundraisers don’t have is that i have these killer aps that khun connect to where the donor is, so that if a donor has a habit of giving annually, i couldn’t begin to think about how i might they have a greater impact by connecting all those gifts that they’re doing if they gave for the last ten years, five thousand dollars a year, chances are pretty good that they won’t be offended if we talk about if you continue your pattern of giving, you could have a whole different kind of impact then you then you were having the fair. So it’s it’s a different different tools and technology that i can use. I don’t have to sell them the math building when they’re really more interested in the arts and music programs i can start with where with where they with where they’re at. Okay, so that that makes all the difference. All right, thanks for letting us into that head. We want when i want to be there explicitly, even though we’re there for the hour. But it’s a good head today because you, you know, you’re not just talking about donor-centric donor focused e-giving when you get this information, you can use it so that if a donor is if they may already have included you in their state plans princessa lot of donors they will they will do that without even being asked that’s that’s where they began. So you know that there’s going to be endowment, possible att tthe ENDOFDICTIONARYTRANSCRIBE so that the impact of that future gift can start now we have just about two minutes before break. And in those couple minutes, i want you to flesh out something you talk in. The book about the four children from the passover seder? Yeah, just a couple minutes. How do they figure into this? The four children? Who are they and what? Okay, in there in the passover, in the passover services, this is part of the service that gets recited every year, so people know these names might be familiar with him. So you could well, they think that we were going to passover seders. I’ve only been to one in my life and i don’t remember the four children. So the four children, the seder are the wise, the wicked, the simple and the one who doesn’t know how to ask. So just imagine that these people have grown up and become donors and each one of them in the past, over service. The idea is to try to reach each individual, each type of children of child where they are, and begin with what they are, who they are, and to relate to them as individuals on then you build out, you build out from that. So the four children who begin to think about them a stoner’s, you begin to focus on where they’re at. If they’re wise, they might give it they might be the kind of person who gives every year without being asked if they’re wicked, they might. Now wicket is not it’s, not a bad term in this case, it’s a kind of a positive thing because the person would be discerning very smart, they might have an interest in taking care of their loved ones as well. The donor, who is simple just might begin with a bequest because as the seeds were planted before them, they will continue to plant the seeds for the future. And the donor who doesn’t have know howto ask, is the one who has a charitable inclination but doesn’t know how to scratch that itch so that they’re the most fun to work with the ball. Beautiful that’s, great story. I kind of wish we’d ended with that, but we’re not ending, but we have. We’ll have a good ending anyway. Let’s go out for a break when we come back, stephen, i’m gonna keep talking, talking a little about counting all these new gifts that you’re gonna be getting stay with us. Like what you’re hearing a non-profit radio tony’s got more on youtube, you’ll find clips from stand up comedy tv spots and exclusive interviews catch guests like seth gordon, craig newmark, the founder of craigslist marquis of eco enterprises, charles best from donors choose dot org’s aria finger do something that worked and they are levine from new york universities heimans center on philanthropy tony tweets to he finds the best content from the most knowledgeable, interesting people in and around non-profits to share on his stream. If you have valuable info, he wants to re tweet you during the show. You can join the conversation on twitter using hashtag non-profit radio twitter is an easy way to reach tony he’s at tony martignetti narasimhan t i g e n e t t i remember there’s a g before the end he hosts a podcast for the chronicle of philanthropy fund-raising fundamentals is a short monthly show devoted to getting over your fund-raising hartals just like non-profit radio, toni talks to leading thinkers, experts and cool people with great ideas. As one fan said, tony picks their brains and i don’t have to leave my office fund-raising fundamentals was recently dubbed the most helpful non-profit podcast you have ever heard, you can also join the conversation on facebook, where you can ask questions before or after the show. The guests were there, too. Get insider show alerts by email, tony tells you who’s on each week and always includes link so that you can contact guess directly. To sign up, visit the facebook page for tony martignetti dot com. If you have big ideas but an average budget, tune into tony martignetti non-profit radio for ideas you can use. I do. I’m dr. Robert penna, author of the non-profit outcomes toolbox. I was just talking to robert planet this morning, as i was saying that’s, a pure coincidence. I did not choose that drop, teo, be put in he’s going to be guest next week. Got more live listen, love rego park, new york. Welcome that’s queens, of course, and augusta, georgia, thea, was that the masters that always in the u s open no usopen rotates the masters in augusta, isn’t it? Live listener love to rego park in augusta, we also give ah, sweden and kazakhstan with us live. Listen, love to you wonderful, thank you for being with us now, affiliate affections. Did you think i forgot the affiliate affections? How could you think that i forgot affiliate affections and podcast pleasantries? Our many affiliate stations am and fm stations throughout the country, wherever we fit into your time block throughout the week, whether it’s a sunday or a tuesday very grateful that you are with us affiliate stations throughout the country, affiliate listeners on those am and fm stations and the podcast pleasantries have to go out to our over ten thousand listeners. Podcast wise, so glad that you were with us. Most ofyou come through itunes, although there’s, others a stitcher and there’s ah podcast site in delaware, delaware it’s d d, which is germany in germany, that we get a lot of listeners from whatever site you’re catching us from. Thank you pleasantries to the over ten thousand podcast listeners. Okay, steve myers, we’re going to have lots of new gifts coming in, and you’re pretty. You’re pretty generous about counting you don’t say very generous don’t say that in the book, but it’s between between the lines you want, you want to give as much credit as possible. Not not surprising. Really. Yes, yes, you do let’s talk about, say, i’m non-cash we break this down, we look at the killer aps and how they would be counted. Or what’s your what’s your counting philosophy generally let’s start there. Okay, the prime directive for me and counting is don’t just count one number. Yes, you said that explicitly. The book? Yeah. Playing everything in our lives. It’s the sort of damage cleese hanging over the head of every fundez razor, its financial resource development. And how much did you raise? You have to? How much did you raise? What did raise? And if you don’t have an answer for that, someone else will. It’ll be on accounting formula financial formula that tells what the present value is of all the gifts that came in. And of course, the president value doesn’t include bequests or request expect expectancies. It doesn’t include dahna the kind of cultivation in the activities that you dio, it reduces everything that comes out of the system that doesn’t not have a present value. Yeah, and as fundraisers know thiss a lot of things that we do that that would be considered us fund-raising achievements that normally don’t count. So we wanna have a way of describing what it is that we do that goes along with how we feel about what fund-raising achievement actually. Is so when i say, don’t count just one number, what we’re really saying is there is one number that you have to be aware of it everybody has to know that, but there’s a complement of that one number and it’s a multi dimensional set of numbers that can help us to measure our own effectiveness and convey to the people that we are working with and for what all this fund-raising has been about and really there are three kinds of gifts that we we like to count outright gifts that count one hundred percent gifts, that there would be like category one gifts like cash and cash equivalents call those the category one cash cash equivalents that would include pledges that are like payable over a couple of years. Legally binding, i get legally binding place it’s legally binding pledges ok and legally binding pledges couldn’t include pledges that air payable over one, two or three years, but also pledges for older donors that are going to be they’re considered is bookable or irrevocable from their estates. That’s another type of ah gift that would count in this cash or cash equivalents. The second category is thie irrevocable gifts that we we raised a charitable remainder trust and gift annuities, and part of the value of them would count in that one number, and the rest of the wood would not count until they were later received. And the third category is revocable gifts or or bequests that are expected, but that have not yet been received and they’re not legally binding and they’re not, and they’re not legally because there are ways of making a bequest legally binding if the person signed a contract to bind their state testamentary contract. Okay, so this, uh, this journey towards personalized philanthropy really began for me with this question of what am i doing here? What? I just asked that question about a half an hour, you’re just asking that’s a really good question that you should always be asking, what am i doing here? And if you’re on task, you’re doing something that relates to one of those kinds of gifts you’re cultivating a donor for a future gift your culture, get cultivating them for a gift that can provide income to them now in a gift to you later, and you’re also cultivating a formal gift that they could make now and that you can have now that could be both cash or khun b assets other other than cash and that’s. How you would evaluate what you’re doing in kind of a multi disciplinary way. How do you like toe, give credit to fundraisers for activities that aren’t quantifiable, you know, advancements in a relationship, but the person didn’t increase. They’re giving this year or pledged to in the future, you know, all those activities that meaningful but non quantifiable, right? You want to. How do we help fundraisers be recognised? Well, you know, we develop metrics out of these out of these out of activities, and you try to figure out the ones that are going to be important for you, and you embrace the ones that are important for you. Now, sometimes, um, people go way overboard on this. There was one fundraiser that i know who travels around a lot to meet with donors, and his super bowl advisor wanted to him to quantify how much. Money per per mile. He was raising. He said, oh, no, no, i won’t do that on. He was senior enough that he was able to avoid that in another system they want to know. What is this fundraiser doing every fifteen minutes? It’s? Almost like a that’s like law firms like a lot of booking for way. I used to book six minute increments. All right, we just have about a minute left. We don’t want to do right. We do it right, that’s what not to do. We have about a minute left. Leave us with some things that we should be measuring to give credit to fundraisers sametz samples of what you measure you like to measure well, when you when you do these blended gifts with blended gifts come from a combination of current and future gifts. So you want to measure the gifts all of their dimensionality so that you could compare them to the single present value along with all the value that they’re going to bring to the organization beginning right now. So if you’re going back to the person that we’re speaking of before, go ahead, you have to wrap it up. Okay, well, their gift just going to have an immediate impact and it’s going to grow and scale up over time and that’s. What you want to try to achieve that’s, the grail of fund-raising and that’s. Why you want to track? Okay, we have to leave it there. Steve myers, vice president at the center for personalized philanthropy at the american committee for the weizmann institute of science. You’ll find him on twitter at stephen meyers eight six three the book get the book it’s personalized philanthropy crashed the fund-raising metrics it’s at amazon and it’s also a charity channel which is the publisher next week master google adwords and master your decision making. If you missed any part of today’s show, i beseech you, find it on tony martignetti dot com responsive by pursuant online tools for small and midsize non-profits data driven and technology enabled, and by we be spelling super cool spelling bee fundraisers we b e spelling dot com creative producer is claire meyerhoff. Sam lee boots is the line producer shows social media is by susan chavez and this cool music is by scott stein be with me next week for non-profit radio big non-profit ideas for the odd, learned ninety five percent. Go out and be great. What’s not to love about non-profit radio tony gets the best guests check this out from seth godin this’s the first revolution since tv nineteen fifty and henry ford nineteen twenty it’s the revolution of our lifetime here’s a smart, simple idea from craigslist founder craig newmark insights orn presentation or anything? People don’t really need the fancy stuff they need something which is simple and fast. When’s the best time to post on facebook facebook’s andrew noise nose at traffic is at an all time hyre on nine a m or eight pm so that’s when you should be posting your most meaningful posts here’s aria finger, ceo of do something dot or ge young people are not going to be involved in social change if it’s boring and they don’t see the impact of what they’re doing. So you got to make it fun and applicable to these young people look so otherwise a fifteen and sixteen year old they have better things to dio they have xbox, they have tv, they have their cell phone. Amador is the founder of idealised took two or three years for foundation staff to sort of dane toe, add an email. Address their card. It was like it was phone. This email thing is fired-up that’s, why should i give it away? Charles best founded donors choose dot or ge somehow they’ve gotten in touch kind of off line as it were and and no two exchanges of brownies and visits and physical gift mark echo is the founder and ceo of eco enterprises. You may be wearing his hoodies and shirts. Tony talked to him. Yeah, you know, i just i i’m a big believer that’s not what you make in life. It zoho, you know, tell you make people feel this is public radio host majora carter. Innovation is in the power of understanding that you don’t just put money on a situation expected to hell. You put money in a situation and invested and expect it to grow and savvy advice for success from eric sabiston. What separates those who achieve from those who do not is in direct proportion to one’s ability to ask others for help. The smartest experts and leading thinkers air on tony martignetti non-profit radio big non-profit ideas for the other ninety five percent.

Nonprofit Radio for November 11, 2016: How To Appeal To High Net Worth

Big Nonprofit Ideas for the Other 95%

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Melanie Schnoll Begun: How To Appeal To High Net Worth

What are the wealthy looking for as they check you out on their way to becoming a connector, board member, investor, donor or other supporter of your organization? Melanie Schnoll Begun leads Morgan Stanley’s philanthropy management.

 

 


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Hello and welcome to tony martignetti non-profit radio. Big non-profit ideas for the other ninety five percent on your aptly named host. Oh, i’m glad you’re with me. I’d bear the pain of pyla, rale, gia, if i had the stomach, the idea that you missed today’s show how to appeal to high net worth. What are the wealthy looking for as they check you out on their way to becoming a connector boardmember investor? Melanie schnoll begun leads morgan stanley’s, philanthropy management tony’s take two mohr ntc video interviews responsive by pursuant full service fund-raising data driven and technology enabled, you’ll raise more money pursuant dot com and by we be spelling supercool spelling bee fundraisers we b e spelling dot com no additional begun she’s here in the studio she’s, the managing director of philanthropy management at morgan stanley. She works with the firm’s, wealthiest and most influential clients, including prominent business owners, venture capitalists, social entrepreneurs, professional athletes and entertainers, as well as foundations and non-profits she is the nominating chair and former board president of the juvenile diabetes research foundation, new york city chapter and vice president of the board of metropolitan college of new york. Melanie is also on advisory boards for the naomi berrie diabetes center and quinnipiac university law school. Welcome back, melanie metoo pleasure. It was it was april two thousand twelve. You were here a long time to for, like, for four and a half years ago or so you’re looking great. Good to have you. Well, i like that. Thank you. Absolutely need that every morning for now. You impressive bio. No book. I thought. In these four and a half years, you would have written a book by now. Well, you know what? What i’ve done in four and a half years, i’ve i’ve run eight more marathons. Is that impressive? Okay, that that’s ah, yeah that’s that’s a a run up to that, but i like to see a book that you like to see it, but now you’re doing the marathon this year, right? And getting the marrow, which means yes, we’re a little pre recorded about ten days or so, which means this sunday you’ll be running this sunday on behalf of a cause. So of course, i’d never just run twenty six point two miles for myself. I’m raising money and awareness for juvenile diabetes for jr of europe. Okay, you’re on the advisory board, right? New york city chuck’s correct. I was ah, president, but more important than that, i’m an owner and owner of the disease, so you’ve got to take a stand, right? You can’t just own a disease and allow other people to raise the money or awareness. You have toe roll up your sleeves like i do. Tow. Take insulin. Okay, you gotta go out. There and run and raise awareness and money. Was there a juvenile diabetes research foundation? When you first found out that you had diabetes, there was the organization’s been around for over forty two years, and i’d say that we’ve had our greatest success this year. So far, we have received fda approval for the artificial pancreas, which could be my life cloaking technology outstanding, right? An owner of the organization that feels magnificent feels magnificent, but it’s not a cure, right at the end of the lot of us owe our promise has always been better treatment, prevention and a cure. So you know another device to wear in your bodies, you know, another device to wear in your body. There was just something in the times i think is today that so many of the the health that cause related non-profits are now seeking cures rather than just counseling and support on howto live with the disease. Yeah, i think that was just in today’s times. Yeah, yeah, it was it was the right article. Greater. Alright, so that’s what? Basically we’re here to talk about what a non-profit khun do should be doing to get the types. Of people who are your clients? High net worth ultra high net worth individuals interested in the cause as as interested as you are in jd are okay and that that’s on all different levels that might be a boardmember donor-centric ter, maybe just like introduction, supporter and some other methods, you know, maybe a volunteer, but not a boardmember so we’re going to talk a fair amount about you’re bored, you know, sort of fine tuning your board and making that look appealing, but the conversation’s not limited there, and we may just be talking about very well. Azad said non dahna relationship all right, so you’ve got you got a bunch of tips. Um, let’s, let’s, get into the heads of these men. He says this is an elusive group for a lot of people. They read about them. It’s always arms length. You know, ninety nine percent of us don’t know these people personally, they never will never meet them. But i got to believe that in the end, they really just i want to be connected to a cause no different than the rest of us. Just people just with norvig gets more money, there are people okay. Okay. Let’s. Gratifying, right? Right. So they just want, you know, they want some connection, the personal relationships. All right? No, i fear that in this presidential cycle, people could come away with a negative opinion of the very wealthy, but i hope that most are not like that. I presume they’re not. I’d like to see the good in you. I think i think we have to think that money and ego could be separate, right would be separate, of course, andi, ultimately, the people that we’re talking about today, which i think i think we’re looking at, many, many, many, many, many people, right? Ultimately you don’t see someone who is ultra high net worth right? It’s not, they’re not wearing it on their face. There’s no color. There is no religion, right it’s associated with with the kind of hair that you have. So it’s a it’s a matter of being right, it’s it’s something that you become either because you inherit the wealth, you create the wealth. There might have been a situation which brought wealth to you and the majority of the clients that we work with. Many of them don’t want to be associated with money. They want to be associated with purpose. So when we think about what creates purpose inside of someone versus a person being a wealthy individual and therefore they have purpose, but what creates wealth in itself, i hope it’s not a purpose as not it i’ve heard lots of stories about very wealthy people who are quite unhappy and quite modest people who are quite a brilliant in their lives, exactly, exactly, definitely independent and independent of you go to now let’s reassure people that there could be a place for these, these these people, these folks in small and midsize non-profits and they don’t all necessarily want to be on the metropolitan opera board, stanford university, right? And not necessarily, i think i think it’s a fallacy to think that wealth associates itself with just large, robust organizations. There is an opportunity if you’re a significant wealth holder to be not just a difference in a small organization, but perhaps to be the difference in a small nonprofit organization. But again, it’s really related to what the organization is doing. There are small, independent colleges that do not have wealthy donors that don’t have wealthy. Alum and are seeking amazing volunteers support leadership. There are arts organizations that are not like the amazing one sitting here in new york city for small museums that are small art collections all over the country that require and need attention. So again, it goes back to you know, where does the person feel that incredible connected with the organization you’ve helped some of your clients start? Teo get engaged with small and midsize non-profits i think the best part about our work is that the best part about our work is helping them distinguish between an organization where they could have a long, amazing history with versus one which is, you know, nice to be on procedures, prestigious. They got great people sitting around the table, they all looked look like them. They all have bank accounts that are like theirs, but most of our clients like a balance, right, and that’s what’s also so interesting about the majority of the boards that i work with. There are a few wealthy people sitting among the board members. There are some who are just industry experts who associate with the organization. There are some who just have some incredible skills or time on dh? All of that is what makes the composition of aboard great so wealth is not wealth doesn’t necessarily mean that i’ll be a great boardmember a great volunteers, you’re right. In fact, it could be the other way around. It could be difficult for the organization. That’s okay, we take our first break um, you know, what can i say? This is going to be exciting, we’re going to talk about it is exciting, we’re going to talk about getting your organization in tune for for making these approaches and then also even these are just very good advice, even if you’re not approaching high net worth individuals, just this is good stuff for your board and for your organization generally, so stay with us. You’re tuned to non-profit radio tony martignetti also hosts a podcast for the chronicle of philanthropy fund-raising fundamentals is a quick ten minute burst of fund-raising insights published once a month. Tony’s guests are expert in crowdfunding, mobile giving event fund-raising direct mail and donor cultivation. Really all the fund-raising issues that make you wonder am i doing this right? Is there a better way there is? Find the fund-raising fundamentals archive it. Tony martignetti dot com that’s marketmesuite n e t t i remember there’s, a g before the end, thousands of listeners have subscribed on itunes. You can also learn maura, the chronicle website, philanthropy dot com fund-raising fundamentals the better way. Welcome back to big non-profit ideas for the other ninety five percent. Okay, melanie schnoll begun. Let’s get into ah, some strategies that we got for for looking good and just being solid. And, um, what is the word that we always use? Sustainable? Of course. Ok, so we, uh, we’d be well advised to show that we can help someone we might be trying to appeal to as a volunteer that will be willing to help them raise money. What kinds of help should we be offering to our volunteers? Right? So many ultra high net worth individuals created their own businesses, right? You would think that they know how to raise money and it’s incredible the difference between yeah, that’s different kind of raising it’s a different fund-raising right, a capital raise for business versus raising money for non-profit that you might be so passionate about. For some reason, the psychological obstacles that happen in someone’s head are incredible. And i’m a professional fundraiser, so to me, i can’t understand it. But you have to appreciate that people get really scared about asking friends, colleagues, business associates for money so non-cash profits staff really needs to feel comfortable. In health, being potential board members were volunteers overcome these obstacles, and there were definitely techniques to do it. I’m getting them into a mindset to realize that this is not asking money for themselves. Most people think when they go out, even though they know they’re raising money for an organization, a small organization, they care about the desperately needs the money, they feel that making that ask appears to be making and asked for them personally. It’s personal way we got to get rid of that, right? Like you got to take that idea. You gotta put it on a shelf way, way up on the top of your ceiling and decide you know what? I’m not going into that box because this isn’t about me. This is selfless. I’m spending my time, my energy might interest to create awareness and raise funding that’s either desperately needed or trust is needed to improve the work of the organization, so taking yourself out of that formula is really important. One of the ways that we do it is helping organisations help, they’re bored or volunteers were raising money, helping them create personal and public narratives, and a narrative is a story, right? We all have our own stories. I have a story about who i am now j r and your relationship with jamie our f etcetera, metropolitan college, all these organizations, all of these organizations, are all of those organisations, so finding that story inside of you that you’re really incredibly comfortable with this isn’t an elevator speech, this isn’t, you know, standing in the middle of, you know, a tight little elevator where the door is closed and the person can’t get out of the way. This is something where it’s so authentic genuine, but this is but this is making it sounds like magnum or personal. We’re trying to put personal up on the shelf now, but but personal because you’re comfortable telling the story about your association with the organization that this is not money for. So i don’t want anyone to think that when i’m raising money for tv, raph, i’m raising it so that melanie doesn’t have type one diabetes. I’d love to not have type one diabetes it’s a disgusting auto immune disease, but i’m not raising money for me, and there may never be a cure for type one diabetes in my lifetime, i’m raising money because i don’t want any other little girl to have type one diabetes because i don’t want another woman tohave to wear all of these devices underneath her dress, trying to figure out you know where i hook it on. Can i wear this tight, beautiful blouse? You know, i just i want people to feel comfortable recognizing that they can keep it. Anything is a type one diabetic. They could be a competitive athlete running the new york city marathon. They could run a big business, right? They could have babies. They would have to worry about living with complications that type one diabetes could bring on. So i take myself out of the formula. You’re not giving me the money you’re giving in an organization that’s working in excellence to do the research to find better treatments and cure. But i tell a story about myself, because, tony, i want you to see me in the center of the story, and then i want to drag you into that conversation because i want tony to see that my story about type one diabetes is your story also it’s your story. I help you. See the connection between me and you give you a quick example whenever i’m raising money for type one diabetes and i talk about me being in a car, my blood sugar being low first talk about the possibility of what could happen to me or my kids if they’re in the car with me. I then relate the story to a donor that that that i’m trying to raise money with from and i say to them, you know what? If you were in your car on the road when i was a possibility of negan into an accident, hurry myself is possible, the possibility of me being low and getting into an accident and hitting your car is also likely. Now i’m not saying that type one diabetics get into more accents anyone else? Probably less because we’re so much more aware of our health and our well, is that anybody else? I’m always checking before i get into a car, but that’s how i help other people who are raising money for diabetes make a story that’s personal, but connect themselves to somebody else and it’s, not about statistics. People are nervous about talking about, you know. The efficiencies of the nonprofit organization they’re nervous about talking about the impact of the organization. I could relate it to just a little story about me being in a car and talk about how j d ref is doing such amazing work on better technologies and how that’s helping me live a better life and helping you because i won’t be in a car on the road level. Yeah, outstanding, milly know very i feel it because i’m planning on soliciting cubine shaking you down for a couple of bucks for my city marathon on sunday, we’re already doing a service for j d r f there were going to take them on the promotions for the show, they’re goingto they’re getting there getting an hour of promotion. Okay, one one more idea of a simple way, tio help someone who’s who feels like they’re they’re not a comfortable, they don’t feel comfortable soliciting one more. One more thing, one more thing you’re gonna have three ideas in your head, like just three don’t noel the facts about the organization we get lost, we get lost. In fact, people get lost in numbers when you make a mistake about a number so you’re you’re making a claim that this little school is serving twenty five children living with autism and the results are fifty percent better lives, whatever it might be, we get lost in statistics, and the issue with numbers sometimes is people can prove us wrong with a number it’s harder to prove us wrong with just a story. So i suggest to all of three organizations i work with who are helping their volunteers, their donors raise money, give them three easy facts that we no can’t be disputed right can’t be disputed and that you could really understand again that you could create a story around one of the facts if if we’re talking about autism and let’s assume that we have a play centre for children xero through the age of five rights in a community important to that community, we know that that autism eyes is increasingly on the rise. We still don’t even know why this is happening to our young children, but this center is so important to this community. So three particular stories, right? So i would i would give them one story about one young girl, right? And how? It changed her life by being in a community where she began. Tto be able to associate, have friends right where he began toe learn skills, teo cope with some of her emotions. We’re too began to make eye contact, right? And then i give them another statistic and it’s a step about the way it changed the life of the parent. That the mother now feels confidence and leaving her daughter in this beautiful little community centre, that the mother now can have a part time job. Right? There’s so many ways to give statistics, they’re not versus forty eight percent of our families feel more confident. Yeah, with the with having a two family income just, you know, okay, exactly. Exactly. So those are the three fax are are incredibly important to fund raisers. And one of them should be a fact that that you can that the fundraiser, right? So as a non-profit is working with someone on the board that the fund raiser can associate with themselves, perhaps they have a child who’s living with autism so they could tell a story about, you know, my daughter, uh, when he was four years old was in this school, you know, and what it did for her and just giving specifics about actually how it can capture how it came to that family’s life, what it did for the siblings in that family, so three strong fax can never go wrong and lose the numbers if they if they don’t serve you, you just raise something that there has to be an affinity before we approach any individual way don’t want to go after high net worth people just because they are because they are wealthy, that there’s no, if there isn’t some genuine affinity for the work that you’re doing. There’s no point, right? May i mean, unless you’re a robber, right? Unless you’re looking to, you know, going to someone’s home and you don’t care now, why would you even think of that? I don’t know, i mean, i wouldn’t even think about it, you know what? I don’t know why? Because i think in fund-raising sometimes wait do feel like we’re robbing the person we do if we don’t if we don’t believe in the story of, you know, i’ve heard actually i’ve heard that from grant writers we were asked by sometimes its board members or their ceo go after this hit this foundation and there’s no connection, but they have to try to find one and they know it’s tenuous as their writing the words of their typing. They know it’s disingenuous, and they know it’s going to fail, but they’re executing something that they were asked to do by somebody who presumes themselves to know more about grantwriting than the professional. So and i’ve heard in that in that realm, it’s, that it feels very feel smart. Well, it feels empty, it feels empty and the results are horse, so you have to know that there’s some connection now you know, you’ve you maybe have seen another similar organization that the person supports you mentioned some of your clients are entertainers and are athletes, so maybe they tweet about a cause and they don’t know about your organization. See, according paper, you know, if it’s not somebody with seventeen million twitter followers but you see them quoted relating to a cause, something you’ve got to know that there’s a connection before you tryto given introduction, we call it a common denominator common denominator so my my son is in the sixth. Grade. We deal with all these fractions percentage of fractions, and every time i’m sitting down looking at his mathos work i’m thinking about fund-raising because i’m thinking, what is that common denominator and a common denominator means we have to have some tenuous connection, something that where there’s there’s a correlation between me and the person that i’m raising money from? So we do a lot of work, we help our non-profit clients to a lot of work on the person, the organization, the foundation before they go and make the ass. Okay, maybe we should touch on something. What do you do for your non-profit clients cause i mentioned it in your intro and that you mentioned well, let’s, acquaint people with that side of your practice. Great. Happy tio r work starts with advisory services, so we work with non-profit organizations, small and large helping them in three particular areas. The first is bored development in governance and going into a nonprofit organization looking at their board, seeing where there are strengths, weaknesses, opportunities and threats. The typical swat analysis, right? And during a swat analysis with a board is amazing. We do it on the way. We do it backwards. I think most people start with their strength, like who doesn’t want to talk about how strong i am? We start with their threats. You call it a tuesday, we calling wools elearning you’re inter combining okay, that’s right metoo we turn it on its head so threats and weaknesses have to be first. You could always go to the opportunities and the strengths of a nonprofit organization. S o going in really analyzing the organization, there will be some tremendous talents thing on the board. Sometimes the board is tired. I mean, we have to realize that some boards where they don’t have bored tenure and this happens a lot, tony and small non-profits like the leadership on the boy that’s been around too long over and it’s because the bylaws say it’s two three year consecutive terms is the max and you look on the board in there, people have been there twelve, fifteen, seven, twenty years, nobody has the the courage or the energy to enforce what’s in writing at night, so you know, you don’t get fresh perspective. I mean it’s terrible it’s terrible, and part of the reason is because they live in a feat they live in fear, you know, starting fresh perspective, people come on the board and they see what is supposed to be six year max, maybe a possibility of a second of a third three year term, and their board members have been here for seventeen years, and i don’t even follow their own by-laws what kind of an organization? By joining that’s, right? So so not only does it have poor governance, right? Not only does have poor governance, but ultimately it’s a new fresh member of the board. When you look at someone who’s been on a board for so many years, you know it, they’re they’re they’re exhausted from raising money for the same organization that’s, that’s one it’s not that they’ve lost the passion for the work they care about the work they want to see the results, but ultimately every three to campaign cycles, a delete four five year campaigns at least, and everything in between those and the preparation of planning and that’s a couple strategic planning cycles with that if you was done right, takes at least a year or so and that, and that means that they’ve even seen strategic plans that have sat on shelves that haven’t even been on there embarrassed the board members embarrassed to leave don’t want to leave the organization flat, but the organization is embarrassed to get the person off he’s another by-laws say they should that’s right, it’s a bad situation. Let me tell you how we help. Let me tell you how we help. Let me tell you how we help, we go into that board and we sit down with, you know, the current officers and really talk about you, let’s, analyze your you’re bored policy, right? This is what your terms are if they’re right. If it was right when we wrote this this language, if we were right about this, then we have to govern this way. Onboarding exactly so we need to make decisions now, how do we get rid of a boardmember who cares about this organization, who we care about, um, letting them resign in honor, right, letting them resigning? I think a lot of times it just takes a face to face conversation at seoul. It takes some degree of courage. Just ask the person to come in and sit with the ceo. And se look, oh, it sit with the board chair, hopefully is not the board chair, but that could be the person, but whoever it is, you know, you gotta go. You gotta grow a pair and and start enforcing the governance that you’ve you’ve put in writing. That’s exactly right that’s exactly what it is that simple and the person is a very good chance that personal thank you. In fact, not only thank you, they want to go, they want they’re embarrassed to leave. They’re embarrassed to tell you that they don’t want to go and you’re embarrassed to ask them to leave. But but i’d never let but it’s an opportunity, right? We never let ah threat or weakness like having someone who’s tired, who’s been on a board too long not turn into an opportunity and into a strength we go back to our twos, and so what’s the opportunity as you are a cz ur graciously in honor it’s celebrating the service of a boardmember who’s. Now retiring, you ask for a gift, we ask for a gift and we do it upon exit. And we allow that retiring boardmember and honor we celebrate that. Boardmember allow his or horse story about leaving this organization all the work that he’s done and in celebration upon departure, leaving a major gift. And by the way, major, at their level right now, talking about small organizations, this person might not have a fourteen to give, given their capacity at their capacity. I never heard that one outstanding, and i’ve heard the transition respectfully, to an advisory board nice, but ask for a gift as forget. I mean, of course we’re going to do all of those other things. But why lose our opportune eddie? Allow someone to retire and give at their highest and best potential and celebrate and celebrate their service and their their their gift? Okay, would you hang out, take it, take sip waters, complicity from aroma while i do a little business, you just keep that. I give a lot to remember. It’s not it’s, not a paid, so we don’t have to disclose it. Um, so much more with melanie coming up first. Pursuant, they’ve got another free webinar. If this one is upgrade your best donors today with pursuant consultants chris taft and christian priest they’re gonna help you identify your donors who have the capacity and interest to do more for you maximize your resources as you engage the right prospects and fine tuning your prospect visits. This webinar is on tuesday, november fifteenth, at twelve central time. If you want to register, go to pursuing dot com and under resource is click webinars yet another free webinar from pursuing we’ll be spelling spelling bees for non-profit fund-raising these air, not your seventh grade spelling bee there’s live music, dancing, standup comedy fund-raising and of course, there is spelling woven in there as well. The’s air ideal for millennial outreach night you’ll love these things because you do them in bars restaurants, not your seventh grade spelling bee. Check out the video at we b e spelling dot com now tony steak, too. I’ve got more video interviews from the non-profit technology conference he’s a rond fund-raising i picked the brains of smart technology guests to help you raise more money. This is what we’ve got in this batch donorsearch vase to boost your revenue growing your sustainers revenue, smart email marketing and increasing donorsearch retention all for those group together my video with the links to each of these four video interviews is that tony martin durney dot com, and that is tony’s take two. Melanie, thank you for hanging in there. I love i just love that gift idea. I know i said it three times already, but i love that gift idea of the departure of a boardmember but, yeah, we can’t have the seventeen years service service members it’s it’s just it’s not right. It’s bad business. Well, you just mentioned millennials and as i think about boards again, some of the work that we do it, morgan stanley is developing these boards. There is not a board around today that’s not looking to bring young leadership onto the board, and some have young monisha advisory boards, even they have if they don’t, they should, and they don’t, they should, and millennials are feeling the pressure. Tony. They’re really feeling the pressure because they realize that these organizations are all looking at them right now, right? Like there is an eye on them to be safe metoo saviors i i go to conferences and there’s a panel of three millennials, and there has to speak for the whole thirty million court record three people supposed to represent the entire group, they’re representing their representing all of us both leadership from the past, and they’re going to be our future. So, you know, we need to be mindful of the pressure that we’re placing on them, but also but again, we need to recognize the opportunity. So as i think about boards and for, you know, the other nonprofit organizations, the organizations that that listened to your show that you serve bringing on young talent is incredibly important. But that common denominator right, you doesn’t necessarily mean that. Wow, that’s a person i want sitting on my board. So as i think about the colleagues on my team, even even craig was on my team was here in the studio with us today, when i think about, you know, how do we bring young talent onto non-profit boards? He gotta do the same personal assessment of them and that’s what i helped non-profits tio, we help them analyze the potential of a young boardmember so e-giving really almost like like a questionnaire and analysis. Who am i? What kind of boardmember could i be? What kind of time could i give? What kind of thoughts can i? Offer would i be intimidated? Sitting among ah board of people so much senior to me coming in and they’ve been there for sixteen years? Am i going to have a permanent gag order? Will i ever feel comfortable offering my opinion, having a voice at that table? So you need to really look at millennials who come on to your board if they’re going to join your big board and make sure that they have the potential to be an equal participating boardmember support the reassurance? Yeah, the coaching one of your ideas is that there be a board buddy system? I love talking about that. I love it! I love it it’s like anything else. When you learned how to swim, no one went into a pool on their own little diesel sensitive hands under me as i was kicking and flailing. I’m still i still i still need that i’m actually not very good even i live on the ocean i flail that the hands have grown but they’re a little different now of it’s the same i do love it well, maybe that’s because you should be using your feet more than your hands that’s a swimmer it’s really? The power comes from the feed from the from the from the legs, but you’re right, it’s that support underneath you until until you’re ready to swim on your own till you’re ready is from on the road. So it’s the same exact like to see a mentor assigned a banner different dahna mentor has a met buddy somebody now i heard friends or friends buddies wait friends of friends, pals, pals, buddies sleep together. Okay? That’s not that’s, not the kind of body. You know what? We’re going to keep this show really clean. Okay, so, so what’s going on? We’re not. We’re not talking about the word sleep that’s killing you, right? So blue. So it was the together part. It was together part, but in the bud washing room she’s really norvig it is mormon studio, but you’re blushing more now than you were ever best falik so the idea of a buddy system it’s not a mentor in it’s, not a sponsor. It’s it’s, not someone who’s going be there give you no guiding you your half and it’s not someone there who’s gonna sponsor you to take on a bigger role in the organization it’s someone who’s going to share with you what they went through when they were joining the board. So would he to know that? Like, when you walk, i’ll give you something. This amazing issue that people have when they first joining aboard, where do i sit? Oh, my god. I’m walking into this boardroom there’s ten board members to someone which we have assigned seats on by sitting in someone’s chair and that’s that’s their there right? How do i prepare for a board meeting? Should i come into notes all over the board book? They’ve dog tag in my book be all highlighted. Do i ask questions? Should i answer questions? I mean, all of these things that go on in someone’s head when they’re first joining aboard because remember, you’re joining a family aboard is a family. These are people who work together, live together, pray together, cry together, sometimes over the issues that they’re working on, and you’re the newcomer and your brand new and your brand new. So a body is someone who gives that kind of support. The first thing a buddy does is they find a seat for their buddy might. They walk in and they go, you know what? You’re going to sit right next to me, you’re going to sit right next to me that reassurance when you just walking for that first meeting, knowing that you got someone right next to you and who like whispers something in your ear, like, you know, by the way, don’t listen to that woman, you know, she doesn’t have a clue what the hell she’s talking about or oh, that guy talks about fund-raising but he hasn’t raised a dollar for this organisation in ten years, you know, that kind of insight on that thing kibitzing really help someone get comfortable and ease into their fiduciary responsibilities, sitting on the board outstanding because i wanted to talk about making explicit the responsibilities of the boardmember clearly the organization has responsibilities to the to the board with the boardmember has responsibilities to the organization, and they go way beyond fund-raising and we need to make these explicit on, i think, going back again to governance many organizations, even small organizations, right, even start up organizations recognized the need tohave policy, and they’ll perhaps even write policy they’ll feel, perhaps copy some other organizations policy and make it their own not knowing what to be in their policy, but at the end of the day, whatever their policy suggests that are the board members responsibilities should be in writing, why’s that so critically important because new board members, especially for small organizations, they need to understand. What am i supposed to be doing here? Like what is my role? The first critical role is to talk about raising money for some reason, we leave it for last we we nominate people to the board, we cultivate them. We’re so excited to bring them on. Sometimes we’re bringing them on because they actually gave a gift to the organization in the past, right? They were a donor to the organization, and then when we bring them onto the board all of a sudden, you know, we don’t talk about fund-raising i start, i lied with with fund-raising in fact, we have not policy usually usually there’s this give and get expectation on the board. I hate that word. I hate that word. Why what they mean by expectation? The reality is, if there is a need, then we should say there is board fund-raising policy and some boards will explicitly say how much the number is that they have to raise. They don’t necessarily have to say how they get the money. But, you know, every board needs to realize if there are ten, people sitting around this table and if there’s an expectation for us to each raise ten thousand dollars or five thousand or one thousand, you know, i don’t know how much some of the organizations who are listening might expect of their things are in the range so in the range, but let’s just say it’s ten let’s, say it’s ten because it’s easier for me to do that kind of mathos on dh there, sir. Ten people sitting around the table rights of ten thousand times ten. You could even do that math. Tony what’s. That number would be a hundred thousand. Well now, imagine formal difference. Wolber lorts right for michael. But both were former lawyers. Exactly. Imagine the difference in a non profit organization. If it every single year before it even had toe open its doors, it knew it had a commitment because the board understood that each of them had the responsibility and on dh. Not a goal, not an expectation, but the responsibility to get ten thousand dollars in that organization knew we have one hundred thousand dollars toward with that. Do you prefer to see those expectations as a dollar amount or something? You see the phrase personally significant gift each year? I like clarity. Ok? I mean, i’m all about being clear and concise. What i hope is that ten thousand is the floor, not the ceiling. Yeah. See, that’s the problem. If you if you say there’s a certain there is a responsibility to do that, that becomes the person ceiling. Exactly. I got ten thousand dollars. I’m done. So i’ve got ten thousand dollars in january and i could fall asleep for the next eleven months. Now, what do you do though if you have a diverse board in terms of assets and ability to give? Yes. And for some people with ten thousand dollars is a stretch. And for some people, it’s, you know, a remainder at the checking account at the end of the week. That’s, right. So so that’s. So now let’s, let’s. Go back to this ultra high net, worth enough people that we were talking. About the beginning of the hour right on policy in that regard doesn’t necessarily have to be the same for everybody, right? And when you’re recruiting a member to report when you’re recruiting someone and you know that they have the potential to give hyre than other board members, you’re i’m i’m very clear with that new board potential boardmember i will explain the composition, the board i want you understand who you’re gonna be sitting with, you’re going to be sitting with some people who are academics who don’t have the opportunity to give them selves significant, but man, they gave intellectual capital to this organization. We have some board members who can give, ah, small amount of money, but give their time and then and then you, tony, you know, you have a lot of time, you’re running a big business, you live in north carolina, you’re on the radio, you got a lot of people want your attention, right? Right, right. Sounds good. Sounds good with you was reality story. I’m creating a good narrative for drama you add to it is eyes intense it’s all about creating the factual was all factual but bring thrown creating the public narrative here creating the public narrative so around that story, i know you have the potential to give mohr, but you don’t have much time. You don’t live in new york, so you can’t always be here for board meetings. You can’t always be here for the volunteer events, so you know, you’re in north carolina, but you have the potential to give more. I would be very explicit with you, tony, i want you to understand something the required give for this board is ten thousand dollars, but one of the reasons that we want you on the sport is because we know you have some tremendous networks. We know that you’re very affluent, we know that you run a great business, we know that you don’t have a lot of time, so we want you to realize that we’re not going to ask is much time of us. We might be asking of other board members, but we do hope that you can give at a higher potential. And what do we embarrass about what it was like, seriously, what we embarrassed about asking, but we know it, right? We’re thinking it, but for some reason. Somewhere between our brain and our mouth, there’s there’s this disconnect, we can’t get those words out, and we know the person we’re talking to his thinking it because as i’m describing the diversity of the board, i know that the academics don’t have the capacity to give the hypothetical tony level that’s exactly right qualified with hypothetical that’s, right? So you’re allowing i know it, you know it let’s talk about the elephant in the room, it’s the elephant in the room, and instead we’re going to be professionals. We’re gonna be genuine, we’re going to be authentic and we’re going to be transparent, and if i’m going to allow you to serve in excellence, what i don’t want to happen is i don’t want tony in north carolina running a big business who says, wow, i feel totally guilty because there was, you know, a volunteer events today. We were going out and clean the park because we’re over the garden because we’re garden organs, unicorns i feel totally guilty. I wasn’t able to be there, and i wasn’t able to be there for the last three, you know, vegetable growing things and the flower cutting thing, but you know what i know i could dio i care about this organization. It was in my neighborhood when i was growing up. I want to be a big part of it. I could give more than other people can give, okay? Honesty, explicitness, professionalism. We’re adults here, all right, let’s, go out for our last break a little early, and then we’ll wrap it up. We’ll still have another, like, nine, ten minutes or so you hang in there. Like what you’re hearing a non-profit radio tony’s got more on youtube, you’ll find clips from stand up comedy tv spots and exclusive interviews catch guests like seth gordon, craig newmark, the founder of craigslist marquis of eco enterprises, charles best from donors choose dot org’s aria finger do something that worked and they only levine from new york universities heimans center on philantech tony tweets to, he finds the best content from the most knowledgeable, interesting people in and around non-profits to share on his stream. If you have valuable info, he wants to re tweet you during the show. You can join the conversation on twitter using hashtag non-profit radio twitter is an easy way to reach tony he’s at tony martignetti narasimhan t i g e n e t t i remember there’s a g before the end, he hosts a podcast for the chronicle of philanthropy fund-raising fundamentals is a short monthly show devoted to getting over your fund-raising hartals just like non-profit radio, toni talks to leading thinkers, experts and cool people with great ideas. As one fan said, tony picks their brains and i don’t have to leave my office with fund-raising fundamentals was recently dubbed the most helpful non-profit podcast you have ever heard. You can also join the conversation on facebook, where you can ask questions before or after the show. The guests were there, too. Get insider show alerts by email, tony tells you who’s on each week and always includes link so that you can contact guests directly. To sign up, visit the facebook page for tony martignetti dot com. Welcome back, big non-profit ideas for the other ninety five percent. Melanie, i love these ideas. E-giving really excellent. Um, by the way, you didn’t mention beach either on the beach in north carolina? Yes, i got it going. Address mamatoto the hypothetical means well, at that additional layer of fact and the view outside of your window. And now now you’re able to sleep with that with the shutters open because it’s getting a little bit cooler for indoor sliding doors, we could definitely do a fundraiser at your beautiful beach house in north carolina. Thank you so much for offering europe. Thank you for offering. I appreciate that. We’ll take that. We’ll take that done. Done. Let’s, not get aggressive. We’ll not only martignetti non-profit here not only taking we’re going where you already admonished me. Aboutthe sex joke that’s, right? We’re not gonna take it, but but at a gala we’re gonna raffle your home ofthe to somebody with a beautiful beach. Um, let’s show that our organization measures its own results, shows its impact assesses it’s assess its its effectiveness to the new potential investor etcetera that we might be trying to entice yes, so effectiveness. And measurement, right? So many conversations about this, i’m sure that you’ve had conversations like this on your range a lot we have, but it bears repeating buy-in impact reporting and measurements. Ok, so so we might have a slightly different opinion than many of the companies that are in the measurements reporting business. Go ahead and i’m gonna give you the opinion from the ultra high net worth jonah, right? So that’s, where we spend much of my time, our staff spends much of our time at morgan stanley. I’m you would think that the wealthy or someone is the more be the big bank accounts that they have the brokerage statements that they get. They always want all these reports. The reality is they don’t read them, they don’t read them, and i’m not saying everyone that no one reads them right. So their trust advisors, i might be reading them on behalf of the donor, but the ultra high net worth donor-centric ng all of your energy on it goes on red. So most of ultra high net worth donors want to know that you’re being effective, right? They want to know that if they have a connection to this organization. You’re not doing anything fraudulent, right? Just not doing anything. Fraud, that’s, that’s a that’s a floor that is the floor, right? That’s the floor. They want to know that their money is going to be making a difference, right? That there’s something that their gift is going to be accomplishing of the organization, that if you did not have their gift, you couldn’t do it right, like there’s. Just something else that was that might not have been able to have been happening. But the most important, the most important again is the relationship that they have with the person who’s making me ask or the relation that they have with someone on the board. So they look at these relationships and time and time again, they go back to, even if we might be doing a deep analysis on the impact of the organization and ah, qualitative and quantitative analysis of their work. If an ultra high net worth client has a relationship to the organization, if they have relations in person who’s asking him for the money or they have relation with a boardmember or they’ve had a relationship with the cause, the cause is done something for them personally for their family, all of the statistics there, not as relevant. And i’ll tell you why because we think about how doe i compared to another organization doing similar work. So if i went to will go back to the example of autism, if there was ah, community center in my neighborhood that was working with a small group of children ages zero to five and on and i had a friend whose daughter went to that school and i saw the impact it made on my friend’s life doesn’t matter if there’s another bigger organization working on autism, finding the research, doing the working towards the cure? No, because it’s so it’s, so easy for me t sting you wish between why this organization first another not because i don’t want to know that there’s going to be a cure, but i have that connection to this organization where my friend’s daughter excels, so it goes back to what we’ve been speaking about. Beginning results matter metrics absolutely matter when you’re looking for very large gifts, he need to make sure that you could back, huh? What you’ve accomplished with someone’s donation. But the end of the day working on that relationship nine times out of ten is what an ultra high net worth persons looking for just like a high net worth person or a low networth person. They’re looking for the relationship, the connection. We want to reassure our volunteers that their time is going to be used wisely, efficiently that we we support our volunteers, are meetings or efficient let’s talk a little about a little about overcoming some of the objections that people might have to volunteer like like thie perception is that all the volunteers are retired and they have lots of time um, the job’s right there, or or there where their home with their kids so so during the breaks with their kids, like they’re trying to find meaning in their lives and those of the people you should be asking for a volunteer, not me so much right away over how do we isn’t non-profit overcome that objection. So so i don’t want to assume that that mom’s at home who have tremendous potential to volunteer, really, who have no time because it’s the busiest, it’s it’s the hardest job on the face of the universe to be at home with your children that’s why i never stayed home with my children. Ah, much easier for me to go into morgan stanley, but ultimately, volunteers is going be an issue if your children listening to this is going to cause any but it could be something the family you know what? That when it was so so ryder and talk, i just want you to know later in life when when you’re lying on the couch just say it was because my mom just it was because of my mom don’t spend all the money saving himself gave all the money out of time and money save all the money and going back to the volunteers we confined volunteers anywhere, right? And the problem that that i see non-profits have is they don’t have an established volunteer program, right? They don’t know how to maximize the effort and the energy of their volunteermatch base. So if we are going after established individuals who have very, very busy lives and you want them to volunteer for a particular purpose, then outline what is the project, the program, the day, the hour than you want them. To spend maybe it’s doing a radio show like this, right? Like maybe it’s coming into your studio and spending one hour with you talking about the work of their organization man is that away toe volunteer and to volunteer in excellence, but many organizations who have who bring in a lot of volunteers, they become their staff to some extent, they’re not spend the time giving their volunteers thie the preparation to be really good volunteers, so even small organizations that are run by predominately of volunteer base volunteers could get lost. They don’t understand, you know, how am i going to be useful to this organization? So if they go into a small school or if they go into a library, let’s make it into a library, so i’m going to volunteer for a library in my neighborhood and, you know, i’m not a librarian, right? And i don’t know how to use the dewey decimal system anymore, right? To even use the library library. I don’t rememberthat night except duitz one through nine, right? That’s because we’re old on the card, the card catalogue. I’d love to go to court catalogue sametz just glide out so nice. There, all wood with the satiny brass fixture on if you pull the handle out, a lot of little tag inside the little it’s little frame. And if someone was eating like an oreo cookie, there was like that love thumbprint, right? Greystone think dahna car in the little time we well, i i don’t know what they use that anymore in our libraries. So when you’re going into a library, you know what? How you could be volunteering in a library and making sure that the volunteers that come in there, that there’s real potential for them tio feel to feel effective. The one opportunity teo do that is tripoint someone who is going to be the leader of their volunteers, right? Who is responsible for this incredible, incredible group of people who are going to be our staff for free, right? So someone needs to be assigned to be responsible for those volunteers they could check in with them. They give them their work orders. They evaluate them. They let them know what they’re being good. Volunteers, bad volunteers. How they could improve their volunteerism. So there’s accountability and and and support absolute. Okay, we have just like a minute and a half left and i want to how do how does that non-profit get the attention of the kinds of people were talking about? And we just have, like, a minute or so let let them realize that if they’re working in the space of on dh educating kids, health care, the feeding, the poor, those are issues that ultra high net worth individuals care about, right? We have to stop thinking that small non-profits need to be in the shadow of the large, established organizations ultrahigh networks care about the issues. How do we get their attention for our small roger’s warnings and make sure that we have stories there are powerful, so if you’re going to use social media, if you’re going to use volunteers to get the message out and advocate, if you’re going to use a letter writing campaign, be concise, be clear creating a public narrative that lets them understand why they are different than other bigger organizations, and make sure that you’re getting that message out to people not just mass but, you know, make it very pointed, so clarity, concise transparency and advocate for your organization because small organization’s matter. As much as the large ones, the ninety five percent matter. What is your twitter id? Melanie espy got melanie s begun. Mm. For morgan stanley at melanie s begun. Bj u n m s thank you very much, craig. Melanie, thank you so much. Great to have you back. Good luck this weekend. Thank you. And i appreciate your not coming on my hair. By the way, i’m dying. I have a second. So i have to just tell our listeners when i first met tony when we first became friends short cropped hair. Now it’s beach fundez mario. Probably like a lion like a lion next week. Eight areas of non-profit excellence. If you missed any part of today’s show, i beseech you, find it on tony martignetti dot com were sponsored by pursuant online tools for small and midsize non-profits data driven and technology enabled and by we be spelling supercool spelling bee fundraisers ideal for millennia. Ls we b e spelling dot com our creative producers clam hyre off. Sam liebowitz is the line producer gavin dollars are am and fm outreach director shows social media is by susan chavez. And this music is by scott stein of brooklyn. Be with me next week for non-profit radio big non-profit ideas for the other ninety five percent go out and be great. Yeah. What’s not to love about non-profit radio tony gets the best guests check this out from seth godin this’s the first revolution since tv nineteen fifty and henry ford nineteen twenty it’s the revolution of our lifetime here’s a smart, simple idea from craigslist founder craig newmark yeah insights, orn presentation or anything? People don’t really need the fancy stuff they need something which is simple and fast. When’s the best time to post on facebook facebook’s andrew noise nose at traffic is at an all time hyre on nine a m or eight pm so that’s, when you should be posting your most meaningful post here’s aria finger ceo of do something dot or ge young people are not going to be involved in social change if it’s boring and they don’t see the impact of what they’re doing. So you got to make it fun and applicable to these young people look so otherwise a fifteen and sixteen year old they have better things to do if they have xbox, they have tv, they have their cell phones. Me dar is the founder of idealist took two or three years for foundation staff, sort of dane toe add an email address card, it was like it was phone. This email thing is right and that’s why should i give it away? Charles best founded donors choose dot or ge somehow they’ve gotten in touch kind of off line as it were on dno, two exchanges of brownies and visits and physical gift mark echo is the founder and ceo ceo of eco enterprises. You may be wearing his hoodies and shirts. Tony talked to him. Yeah, you know, i just i’m a big believer that’s not what you make in life. It sze, you know, tell you make people feel this is public radio host majora carter. Innovation is in the power of understanding that you don’t just do it. You put money on a situation expected to hell, you put money in a situation and invested and expect it to grow and savvy advice for success from eric sabiston. What separates those who achieve from those who do not is in direct proportion to one’s ability to ask others for help. The smartest experts and leading thinkers air on tony martignetti non-profit radio big non-profit ideas for the other ninety five percent.

Nonprofit Radio for November 21, 2014: Ask When Not Asking & What Are The Wealthy Thinking?

Big Nonprofit Ideas for the Other 95%

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Marci Brenholz: Ask When Not Asking

Marcy Brenholz at Fundraising Day 2014
Marcy Brenholz at Fundraising Day 2014

Strong, real donor-centered programs will save you money because you’ll hold onto existing donors rather than having to find new ones. Marci Brenholz knows how. She is director of development at the Ralph Lauren Center for Cancer Care and Prevention.

 

 

 

Glen Macdonald & Stacy Palmer: What Are The Wealthy Thinking?

Glen Macdonald & Stacy Palmer at Fundraising Day 2014
Glen Macdonald & Stacy Palmer at Fundraising Day 2014

Stacy Palmer & Glen Macdonald dish on the changing landscape of philanthropy: what giving habits persist and what new trends are developing. Stacy is editor of The Chronicle of Philanthropy and Glen is president of Wealth & Giving Forum

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Hello and welcome to tony martignetti non-profit radio big non-profit ideas for the other ninety five percent, i’m your aptly named host. Oh, i’m glad you’re with me. I’d be forced to endure scleroderma if i had the itchy feeling that you missed today’s show ask when not asking strong riel donor-centric programs will save you money because you’ll hold onto existing donors rather than having to find new ones. Marcy brenholz knows how she is director of development at the ralph lauren center for cancer care and prevention that was recorded at fund-raising day two thousand fourteen this past june. And what are the wealthy thinking stacy palmer and glenn mcdonald dish on the changing landscape of philanthropy? What e-giving habits persist and what new trends are developing? Stacy is editor of the chronicle of philanthropy and glenn is president of wealth and giving forum that’s, also from fund-raising day on tony’s take two thank you, responsive by generosity. Siri’s hosting multi charity five k runs and walks here is my interview with marci marci brenholz on asked when you’re not asking. Welcome to tony martignetti non-profit radio coverage of fund-raising day two thousand fourteen, we’re at the marriott marquis hotel in times square, new york city with me now is marcy brenholz her seminar topic is howto ask when you aren’t asking. Morsi is director of development for the ralph lauren center for cancer care and prevention. Marcy brenholz welcome to the show. Thank you, tony. Good to be here. Thank you. What a pleasure to have you how teo latto asking. You aren’t asking what are what are non-profits not quite getting right about stewardship. Well, i think you know, in this day and age, we have a lot of focus on acquisition and acquisition is really expensive. So there’s direct costs like buying lists. If you’re doing direct mail there’s also staff costs for prospect research and things like that. It’s a lot less expensive toe hold onto the donors you already have. But it’s not the easiest thing to do. So in the seminar, i’m going to kind of break it down into two things that you can do. What is getting your house in order at your organization? So meaning your acknowledgement processes streamlined. You have a great way of recognizing staff might redo your cash reports, some kind of really boring things, like that make an assessment of what kind of stewardship each department is doing. If you’re a bigger organization on dh, then the more fun part of it is to think about what you have to offer to your donor’s that’s really special? Do you have access to celebrities? And that doesn’t necessarily mean, you know, beyonce and jay z. It could be an expert in the field where you work. It could be a great event that you do. You could add on opening session for special donors. There could be travel any number of things that you can do to make donors really feel like they’re part of your work. All right, so why don’t we start with the, uh, the more dry but still important? Yeah, right? You’ve got to get yourself in order before you could go outside. Yeah, we have a good amount of time together. So that’s, where should we start with assessing? I mean, how do we figure out where we’re what do we need to look at? You figure out where we are and then we’ll look at where we gotta go. Yeah, well, i think it depends on the size of your organization. So the case study that i’m going to use is from the u s fund for unicef, where i worked for about three and a half years. It’s a bigger organization, a bigger staff. So what we did is we put together a working group. I mean, people hear the word words working group and just generally roll their eyes, but sometimes they can be effective. We made sure we had representation from all of our departments. And during the first meeting, we just talked about what we thought would be challenging for donors. Attention, soda place. Like the us fund, for instance, we acquired a lot of donors to emergencies the indian ocean tsunami, the haiti earthquake, et cetera. And then we really struggled to have plans about holding on to those donors. Okay, so we talked a lot about whether we were being donor-centric as an organization. So on a two inch of you, you’re my second of you so far from the first one was all about donor-centric zm he was ceo of food for the poor in florida on concerned about donor-centric sametz well, but trying to make it true, not just not just a flash phrase that doesn’t really have a meaning behind it yeah, it’s kind of a buzz word, but you know, the way i think about being donor-centric and if it’s not kind of resonating for you, every fundraiser kind of has low moments, you know? Why did i why did i become a fundraiser? Why am i doing this on dh for me going back to being donor-centric can make you feel better in a way if you think about why donors are given to you and how much of their time and personal resource is there devoting because they believe in your cause, it makes you want to be donor-centric it makes you want to be a good friend in a way, you know, if you have a friend who’s, incredibly supportive and thoughtful, who remembers your birthday always asks you about important things in your life, you know, who shows up at your party with a great hostess gift every time, and then you do nothing in return, you’re not being a good friend, so that’s like being donor-centric if the donor is so generous to you, but you’re not respectful of his or her wishes, you know? You’re just not doing the right thing, there’s such a thing is doing the right thing so well, where should we look specifically to determine whether we are doing the right thing? Well, our marketing communications our, which includes the website print and, you know, let’s, let’s, drill down to some some of the things we should be looking at. Specifically, i think probably where to start is financial accountability that’s also kind of a buzz word these days, i think, but making sure that you’re letting your daughter so and this is the drier stuff again, this is the getting your house in order, making sure that your donor’s know where their money is going and making sure that you’re respecting where they told you they wanted it to go. You know, there’s some great donors who say here’s, some money, i don’t care what you do, it could be operating costs, it can be salaries, and then there are other donors who say no, i really wanted to go to the specific program and we have to make sure that we’re being a countable to the donors on and i liked your work too respectful, yeah, respectful of what their wishes when when they do don’t make a designation right back to the friendship example, you know, it’s just what’s the right thing in the friendship. In the exchange you mentioned website it’s a great point, you know, there are all of these charity rating organizations now, including charney navigator, who look at two things they look at your your finances so they’ll read through your audited financial statements in your nine nineties. They also want to see certain things posted on your website, and that includes your audits and your nine nineties on dure leadership staff. And you have to really be telling donors how you run your organization and not be afraid of letting them, and i think we’re often afraid that donors will find something out about us that they don’t like and that’s what marketing communications has forts it’s for telling the story, but you really do have to be pretty open with your donors. I think in the more sophisticated days where we live, so making sure that that stuff is up on your website is great for ratings on charity navigator, but again, it’s just the right thing to do. Also interesting. Parallel about not not fearing letting donors in. I think of a parallel with social media know what? Everybody’s got a facebook page now, but the early fear was what if donors post comments that we don’t like, right? And there haven’t been many instances of that, and when it does happen, it’s an open communication and if it’s, of course, if it’s blatant and doesn’t belong, that can always be eliminated. Deleted but but that’s that’s the that’s, the that’s, the rare rare exception yeah, no it’s it’s a conversation, right? It’s it’s a dialogue, and so we shouldn’t fear the openness. And now facebook pages are rampant but seven hundred wherever five or seven years ago probono heimans many, seven, five, four, five years ago, the fear was when we can’t let donors post on our our our new facebook page, they might say things we don’t like, right? Yeah, reputational risk is obviously huge and the problem with the google accessible world right? Is that you confined if there was a faux pas non-profits passed it’s just like any person it’s going to be on the internet? So if some risk to your effort, reputation occurs it. Lasts forever, so it makes a lot of sense that we’re apprehensive, but i think you’re making a great point if someone comes out, whether it’s on your facebook page or if they send you a private message and says i’m really worried about some aspect of your business practices, i’m really worried about your program design it’s a great opportunity to be able to say, you know what? This is how we really do it. Let’s, let’s have a conversation. So yeah, i mean, it’s a lot to manage its a lot more to manage than we’ve ever had, but i agree, it’s a good opportunity to be out there on that person who’s saying that to you cares about you? Yeah, if they didn’t care, they were just written you off and said they’re screwing it up, you know? I’m not gonna bother, but they do care enough to to learn and maybe and they’re even trying to help. Yeah, and just to bring it back to donor intention to kind of tar tar topic, if someone cares and they have a concern and you address it, you probably have that person for life, right? I mean, you if you’re honest, if you’re open, if you’re thoughtful about how you’re telling your story, you’re going to be able to hang onto two donors and it’s better in the long run for your business. What else should we be doing? Internal e-giving getting our own house in order? Welchlin look, so i think once you’re kind of clear they are out there that you’re financially accountable than a lot of what i encountered when i was looking at stewardship again, i’m using the us fundez and fundez an example, but there’s this’s applicability. Other places, too, is how motivated staff were to retain donors, so sometimes that way organisations put together their cash report or the way that they recognize fundraisers might recognize acquisition more than it recognizes retention. So just making sure that you’re you’re making sure that it’s really a priority for your staff and they’re being recognized and evaluated on the right, the right kind of metrics, right attention as well as acquisition? Yeah, exactly and internally, a lot of organizations have started to measure their retention, but they don’t necessarily measure upgrades or donorsearch atis faction and i’m just going to name check here because this is not something that i thought of this is actually from karen osborne of the osborne group, and these are her recommendations specifically to measure retention upgrades and donorsearch atis faction as a wayto make sure that you have a healthy stewardship for donor relations program going on, so some organizations are not even measuring retention necessarily. So that’s a great place to start, but measuring how often you’re moving, the donors up the pipeline that’s also really helpful, and then whether or not donors think that your mission is crucial whether they feel that you’re one of their top five organizations, how committed are they to you that reflects on how you’re communicating with them? How do you how do you judge these things? Well, if you have a donor database again, i’m talking about a little bit of a bigger organization. You can actually run reports on these kinds of things. You can set them up in an ornament. Sorry. That’s what i meant. Donors feel that your mission is critical. Are you one of their top five charities? That’s gotta be done by survey conversation. Yeah. So if you want to do, you can do a doner satisfaction survey with smaller donors, you can do it online, but you can also sit down when you’re talking about major donors are board members you, khun do individual interviews with them where you’re really not asking them? So why i called the session howto ask when you’re not asking, i hope everyone doesn’t show up and think, oh good, i don’t have to solicit anymore marcie’s going to tell me how it’s more, what are the moves that you’re doing in between? The asks that are making the donor feel really good and really invested in you? So sitting down and talking to them about what they think about the organization without asking them to write a check is could be a good move, you know that old saying if you want to ask for money, ask for advice, it’s like that? Yeah, so you would do it face to face or you could do, you know, an online survey or something like that and agree maybe to do it every two or three years, you know what i’m talking about really takes a lot of resource is and not every small organization, so now i’m a one. Person shop at my new job on dh. This kind of thing is probably going to be a little bit more challenging than it was when i had more research. Resource is at a bigger place, so there’s that, too. But you’re going, you’re going to find a way. You’re tuned to non-profit radio. Tony martignetti also hosts a podcast for the chronicle of philanthropy fund-raising fundamentals is a quick ten minute burst of fund-raising insights, published once a month. Tony’s guests are expert in crowdfunding, mobile giving event fund-raising direct mail and donor cultivation. Really, all the fund-raising issues that make you wonder, am i doing this right? Is there a better way there is? Find the fund-raising fundamentals archive it. Tony martignetti dot com that’s marketmesuite n e t t i remember there’s, a g before the end, thousands of listeners have subscribed on itunes. You can also learn maura, the chronicle website philanthropy dot com fund-raising fundamentals the better way. Now, so one person fund-raising shop, you are talking to donors a lot. Yeah, so? So some of these questions could weave their way into your daily conversations with donors. Maybe not everyone, right? But you can sample, right? Yeah. And one of the things that i’m doing so there was ah, one year gap between development directors at the ralph lauren center. So some of the things that i’m doing there are sort of resurrecting some relationships that we had before. And i’m making sure that there’s no stone unturned if you’ve given money to us before, if you cared about us before, i’m going to try to bring you back. You can’t be successful all the time. You’re gonna lose some donors. People’s circumstances change. It might have nothing to do with your organization. But it’s really important to make sure that you’re being very methodical about renewing let’s let’s, switch to the more fun the donor side of good donorsearch worship. Yeah, so i had a great experience again at the u s fund for unicef. Where i put together are a major donor e-giving society now abel he managed by another colleague at the us fund-raising donors we decided to talk to our board members about what they might like to see. So when you structure a major donor giving society, you’re basically putting together a list of tiered benefits and that’s also an important part of putting your house in order. What are you offering to donors? A different levels is a consistent who are the donors that your leadership and board members need to be involved with? And you have plans for howto steward those donors. So with us one farina’s have is lucky they have a lot of board members, so they have a national board and then seven regional board. So some people may say that’s very unlucky that’s true. Thankfully, it was thankfully was fortunate for the for the us fund. These board members are great. I’m a board relations person, so right, i think that’s great and some people think it’s a nightmare. Now i have an eight person board, so i’ve, you know, i’ve gone on, but they have about probably about one hundred twenty five port members between all those groups, and we did some surveying of them and i’m not saying that these air the answers you would get from every a group of board members, but this is the kind of thing that, like on your terrible worst day, you just think about it and feel good. These board members were like, i don’t care about recognition that’s fine, i just want to be more connected to the mission. I just want to talk, teo, the workers in the field and really understand what you do. They were looking for these really meaningful engagement opportunities. It wasn’t like, oh, yeah, i’d like a tote bag or i’d really like to meet beyonce when i’m named checking her, maybe she’ll call me, uh, you know, they really wanted more programmatic depth, and they also wanted to network and connect with each other, so we tried to build benefits that felt a little bit less transactional and more i’m kind of life affirming. Like what? What? What were a couple of examples? Well, you know, again, this is not something that everyone can offer, but travel to the field is an example at a certain ok, but a small organization, maybe maybe it’s not travel to on exotic country, but maybe welcome to the to our office. Yeah. To the place where we’re serving people that you’ve never seen yu know we internally take it for granted because it’s on the floor below us who’s down the hall, but our donors have never seen it however modest you may think it is. It might mean the world to the donor to be invited. Absolutely, i mean at the ralph lauren center. So i work on site at the cancer center it’s in harlem on one hundred twenty fourth and madison, i’ll be honest, a lot of donors don’t go up to that neighborhood very often because of the involvement of ralph lauren. The center is really beautiful looking, and i love walking in there every day and seeing the patients in the in the waiting room, not it’s, a very unhappy time for the patients, but i feel really connected to them into the mission, and we do a lot of site visits at the ralph lauren center. Before unicef, i worked at a education non-profit called learning leaders, and we did school volunteerism, so we used to do a lot of site visits to schools, and that was great. And whenever i was feeling kind of disconnected. Elearning leaders, i would get up and go to a school and be like, okay, this is why i’m doing this, so yeah, the travel with units of the little sexier right, every charity has got someplace that you can come. Yes, absolutely. Or some meeting that you can come to that you haven’t previously been invited too. Yeah, something is going on at your charity. I just went teo, a special events training session at robin hood. So the ralph lauren center is a robin, but grantee on the special event staff was sharing that their donors love to come to their office and just see where the work is done. So just just the administrative, like, ministerial type officers. Yeah, i mean, the stuff that the people who work there take for granted every day that has no interest. I mean, it has interested them, but it would never think of inviting an outsider. But you got it. We got stop thinking like that. They’re not outsiders, they’re insiders, and we want to welcome them. Welcome to the workplace. Yeah, you do it one day a month, who have a bunch of invite a bunch of people and have a breakfast and maybe you know that that half a day a month becomes mohr donor-centric yeah, then the other nineteen and a half workdays that you have in the book. Yeah, absolutely. And i think that’s why i found the responses from the board members of the u s funds so encouraging, they were saying exactly what you’re saying. We want to know how you do your work. We want to really drill down with you. We’re not necessarily looking for a lots of glitzy stuff we want we want the day to day and it kind of relates financial accountability also fixing your bike so it doesn’t fall off table, right? I’m i’m getting violent with my mike. I’m better that way. Yeah, although we’re close enough, you could. But if you should appreciate, you’re not breaking down that you haven’t done anything. Yeah, it’s been it’s been ok? Not feeling your mind myself across the line either of this relates back to financial accountability again, if we’re afraid to let donors in, then they’re not going to come closer to us and we want them to be closer. That’s not every single donor, but the important. Ones and the ones who care. So yeah. That’s. The interesting part that was so us fund for unicef. It was travel abroad. Make clear that it could be traveling to your administrative office. Yes. What else? What else did you do on the outside? It could be also in individualized reporting. So back to how donors want their money spent. You know, a lot of us do kind of ah, general operating support report, which is okay, but at certain levels, you really want to make sure that you’re doing an individualized report and, you know a lot, i think most of us do this, but that was included because unicef being such a big place, sometimes people were getting a more generalized report and not feeling like we were really drilling down into the program that they wanted to support. Then we did a couple of other things, like at the higher levels dinner hosted by a boardmember dinner hosted by the global unicef executive director. So that thing that i said about celebrities before a lot of people think that tony lake who’s, the executive director of unicef globally, is a celebrity in the world of you. Know, international charitable work people really want to meet mr lake and he’s more of an academic than he is anything else but that’s really interesting to donors. So we did travel to see unicef’s work in the field, and then unicef has some other interesting international properties to visit there’s, a research center in florence there’s a supply division in copenhagen, so travel to those places also, which is again inner workings. Okay, way covered travel. Yeah, but but your phone is ringing. I think it was beyonce. I heard a phone ringing. This is more important. I mean, i’ll get to her after i agree. You’re everything in the world in your life has brought you to this moment. Exactly don’t want to surrender it to be on no side. It might have been someone else’s phone. I heard that you could actually be calling. I always keep mine on site could be calling somebody else. I’m sorry, it’s. All right, you’re next on the list. I’m sure i’m sure i’m sure up. What else? Way put on there. So receptions before big events for having a gallery. You don’t spend a lot of money to add a small reception before you’ve already got the space, the caterer is already coming. Yeah, marginal cost of that before or after reception, especially when you’re putting on a bigger event on that gets to the donors wanting to network with each other and to know each other. They don’t always get to be in the same place either. And, you know, a boardmember meeting or another kind of meeting isn’t always the best place to network. So something like that, which is a lot of my my work is planned e-giving consulting way. Do a lot of those vips receptions before the larger event? Right? Another thing that doesn’t cost much is v i p seating at an event? Yeah, it costs nothing. It cost the couple strips of masking tape. Yeah, mask often area and and have vips seating for an event you’ve already paid for the tickets. For you’ve already got the seats rope off ten or twelve seats for vips. People feel like the world way because the i p c yeah, and, you know, what’s funny about that. We’re already doing it right when you think about it. When you’re doing your gallus eating, you are putting your most important people in the front, but they don’t know that we’re not revealing our methods. So if you make that a little more open and say by the way we’re going to, we’re gonna give you the best seats here this important, i think, you know, we’re continuing on that theme of tell your donors what you’re doing, and it might make them feel good, so yeah, great. Ok. Ok. What else? We still have a couple minutes left. Marcie. What? What else? What else can we talk about? Well, we could talk about volunteer opportunities. Maybe. I think that that is a big saying. That’s emerging volunteers helping with stewardship donors having volunteer opportunities to make you feel more engaged. Because i think it’s emerging as a theme because corporate supporters often are asking while how can my employees come for a day and do something and it’s a little bit difficult for some organizations to figure out how to do that? I had the luck. This is back. Tio. Sometimes stewardship moves are a little easier at one place or another. A little more obvious. When i worked at a volunteer organization, i got a lot of my donors and my board members through a pipeline of one particular volunteer program, which was an art program, and it just attracted the kind of volunteers who were also able to be donors. Not everybody has that. So ralph lauren center does a lot of stuff with our physical plants, having people come in and paint having people come in and plant flowers outside. You know, i just think it’s important to make sure that you have at least a couple just up your sleeve and ready to go a couple of volunteer opportunities in case either of corporate supporter asks or, you know, a group of boardmember xero group of donors say, i don’t really feel like writing another check. What can i do so that’s, you know, i think that’s big and a lot of donors also want to do things that involve their children and family. Family philanthropy is such a big emerging topic, so if you can think of a program or volunteer opportunity where people can bring their children that’s also huge, we have just a couple of minutes left. What about the board’s role in the stewardship? Yeah, that’s a really good question. Okay, we’ll come up with one. Twenty. Only took me about twenty four minutes. Well, i mean, this is like a house in order. It’s, you know, it’s, the more kind of the more boring stuff. So i had mentioned that bored hosted annual dinner could be an interesting big storage it move. Thank you calls. Thank you. Notes all those kinds of things. I hear that from a lot of guests. Just get the board together, do it for an hour before a meeting. Right? And they’re going to get a great feeling from it themselves. And you’re just right. Just calling to say thank you, thank you. Nothing else. Don’t do don’t do anything more, you know, we’re not asking for anything more. Just calling to say thank you. And and a donor has gotten a call from from a pipe and the organization it’s a boardmember it’s really big it’s big you people. A lot of people in the international world love teo support the carter center because the carter center does great work, but also jimmy carter calls you. I’ve had a bunch of donors like president carter called me. Okay? So not everybody. Has jimmy carter, but it’s still important to hear from, you know, a leadership voice if you much you mentioned the executive director? Yeah, who’s not not really thought of as a celebrity in in in way, popular media, but within the organization within that mission. He’s very well known. Yeah, so it could just be somebody in your office. Exactly. And also, i didn’t mention loyalty recognition. I think calling donors and thanking them for gift that they’ve just given is fantastic. Don’t take that off of your roster, but five years in a row, ten years in a row recalling their thing irrespective of the size of the raft. Is that kind of loyalty? Yeah. Recognition for for the history. Yeah, how gracious and thoughtful is that if you just say thank you for giving to us for five consecutive years, we really appreciate it. That’s it and we didn’t care how much it was. Marcie, thank you very much. We have to leave it there. Thank you. My pleasure. Marcie brenholz. She is director of development for the ralph lauren center for cancer care and prevention. Thank you very much. More. See again. Thank you. You’re listening. To tony martignetti non-profit radio coverage of fund-raising day two thousand fourteen. Live listener love we got fort lee, new jersey, brooklyn, new york, jersey city, new jersey hutchisson in new jersey might that’s when my dad was born and raised in greenville hospital and has to live on mcadoo have in jersey city, but you probably that’s old jersey city, new york, new york, washington, d c live listener love to everyone let’s, go abroad paris, france bourgeois iran is with us live listener love to you. So is toronto, ontario and king city, ontario in canada, of course, tokyo connie chua beijing and she on in china. Ni hao and seoul, korea on your haserot we have a couple of others too, and they’ll be later on generosity siri’s you know them because they host five k runs and walks and i talk about him often two weeks ago. I am seed. They’re new york city event. Last week they were in philadelphia. Nine charities in philadelphia came together, raised seventy five thousand dollars, had a very fun event. The key is none of the nine are big enough to have hosted their own five k run walk. It just wouldn’t have enough people participating, but when the community comes together, great things can happen. Seventy five thousand dollars raised that’s what generosity siri’s does puts charities together in these events, and they have them coming up in new jersey and miami. Devlin is the ceo. Please tell him you’re from non-profit radio you could talk to dave lynn it’s seven one eight five o six nine triple seven or generosity siri’s dot com i thank you very much for supporting non-profit radio. We’re almost at ten thousand listeners each week very close and i thank you very much for being with us. There isn’t a thanksgiving show next week, so i’m giving my thanks this week to you very much for your support. I have to give a special mention to our outstanding monthly contributors maria semple, jean takagi and amy sample ward. They are so generous with their expertise for the benefit of all of us very, very grateful for them as well. Again, no show next week. This week i thank you very, very much for your support of non-profit radio. And there is a thank you video at tony martignetti dot com that’s tony’s take two for friday twenty first of november forty sixth show of the year here’s my interview with stacy palmer and glenn mcdonald about what the wealthy are thinking. Welcome to tony martignetti non-profit radio coverage of fund-raising day two thousand fourteen we are at the marriott marquis hotel in times square, new york city with me now are stacy palmer and glenn mcdonald. Their workshop topic is whatthe wealthy. What are the wealthy thinking now? It’s a question, not a statement. We’re going to answer that question. Stacy palmer is editor of the chronicle of philanthropy and glenn mcdonald is president of wealth and giving forum stacy glen welcome. Thank you. Thank you for having us. Pleasure to have you, glenn let’s, start with you. What? What? What is this topical? About? What? What? What are the wealthy thinking now? Well, the first thing i want to say as a preface is that we like to categorize the wealthy as a homogenous group, but in fact, that’s really not fair of anybody are very diverse. I’m just like any cohort group that you would mention they spend this political spectrum young and old. You know that wealth can be minute very quickly, especially in silicon valley and and, interestingly enough with on that topic, you know, it is young generation that is spurring new trends. E-giving um, and the number one trend right now is thinking about their philanthropy across everything they do not just in the czechs, they write, meaning how they invest their portfolio and what sort of for-profit cos they invest in ones that they believed that they could be transformation on society. And i think that’s really the number one trend that i see on day are shifting the thinking of their parents and grand parents to be quite frank. And when you say the young, are we thinking of people in their thirties, you know, early, early twenties coming out of college and thinking about the business voices they make the careers, they want to be involved with, the types of companies they want to work for, they want their doing good and doing well and making money to be integrated into one it’s no longer separate, and i think that’s a trend that’s here to stay, and i’m sure we’ve read, you know, in the press in the chronicle philanthropy wall street journal that socially responsible investing and impact and interesting are considered alongside of the donations and grantmaking that foundations are making now. Right now. Stacey, what do you have to add? Early on, i agree that’s one of the big trends, the other thing that some people are starting to talk about is whether there’s a whole third wave of philanthropy coming among the young and whether mark zuckerberg really kick that off and he’s not even thirty yet. Ah, but by giving so much money to the silicon valley community foundation rather than setting up his own foundation, he said a model for the other ways of thinking about giving, not institution building, but really saying i want to do this differently and others may be following his model. So i think we are seeing a pretty big shift. Yeah, glen a third wave. I agree wholeheartedly, i think even before mark zuckerberg duitz warren buffett said, look, rather than build a new private foundation, i’m gonna give my money to bill gates. I respect him. I trust him. I like his work. I like his team he’s built. Why start over? I think, you know, station. I would probably agree that the proliferation of new foundations and new non-profits when a lot of great organizations have already been built, small and large, and everything in between already available to donors and in some respects, by giving to the community foundation what market burghdoff burgers saying, the staff is there, there’s, a lot of programs already in place, and we can be flexible because the community foundation structures allowed for flexibility, not only in the way they given the timing e-giving, but also in the number of programs that are available now. Those watching video will note that the room got darker, durney martignetti non-profit radio, a cz continuing. The overhead lights are flickering, a little bit of that coming on off, but it makes no difference. We persevere here non-profit radio, absolute. Nothing stops us earthquakes, bring them on. We will continue. We are not leaving this set until until we flush this out. Let’s see, let’s, talk a little more stacy about this this third wave, what else? What else characterizes this? You know, i think in addition to things like impact investing, we also see growing interest in merging political giving and philanthropic e-giving and thinking about the various ways that you can use your money to influence change. And of course, as came pain finance limits are basically going away. It’s easier for the wealthy to think about doing that when you think about the scale of their political giving compared to philanthropy, it’s so much smaller anyway, but they’re definitely looking at both ways to do things. I think that’s got good sides and bad sides. The good side is that they’re getting engaged to the bad side is people are starting to worry about whether the plutocrats are setting policy and are starting to hear more about that. I think that could kick back on philanthropy in some pretty serious way, so we have to talk about, you know, sort of are people going to be accused of of trying to sway public policy through their philanthropy and the wealthy, setting the setting, the agenda, setting the research research? Priorities indeed. But the flip side of that, of course, is that we all know that you can’t create change unless you change some systems with everybody influence if he’s been talking about that for so long, so in some ways you would think that they might be applauding the billion years for finally getting more engaged in public policy. But yet we don’t see that going to see you nodding a lot. Yes, absolutely agree, and i think that, you know, in some respects, there is some advocacy and political influence of the wealthy that are looking to take care of themselves by not having more taxes or limiting wreck regulations on businesses, and i think they’re the coke brothers are big example and tom style on the other side of the fence would say, well, yes, but i’m advocating on behalf of those who don’t have but you know that the challenge there is that while i think tom’s tires is well intentioned, that sometimes the billionaire’s advocating on behalf of those that are less fortunate don’t really see the issues at the depth that the underbelly really does and that they should be advocating for themselves and the only way to do that is, you know, frankly, this is getting bleeding out of philanthropy and into a political commentary is through true democracy. And so i think there is an issue and stacy’s spot on and saying, you know, by philanthropy and the ability to raise dot org’s toe, advocate and influence the political process, the challenges that will philanthropy get, you know, a little bit of a black spot when there’s so much goodness like in this room, you go upstairs, there’s a thousand organizations that are doing are wonderful things that nobody hears about it. And you don’t want the non-profit charitable sector and philanthropy world to be viewed as to to link tio, you know, just the wealthy influencing the way the political game happens because the real truth is it’s so much goes on underneath that’s. Wonderful. Yeah. Yeah. Stacy looked like you wanted to add. Well, and i also think part of it too is that there’s so much influenza b that doesn’t have anything to do with politics. And so that is we need to bear keep things in context. Yeah. What else? What else are you planning to your session? Is this afternoon, what else is on your minds for the for the audience? I think one of the things we’ll be talking about is the different ways to appeal to today’s donors and to talk about what kinds of things draw them in it’s not enough just to say that they’re motivated by a particular cause, but what kind of language do you use, teo, get them engaged, you know, do you need to talk about financial metrics when you’re appealing to an investor? Do you need to talk about how you’re fixing things when you’re talking to an entrepreneur? I was talking to a wealth advisor the other day who said she was advising an ophthalmologist, and he looks at everything through what people aren’t seeing because that’s what he does all day, you know, and so trying to think about donors in those ways, um, and what their professional obligations are, that that might shape what it is that they want to hear about how you draw them in and get them engaged. So we’ll talk about tips for doing that so segmenting absolute across your constituencies will want to share and share some of the some. Of those tips, but let’s not hold out on listeners. Well, again, i agree with stacy. You know, you know, the rail challenges that i say that that every individual who is a donor giver investor in for-profit solutions to social issues has his or her own own formula for wanting to give, and it involves the head and the heart and summer, morehead oriented and rational thinking about and they focus on outcomes and measurement more than the emotional joy of that comes sometimes from giving and everything in between. And i think that to stacey’s point and wealth advisers have the same challenge in managing money. They have to figure out what makes the person tick. And i think the most important thing and i think everybody in this room would agree, is what’s most important is the discovery processes, the listening and then the appeal khun b couched in the framework of the individual not in some standard way of of soliciting money asked the listening, listening whether that’s done through social media channels right at our one to one conversation with a survey. Yeah, i think that’s that’s something that i hear on the show often. Is that we’re not active listeners. And you love listeners. I have read of nine thousand of them. I do love them, and i listened to them. But they are sometimes not listening the way they need to be less exactly to their various constituents, whether that’s vendors on one hand or donors on the other. Yeah, someone’s trying to watch that. Okay. Background noise, bleeding in. 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Duitz one further thought i’d be interested in stacy’s perspective on this is i’m just getting to know her. Um, that comes to mind is, is that i’ve seen that the most committed philanthropists that really followed through on a long haul on and staying with heimans developing a strategy and then really staying through with an organization or an innovative not-for-profits leader that’s starting something new or social issues to address is is the ones who really do stay the course and have great impact and have patients for the outcomes. The right outcomes are those that have been introspective and been thought and taking a step back and not do something that’s trendy, but something that really means something to them or their families, but that takes a certain kind of investment and investors who are in for the long term and damp latto had a lot to say about that correct perfect example. Stacey, wait, we all know that one of the things that goes wrong in philanthropy all the time is that people follow the trendy they want to start new organizations and get excited about the next new thing instead of staying for the long haul. And in some ways, what we need to change the culture of philanthropy is to say, there are some of these organizations that are doing great work already if they just had more money and more support from their board members, they could do even more on and that’s not to say that the organization shouldn’t get started, but i think when people come into philanthropy, they just get excited about i’ve got this innovative idea, please back me instead of saying, wait a minute, who’s already doing terrific work and how can i get involved in the board and that’s? One of the things that non-profits really need is committed born members who will get involved and do that kind of thing is, well, it’s not enough just to write a check there’s some sentiment that the, uh, the passion takes over and r r system allows people to start a non-profit as long as they could meet some some not very high threshold requirements from the irs and that we never end up with a proliferation of charities duplicating overlapping rather than the person going through an existing charity and saying if you don’t have an opening for me on the board? Can we can i partner some other way with you exactly about this proliferation of non-profits means that you see that hurting us? Well, i think the stacey’s point at the beginning of this session that, you know, mark zuckerberg and and i added, you know, maura buffet to the mix and there’s more and more that are saying no, that isn’t the right thing, and i think they’re setting that example altum that others are starting to take a step back and ask that question, which is a good trend, and i also think there’s some consulting firms that are starting to encourage non-profits to think about partnerships and merging and consolidating programs into one and gaining scale and leverage across that that’s starting to happen. It’s we need more of it, and some of it was by necessity and some in our great recessional that’s, exactly the wayto nine crisis forced with lower funding and some issues that even someone doubt doubt organizations, you know, that poor performance on their operating budget suffered that that forced the issue. But it’s, it’s, it’s, it’s a trend that starting and what we need more of it. You know, no question, yeah, we have an op ed in our current issue that’s actually arguing for that and saying that, you know, really there needs to be more of mergers and acquisitions business in the new non-profit field thie incentives are totally different than in business, but we need to find ways to think about ways for strong organizations to work together, not just because the financial crisis caused it, but for reasons to extend the mission and to think about it that way. And sometimes, you know, we were just talking before about board members it’s often the board that gets in the way of a merger because they don’t want to give up their boardmember ship, we’ve got to find some other incentives for them because there’s plenty of roles for them to get involved. There are precious few consultants i’ve had one on sabrina lamb, i think sabrina lamp consultant’s doing latto advising around merger, acquisition and or even just joint ventures, partnerships and not always for fund-raising purposes, but for a longer time, you know, just mission that mission achievement, there’s that that overlap is, uh, can be hurt can’t be hurting us. Back-up what other? Any other strategies around the the topics of listening? I think one of the things that many fundraisers find challenging is that even if they are the ones who are doing the listening, getting the ceo, getting other people on the staff, teo do that listening is much more of a culture shift home. And so one of the messages i think well osili talk about today is how to engage the chief executive and other people in the organization to see that talking to what it don’t cares about doesn’t mean sacrificing your ethics or, you know, getting in the way of letting the donor dictate the mission it’s just saying, how do you talk to them in a language that they understand and that appeals to them? And maybe they do actually have some good ideas about how you run your organization differently that were worth listening to, but i think you know so often, that’s one of the challenges fundraisers have is they get it, but not everybody in the organization corrected. On the flip side, you might be talking to a donor who is really it’s, a patriarchal matriarch, or maybe even the son. Of daughter of a wealthy family on dh sometimes the whole family’s going to be part of the decision process. So it makes that dynamic and challenge a little bit more complicated, because sometimes family members they seemingly be on the same page till the time comes for the check to be ripping and then there’s some symbol, wait a minute, that’s. Ah, that doesn’t really have it is not in concert with the mission of our private foundation and one orders yes, and the other going there’s no, and so look fundez that that’s why this is a profession i mean fund-raising is a huge challenge. You’ve gotto work the organization on the one hand and step, as stacy pointed out, on the other hand, sometimes the dynamics of the emotional dynamics of one individual donors end or the family dynamics associated with that donor is makes it a interesting challenge. If we’re seriously interested in listening, then we have to be asking questions the answers to which we need to be willing to hear couldn’t and they’re often not, and they’re often not couldn’t have said it better. I mean, you know, that’s why i mentioned the discovery process if that’s not part of the question set, whose else involved in this decision process? I know you have a private foundation to have professionals on the part of the private foundation that are going to influence this. Do you have other family members come teo going to come and weigh in on the decision? And should we be meeting with them and and so forth? There was absolute a lot of times, you know, for smaller and maybe even midsize shops they you need often, i think, an outside adviser to help facilitate this, this this process and a lot of the smaller shops, you know, they don’t just don’t have the wherewithal to bring someone in to facilitate a conversation on the board or conversation among among donors, you know that, and they and they’re so insular in their work that they’re not able to ask these these challenging questions. I think one of the things all non-profits no matter what size they are can seek out is professionals who want to give their time to facilitate something like that. Most people would like to help in organization in various ways, and, you know, we don’t think about the sort of skilled volunteering enough in the ways that people can help out. So i would say, you know, an organization of any size can really reach out to people who can help in that process on dh should be creative and thinking about that rather than just asking for money because you’re right, sometimes you need more that kind of coaching and that sort of thing. Clint, i think one of the things you talked about in our call was thinking about mentors for people who so, you know, thinking about the way people in their profession want to meet other people in their profession and that that’s a good way for non-profits to think about how to find new donors and volunteers, you had a couple of a couple of things on that was, well, we believe the weapon giving form we believe in pierre learning, so wait really exist to encourage greater philanthropy and in that regard now our sweet spot is emerging philanthropists. But we have other philanthropist comments tell their stories about how they developed their own form of forgiving and struggles and challenges. They asked themselves about how much to give and what’s the direction of my giving and howto i involve my family and how do i ensure that when i’m i’m not going to get dahna fatigue and so forth and so on? And it’s really? I think peer-to-peer learning in any field of endeavors is hugely important. That’s why there’s a lot of, you know, organizations like young presidents organization for ceos and so forth and so on, but even for non-profit professionals, i mean there’s a great a couple of organisations, they’re just i don’t if you heard of catch a fire. Oh, sure, back when stacey was talking about going to mention catch afire volunteermatch right, so in order to get, you know, if you need an accounting accounting or you need your having board challenges or you’re having, you know, they will find professionals who could help come in and advise non-profits on those issues and challenging than one new one i just heard about was inspiring capital that i mean, really just organize this year to help non-profits think about intellectual capital and capabilities they developed that might be a source of revenue stream because they developed this expertise, you know, i give you one. Example, a year up national, you know, organization that helped inner city youth find a pathway to self sustaining, you know, income and a great career and, you know, they become very well known, but they’ve really developed over the past fifteen years a great capability to only train young adults in inner cities, but also to stop thing properly and be on dso, you know, they have a model that’s that can compete with robert half, so they’re, you know, thinking about a revenue stream off of that that can help fund the organization, and i think more and more non-profits we’re gonna start doing the same thing, stacy, we have just a minute or so left one leave ah, parting thought something we haven’t we haven’t talked about that you plan to share one of the things that is clear and giving trends overall is that the affluent are the ones that are powering givings growth in america. We just saw e-giving yusa report come out and were it not for the wealthy, i don’t think we would have seen the good numbers that we saw so making sure that every organization of every size reaches out to these individuals is really important rather than focusing on things like special events and other kinds of things, i think almost every organization has the capacity to get what is for them a major gift, and there really should be thinking about that and important for them for then everybody doesn’t need to be going after seven, seven, eight, nine figure give exactly a ten thousand dollar gift might be a big gift for you. Go for it. Excellent. We’re gonna leave right there. Well, but i love that alright. Stacy palmer, editor of the chronicle of philanthropy, and glenn mcdonald, president of wealth and giving forum thank you both very much. Thank you for happiness. Thank you. Turning my pleasure it’s tony martignetti non-profit radio coverage of fund-raising day two thousand fourteen thank you so much for being with us. Thanks to everybody at fund-raising day two thousand fourteen next week happy thanksgiving. I hope you enjoy your time very much with loved ones and friends take the time. Enjoy take a nap over the long weekend. I’m a big fan of naps indulge no show next week if you missed any part of today’s show, find it on. Tony martignetti non-profit radio no finding on tony martignetti dot com non-profit radio just rolls off my tongue, it’s it’s in my sleeping. Then i’m saying it. You’ll find info at tony martignetti dot com generosity siri’s, good things happening when small charities work together. Generosity, siri’s, dot com. Our creative producer is claire meyerhoff. This week’s line producer is janice taylor. Shows social media is by julia campbell of jake campbell. Social marketing on the remote producer of tony martignetti non-profit video is john federico of the new rules. Our music is by scott stein. You will be next week for non-profit radio. Big non-profit ideas for the other ninety five percent. Go out and be great. Heimans what’s not to love about non-profit radio tony gets the best guests check this out from seth godin this’s the first revolution since tv nineteen fifty and henry ford nineteen twenty it’s the revolution of our lifetime here’s a smart, simple idea from craigslist founder craig newmark yeah insights, orn presentation or anything? People don’t really need the fancy stuff they need something which is simple and fast. When’s the best time to post on facebook facebook’s andrew noise nose at traffic is at an all time hyre on nine a, m or p m so that’s when you should be posting your most meaningful post here’s aria finger ceo of do something dot or ge young people are not going to be involved in social change if it’s boring and they don’t see the impact of what they’re doing. So you got to make it fun and applicable to these young people look so otherwise a fifteen and sixteen year old they have better things to dio they have xbox, they have tv, they have their cell phones. Hani door is the founder of idealist. I took two or three years for foundation staff sort of dane toe. Add an email address card. It was like it was phone. This email thing is right and that’s why should i give it away? Charles best founded donors choose dot or ge somehow they’ve gotten in touch kind of offline as it were and and no two exchanges of brownies and visits and physical gifts. Mark echo is the founder and ceo of eco enterprises. You may be wearing those hoodies and shirts. Tony talked to him. Yeah, you know, i just i’m a big believer that’s not what you make in life. It sze, you know, tell you make people feel this is public radio host majora carter. Innovation is in the power of understanding that you don’t just do it. You put money on a situation expected to hell. You put money in a situation and invested and expected to grow and savvy advice for success from eric sabiston. What separates those who achieve from those who do not is in direct proportion to one’s ability to ask others for help. The smartest experts and leading thinkers air on tony martignetti non-profit radio big non-profit ideas for the other ninety five percent.

Nonprofit Radio for November 14, 2014: Trust, Mistrust and Betrayal & Why The Rich Give

Big Nonprofit Ideas for the Other 95%

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Nina Chanpreet Kaur: Trust, Mistrust and Betrayal

Nina Chanpreet Kaur

These by-products of our relationships with donors, bosses and peers can make your success or break your heart. Nina Chanpreet Kaur, organizational consultant and doctor of social problems, shares her research on trust.

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Maria Semple: Why The Rich Give 

Maria Semple

Maria Semple is back. She’s our prospect research contributor and The Prospect Finder. She’ll walk us through the 2014 US Trust Study of High Net Worth Philanthropy. 

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Hello and welcome to tony martignetti non-profit radio big non-profit ideas for the other ninety five percent. I’m your aptly named host. We have a listener of the week build driscoll he’s, a disaster non-profit executive, and he takes non-profit radio with him when he travels love that bill, you’ll find him in milton, massachusetts, or the twin cities in minnesota on twitter. He’s at b driscoll j r there must be an s r but he’s. Probably not on twitter. Congratulations, bill, and thank you very much for your support of non-profit radio. We’ve got a new online station joining us k s c r out of pomona, california welcome very good to have you with us and i’m glad you’re with me. I’d suffer the embarrassment of submarine dermatitis if i even heard rumors that you had missed today’s show trust, mistrust and betrayal the’s byproducts of our relationships with donors, bosses and peers could make your success or break your heart dahna chanpreet power core studies the issues around trust and why the rich give maria semple is back she’s, our prospect research contributor and the prospect finder she’ll walk us through the twenty fourteen us trust study of high net worth philanthropy on tony’s take two it’s amazing when charities come together and work together responsive by generosity siri’s hosting multi charity five k runs and walks i am seed. They’re new york city event just this past weekend, and i’m very pleased that nina chanpreet core is with me in the studio. She’s, an organizational consultant and social psychologist by training doctor of social problems and educator her work sheds light on what underlies drives, motivates and manages effective change in the world. She was the founder of kitchen table community teaching cooking classes to understand how food can build trust across ethnicities and religions, nina lives for the tender moments of truth and compassion, clear seeing eyes, hands reaching out to help arms embracing in understanding. You can follow nina on twitter she’s at nina chanpreet nina chanpreet court welcome to the studio. Thank you so much for having me. Tony it’s. A big pleasure. Thank you. I love the you know the way you describe yourself as living for tender moments of truth and compassion. That’s very touching. Well, it’s, very important in the world we live in today, i think it’s difficult. To ah have the experience of trust. I mean, in many ways, there’s very little we can trust the ingredient labels on the food we eat and the information we’re getting from the media. It’s challenging to understand what’s really that’s not really what’s what we can trust andi, i think there’s a lot of wounded nous and i rolled around it interesting that you mentioned the first example you give his food labels well, always right, you’re you must read ingredient labels like i do, so i don’t try don’t i am one of those people going to bother? No, no, no, i’m very meticulous. I don’t trust any ingredient label myself. I’m writing a fiction i mean, michael short work of fiction, right? My my research on trust emerged out of my own personal experiences and in which i found myself not trusting anything or anyone and really having to examine that and understanding what it is like in an organizational system and what it is like internally as well, not trusting anyone or anything that that that that’s a cold place to be a lonely place. It’s a cold lonely i’m exaggerating, but but you understand you know we’re going to actually define i’m going to ask you later, you know, defined trust and betrayal and things, but i feel like i’m a person who trust at the outset before i even know somebody i sort of i trust until someone gives me a reason not to trust, um, i think i’m going down the wrong path. Well, seymour, about that okay, let’s, take a business interaction. I just on the strength of a phone call, i trust my intuition. Yeah, i’m going to use the word trust or rely on my intuition, and the person seems like a good person like they they they ah, can be. They will be someone who will follow through on their commitments, whatever commitments we’re talking about making together. And when they give me their word, i can rely on it. Um, someone you know and i draw these conclusions on the strength of maybe a ten minute phone call. Maybe i’ve never let’s use the example where lots of times i’ve never met the person face-to-face it’s. Just a phone call, and i feel that, uh, that i can i can count on them. I can rely on them. I can trust them. That’s just my my nature. Well, one of the parts about trust that i research was the unconscious elements of trust and what’s really going on underneath the surface. So while consciously we may say, oh, you know, i trust this person there’s always something else going on under the surface. And i think we do need to challenge the idealization of trust because buy-in doing the research that i kept breeding things that trust is so important. Trust is so important trust is so important, and mistrust is actually equally important i mean, scientific research and, you know, antibiotics and so many scientific inventions were based off of not trusting something and seeing something in the road saying, wait, let me let me rethink that. Do i really trust what i’m seeing? Let me let me study this right there’s so many inventions in the world, scientific and non scientific that were really premised on mistrusting or trying to look a little bit further. So the idea that trust is that simple or that it’s, the most important thing on dh is easy to achieve, i think it’s something that i challenge because i think it is more complex than that. Similarly, i think mistrust and betrayal can be equally important, if not more, in some cases. Okay, so something more going on? All right, i’m glad we have. Well, there’s always more going on. Isn’t there? Okay, i don’t know. I you think about these things and study them more than i do. You know, i gave you my my approach toward it. Let’s. Define some terms. So since you’re the researcher in this, what how do you define trust? Well, there’s it’s a challenging question to answer because i think it it’s so subjective. But i do think that trust is not it’s it’s, not some kind of stable, non changing experience. I think it has a sort of life of its own and is very subjective and is the product of conflict and collaboration and deep relationship building. Yeah. Excellent. I know you refer to it is a product or by product of relationships. Yeah, some of my earliest work experiences is a when i was in my twenties att that time, i was a teacher. We would sit down in these meetings and we were supposed to take on these very big tasks, and we’d sit there, and everyone was twiddling their thumbs, complaining about how nobody trusts anyone. Of course, that wasn’t the language that was being used, but it was really a cop out and a lack of accountability because we would have gotten there, we would have formed that trust had we been willing to dig into stuff that was very uncomfortable to confront our own incapacity and our own kind of heartbreak about our failure as teachers in a school system that is failing, and so our inability to do that or lack of accountability, which, you know, we were just kind of dancing around, and i’m sort of pretending, and i say we i mean, i was of course aware that this was happening, but unable to necessarily do something about it in a big way. So and i’ve seen this in another non-profits i currently work a teaching matters, which is a non-profit i’ve consulted other non-profit so i so i see this kind of expectation that we start with trust, but the truth is that we usually end with it. So what? Okay, i’m going to challenge myself then, since you’re challenging these notions what i’m calling trust maybe is naivete. Well, i have a child in the dark or something or so that’s. A very interesting association. I wouldn’t say naive a tae that that there’s there may be i mean, there’s always a judgment. I think when we use that word in it, i don’t know what it is for you. But i do think our our first experience of organizational life is in our family system. And so are first formative experiences around trust are really important to pay attention to because they have a rich information for how we currently experience trust and betrayal and the notions that we have in the associations that we have around that. So i do think thie i mean, not that it makes you a child, but i do think it’s important to look at that dimension of our relatedness around trust. Okay, this may be a conversation more for my therapist than then a special psychologist. Let’s see s o i’m going to presume that your definition of mistrust would be something similar. It’s certainly also a byproduct of relationships. And it was him. Or you would add about mistrust. Well, again, it it there’s there’s a different i guess the only way i can distinguish it is there’s a difference between mistrust and betrayal, i think, which is that i think trust and mistrust kind of live together. So if we’re if we think we have one underneath the surface, the mistrust is always there. If you think about any even personal relationships, you can’t have a professional ones many times we give trust, hoping that we won’t. We won’t have the experience of being betrayed or are having experience of mistrust so that there’s it’s always there and betrayal in particular is an incidents when agreements between two people, whether unconscious or not conscious, are our transgressed or broken or boundaries are really crossed on dh i mean and well, i guess there so i’m saying that there are so many other components to betrayal, but that would be a very basic way to look at it. Okay? Betrayal. Very harsh. That’s the word no eight years horse but but but that’s, the thing about the world we live in today’s, which is why does it have to be perceived so harshly? We have to go away for a couple minutes. Nina chanpreet corps. And i’m going to keep talking about the bite. These byproducts of your relationships, trust, mistrust and betrayal. Stay with us. You’re tuned to non-profit radio. Tony martignetti also hosts a podcast for the chronicle of philanthropy fund-raising fundamentals is a quick ten minute burst of fund-raising insights, published once a month. Tony’s guests are expert in crowdfunding, mobile giving event fund-raising direct mail and donor cultivation. Really, all the fund-raising issues that make you wonder, am i doing this right? Is there a better way there is? Find the fund-raising fundamentals archive it. Tony martignetti dot com that’s marketmesuite n e t t i remember there’s, a g before the end, thousands of listeners have subscribed on itunes. You can also learn maura, the chronicle website philanthropy dot com fund-raising fundamentals the better way. Welcome back to big non-profit ideas for the other ninety five percent let’s talk about your research, nina, how do you study these issues? Well, my, my, my approach to doing research is looking through a psychodynamic lens, so just to touch on what you said before about, is this a conversation more for my therapist and and and i and i think that that is something within non-profits the idea that well, we only have to deal with strategic plans and theories of change and how we run meetings and not deal with the softer aspects, the reality, the felt experience between people. And so i about a year ago, i went to a group relations conference, which is it’s, an experiential unconference looking at the group dynamic systems, dynamics, organizational dynamics, and i stumbled upon the topic of trust and betrayal that week, it was a week long conference, and it was a very powerful experience, one of the members on staff there i was dr jim krantz, and he has done a lot of research also about trust and betrayal and how leaders often times have to make very tough decisions and betray in the process of managing organizations and it doesn’t it doesn’t, and you’re right. I mean, when you said betrayal is harsh, it’s true, it it’s a very painful experience. I mean, i don’t mean to take away from the felt experience that can be debilitating in the face of betrayal, but but but but our ways of thinking about trust and betrayal is really what i researched and in the context of school. So i have i mentioned before, i am a consultant teaching matters, and i’ve worked for the new york city department education for the last ten years, and trust and betrayal are just the most the biggest issues happening in schools today because there are so many changes, and those changes aren’t being built well managed, and as a result, i was looking in these organizational systems, i working in the schools and seeing that the ideas about trust and betrayal, or were very for me a little bit strange because change itself for many teachers and for many even administrators was a form of betrayal, just just the fact of so many changes happening was produced and invoked a sense of betrayal, not probably not only among teachers, but among students, also parents, i looked mostly at the staff and what we’re looking at. We we’re looking at a school system that fundamentally is not meeting the needs of the student. And so what i research was, why is this happening? Why do we have a system? And by looking at a couple of schools this case, studies in which the needs of the children are being met and what i found was that there is a regression happening, there’s this idea that we be able to trust or or that change never happens this agreement within the staff systems of schools, and this expectation around things either not changing or being ableto have a certain level of comfort, right right now in school, so many things are being challenged, the contract, the pay scale, the curriculum, the standards. I mean, almost everything in a school right now is changing. But basically nothing has stayed the same. And so what i wanted to understand is, why have we why do why does that expectation exist? That nothing changed on my hypothesis about in what i research? Was that the expectation that there be some kind of idealized trust that doesn’t change is a form of regressed thinking in a way in and a way in which and when i say regression, what i mean is that the needs of the children are being met, but rather the needs of the staffer put first and that’s what that’s what’s going on, and it doesn’t mean i’m not trying to say teacher would be listening. This alarm bells might be going on. I’m not trying to say the needs of the staff are not important to the needs of the adults are not important, but the needs of the children are not coming first on di didn’t you know it’s interesting, i didn’t look at the experience of trust between teacher and student that is a more difficult thing toe look at just in terms of the, um i guess just the logistics in terms of running a study like that, so my research was both quantitative and qualitative, and i was looking at it from a particular psychodynamic lens, so i hope that gives you a little bit of context. Well, one of the other things i’ll say is that a couple of years ago i had a leadership mentor. Who said to me, you know the world is changing so quickly, you really do need to know yourself and have a firm sense of yourself. Because when things change, you don’t also want to be falling apart in the middle of it. And around the time when i started this research, something in my life happened that really challenged me and challenge my notions of myself and trust and other people on dh in it and i it really required me to have that strength. And so one of the one of the things whenever, whenever i talk about my research, it’s impossible also not to talk about what i personally went through to be able to learn and see more clearly in my research, right there was there was a personal journey there. So you want to expand on what the journey was in a minute or two? Well, you said a little bit about it before i mean, it is t now there was a personal journey, and then, well, not sure. Well, what i’ll say about it is just that i, like i had mentioned before, beginning when we were first talking was that i was looking at myself, kind of putting myself in a p tradition, noticing that i don’t trust really anything, including ingredient labels, which are very black and white and s o it was just sort of, you know, looking more carefully at my own internal and interest psychic world around trust and betrayal, and trying to understand what was going on for me, and it became very informative for how it was then seeing the world around me. Where do you think this expectation comes from? That that there won’t be changed and that things will remain constant? Well, i think it i think it comes from, um it come, it comes from living in a world in which our organizational systems, and in which our school systems are are not are not dealing with the what i will say unconscious or underneath the surface elements of things, and so eh? So i think when we are more conscious of our thoughts, beliefs and actions it’s very simple to to challenge that notion. But when we’re not doing that, it’s just it’s, it’s, it’s very easy to fall into that belief, it’s very counterintuitive because there is so much change day to day from from employment situation’s toa technology, tio new stop signs. And in new york city the new speed limit this week from thirty to twenty five there is so much change around us, but so the expectation seems really exactly it’s irrational. This is so this is it. So when we think about when i say unconscious is exactly what i’m referring to is the irrationality, and we and and this is something i learned from jim krantz, which is that we are really living in a myth of rationality in the world, when in fact, there’s a whole lot of irrationality, that’s running our organisations in our systems and particularly i would say, buy-in in startups non-profits where people who are running them not that this oh my god, it’s, just so much irrationality happening in corporations, but non-profits and social enterprises are very interesting to look at because they have less funding to invest in some of these other types of mechanisms that they may need in their organizations. It’s kind of you know what i experience a non-profits is sort of like you have to be bare bones, right? You can’t always invest in these other aspects of organizational life that are so critical and and what i’m referring to is this approach of looking at the irrationality and an organizational system and looking at group dynamics and really grasping it. So how are we going toe navigate through our relationships, understanding that there’s going to be disappointment and frustration and also elation? Yeah, i think what you just said is the first artist is having that expectation and and knowing with open eyes and an open mind that, you know, there will be mistrust, there will be betrayal. And why do i have this idealization that that might happen? Let me look at that and what’s going on with me that i’m not seeing the reality of what could potentially happen. I mean, i think that’s the first start, but the other piece of it is tio when we think about working and living in an organizational system is it is trying teo, to really know oneself to really reflect no, your triggers know your motivator is no what’s really important to you and to be able to gauge that about other people and see the connection between the individual, the group, the organization the system, the world around us, i mean, these these these connections are very important to make, and when we’re not making them, we’re really missing a big part of our a big piece of relationship building, and we may not be able to see what is necessary to see to build that trust so i don’t have hokey ideas about okay, sit around in a group and tell the truth for a while, and then then you’ve got trust me. I there’s so many people are very quick to sell you ideas that would form let’s. Go on a group retreat and we’re walking on hot coals. I think therefore i think that trustee or reform back, i hope it’s okay for me to say this, but i think that’s bullshit. So i know we’ve had worse, i think it’s i think it’s i think it’s much more complex. I think it depends on the type of organization, the history, the memory of that organization. How long it’s been around the dynamics of turnover in that group? There’s? Just so many things to think about. And when you’re on the funder the managerial end of things you you know leaders have to make decisions all the time, whether they’re conscious of it or not, that they that they are betraying our may need to betray in the service of the larger task of the company and the larger well being of the mission of the work. And i mean, i think a lot of funders don’t don’t know the quality of of the dynamics within systems and organizations, and if there’s one thing i could recommend, it would be i mean, i’m not in the business of giving advice, but i really do think the experience i went through was invaluable and going to a group relations conference, and particularly for funders and the managers and leaders of organizations to be ableto have that experience it’s very eye opening. So and there is one coming up in our area in january it sze called authority roll on accountability and organizations and it’s happening january fourteenth eighteenth it’s a residential experience experiential conference in the taba stock tradition. And dr jim krantz is the director where it’s andover, massachusetts so it’s not far from here, and i have the name of it again its authority um roll an accountability authority. Role and accountable the website is leadership twenty fifteen dahna oregon. So we’ll post it, you know, we’ll post it when you were so sure the link with you. Yeah, we put in the takeaways. Paige there’s a lot of variables that go into power and authority in relationships, and i think those air relevant in around these topics, the variables on something of whose wealthier who’s got more experience, those the ones that come to mind and i’m thinking, you know, i’m thinking like, fundraiser donor-centric gree more tony, i mean, i think we we again living under this either this myth of rationality, this this idea that we have leadership figured out we don’t you know, we would continually need to revisit these basic issues of authority roll power. You know, these very basic things that play into how we relate to one another and how our organizational systems function as a result of that. And i think that, you know, trust is not in itself it’s sort of is just one thing, but it’s, everything around it that either creates that air destroys it. It’s a very elusive thanks, yeah, little more book. Well, like when we’re talking about authority and power and i mentioned before accountability, you know, we were talking about the group dynamics. These things are kind of the the the world of the organizational life and that’s going to determine whether or not they the system’s ableto hold trust and individuals can form bonds of trust or not, and in my experience and this is something that’s challenging for me to even say, but in some of the school’s right work, it’s just buy-in what i found is sometimes it’s just not possible it’s not possible to form trust, and it can take a very long time. And it’s it’s, the reason why i have a hard time saying it is because it makes me feel debilitated or i’m like, how do we live in a world where it’s just at times not possible and many people may challenge me on that. But from what i felt and experienced, there are times when it’s just not possible, and it doesn’t mean that there’s no solution, but it can take it can take an organization where there is a significant trauma or an incident decades to rebuild e i mean it’s on and it goes much better when we’re looking at what we’re just talking about, we’re looking at these dynamics and we’re working on them and we were we continually see trust is a byproduct instead of having the expectation that it be there in order for us to do the work, we’re always going to be working under a kind of discomfort and a sense of constant change that that may not be ideal, but but we have to work wonder it to get to the trust we’re always working in a state of discomfort you’re saying i think so to some extent, i mean, i mean, when in my own work, you know, i love what i do. I really love the work i’ve done in schools over the last decade, and it brings me a lot of pleasure, but that, but but that feeling of pleasure is always there with a lot, with a mixed, other set of emotions around discomfort, uncertainty, fear, you know, questioning myself, questioning other people on dh in fact, what’s interesting so year, so a year since i started well, over a year now since i started doing that research what i have discovered in myself is, i trust myself more, but i continue to question myself, and i continue to reflect, and that has been, i think, a guiding light for me and being able to navigate so much complexity. Yeah, good, yeah. Lorts there aren’t probably enough very many people always questioning, always asking these bigger questions the way the way you’re going through not only your research but your life. It sounds like you, and the reason why i figured out how to do it is because i’ve met many people along the way who opened the door for me or open my eyes to something that said, hey, pay attention to this or, you know it it’s so much of my success is based on the success of other people who i have many form bonds of trust with, but but but but nothing and nothing in my life has ever remained constant or consistent, and so perhaps because i’ve had that experience just even from my childhood to today, it has given me a bit of a different perspective. What is it that you love about the work that you’re doing? Whether it’s consulting the research, what do? Well, i’m really driven by you know what? What you mentioned in the introduction, which is, which is how do you effectively impact change? And i’m i’m also driven by buy-in finding ways to continuously improve what we’re doing that so that’s my m o that’s what i really want to see in the world and so it just gives me great pleasure to be able to work with people and work and organizations where i can help them do that. And i can be part of that experience and figure figure something out for the wide world. So a lot of what i’m doing in schools, the reason i do the research is so i can look at it and take it back and say, okay, wait here. I found something this could apply across, right the applied research. This could apply somewhere else and making that making that connection, leveraging that change is really important to me. Um, you know, it comes from it comes really from my mother and the way that i was raised and she was very aware of global issues and whether or not i should have known what i knew about the world at the ages that i did is another issue, but just just having from her and seeing from her what’s happening in the world and wanting to understand kind of in this title that i wear the doctor of social problems, what’s going on and how you solve it. It is really what gives me a lot of pleasure, so i’m glad you credited your mom at the end. Well, of course, we have to leave it there, ok. Nina chanpreet corps last name spelled k es. You are. You’ll find her on twitter at nina chanpreet, thank you so much for having me, tony. My pleasure. I’m glad you know i’m glad you’re with me. Thank you very much. Generosity siri’s. They host five k runs and walks last sunday. I am seed, their generosity and why see, event over three hundred runners from nine charities came together in riverside park. They were from the center for urban community services. Creative artworks engender health, forrest, dale and other non-profits. One of them could have hosted their own event. They don’t have enough runners, but when the community comes together, then they can do incredible things together, raising over one hundred fifty thousand dollars for these nine organizations. And the fund-raising actually continues for another two weeks, so they’re not done. Generosity. Siri’s, dave lind, he’s the ceo. You can talk to him. Tell him that you came from non-profit radio he’s at seven one eight five o six. Nine triple seven or generosity siri’s, dot com. They have events coming up in new jersey, miami and philadelphia. I shot this week’s video in riverside park at generosity and y c because i was really moved by the great success of these nine charities coming together like i just said, they none of them could do it on their own. But coming together such enormous synergy and there’s just ah, terrific lesson about collaboration, whether it’s with your colleagues or other organizations, this week’s video is that tony martignetti dot com and that is tony’s take two for friday fourteenth of november forty fifth show of this year. Maria simple. You know maria simple she’s, the prospect finder she’s a trainer and speaker on prospect research. Her website is the prospect finder dot com and her book is panning for gold. Find your best donorsearch prospects now she’s our doi end of dirt, cheap and free. You can follow maria on twitter at maria simple. Welcome back, maria simple. Hello there. How are you today? I’m doing very well. How are you? Just fine, thank you. Excellent. We’ve got the pleasantries out of the way. What’s what’s this high net worth study all about that you want to talk about? So i had an opportunity to hear about the results of the most recent high network study that was undertaken by us trusted it’s actually a partnership between us trust and the indiana university lily family school of philanthropy, and they do this study every other year. And i was attending a conference on friday for a f p in west chester, and i heard david radcliffe speak he’s, one of the managing director’s um, over at us trust, and so i thought it would make for some very interesting conversation because, of course, non-profits were always interested in knowing what what are the high net worth individuals in our communities thinking about as it relates to philanthropy in general, but about how we as organizations operate on dh? How can we leverage the results of this study to sort of improve or tweak what we’re doing is non-profit so it was very intriguing to me, and so as i was listening to him, speak and then afterward went in on the web and sought out the study itself. Um, i was thinking of this through the lens of a non-profit and what should they be gleaning from these reports? We should just cut you out and brought david on well, let’s, bring the principal in here. Well, well, you know what that would probably make for conversation, you know, how you know? Absolutely, but i think but, you know, i’m looking at it fromthe lens of if i were well, obviously, as a prospect researcher, i was very interested in this, right? So i’m always interested in what is going on in the psyche of the high net worth individual, but also through the lens, as i said of a non-profit executive or a non-profit boardmember what do you need to be keeping in mind as you’re approaching or thinking about approaching high net worth individuals for some major gift to really propel your organization’s forward? Important, i think, to recognize that the survey is based on self reported activity and thoughts around why we give why i give so there’s always that, you know, sampling bias. I’m not sure if that’s the right phrase, but there’s always a bias around self reported results versus something that’s observation all yeah, but what? You know, what was interesting was they really made sure that they tried to randomly sample across the entire united states on dh so in the end they’re in there. I understand. Just still self reported data. Oh, yeah. Oh, absolutely. Itself reported data and it has to do with their sentiments about they’re giving in the year twenty thirteen. So overall, i will say that i thought things came out to be pretty positive from the report. Things do seem to be on an upswing. So that was the overarching from me. Good news that i got out of the executive summary of the study. I did see that ninety eight percent of high net worth. And by the way, we should define our terms to they define high net worth as having a minimum of a million dollars net worth, excluding you home value on and having on an annual income of two hundred thousand dollars or more, right, that’s their definition of high net worth. All right, i saw that ninety eight percent of the high net worth individuals donate. Yes, yes. So that was that was indeed very good news as well as their average dollar amount has gone up. Um, since since the last study was done, so in two thousand eleven, their average gift was at fifty three thousand. Five hundred nineteen dollars and it’s actually increased twenty eight percent. It’s now up to sixty eight thousand five hundred eighty dollars. So again, good positive news. That’s probably reflecting our improved economy from two years ago. Right? Sort of expect that. But it is very it’s. Good news. Encouraging hyre encouraging also for the future that a lot of people think eighty five percent expect to give the same or mohr this year. Yes, yes, very ous. They look forward to what do they plan to do in the future? The overwhelming number of people said they planned to keep it at same levels or increased levels. So that was good to know that in their psyche, their not thinking about pulling back. Ah, they also think that non-profits are sort of a great solution to many of the problems and issues that we face in our community. So they do feel that they have a great deal of trust in the nonprofit sector to really harness and tackle some of the big issues that are going on right now. Okay, that you’re right. That’s also encouraging. What else you see in there? Well, i liked the fact that just over seventy eight percent of them gave unrestricted e-giving so that to me says as a non-profit as you’re thinking about your programs and so forth and how you know when you’re approaching foundations or corporations, and they want to give to some very specific programming as you’re approaching a non-profit i’m sorry, an individual their psyche is a little different, they don’t mind giving toe unrestricted e-giving they totally get the fact that you’ve got to keep the lights on and pay salaries, et cetera, so that takeaway was don’t forget to ask for that general operating support. Yeah, that is pretty startling. It’s that’s ah, considerably hyre number than i would have thought. But, you know, my insights could be completely off base as well, but that was yeah, pretty revealing to me that that high proportion of unrestricted giving also very encouraging. What did you say that? What did you say? The percentage was of unrestricted gift. Uh, the statistic that david shared with us with seventy eight point two percent okay, gave unrestricted among friends. We can call it seventy eight percent. Okay, um, i saw that volunteers give more. That seems intuitive if you’re spending time with the organization, you’re you’re more apt to give more to them than if you’re a non volunteer. That’s, right? Absolutely. So another takeaway, then, for a non-profit is teo not be afraid to first approach on high net worth individual and ask them for a gift of their time, as opposed to outright asking for a gift of cash? Because it is pretty darn likely. I think that if you can get them engaged at a very deep and committed level, it will probably stand to reason that the money will also follow what else you got there. So another interesting piece for me was that you have to really think about engaging both spouses so as you’re thinking about your approach to them, if they’re married, um, think about having the conversation with both people don’t leave the spouses out of the conversations around major gift because they are not making these decisions in a vacuum, and the spouse does appreciate very much being involved in that conversation on dh taking their overall interests and ideas toe heart. So they really wanna have that that level of, you know, involvement. So that would be a big takeaway i thought was make sure you’re not just talking to one person if they’re married, make sure both are at the table for the conversations. You know what i see that maria playing out badly often is at events, not where there’s an ask being being made the way you’re describing, but the, uh i see so often people working for the for the organization are talking to the predominant donor in the in the couple, whether it’s, the wife or the husband and sort of minimising or excluding fromthe conversation, the other person it’s really offensive, but i see that a lot. And so how does the how does the other person feel they feel marginalized? They they feeling like the organization thinks they’re insignificant, and i think that has a lot of repercussions. Yeah, you know what, you’re absolutely right. I’ve noticed the same thing and, you know, one way around that for an organisation is just to be a little bit more strategic, you know, in deciding all right, you know, in advance who’s going to be an attending a an event, so why not make sure that you leverage your board and keep volunteers that will be at this event to have them understand the key couples that will be there so that if a conversation is happening, you know, with, say, as you called it, the predominant donor and make sure that somebody else is, you know, trying to at least engage the other person in the conversation so that there emotions are taken into account well, just to be a decent person, you know, talk to talk, to both, talk to both the guys or the both the women or the guy in the women, you know, talk to everybody, don’t you know, just ah, yeah, i think we need a lot. More sensitivity to the fact that it’s not, you know, it’s, not all about just who gives and who volunteers and the other person we should ignore. I see that i see a lot, ok, but this was one of the other kind of along those, you know, staying on that line for a minute. One of the other interesting pieces that came out of that was that as i said, you know, you you want to make sure you’re taking both people into account. But then one piece of this study said that women are more likely to be the sole decision makers nearly three times as many women as men. Twenty percent versus seven percent are the sole decision maker. So and i’m pretty sure that us trust has also done a study in the past around women and philanthropy, so that might be something interesting to take a closer look at as well. But don’t forget to talk to the woman in the couple, that is for certain. Yes, if the if the guy is the predominant donor. But talk tio, talk to the whole family, you know? I mean, just be just just talk to people. Be decent. That’s all yeah. Okay, um, i thought it was interesting some of the breakdowns of why people give i like that there’s a very good chart about personal motivations for giving. Yes, you’re right. And i don’t have that one in front of the thing that stood out was that altruism. I was ranked highest and something that you would expect to rank high did not, which was the tax benefits ranked almost close to the bottom. So you’re a cynic you would you expected text to rank? I see i didn’t, but i work in plant giving, and i know that taxes don’t motivate most most people, but you’re okay, your little, your little more cold hearted than i am that’s. Interesting? No, i just i think i would have expected from the study that a tax incentive would have been ranking higher than it did on the overall results have been surprised to see how low it ranked it was, it was one third actually, to be exact, thirty four percent said that receiving a tax benefit motivates them to give and what you mentioned the altruism, personal satisfaction rank very high, seventy three percent said personal satisfaction. And when you believe that your gift can make a difference, that was comparable seventy four percent, a lot of a lot of altruism, you’re right. What else was interesting to you? I thought it was interesting to see why wealthy donors actually stopped e-giving so when they were asked why why they had stopped supporting an organization, they said that receiving solicitations to frequently or being asked for an inappropriate amount. Forty two percent of the people said that was the reason why they stopped. Thirty five percent said they had you there change their philanthropic focus or decided to support other causes. But i thought it was very interesting. And so, you know, that just goes to really reiterate why, as a researcher, you need to think about what is that very targeted? Ask? We can make let’s ask less less frequently, perhaps, but let’s make that ass very much tied to what that family wants to be able to do in terms of making a deep impact. Impact was also a word that that was throughout this study, i thought, because fifty over three fifty three percent of the people said that they monitor or evaluate the impact of their charitable gift. So if you can really tie closely together, i think how often you ask how much you’re asking for and then clearly demonstrating and stewarding that gift. Well, i think that’s gonna have good results. We have to go away for a couple of minutes. When we come back, maria and i will keep talking about the us trust high net worth study. Stay with us. Like what you’re hearing a non-profit radio tony’s got more on youtube, you’ll find clips from stand up comedy tv spots and exclusive interviews catch guests like seth gordon. Craig newmark, the founder of craigslist marquis of eco enterprises, charles best from donors choose dot org’s aria finger do something that worked and a a me levine from new york universities heimans center on philantech tony tweets to he finds the best content from the most knowledgeable, interesting people in and around non-profits to share on his stream. If you have valuable info, he wants to re tweet you during the show. You can join the conversation on twitter using hashtag non-profit radio twitter is an easy way to reach tony he’s at tony martignetti narasimhan t i g e n e t t i remember there’s a g before the end, he hosts a podcast for the chronicle of philanthropy fund-raising fundamentals is a short monthly show devoted to getting over your fund-raising hartals just like non-profit radio, toni talks to leading thinkers, experts and cool people with great ideas. As one fan said, tony picks their brains and i don’t have to leave my office fund-raising fundamentals was recently dubbed the most helpful non-profit podcast you have ever heard. You can also join the conversation on facebook, where you can ask questions before or after the show. The guests were there, too. Get insider show alerts by email, tony tells you who’s on each week and always includes link so that you can contact guests directly. To sign up, visit the facebook page for tony martignetti dot com. Lively conversation, top trends and sound advice that’s tony martignetti non-profit radio and i’m lawrence paige, no knee author off the non-profit fund-raising solution. I still wish lawrence would pronounce his name panjwani sounds so much nicer than paige an oni i don’t know if i told him that when he was on. I don’t think i did. I think it only said it behind his back on the ship, but nobody listens to this show, so it doesn’t make a difference. All right, maria sample. What else was interesting in there, too? I have a few things, but let’s throw to you. What did you find? What else? Well, i did not see this printed anywhere in the report, but one of the things that david said at the conference was he really encouraged the non-profits to have a very succinct one page document about the organization with the legal name spelled correctly so that they can pass this document along to their attorneys for consideration in wills and bequests. So i thought you would like that tip in particular, and i modify it. One piece i would include. Besides, the legal name is the federal tax i d. Number yes. I like gross amounts of precision. Yeah, yeah. He said that, you know, make it as absolutely clear, it’s possible? Because, you know, and i’m sure you have seen in your work problems can arise if things are not properly spelled out. So i thought that was a really good tip that he shared with the audience. There’s another reason for doing it. And that is to make it easy for people to. And i’m sure this is what david thinking is they david is thinking easy to give to the organization by including it in your will. Your life insurance, maybe some other beneficiary designation document without having to go to the organization to ask what’s your legal name. What? Your tax? I d number what’s your address, you know, so just making that ah, easy process for donors. Exactly. On dh that’s. Why he wanted it to be. You know what? Go thanked one page. I thought it was interesting where the dollars are going. The high net worth dollars mostly to education. Just mostly education. Yes, they place a very high ranking on education. And that percentage did grow as well. From twenty eleven to twenty thirteen so they did feel that that was a key policy priority on dh. There were, you know, right behind that where poverty, health care and the environment. Yeah. Now that’s ah, beneath education that’s where this diverges from what atlas of giving and giving, yusa would would say, is the next most popular e-giving which is religion in the no studies. But here religion was number five durney beneath beneath like you’re saying social social services, basic needs beneath arts and beneath health. Then came religion. Yeah. And it could very well be because of the population, the demographics of the population that was actually being surveyed here. So, you know, while atlas of giving and giving us a look more broadly across all income levels since this was focusing so specifically on that hyre network population, you can see that you know what? That level things air skewed a little bit differently. Well, they’re coming again. They can afford to buy themselves into the afterlife. They don’t have to give to charities to get there. Maybe that’s it, i think, to the benefit of other non-profits other other terrible missions. What else you got there? Well, you know they’re clear expectations that they have set out for the non-profits and again, you know, comes back to two to measuring impact. I can’t stress enough how much i thought as david was speaking, then i subsequently went and read the executive summary how non-profits really need teo get very clear, um, about stewardship so important, i mean, i know that i’m here to talk about prospect research, you know, that feeds into getting the gift, but then keeping those people engaged once you’ve got them engaged with your organization toe, let them slip away because you’re either asking too frequently or ass skiing for not the right amounts or you’re not just simply telling your stories about keeping them engaged is just such a huge missed opportunity. How did how did they gauge that from this study? Well, they were they were talking about their expectations and how they expect to be having there is the impact of their gifts, how they monitor their giving, so a lot of them are actually measuring the impact they’re giving by directly engaging with the organization at eighty percent of the people are so again, it goes back to that asking them t be volunteering with you stay as close to possible with the mission of the organization so that they’re able to continue seeing the impact that you’re doing so don’t only demonstrate that impact through letters and and email and social media, but make sure that you’re engaging them to really have direct contact with the organization on dh reporting on impact for those that want that reporting? Absolutely yeah, i mean, there are going to be that the people who really want to see it in, you know, in that number’s format, you, they want to see the reports and so forth and that’s great, you’ve got to do that. You’ve got to do those outcome measurements and so forth, however, at that high net worth level, if you can keep them engaged as well through volunteerism. It’s going to bode very well going forward for you. Okay, we have just about a minute left. What what’s a final point you’d like to make again having that one page document don’t ignore thie, you know, because a couple aa in its entirety a cz decision makers understanding what motivates them, keeping them engaged with your organization, getting them to volunteer more often on dh asking for appropriate amounts so that does involve prospect research. It involves understanding where they’ve given what other levels and where you know what motivates them. What is it that they want to give to within your organization? She’s, our regular contributor in prospect research and she’s the prospect finder. You’ll find maria simple at the prospect finder dot com and on twitter at marie. A simple thank you so much, maria. Thank you. Real pleasure to have you back. Thank you. Next week got mohr informative interviews coming from fund-raising day. If you missed any part of today’s show, find it at tony martignetti dot com generosity siri’s good things happen when small charities work together. Seven one eight five o six. Nine triple seven or generosity siri’s dot com our creative producer was clear meyerhoff sam liebowitz is on the board as the line producer shows social media is by julia campbell of jake campbell social marketing and the remote producer of tony martignetti non-profit radio is john federico of the new rules this music is by scott stein you with me next week for non-profit radio big non-profit ideas for the other ninety five percent. Sorry, i couldn’t do live listener love pre recorded this week. But i love our live listeners and podcast pleasantries as well. Go out and be great. What’s not to love about non-profit radio tony gets the best guests check this out from seth godin this’s the first revolution since tv nineteen fifty and henry ford nineteen twenty it’s the revolution of our lifetime here’s a smart, simple idea from craigslist founder craig newmark yeah insights, orn presentation or anything? People don’t really need the fancy stuff they need something which is simple and fast. When’s the best time to post on facebook facebook’s andrew noise nose at traffic is at an all time hyre on nine a m or eight pm so that’s, when you should be posting your most meaningful post here’s aria finger ceo of do something dot or ge young people are not going to be involved in social change if it’s boring and they don’t see the impact of what they’re doing. So you got to make it fun and applicable to these young people look so otherwise a fifteen and sixteen year old they have better things to do if they have xbox, they have tv, they have their cell phones. Me dar is the founder of idealist took two or three years for foundation staff, sort of dane toe add an email address their card, it was like it was phone. This email thing is, we’re here that’s why should i give it away? Charles best founded donors choose dot or ge somehow they’ve gotten in touch kind of off line as it were and and no two exchanges of brownies and visits and physical gift. Mark echo is the founder and ceo of eco enterprises. You may be wearing his hoodies and shirts. Tony talked to him. Yeah, you know, i just i’m a big believer that’s not what you make in life. It sze, you know, tell you make people feel this is public radio host majora carter. Innovation is in the power of understanding that you don’t just do it. You put money on a situation expected to hell, you put money in a situation and invested and expect it to grow and savvy advice for success from eric sabiston. What separates those who achieve from those who do not is in direct proportion to one’s ability to ask others for help. The smartest experts and leading thinkers air on tony martignetti non-profit radio big non-profit ideas for the other ninety five percent.