Tag Archives: Video

Video: ALS After Ice Bucket Challenge

Last week on Nonprofit Radio I interviewed Barbara Newhouse, the ALS president and CEO.

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Don’t despair. Here it is. My takeaways are below.

Takeaways:

— Ice Bucket Challenge yielded $115 million and 2.4 million new donors

— roughly half the donors expressed interest in remaining engaged

— no spending and allocation plan until November

— there’s so much to tell, you really should watch the video

Next week on Nonprofit Radio:

Maria Semple, our monthly prospect research contributor and The Prospect Finder, returns to talk about finding in-kind gifts.

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Nonprofit Radio for September 26, 2014: Critical Development Committee & Creative Commons 101

Big Nonprofit Ideas for the Other 95%

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My Guests:

Greg Cohen: Critical Development Committee

Greg Cohen

Greg Cohen is senior associate at Cause Effective. He wants you to understand how important your development committee is to your board and your organization. What does a high performing committee do and how can you support them? Plus tips on recruiting and mentoring.

 

 

 

Carly Leinheiser: Creative Commons 101

Carly Leinheiser at NTC 2104

Carly Leinheiser explains what Creative Commons is and how valuable it can be if you need video, images or pubs or want to release your own to raise awareness. She’s an attorney at Perlman+Perlman. (Recorded at NTC 2014, the Nonprofit Technology Conference.)

 

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Hello and welcome to tony martignetti non-profit radio big non-profit ideas for the other ninety five percent. I’m your aptly named host. Oh, i’m glad you’re with me. I’d be hit with red know cora did itis if i saw that you missed today’s show critical development committee greg cohen is senior associate at cause effective. He wants you to understand how important your development committee is to your board and your organisation. What is the high performing committee do? And how do you support them? Plus tips on recruiting and mentoring and creative commons one oh one carly leinheiser explains what creative commons is and how valuable it khun b if you need video images or publications or want to release your own to raise awareness. She’s, an attorney at perlman and pearlman we talked at ntcdinosaur fourteen the non-profit technology conference on tony’s take two, get off a less is back and a very special, a less show next week. Responsive by generosity siri’s you know them. They host multi charity five k runs and walks. I’m very glad that greg cohen is in the studio with me. He is a senior associate at cause effective since two. Thousand six he has provided training and coaching on fund-raising and governance to the boards and staffs of hundreds of non-profits for over thirty years, he’s worked to the wide range of non-profits greg cohen, welcome to studio very glad to be here. We had your colleague susan gabriel on about three weeks ago or so, and i am so in love with what cause defectives work does and how smart you all are on when she introduced me to you, i said, yes, this is definitely an important topic development committee. Please just remind us what cause effective does it’s a non-profits were non-profit ourselves, we’ve been around for over thirty years and where a capacity building group with a focus on helping other non-profits build communities of supporters with a particular emphasis on individual donors. We help them strengthen their boards both for governance and stewardship functions, as well as to make boardmember sze confident and effective fundraisers, aki function and the third area is to advise groups on the strategic use of special events. So not event management, but more the big picture of if we’re going to do something special this year, how do we make? Sure, it aligns with our capacity in our long term organisational objectives, and we don’t steer off the cliff running an event that doesn’t really fit who we are and who our audiences are and that’s related, the third part is related to what susan and i talked about using anniversaries exact effectively, basically when i would say that in a nutshell, it helps you get to the next level for small organizations that are struggling, particularly with fund-raising but also governance? Well, they may not really know that they have governance issues. Um, i think cause effective is a very good place for these organizations again, so it’s, particularly about diversifying funding when we’re talking about fund-raising for groups that have been very dependent on government or foundation, a few sources to diversify into individual donors and don’t know quite what the first steps are in aa strengthening, i think everything every organization feels its board could get to the next level so very much helping boards figure out how to be better planners and stewards of their organization. How does cause effective charge for its work? So about half our clients have a third party like united way. Or a foundation like new york women’s foundation who have funded us to work with them to strengthen them in a particular area. And about half come in having found a source of funding, either unrest, districted or a boardmember someone who feels the topic is important and helps fund our work with them. We also do a lot of work for free through partners like the foundation center and the non-profit coordinating committee, where we offer workshops, i do a lot speaking at the foundation center, i’ve never done non-profit coordinating committee, maybe you can get me in there. I don’t i’m on the board, so you are i’m talking e expected to get me, but i have done a lot of the foundation’s enter through the years on either planned e-giving or charity registration. They have an open house in november foundation center i’m speaking on plant giving a great that open house our development committee? Yes. Why is well, let’s start with why it’s important that we get to whether everybody needs one? Why is your function so important on the board as a committee? So i’m going to get a little high concept for a minute. And talk about the sociology of philanthropy and one of the key principles is that people are motivated to give and respond to their peers people who are like them in a socioeconomic way, perhaps, but i’m sure staff people listening are familiar with the fact that after a while, because they are always speaking to their boards about every possible topic, they’re urging them to fundraise becomes part of the wallpaper just become something that becomes routine. So how do we break through that to encourage and support boardmember sze to fundraise in ways that they can really here and the development committee, which is made up of their peer board members, is a key way for board members to talk to board members as a team about how we’re going to approach fund-raising for this organization, it sounds like even a small board six people should have ah, development committee absolutely so even if it’s a committee of two, although i would work to grow the board and grow that committee that’s important because the other thing is every critical function of a non-profit needs somebody who owns it. So if ah, a lot of organizations think, well the whole board should be fund-raising that’s absolutely true, the function of the development committee is to be the little wheel that turns the big wheel board fund-raising not to be the people who the rest of the board has delegated to go out and raise the money that the port thinks it should be raising, but rather it’s, the people who leave the meeting thinking about how do we move the board forward towards some fund-raising goals in between those meetings, just the way the staff does. A lot of times, i think boards delegate the fund-raising to the staff person, and they see maybe hiring their first director of development as the panacea, the cure all that’s right now, we can relax now we don’t have worry about fund-raising cause we have a director, we hired a director development so it’s his or her job. So this is why that peer-to-peer concept is so important because if we can visualize around every boardmember their facebook and lengthen networks, they’re connected to dozens, if not hundreds of people, but the staff would never have access to those folks were it not for board members willingness to be in front. Of those folk shin’s share their passion for the mission of the organization. So and typically, staff members don’t come in with the multiple of networks that aboard represents. So we say aboard is the vanguard of individual fund-raising and they have to be willing to reach out themselves to connect with other people and that can’t be delegated to staff, even if that the director of development does have networks, they’re not the networks that you, khun that person can bring to the organization their networks of other professional fundraisers, friends and family. But but it’s it’s not appropriate for this staff person to be asking their friends and family just be supporting argast that they work for well, we like staff people teo fund-raising actually, but it’s limited to their network. And if you have six, eight, ten boardmember sze sitting around the table who might offer access to hundreds more people, you’re leaving that resource untapped if you only rely on the staff to do that individual relationship building within their circles. Okay, then what is the relationship between the board development committee and either the director of development or even let’s? Consider a smaller shop that don’t even have a director development where it’s, the executive director. Sure. Well, let me start, actually, with the functions of the development committee, then it’s easier to understand. Taking taking over. All right now, i just think it’s a little. All right, well, okay. You know, i’ll say that it’s in a way the staff leads from behind. So they’re the ones who are the professionals who are thinking of, in a sophisticated way about where the organization could go for fund-raising collecting the information on what’s effective and but what they’re doing is they’re guiding the board leadership into howto have the conversation about fund-raising and supporting their fellow board members, kind of from behind, right? Okay, so so they they may in fact be either masterminding or thinking in conjunction with the head of the development committee or the board chair how we’re going to move this group, but they’re they’re letting the board voices lead the conversation around the table instead of it being their voices thie other thing is there plenty of tools that board members need? They need elevator speeches. They need talking points. They need help thinking out cultivation events to bring their friends in aa lot of different activities and events that are going to need the support of staff, the most valuable thing the boardmember brings is the ability to get someone to respond to their phone call or their appeal. Excellent. Ok, i just wanted to lay out, yeah, i didn’t want to get into detail, okay, don’t upset you, okay, we’re gonna go because right after this break was going to take right now, we’re definitely going to get into what does this committee do? Great. And then we can talk more in detail about the the staff functions to support that in detail. Sure, i just want to lay out the general landscape relationship. Thank you very much for indulging me. All right, we’ll go out for a couple minutes. When you come back, greg and i are going to keep talking about your critical development committee. E-giving didn’t think dick tooting good ending. You’re listening to the talking alternate network, get in. I think. Cubine this’s, the cook said about wear hosting part of my french new york city guests come from all over the world, from mali to new caledonia. From paris to keep back. French is a common language. Yes, they all come from different cultures, background or countries, and it common desires to make new york they’re home. Listen to them, shed their story, join us, part of my french new york city. Every monday from one to two p, m. Are you stuck in your business or career trying to take your business to the next level, and it keeps hitting a wall? This is sam liebowitz, the conscious consultant. I will help you get to the root cause of your abundance issues and help move you forward in your life. Call me now and let’s. Create the future you dream of. Two, one, two, seven, two, one, eight, one, eight, three, that’s to one to seven to one, eight one eight three. The conscious consultant helping conscious people. Be better business people. Dahna you’re listening to the talking alternative network. Oppcoll welcome back to big non-profit ideas for the other ninety five percent. Greg let’s, let’s, move right into this. Now, what does this important development committee do? Right? So i said, it’s, the little wheel that turns the big wheel aboard fund-raising so what are the functions of that cock? First thing is, it helps the board have a conversation about what are its goals for fund-raising as a subset of the goals of the overall organization, sometimes an organization says, okay, we want to raise fifty thousand dollars from individual donations this year through a combination of our event staff driven fund-raising inboard fund-raising and that goal sits there. However, the the board itself doesn’t have its own thermometer for its own activities, and commonly there’ll be a board meeting and every will say, you know, we have the big anniversary gala coming up. I know everybody’s going to go out and sell tickets and sponsorships, right? And everybody agrees at that moment, there’s a good feeling in the room, and then they go back to their regular lives and expect, as in the past executive director and the board chair going to pull the rabbit out of the hat so what we want to do is set goals for the board specifics, both for events and overall so of that fifty thousand what’s our board promised to the organization that we’re going to do let’s say we’re going to twenty thousand of it minimum, and we’re going to have a stretch goal a thirty five toward the fifty that way, the exact director knows one they can write that number into the budget and actually spend on it rather than live in suspense until the end of the year to see are the boardmember is actually able to come through and two, it gives a rallying point throughout the year for that board development committee toe work with the other boardmember sze to say, hey, we’re up to fifteen, you know, with this spring reception, we could get toward twenty five of our goal who you thinking of bringing and how much do you think they’d be able to do? So, you know, they say what gets measured gets done and setting goals for board specific fund-raising and having knows that gold monitored, but and supported by members of the board itself is a strong way to actually tow actualize those girls. What happens if the development committee brings these goals to the larger board and there isn’t support for them, so it has to be consensus, right? You can’t the ah, one of the most important characteristics of non-profit is it’s, not a command and control culture, it’s by consensus and, of course, what’s. Most important is that you bring in the board members who have the most ability in terms of your financial goals. But if you have a board with varied economic impact in a diverse board, then you also want goals that have to do with capacity. How many new people worry bringing into the organization? How many new donors without regard to the size of their gifts, how many people are we asking and those air goals that every boardmember can embrace without regard to? Hey, i don’t know anyone of high net worth and your point earlier was that these this is peer-to-peer so its board members in the development committee bringing these goals eggs, activities exactly to their fellow board members versus the staff, and it voids the awkwardness of saying, hey, reach a bigger goal that goes for my salary. Right, you can see where that might not be a most comfortable conversation foran executive director not to set a goal, but to exhort boardmember is that’s kind of hard when it when it’s partly your livelihood that’s at stake, so that’s goal setting the second thing is i mentioned is monitoring toward the goals. The third thing is supporting board members, so checking in and saying, how’s it going? What are you hearing when you’re out talking with your friends about the work or your colleagues at work? Are there additional tools that you need? What kind of events would help you bring in the folks that you think might be most interested in your circle in our work? So they’re they’re getting the chance to ask the board members how’s this process going rather than again? Exhorting people have him leave the room and be on their own teo to meet their individual fund-raising goals there’s the idea that they’re backing them up, and in fact, we advocate a buddy system where each member the development committee takes a few people on the board if you have a board that’s large enough who are not on the development. Committee and works with them over the course of the year in partnership to help them reach their goals. All right, we’re gonna have some more time talking about the buddy system of that. Because it’s ah, it brings back to my boy scout data on ah, we had troops whims. You have a swim in the water front now on the waterfront of been inspected. That’s a part of the truth from you had a buddy system and everybody had to be near their buddy swimming. And these are body checks. So we’re going aboard united now checks and hopefully they’re not drowning in the water. The board members, they’re i’ve taken that foreign so away. Other things that the committee does but let’s sze check in which this support role is this, i guess it’s not on ly at board meetings, but but we can be particularly between the time right took in board meetings is when we’re together. We have ah good feeling of working as a group and being aligned. The hard part is when we go back to the rest of our lives, family and work and our board responsibilities tend to fade in the face of the immediacy of those other things having development committee people checking in with board members in those periods between board meetings is a way to keep that present in their lives. All right, so that’s the monitoring and support role that’s that’s, right of the committee that’s right and listening, you know, there’s such a key thing in all fund-raising but hearing how’s it going for this difficulty thing of asking for money and and and finding out what’s, easy, what’s, hard, and and also because each development committee person is talking to a few people, they start to see what the commonalities are, you know, something’s missing from our pitch, i’m hearing that from several people. What about dealing with the recalcitrant board members so kind of in a version of everybody bring in stories, but sure, if you want to tell me so in a version of the buddy system, one one great system is to take boardmember sze who are experienced and confident and match them up, whether they’re on the development committee or not matched them up with newer boardmember czar or board members who are more reluctant to ask and have them go. Out together, for instance, on and ask so that the lesser experienced person had has a chance to see how it’s done and participate first. So great great example a peer-to-peer support there thie other area that often happens is chaillou i think i’d liketo have host a house party to get some of my friends, but i’m not sure enough people will turn up, and i wouldn’t want the embarrassment of having an empty room. Well, is there another boardmember thatyou could pair up and co host together, for instance? Excellent. Okay, and we’re going to talk about the recruiting, but but just it’s coming to my now the ah fund-raising expectations e-giving of board members at the recruitment stage can we just can we talk about that confession? How explicit should we be? Should it be in writing? Not in writing? How do we have this conversation about fund-raising expectations at recruitment? Great questions so that that’s really the next evolution of board fund-raising goal setting, which is ok overall, is aboard. We’re going to set some goals and then the next step is to say, what does each person think over the course of the year, they khun do toward those various goals. Can they host an event? Will they show up at other events? How many new people do they think they can bring into the fold? How many people do they think they can ask for money and at what levels? And, of course, for their own giving what? What between events and an annual gift? Do they think they’ll give and that’s important? Because that’s really where the rubber meets the road and being able to match the aspirations of a goal with what’s actually likely toe happen over the course of the year, and it let’s board members reflect on what they can, what there actually able to do? Dahna what’s easy and then what becomes a stretch? And if you add up, if you get people to write down on ah pledged pledge form pledge is probably the wrong word, but a projection form of what they can do, and you add that up, you see two people’s own projections of what they do get anywhere close to what we’re projecting as a goal overall, and if it’s too far apart than either you have to lower your goal or ask people. To redouble their efforts. All right, but still sticking with the recruitment stage. Yes, we putting all this, these expectations in writing for the boardmember the the potential boardmember boardmember including yeah, ideally, yes, because particularly if you’re trying to recruit people who are experienced and fund-raising the more organized and clear you are about what’s expected the more comfort that they’re going to feel in joining your board. You know, they say you want something done, ask a busy person. Yes, the worst thing you could do is say you’re so great and experienced wolf will find lots of roles for you. I think busy people run from vagueness. If you say we are looking to recruit five sponsors from fortune five hundred companies, you work for such a company and you have a network. It is our hope that you will help us, particularly the sponsorship area. Then the person can evaluate. Can i step into that role? And can i meet those expectations or not? Versus so often we recruits on because we have unspoken sense of what their connections will bring spoken and and then it turns out either the person’s already committed those connections to another cause or they’re not a confident fundraiser and the last thing they’re going to do is turn around, use their business relationships for the charity. Okay, okay. Let’s, let’s. Go back, tio the functions of the of the development committee beyond the goal setting and monitoring. And so there’s ah, one really critical one, which is to celebrate success. And that doesn’t mean just when the check arrives. But when that person who was a recalcitrant, ask her, ask their first person whether they get a yes or a no, we want to say, i want to acknowledge tony for stepping forward and actually sending out that appeal that we might then want to be the step pick somebody else. Okay, okay. I don’t want the recalcitrant. Okay. Ah, so we’re doing this in public at the board meeting at the board neo-sage celebration is the best way tio provide positive feedback for somebody’s step so that’s another aspect of that pure culture, which is we all have an equivalency of effort. And when we when we step forward to do that and show her on the bus ah, the rest of us acknowledge it and celebrated and in all forms you notice? I wasn’t talking about the amount of money i’m really talking about nufer fund-raising activities, right? And what other one of their activities should we be should be celebrating the first ask the first ask turning out ah, above and beyond kind of number of people to an event taking a leadership role by hosting an event or at the event itself, doing a great job with follow-up and saying thank you to donors on behalf of the organization and the board there’s so many activities that don’t involve asking that any boardmember can undertake, and then we want to say, great job, you know, both to reward that person and also to give the message to the other people around the table, you have the chance to step in the limelight as well. That’s cool the celebration. I haven’t heard that you mentioned the board members thanking i love that. I have heard that suggestion that at a board meeting or a special event, i’m a special evening, a bunch of board members around a table, and they’re just thanking donors for having made recent gift so i love a one to one thank so encouraging board members to make a phone call, maybe to someone that they haven’t met, you don’t know me. My name is greg on the border cause effective and, ah, i’m calling to thank you for your support and ah, and then you wantto what’s that person thinking there’s an ask buried here and then you have the boardmember say, i just have one question for you, and they think here’s, where the shoe drops, why did you choose to support our cause? And then they’re going to hear a bunch of extraordinary reasons that come from the heart of that donor it’s reinforcing to the boardmember oh, you know, we’re not out there with our tin cup. People are giving because of a connection to our mission and when’s the last time you got a thank you call from a board member of a charity you donate to never happens. So even the smallest organization that’s their comparative advantage against channel thirteen. Yes, they can thank every single one of their donors personally, right? Logistically, do you like to do those where? It’s a bunch of board members in a room together, and they’re they’re encouraging each other? They’re making individual falls or you rather have people do it from their home or their office depends on the size of the charity, you know, university’s love those call a thon. Alumni call it on things. Thank you. Call. Thank you. Write well for whatever i think it’s hard enough to get a board together for its general deliberations so i wouldn’t complicate matters. Ah, and let people also let people make those calls on their own schedule. So you’re giving them a list of dahna people little information about them? Ah, script that’s one of the forms of support staff can provide so that until someone gets their sea legs in these calls, they know what to say after a few it’s going to go easy and yeah, and you’re gonna hear terrific, heartwarming stories about why this is it right? So that, yes, your point that reinforces for the boardmember there are people all of us and it says now now now there is a step toward their getting confidence to be askanase themselves. Excellent that’s a great one. Okay, this celebration and the thank you’s. What else is there more this committee can be doing to turn the bigger wheel. Well, do you want to touch on recruitment? Not yet. It felt more that the committee khun do other functions. Those air, those air, the main function. Okay, can we talk about staff support? I have time to go short. The agenda with you. You’re you’re the board meeting with an agenda. I’d rather talk about a staff support for all these activities for yes. And then we’ll come to recruitment and mentoring. Right? Our buddy staff support. So ah, this could be the executive director without who doesn’t have a director of development supporting this a ll this committee work that’s correct. It’s always the exact director who has some involvement. Even with the development director. Just the way you observed the board can’t relax when they hyre their first development director. To manage all this. The staff can’t relax just because the board’s formed the development committee and there’s a good, vital conversation about board fund-raising taking place. They’ve got to be providing those tools. And that support because boardmember don’t have the time toe manage the infrastructure of fundrasing that’s still falls to the staff, including very importantly, if this is working, having a system for tracking all the contacts, all the people and the contacts that are made with those folks over time. So there’s a good record of the relationship that’s important staff function yes entering into r r fund-raising database are exactly our cr m database that’s, right? The contacts that are made calls that i made the right back we get, and then something very basic when so in response to a board appeal, so let the boardmember know that it happened so that they can say thank you and avoid the embarrassment of running into the person who is waiting to be thanked and the boardmember doesn’t realize the person made a gift, right? So keeping the board members up to date on what’s happening in terms of their contacts and overall for that monitoring function is really critical. All right, so the running of these reports, right for right? For the for the board, right? And it’s it’s, partly the staff celebrating with the board to say, hey, your donor came back this year with an even bigger gift when you give me a call and say thanks that’s. Great, yes called. All right, um, i have to talk. Ah, i’d like to talk about ah, an organization sponsors non-profit radio generosity siri’s and i don’t know do doo ahh and your strategic use of events, teo do runs and walks ever ever figure in so some of our groups do do walks, we don’t get involved in any of the you’re not planning on you know, but but we’ll ask the question, you know, do you have a broad enough constituency base to have confidence that you’ll recruit enough people to make a walk or run successful? You know, you need zack, i need a word pretty well established network, and you need people who are willing to be the cheerleaders to bring people together in that, for instance, for organizations that can’t generate hundreds of unity’s hundreds. If you’re gonna have your own stand alone event for organization that can’t do that generosity, siri’s generosity, siri’s dot com their sponsor and they host multi charity five k runs and walks i am seed one of theirs last november, little chilly day. But it’s still great fun. There were about a dozen charities they had about no two hundred or so to fifty runners. Among these dozen charities, one hundred thirty, one hundred forty thousand dollars was raised, and it was great fun. And none of the charities could generate enough support. Enough participants on their own. But collectively through generosity siri’s they had this great event and generosity. Siri’s does all the all the back end work of licensing. We were in what’s the huge park in brooklyn that take part. We’re provoc piece of problem back park. They got the licence to get the port a johns to get the amplification and the big start the starting gate way in the finished gateway. And, um, it’s all done. Very smart, great. And its collective that’s. Quite if you would like tio. See if it makes sense for you to be a charity partner of generosity. Siri’s do what i do. You know, i like to talk to people. Pick up the phone. Devlin is the ceo and he’s at seven. One eight five o six. Nine, triple seven if you prefer generosity siri’s dot com a l s i’m keeping this video on the top of my sight tony martignetti dot com for a third week because i want people to get off a less is back let’s give them a chance to see how they’re going to manage this enormous growth. And next week we’re going to hear directly from the ceo and president of l s she’s going to be my guest. Barbara newhouse, we’ll hear first hand how they plan to manage this enormous spike in donors and dollars. The show next week is going to be a google plus hang out on air. We’re doing it from the chronicle of philanthropy offices in washington that’s where l s is that’s where the chronicle it obviously and that’s where i’ll be, because i’d like to be face to face with with barbara new house so you will join the google plus hang out on air at tony martignetti dot com that’s the place to view. We are definitely taking questions for barbara throughout the hour if you know how hang out on air works, you just type in your questions if you don’t, we’ll explain at the beginning, so very exciting show. Next week and very different format you come here to, well, not don’t come here, come to tony martignetti dot com and that’s, where you’ll watch the hang out on air with a less is president and ceo barbara newhouse, and that is tony take two for friday, twenty sixth of september thirty eighth show of this year thank you, greg, for indulging me little pleasure. Um, let’s, let’s, talk about let’s continue the staff support training. I’m glad you brought it up. Of course that’s one of krauz defectives great loves as something we provide, which is so few people come to a board with either fund-raising experience or a positive fund-raising experience, right? We’re lucky if we can recruit someone who’s been a great fundraiser for their alumni association or another non-profit but most often we’re recruiting people who are willing and interested, but i haven’t had the chance to fund-raising a systematic way before and of course, like everything else that we need to master in our lives, we need some training and information so staff arranging for training to make boardmember more confident is a great idea and cause effective could be the real happy that makes you happy to be a provider of such training latto onboarding persuasive years of experience, i could see you moving and motivating boardmember toe task that they’re not comfortable with at the beginning of your of your so i’d say it’s a little bit like arthur murray’s dance studio, we paint the steps on the floor, we get people toe awkwardly, try those steps and it gets more and more fluid until they discover you know what? I really like this so let’s, move them. Tio recruiting yes, talk some about recruiting to the development committee, so we have our board who were responding specifically for this committee, so i always take the extreme position not often embraced by every board. Every new member of the board should be placed on the development committee, plus one other committee. So i like to give the message right, it’s just a place to start. Absolutely because one people are at their highest point of enthusiasm, usually when they’re joining aboard two they don’t know better, right? If the culture of the board is a few people carry all the weight for fund-raising we don’t want them to sink to the lowest. Common denominator after going to a few meetings, so let’s grab them while they’re hot and put him on that development committee and then if you’re organized enough maybe to serve on one other committee as well, so that would be my preferred position. But i would say, of course, anyone who’s got prior experience ought to be recruited because they can help with the planning function and be creative about how the board can be fund-raising but really, what it really is a question of there’s someone have to desire to give it a try, and if you’re providing the tools and the training than anyone who’s willing ought to be added to that committee and bring in that new energy, can they also be mentors? Now they’re new board members? Can they be mentor? They’ve got what has the Numbers and actually 1 of the great ways to turn around the culture of a board that has gotten a little stagnant on fund-raising or has never stepped up is to bring in some fresh blood who are able to say when i did it over here, this is what worked and really help revitalize that culture i’ve even seen that work with some organizations that have young professional boards or junior boards where the enthusiasm of those young folks actually ah, crosses over and helps the established board embrace some goals with greater energy infecting them. They’re like their youthful energy that’s, right and vigor that’s right? Who do we look forward to lead our development committee? That’s a great question, so good question forty minutes, that’s a pretty good now they’re evolving right chair the development committee. You want someone who’s, a good cheerleader who relates well to other board members can communicate well, they don’t have to be the most generous giver on the board or necessarily the greatest getter. In fact, you probably don’t necessarily want the wealthiest person on your board to behead development committee because other people will look and say, well, they have the resource is of course they do. It seems effortless. You don’t identify with the right, right? So you want someone who’s really out there showing their commitment to the organization, but both by e-giving stretch gift themselves and out there asking widely in their circles durney ideally, that person would have prior experience, but it’s really the effort? They’re willing to put in that counts the most in their willingness to be a role model, because and this is true for all bored fund-raising if you’re not a giver yourself, it’s very hard to ask others to do something you’re not doing beyond that. I think it’s great to get experienced people for that mentoring and butting up, they can help with the training. They can help build the confidence. So you do want a cadre of people who are comfortable around the fund-raising conversation and who are well regarded by other board members so that they can induce them to join that conversation. Let’s, have a body check? Yes, the buddy system could we say more about how the development committee is mentoring and buddying with shirts? Are what’s the idea that you’re providing focus on fund-raising gear around and you have somebody on the development committee who really comes to understand what’s going on in the mind of their fellow boardmember who their networks are can be a thought partner and how to reach them. I can understand where their fears or inhibitions are and helped develop ways of overcoming them also hears what do you need to be successful? Would you like practice in making the elevator speech? Would you like to be paired with someone who’s going out, making an athlete, see how it works? Do you want a staff person to join you? And you’re asking because you’re not confident that you could answer detailed question about the organization’s program so that someone who can check in and ah, that the boardmember can reveal themselves to without exposing the fact that they might feel like to write about a topic and facing the professional staff, that might be an important aspect. We have just a minute left, okay, i really would like to hear what it is that you love about the work that you’re doing with boards. Well, you know, we say that boards are the most important volunteers of any organization, so we work with so many fantastic organizations and missions and boards are the place where you see people who, despite busy lives, step forward to make these organizations successful, make incredible sacrifices are incredibly generous with their time and expertise. So it’s fantastic to be in a room with people who are thes chief cheerleaders as volunteers around the widest range of causes it’s very noble calling great going senior associate at cause effective on twitter, they are at cause effective, and greg on twitter is greg causevox greg cause you want to follow him. Greg, thank you so much. My pleasure. Thanks so much. Now the interview that i did at ntcdinosaur profit technology conference on ah, creative commons one o one with carly leinheiser welcome to tony martignetti non-profit radio coverage of the non-profit technology conference and t c twenty fourteen we’re at the marriott wardman park hotel in washington, d c with me is carly leinheiser she’s, an associate at perlman and pearlman that’s, a law firm in new york city. And her workshop topic is share use remix an introduction to creative commons. Carly welcome. Thank you. It’s. A pleasure to have you. Thanks, it’s. Great to be here. Thanks. And thank you for taking time on a pretty busy conference day. What is creative commons that i think a lot of people have heard of and not so familiar with? Sure. So creative commons is itself a non-profit they were founded in two thousand won with a mission of making the basically making content. On the internet accessible, so they developed a suite of licenses, which are basic copyright licenses that allow creators, artists, authors to distribute work under one of these licenses, and that signals to anyone who might find their work that it’s freely available for use subject to certain different restrictions. So this is quite a service, really it’s a certain unorganised ation serving non-profits and making content available, right? I mean, they’re serving not only non-profits but sort of ah, the larger idea of basically the commons there, they’re making a easier to put more works into not exactly the public domain because they’re still under copyright but making more works freely available for anyone to use. So the idea is that right now, the way copyright works is any time that somebody creates a work it’s automatically subject to copyright, you don’t have to register it. You don’t have to put a notice on it if you’ve created a work it’s copyrighted on dso that’s what is known as the all rights reserved model and that’s what happens automatically so if you are an artist and you get benefit from distributing your photos online and having other people take them and incorporate them into their works. It’s hard to do that because somebody would have to seek you out and get individual written permission from you in order to do that. Otherwise they’d be infringing your copyrights. But most people’s experiences it’s incredibly easy to find content online that you can just, you know, screen. Grab our download and creative commons brings the law in line with that experience that it’s fine it’s easy to find content online, it’s easy to incorporate it into new works. And so by with using these licenses, it makes it easy for people to know they have permission from the artist to do that. Do we need to know a little bit the basics of intellectual property law before we go to into too much detail? Well, i think that that sort of covers it so i could say copyright well, i could talk a little bit about it. Copyright is ah, is basically a bundle of rights that anybody who creates a creative work gets in their in their work. So you have a set of exclusive rights that you’re the only one that you khun the only one who can exercise those rights with respect to your work and um and then you can also assigned those rights or licenses rights out to other people. So you have the right to use the work to distribute it, to make copies, to make derivative works or a new work based on the original work, so that something like a translation or collage would be a derivative work and to license that out to other people. So what you’re doing with the creative commons licenses, you have your bundle of rights and you’re saying anybody can use my work. Anyone has access to my work. Andi anyone can exercise those same rights as long as with all creative commons licenses, you have to give attribution or credit s o you link back to the original work and then there’s certain other restrictions that are in some of the different licenses. Okay, on dh. Some of those different restrictions is get a little too technical. Know that’s that’s, sort of the heart of creative commons there’s. Six basic licenses. So all of them, including attribution requirements. So say i post a photo online and i license it under a creative commons attribution. License that means anybody who came across my photograph could take it, download it, use it, put it into a new work. All they have to do is give me attribution. So that means maybe linking back to my web page just putting my name on it. And i i would normally specify how i want to be attributed. So some of the other restrictions are share alike. Which means that i would license my photo under a creative commons attribution share alike license meaning anyone could take my photo, download it, use it, make a new work with it. But if they did that and distributed that new york new work, they’d have to release it under the same license. On this is a concept called the copy left and the ideas that i’ve created a work that someone else is used. And then now their work is also in the commons for anyone to use s o, for example, wikipedia’s content is licensed under c c it’s, cc by essays are creative commons attribution share alike license so anyone can use the content on wikipedia and incorporated into a new work. But then they have to also license it in the same way, so grows the body of work. Exactly. They’re two other restrictions. One is no derivatives, meaning you can download my work. You can share it or distribute it, but you can’t change it in any way, so i’m not allowed to make a new work based on it. So you’ll see this sometimes with some sort of reports that in the case of non-profits, maybe report that you’ve published on a particular policy issue, and you want that shared as widely as possible. But you don’t want people sort of taking accepts. Reinardy. Or, you know, photos, or maybe personal histories, things that, like you want shared sort of intact on dh. The last restriction is a noncommercial restriction, so that means anybody could use the work as long as what they do with it is for a non commercial purposes. Ok, thank you, little detail. But details, i think, are interesting. I think they are. You think they are. I think they are all right. You’re listening to the talking alternative network. Oppcoll have you ever considered consulting a road map when you feel you need help getting to your destination when the normal path seems blocked? A little help can come in handy when choosing an alternate route. Your natal chart is a map of your potentials. It addresses relationships, finance, business, health and, above all, creativity. Current planetary cycles can either support or challenge your objectives. I’m montgomery taylor. If you would like to explore the help of a private astrological reading, please contact me at monte at monty taylor dot. Com let’s monte m o nt y at monty taylor dot com. Are you suffering from aches and pains? Has traditional medicine let you down? Are you tired of taking toxic medications, then come to the double diamond wellness center and learn how our natural methods can help you, too? He’ll call us now at to one to seven to one eight, one eight, three that’s two one two, seven to one eight, one eight, three or find us on the web at www dot double diamond wellness dot com. We look forward to serving you. Talking alternative radio twenty four hours a day. I’m christine cronin, president of n y charities dot orc. You’re listening to tony martignetti non-profit radio big non-profit ideas for the other ninety five percent. How do we how doesn’t know provoc about using creative commons? What do we need to do right xero assumes we create something. I understand we have a bundle of automatic rights, but we’re talking about now making it available under creative commons license. Sure. So if you want teo well, i guess i’ll start with how do you find works that you could better license? Okay? Because they think that’s a lot more people have experienced with searching on flicker, for example. So if you’re looking for save photographs to put on your website or incorporate into a brochure and you want to find a photo that’s, all you have to do is give attribution to the person who made it. You can go on. Flicker flicker has a search feature and also the creative commons website itself has a search feature where you can go in and specify what you want to do with the work, whether it’s going to be for commercial or non commercial purposes. O r all you want, you want the least restrictive license and you put in your search terms and it pops up. So when i was putting together my talk, i wanted to find pictures of cute cats because that’s, what people like to look at on a saturday morning esso i search for cute cats license under creative commons license and found a whole bunch as far as really seeing your work under creative commons license if you’re distributing it online, creative comments has a licensed chooser on their website, so you don’t even have to really know the technical restrictions you go in and you say, i want people to give me attribution. I want to allow derivative works or not if i allowed derivative works, i want them to be released center share, like license or not, and i’m ok or not with the commercial uses, and then creative commons tells you which license you’ve picked on degenerates thiss html code that you can embed on your site, which then makes your work searchable by license. Okay, you become part of the search results and and it generates a little button you can put on the work, so you’ll see in a lot of like footers of websites thiss you know this pages published under creative commons license in which one? Okay, now the search function sounds pretty. Easy finding finding going back to finding content. Pretty simple. Yeah, it’s really simple the the only risk is you want to make sure that that thing’s air correctly tagged so but it is really pretty intuitive and you khun search you can search flicker you khun search through google images i think that there are more and more search engines that are supporting a search by license, so it is really easy to use and in terms of releasing your own content, any restrictions on what that content is? Well, i mean, it’s basically anything that’s subject to copyright so you wouldn’t you use a creative commons license with se your trademark or something that was protected by patent law, not copyright law. It also doesn’t deal with model writes in photographs, so if you have a photograph that includes an image of a person, creative commons doesn’t really deal with that person’s right of publicity or protections that they get for being in the photograph. So there was actually a litigation over this issue where a company used a photograph that included an image of a person, and the photographer had released the image under creative commons license. But never secured the model rights s o the person in the image sued the company and ask them to stop using it. Okay, are there other other cases that air don’t necessarily mean litigation case? Maybe client examples? You know that air that interesting, that and somewhat, you know, instructive. Yeah, so, no, i don’t have any specific client examples. They do have some examples i found in researching for my talk. One of my favorites actually is the brooklyn museum, which is i live in brooklyn, so i have a lot of pride for the brooklyn museum. They do really interesting things with their they’ve done two very interesting things. One is that a lot of their collection, they made their collection searchable by license. So much of their collection is very old and in the public domain, so you can now search their collection online and see what’s in the public domain and use those images if you want, and i actually incorporated a few of their images into my presentation and where stuffs not out of copyright but they on the right, innit? They’ve released it under creative commons license so you can use some of the works in their collection, another interesting thing that they did was in connection with the show they did a few years ago, go called who shot rock n roll, which was a series of portrait it’s and photographs relating to rock n roll. They did a remix contest, so they had chris stein and believes his name from blondie put together a bunch of tracks that he released under a creative commons license. And then anybody could download those tracks, remix them, upload them and those tracks would again be really center creative commons license. And they picked a winner, and they’re all available on their website. Um, it’s really interesting. So it was this great way to engage with their community and sort of further their mission of, like, getting culture out to the public on really engaged people while completely avoiding the issue of having to get signed releases and have people wave their their rights or sign rights toe in their tracks that they made to the brooklyn museum. They were just available to use, which i think is a really interesting example of what you could do. So photo contest anything like that video as well, video yeah, absolutely. I think on a new tube, isn’t there? Ah, little pull down window, whether you want to use a have a standard creative commons license to your video yeah, i wouldn’t be surprised i’m not positive, but i think that sounds right. Ok, i think they have a three or maybe four licensing options, and one of them, i think, is standard creative commons license. Yeah, and actually, when i was uploading my slides, teo the ntc, they asked whether i wanted to release my slides under creative commons license or not, so they’re they’re on top of it. Excellent. Well, you know, i don’t know what teo asked specifically, but what more do you want to share that we haven’t talked about? Let’s see, i think i mean, one of the things that i think is most interesting for me is they think a lot of non-profits have have sort of limited experience using creative commons in looking for photos and things like that on flicker, but i think that there are a lot of great examples of non-profits really saying they’re content under creative commons license, so not only so the brooklyn museum is a good one, but and wikipedia is another one. There’s, another organization called teach aids that creative commons features it’s a case study on their site. They big, they make sort of educational health materials that are really sandorkraut of commons license so anybody can download materials from their sight, redistribute them on, and i think for non-profits that have any kind of educational mission thie idea that you could create these materials and then just release them out into the world and they would be freely shared and no one had to worry about, like, violating your copyright if they wanted to download a report or, you know, i know your rights pamphlet or health materials, those kind of things i think are really great uses for creative commons, particularly for non-profits that have a mission based on education, where you’re not worried about so much selling individual copies of your materials, but that the more you get the word out about your organization by distributing materials, you’ll get your name out donordigital here about you, and you don’t have to worry about the transaction costs of negotiating, you know? Oh, okay, that person could buy a copy to do this or that. So i think it’s one of the more interesting things, all right, i hope listeners will pay attention to a creative commons both in terms of their own you’re your own work and and searching for others as well. Sounds like it, sze i’ve learned a lot more about the community then thin. I knew. Thank you very much, carly. Yeah. Thank you for the pleasure. Carly leinheiser is associate perlman and roman. You’re listening to tony martignetti non-profit radio coverage of ntc non-profit technology conference twenty fourteen. Thanks so much for being with us. My thanks to everybody at the non-profit technology network and ten next week. Barbara newhouse ellis is president and ceo for the hour joined the hangout on air at tony martignetti dot com regular time one p m eastern. If you missed any part of today’s show, find it on tony martignetti dot com it’s, the store it’s, the center of universe you’re seeing this so all things emanate from there generosity siri’s and their charity support team that helps you in your fund-raising think about them for multi charity five k runs and walks generosity siri’s dot com seven one eight, five or six. Nine, triple seven our creative producers, claire meyerhoff. Sam liebowitz is our line producer. Shows social media is by julia campbell of jake campbell. Social marketing and the remote producer of tony martignetti non-profit radio is john federico of the new rules. Our music is by scott stein. You with me next week for non-profit radio. Big non-profit ideas for the other ninety five percent. Go out and be great. I didn’t even think that shooting the ending. You’re listening to the talking alternate network. E-giving dahna cubine come. Join us for the thirteenth annual vigil for international peace and ecology on sunday, september twenty one. From nine a, m to six p, m celebration of live music and dance performances spoke a word human-centered line art installations in a world peace flag ceremony that celebrates the united nations international day of peace. That’s sunday, september twenty one from nine a, m to six p, m central park numbered band shell by the bethesda fountain. For more information or volunteer, go to www. Dot vigil number four. International peace dot borg that’s, the number four in the earl, or call to want to chip in to five, four, three two to want to triple. Two, five, four, three two we’ll see you there. Heimans you’re listening to talking alternative network at www dot talking alternative dot com, now broadcasting twenty four hours a day. Have you ever considered consulting a road map when you feel you need help getting to your destination when the normal path seems blocked? A little help can come in handy when choosing an alternate route. Your natal chart is a map of your potentials. It addresses relationships, finance, business, health and, above all, creativity. Current planetary cycles can either support or challenge your objectives. I’m montgomery taylor. If you would like to explore the help of a private astrological reading, please contact me at monte at monty taylor dot. Com let’s monte m o nt y at monty taylor dot com. Are you suffering from aches and pains? Has traditional medicine let you down? Are you tired of taking toxic medications, then come to the double diamond wellness center and learn how our natural methods can help you to hell? Call us now at to one to seven to one eight, one eight three that’s to one to seven to one eight one eight three or find us on the web at www dot double diamond wellness dot com way. Look forward to serving you. Talking. Hyre

Nonprofit Radio for May 23, 2014: Into Focus Nonprofit Video Survey & Activating For Fun, Celebrity And Organizing

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Michael Hoffman: Into Focus Nonprofit Video Survey

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Michael Hoffman, CEO of See3 Communications, has takeaways from this survey that YouTube contributed data to: What works in video? What doesn’t? How do you measure so you’ll know? Plus he explains why he’s a big fan of Google+ Hangouts on Air. Recorded at NTC in April. df

 

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Matthew Fisher: Activating for Fun, Celebrity and Organizing

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Have fun in your social networks, because fun means viral! Also, identifying the VIPs in your networks and empowering your supporters. Matthew Fisher is chief marketing officer for Fission Strategy. Also from NTC.

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Dahna oppcoll hello and welcome to tony martignetti non-profit radio big non-profit ideas for the other ninety five percent. I’m your aptly named host it’s, the memorial day show i hope you enjoy your long memorial day weekend, but while you do perhaps keep in mind that many people through the years through the generations have given they ultimate sacrifice so that we could enjoy the freedom that we have today, so saluting all our active duty and veterans and those who have made the ultimate sacrifice remembering them over memorial day, i’m glad you’re with me. I’d suffer the effects of dendritic carat itis if i had to see that you had missed today’s show into focus non-profit video survey michael hoffman, ceo of c three communications, has takeaways from this survey that youtube contributed data, too. We’ll talk about what works in video, what doesn’t and how do you know how do you measure? Plus, he explains why he’s, a big fan of google plus hangouts on air that was recorded at the non-profit technology conference in april, also activating for fun, celebrity and organizing have funding your social networks because fun means viral also identifying the vips in your networks and empowering your supporters matthew fisher is chief marketing officer for vision strategy. That interview is also from the non-profit technology conference on tony’s take two, you know, festival del fund-raising that was last week. Here is my interview with michael hoffman talking about thie into focus non-profit video survey welcome to tony martignetti non-profit radio coverage of the non-profit technology conference and t c the hashtag is fourteen ntc we are at the marriott wardman park hotel in washington, d c with me is michael hoffman. He is ceo of c three communications and see three is s e and the numeral three michael hoffman, welcome to the show. Thank you. Good to be here. It’s a pleasure to have you. Thanks for taking time in a busy conference day. Your topic is very interesting and the survey says with e into focus non-profit video report could do for your orc. Tell me about the into focus non-profit video survey. Well, we’ve been working with organizations for many years now around video and non-profits and we always get asked the same questions. What can we do with video? What works with video? How do you do it on? A budget who’s doing the best work with video, all of those kinds of questions, and we realized that there is data about almost everything in the nonprofit world there’s data about e mail and there’s data about social media and there’s data about fund-raising and there was no data about video, and so we went to our partners at youtube. If you’re going to do something with video it’s a good idea to do it with you two is a good it’s, a good name in video, and we went to edelman, which is a a big p r agency, and that works a lot with data and doing reports like this on we got together and we said let’s, find out let’s, find out what people are doing. We did a survey of organizations in north america, we had about five hundred organisations respond. We also got from youtube something they had never released before, which was actual platform data about what non-profits air doing on youtube. So what? Successful there in terms of views and which channels are doing well and all of those things, so we got all of that data. We also did qualitative interviews. We we interviewed lots of folks who are from the executive director position down to the person making videos to the digital managers all about. How are they using video? What did they see working? And we put it all together in this report called into focus, which you can download fromthe sea three website at sea three dot com slash into focus. Okay? And, uh, i presume a lot of what you’re goingto share his lessons fromthe survey, right? What? How should we as we break this down through the categories with survey house, we best approaches for listeners? Well, i think that the, you know, the big question is, you know, do organizations think videos you useful tactic? And, you know, what are they doing with it? And i think overwhelmingly organizations, they’re saying videos important, we need to be doing more but then some interesting gaps because when you ask them, are you budgeting maur? The answer was not know pretty much, you know, that they’re not, and then i think one of the really interesting findings was when you asked them, how do you measure success of video? Seventy three percent on ly measure success anecdotally. Or through views of videos, which is what you see on youtube and, you know what i always tell organizations is views never solved your problem. You’re working to solve views, don’t keep the lights on youse don’t create donation very much a vanity metric, like, like facebook fans, right? Exactly. It’s, it’s, it’s fine to have that kind of metric if it is connected to something that really matters for you. And you understand how it’s connected to that, you know, i think more important than views is whose views you know, are you getting and they lead to other kinds of engagement. So those are the things that the survey revealed when we looked at who’s doing well, we saw that it starts with planning, you know, there’s. So many organizations that say we need to make a video and the question is why? What do you expect to happen? What’s your goals? How is this going to do something for you and the organizations that reported thinking about that and asking those questions? Are the organizations that reported success with video? So the idea that you know why you’re you’re working on it and what your goals? Are is the first step that remarkably many organizations are not you are not taking. Yeah, i think the thinking about the the strategy and the goals that are going to get us there is often i mean, this is not a problem limited tio our shortcoming limited to video, i had guests talked about in terms of campaigns dahna engagement, whether to dio whether to engage in a new social channel or not. All right, i’m seeing this right? We’ve always about not planning shiny object syndrome. You know, it’s, you see, you hear about the newest channel or you think you need something or boardmember tells you that you should be doing something, but it’s not grounded in a strategy, and i think that’s, really what we encourage organizations do is think, what can you do? What should you do, what’s the best way to do that? And to really understand that moving forward to ask the hard questions up front. What advice do you have around the budgeting issue since so few non-profits are aligning budget with their desires around expanding video, right? I like in it too. I feel like we’re in the phase with video. That we were with the web in the mid to late nineties. If you asked organizations you know, in nineteen, ninety six or seven do they need a website? Some would say they have one already. Others would say, oh, yeah, we’ve got to get one because we see this web thing is really taken off but if you told them at the time that they would have a whole department that worked on the web, they would tell you you were crazy. They would say, where in the world could the budget come from to do that that’s impossible that’s a pipe dream and i feel like that’s where we are with video video is eating the web in terms of the amount of content the where people’s attention are the cisco estimates that ninety percent of all internet bandwidth will be video within four years. Oh, my good, really? Yes, on you know, we’re darling, we’re seeing you know the web turn into a interactive tv platform and dahna organisations have to become publishers in the same way, and broadcasters, you know, in the same way that everybody else does on videos a big piece of that and there’s a biggest barrier is a paradigm shifting cultural barrier, which is organizations didn’t grow up needing to do video, so they have no capacity and they’re not. They don’t think that way, and so when they think about video, they think about hiring a firm like ours to make that one big, you know, gala event video or something like that and that’s, not the world we live in, right? The world we live in demands a regular content and so that’s a huge paradigm shift for gin is ations. Oh, you have a bunch of things in mind. What about mobile? As as people are going more mobile? Is that increasing their their affinity for video are decreasing, so they’d rather not see it on a little screen. Oh, actually, the opposite video is the fastest growing mobile service that there is we’re seeing as for g has rolled out across the united states were seeing video. Um, grow incredibly and the other piece about mobile and video is everyone has a high quality video camera in their pocket. That’s remarkable. I mean the quality you see iphone video incorporated into feature films so the quality that you can get from these devices that are in our pockets is amazing and it totally the gates this argument that, you know, we can’t afford to do it it’s really about mind share in time more than it is about we need, you know, big investment dollars to do some video things in addition to having a video production studio in your pocket, you also have a distribution channel in your pocket, right? Exactly. I mean, the revolution of peer-to-peer communications, you know, through social media and the ability to reach people through their social channels and, you know, to be online all the time that way is incredible, it really is. So i’m not saying and, you know, we make great video, so i’m not saying there’s, no need for outside support ever, you know, in videos, but i think of it more like a pyramid, you know, there’s that one great video that’s on your website that explains what you do that you khun keep for five years, it probably makes sense to spend some money and make that really good the day to day content that describes, you know, where you are in a fundraising campaign or trying to get people to be advocates or giving an update about a storm that just happened that you’re working on all of that can happen from your phone from other kinds of equipment that you can have in the office and really should be internal capacity. And so we’re spending more and more time training people about how do you do this and not just camera skills, but really the the strategy piece, which is what should our video strategy be? And how does that make sense? I’ve seen such moving campaigns where the organization asked donors or or even better than donors, people benefiting from the service of the work of the organization. Tell us how you make your own, make your own video turned the turn their cameras to yourself and tell us how our work has improved your life saved your life impacted you enormously. Yeah, i think if you haven’t engaged community video’s a great way to do that, it’s still, for a lot of people, high bar, ask, you know, to produce video, so makoto sharing, for example, is much more popular and easier for people to do than video, but we’re seeing now. With services like vine that allow you to make a six second video or instagram now has a fifteen second video, it becomes much easier toe to do that bond. We’re seeing, you know, cem, entrusting things that general electric. I did a thing about science. They wanted to promote science, which is just connected to their brand. But it’s really kind of a social good thing, and they did something called six second science, and they said, how much science can you do in six seconds? And they invited a community of people you know, publically to do six second videos about science, and then they aggregated those they curated and aggregated those into a youtube video with all these different six second science video and it’s terrific it’s a great way to mobilize your community. I think lots of organizations are are doing that, and many more could be doing that e-giving anything tooting getting thinking. You’re listening to the talking alternative network get in. E-giving cubine do you need a business plan that can guide your company’s growth seven and seven will help bring the changes you need. Wear small business consultants, and we pay attention to the details. You may miss our culture and consultant services, a guaranteed to lead toe, right, groat. For your business, call us at nine one seven eight three, three, four, eight six. Zero foreign, no obligation. Free consultation. Check out our website of ww dot covenant seven dot com. Are you stuck in your business or career trying to take your business to the next level, and it keeps hitting a wall? This is sam liebowitz, the conscious consultant. I will help you get to the root cause of your abundance issues and help move you forward in your life. Call me now and let’s. Create the future you dream of. Two, one, two, seven, two, one, eight, one, eight, three, that’s to one to seven to one, eight one eight three. The conscious consultant helping conscious people. Be better business people. You’re listening to the talking alternative network. Dahna duitz is email us a growing frontier for for video? Well, we are seeing some new technologies that will allow email video to be played inside email so without clicking a link but emails a great driver for your community in general, i think if you ask organizational people often, how often do you think your your donors or supporters come to your website? They’re usually wildly inflated numbers from the reality because we don’t normal people don’t go backto organizational web sites, you know, unless you’re drawn there for some reason and the most of the time what’s drawing you there is something that was in an email and email is still the number one digital way to connect with people, and we know that when you say there’s, a video to watch the open rates of email goes up and when you say there’s a video to click on, we know that the click through rates go up so video is the content of the type of content delivery that many people want to have and so thinking about how are we using video? And where is it in our stream of communications? Overall is a n’importe n’t strategic. Question that organizations need to ask compelling moving video doesn’t have tohave high production values are being particularly expensive. Teo in production, right? No, i mean, there are a lot of the videos that get shared that are wonderful and moving our high production value video eliminated, you know, no question, but no, i mean, i think story trumps production that’s what i always say so, you know, if you have that moving story and, you know, you can tell it straight to camera and it’s going to be moving, and we saw that, you know, we see that all the time, really, where there’s things that are just telling the story and organizations have that, and i think one of the demands of being able to do that is for the communicators and organizations to be more connected to those stories within their own organizations, because it’s often not the communicators who are on the ground doing the work that connects them to those stories so they need toe open up the idea that everyone in our organization needs to be a storyteller. So that becomes, again part of this cultural shift that’s going to create, you know, and have an organization thinking of themselves like their media company. They’re they’re a broadcast of publisher where our stories. How are we finding them? How did they float up to our communications folks? How do we decide what make videos about? That path is not articulated very often in organisations, particularly smaller ones. So i think, you know, it starts with just having that conversation and that’s goingto do a lot. But google plus hangouts on air to me that seems like google is giving you the tools to create a a network you, khun broadcast on dh, put your message and and but but not follow the tv model because it’s enormously interactive, you see, promise, i think that’s. Absolutely, absolutely. I think that’s a great point. So when we look at youtube channels, for example, most organizations in ninety nine percent actually one hundred percent of organism growing because i haven’t seen one that’s doing anything different yet they treat their youtube channel like a repository for everything that every video they make, right. So you make a video for a campaign. You make a video for the web site, you stick it on youtube. So you two just a dumping ground for a lot of videos, every channel on youtube that’s really successful, the ones with millions of subscribers and millions of views, and they don’t treat you tube like that as a dumping ground. They treat you too, as ah broadcast channel that needs to have regular content toe build audience, just like your radio show needs to have a schedule and a regular way for people to find it for audience to grow for people to share it. Same thing with non-profit video hangouts on air give you an easy way to create regular content. So the idea that you could do, for example, a show using a hangout where you interview people from the field or experts or donors or whatever it could be ten minutes long. But if you post that every thursday at five o’clock, you’re gonna have an opportunity to build engagement and build audience if you’re putting a video once in a while, whenever you happen to have one on youtube, you have no opportunity to build audience. So i think the hangouts to me is connected to that question of how do we create mohr and regular content you know among the content we created and how, how can a non-profit use youtube in that way to the extent that it allows it’s not as robust is hangouts on here, but you alluded to the most successful youtube channels doing regular distribution have done well, you know, the most successful youtube channels are often individuals who are making videos themselves. I mean, with no crew, no, nothing, they’re they’re shooting themselves with video, they’re editing it themselves and their, you know, and what is it about them? They’re engaging people within? You know, they’re funny or they’re engaging or they’re doing something, and i think organizations need to think about, well, who in our world has that personality? People with personality is exactly the workers on our side. I mean, it’s like into the cooking show people don’t watch cooking shows about because it’s about cooking, they watch it because about personalities or competition or other things. So where is where those people who were those people in your organization? Among your donor’s among your supporters among your clients. Hoo, you go, that guy should have his own show, or that woman should have her own show, those are the people you want to figure out, okay, how do we get them? And hangouts on air is a great free way to start you khun do alive thing and it’s recorded and you don’t have to edit anything, and it goes right on your youtube channel. So that’s an easy way to start, but it takes a commitment, teo, you know, begin doing that, and i think that this there’s so many other benefits to doing that for an organization, right, they’re going to hear more stories that they can use in other places they’re going toe, you know, they’re going to create a certain kinds of internal communications is going to be helpful for them to do an initiative like that and empowering people who don’t think of themselves bad enough that the organization doesn’t think of itself as content creation and producers, but empowering people within the organization, individuals who don’t think of themselves as frontline communicators, teo to, in fact be such exactly. And i think this is connected to the bigger trends that we see around social media. You know, the old model of communications is corporate brand voice, you know, the voice of god. Talking in a hub hub and spoke model, right? So this corporate voice produces content and pushes it out and tries to interrupt people with it. You know, a new model is individuals communicating with each other and it’s a two it’s more than a two way conversation. And so that means that you have to have these channels where people can talk back to you and you engage with them, whether it’s video or whether it’s, facebook or whether it’s any other channel and then also people don’t want to hear from corporate brands. I don’t want to hear from your logo, i want to hear from people. So who are those people? So you need toe pig peek behind the curtain is what i say. I don’t want to see oz, the great and powerful wizard, i want to see the guy behind the curtain, and so we’re seeing he was a hell of a lot more charming and and fund then then the video projection of his of his image. So exactly, and we’re starting to see it. I mean, i saw something recently with a big ngo hyre, you know, had a of some videos at dealing with a storm and instead of saying, you know, we big organization need you to do x, you know, they said here’s, we want to take you inside our war room, about what’s going on and how our planning and so you see all these people who have been up all night, you know, working on maps and all kinds of things happening and and you, as the viewer feel like, wow, they’re people behind this and they’re giving of themselves for it, and i can be part of that and that’s very different kind of communication and, you know, it’s related to ah reduction of trust in brands and maura peer-to-peer communications in general and organisations need to be there or they’re not going to succeed this morning at the opening session of ntcdinosaur wasn’t there, but i know you were there you have the do gooder awards wanted to share with listeners with what that was about? Sure, about eight years ago we started to do gooder awards because we knew with broadband that video revolution was coming, it was definitely coming, and we wanted to take the few organizations that we’re really doing it and jumping. In and doing it well and hold them up as examples to try to encourage everybody else to do it on dh. So we created the doolittle awards a few years ago, youtube came to us and said, can we adopt these awards to become the official wards of the non-profits on youtube? And we said, yeah, you could do that on dso ever since we partner with them, we’ve had wonderful sponsors and partners and ten eyes, one of them and cisco is another and dot sub this year, and nickelodeon and and and other terrific sponsors. And, um, every year at the ntc, we announced the winners. And so any organization that’s on youtube in the non-profit program, i can submit their videos. We have different categories, the four categories that we have our youth media categories. So we’re having young people who are making videos, we have an impact ex category durney that’s sponsored by cisco and that’s. Really about what did that video do so it’s? Not just about is it a good video, but it’s about did it have impact and that those groups have to submit a statement of what the impact wass then? We have a funny for good category because we’ve seen time and time again, the videos that move people to action that move people to share are funny, and we wanted to call those out and they’re fun to watch, and then we have best overall video on dh we can put the links up to these videos, i think we’re on dh point people, but buy-in, you know, they were terrific and, you know, literally the audience today they laughed and they cried and you confined the video’s, all of it, it youtube dot com slash do gooder easy enough, share one of the really poignant moving out, you know, i’m sorry, one of those sort of heart string videos that it sounds like there were a couple of, well, the winning overall video was partners and mental health from canada and a video about teen suicide, and it was the thirty second piece, and the video shows teens very angry at their parents and then slamming the door like running into their room and slamming the door and slamming the door and slamming the door. And then the last time the doors slam it’s actually the mom on. The other side of the door in the room and it says it’s, hard to live with a with a team, you know, with depression, it’s, harder to live without one it’s, a very intense and, you know, packed a tremendous amount of emotion into a very small, you know, time frame. And the funny for good video was also canadian. Remarkably, the canadians have been doing doing great and that’s, actually from the canadian cancer society, and it was about testicular cancer, and it was about checking your nuts. It’s hilarious. And so i definitely recommend you. You go to see it because it’s just it’s funny and it’s taking something that is a serious issue and it’s educating people through humor and i think that’s great. And so, you know, there’s, no issue, really, that you can’t find some humor, and i think it was that a longer one. I would need more than thirty seconds. I was, ah, a minute and a half that would be about my speech all right night. I need a little more than thirty seconds. Let’s leave with listeners with a couple of tips that come from the survey, but how they can be mohr i’ll just say generally effective, and you can choose whether that’s in production or distribution, right? Go ahead. What can we leave? Well, i think that, you know, the one takeaway i would i would want to leave people with is the idea of mohr you need mohr content, you know, we’re in theirs, you have many more channels to put content in. You have social media, you have your website, you can’t rely on a single video anymore, you have to be thinking about more now, more can come from occasionally using professionals to produce videos, but more should also come from being able to grow your capabilities around production as well. And this is important, especially for small organizations. Mork uncomfortable curating videos made by other people. So for example, if somebody was working on the storm in the philippines and they said, we’ve got to go shoot the destruction footage there and it’s gonna cost, you know, all kinds of money, i’d say, well, why would you do that on youtube? There’s a thousand videos that show that really, really well and guess what? All of them allow you to embed those videos on your website and so you can take a video that somebody else made, and you can wrap it in your own wrapper on your website with your own calls, action and utilize something that costs could have cost hundreds of thousands and millions of dollars in particular with documentary film trailers, for example, really high quality stuff on almost any issue is there for the taking, and i would say two organizations make playlists on youtube, which fills out your channel with other people’s video use this video on your website shared in your social media with your calls to action and be wrapped in the halo of somebody else’s great work, excellent! Thank you very much, michael. Thank you. Michael hoffman is ceo of c three communications and how come people follow you on twitter? I met michael underscore hoffman on twitter. All right, tony martignetti non-profit radio coverage of ntcdinosaur profit technology conference. Thanks so much for being with us. Thank you very much again. Michael hoffman. Generosity. Siri’s supports non-profit radio. You’ve heard me talk about them. Sponsor’s like them. Help me to travel to conferences like ntcdinosaur last april, and obviously that helps me bring interviews to share with you generosity. Siri’s hosts multi charity peer-to-peer runs and walks, they do all the back end work that you’ve heard me talk about also. And of course, they have the charity support team that helps you to get participants for your five k run or walk, and then also helps you with the fund-raising you mean that’s the whole purpose? So that’s why they have the charity support team. The whole purpose of these things is to get money for your charity. The statistic that they share is that first year generosity siri’s fund-raising exceeds average thirty year fund-raising for charities that do their own events, do all this work and host the thing all on their own so you can skip years wanting to jump right to third year fund-raising they have events coming up in new jersey, miami, atlanta, new york city, philadelphia, toronto, those air all this year, you can talk to them by picking up the phone. David linn, l i n n is the ceo at generosity siri’s and he’s at seven one eight five o six. Nine triple seven and of course they are on the web at generosity. Siri’s dot com very grateful for their sponsorship. Last week i was at festival del fund-raising in italy. It was amazing. It was terrific. Great fun to be with about seven hundred italian fundraisers from throughout the country. My session was on planned e-giving which they call legacy e-giving in italy. Very grateful to the festival. President valerio manda rally for inviting me and just everybody’s there was you know what? What italy has as its reputation. Warm, friendly, delicious food and the closing night was a terrific party. There is a video on my on my site. I got some video from the opening night and also from that closing night party that is at tony martignetti dot com many thanks to festival del fund-raising and that’s tony’s take two for friday twenty third of may the twenty first show of the year here’s my interview with matthew fisher of vision strategy from the non-profit technology conference. Welcome to tony martignetti non-profit radio coverage of ntc non-profit technology conference twenty fourteen we’re at the marriott wardman park hotel in washington d c i guess. Now is matthew fisher. He is chief marketing officer for vision strategy. The workshop topic is activating your organization’s social network for fun, celebrity and self organizing. Matthew fisher, welcome to the show. Thank you, tony it’s a pleasure. I’m glad you’re here. Thank you. Invite your welcome. Thank you for taking time. Um, okay, we’re ah, we’re going. We’re going to activate our our constituents are social network for fun, celebrity and self organizing. What? What? What is the need around? What do you see that non-profits could be doing better that they’re not doing so so well? Yeah, it’s a big topic in it, you know, fun and celebrity, you’re certainly very different from thie organizing piece that i think most non-profits air, you know, on a daily basis engaged in and, you know, we sort of look at it is taking a new approach to engaging with those advocates and supporters. You know, we’re very versed in sort of the organizing concepts, but we also want to push towards making things fun because ultimately fund means viral and with viral, then we start to see things that you get a halo effect, for instance, when you start engaging celebrities ah lot of folks don’t believe celebrities, you know will engage on social media and there’s numerous examples where that’s not true, but, you know, for us we look at it is, you know, fun is more likely to be shared. It certainly is when when you get into the technicalities of facebook, you know, a drink goes up and certainly your clout creds scores as an influence or go up as things become fun because those are ultimately what we share online. So for the non-profits we really want them, and this is the lesson we want to resonate. We want to think about fun and celebrity in terms ofthe activating these guys to help your cause. Okay, well, let’s, let’s, let’s not get out, celebrity, we’ll come to it. We’ll spend a little time, but thie audience is small and midsize non-profits and and i think the likelihood of getting celebrity is kind of small. Sure. So let’s. Focus on fun and we’ll have a little time on maybe recruiting a celebrity for your cause but on the fun side how do we, uh i mean, how do we identify? What do we know? What’s going? To be fun for our, for our constituents to play with. Well, i think here we have to look at examples that air, you know, have been out in the marketplace and certainly there’s no definition of fun. Yeah, you know, but i think memorable and unexpected are to sort of elements of that recipe. I’m sure a number of people i’ve seen talks by youtube and they talk about what actually makes ah, video fun or viral on they have sort of three core principles there one is thiss unexpectedness and an example they uses, gentlemen, is riding his bike down in new york city and the bike lanes and he’s actually calling attention to a very serious issue, which is construction and hazards and so it’s it’s ah, sort of a monty python play where he’s running into construction trucks and taxis. And so this is something they show is, you know, something that touched in a core issue in new york city and ultimate lead to twenty million plus views of that video? Sort of. The next piece is something they call tastemakers i’ll use the word influences because i think that’s more relevant for us, but you know, touching and getting into something that will allow those influences and tastemakers to call attention to your your cause. And in this case, with videos, they used the example of somebody has shot a double rainbow in the backyard and sort of sat there and and yelled and screamed and couldn’t believe it. Oh, and it had been on youtube for six months and really had less than five hundred thousand views, probably extended family and friends. Yeah, and so but what happened was jimmy kimmel showed it on one of his late night shows, and almost immediately, of course it went viral. And so the key there was not the dennis lee pushed it towards jimmy kimmel, but it caught his eye, and so it really had nothing in it of it, other than sort of a fun, emotional response that we typically see and then the third is ultimately is the copycats that is ultimately what we see with buy-in viral and fun, um example, that is there’s a square cat that an animated story they’ve been going through on youtube on and really only had a couple hundred thousand views. But then as people started copying and reproducing this animated cat with different clothes on different nationalities, different holidays. And so we saw a replication of that. And so we think, sort of that unexpectedness the tastemakers. Oh, and ultimately copycats tragic can work in social media of all types, for fun. Because ultimately, you know, we believe once it gets fun, we have a balance of messaging betweens a serious issue on something that’s. More lighthearted. Yeah, wand. Your examples are well, certainly the bicycle you’re bringing you bring something that’s, light hearted. Teo, as you said, you know, a serious issue in new york city is hazards for for bike riders. So it’s got to relate back to what your charitable mission is all about. Exactly. It’s it’s gotta be it’s. Gotta be somewhat tangential to your issue. You know, the sort of the technicality behind fun or pulling it off actually, obviously is a little bit more difficult, creative. But, you know, the first part of it is, you know, we had vision and attentively are our email based platform. So we we love e mail and we see email is sort of the third leg of that social strategy and the reason is because certainly over the first two legs, certainly the first two legs are, you know, the social media platforms of facebook and twitter, they’re the big beasts, they’re the ones that have the most online time, the most phone usage time on they’ve dominated, obviously, but email has been in, you know, for the last decade has been a major source for online organizing and fund-raising still very important still very, very importantly, open rates. Well, you know, that’s that’s, the challenges that those those open rates in this click rates and those donate rates are dropping because we just have more, more email coming in and are they dropping overall? Absolutely okay, absolutely all right. And so, you know, as part of that third leg, you know, we believe that you know, you’ve gotta activate your full supporter base and there’s a number of people on your email database who our supporters, but not necessarily liking you or tweeting you. And so we really encourage people to look at that because generally speaking, you’ll have fifty times your audience in that email database. Then you will on your social media platforms now, if you get a celebrity a celebrity typically might be someone that we define as a clout score forty and hyre they might have an audience a total audience of three point two million on the reason is because they might have fifty or hundred thousand followers to start, and then they have a high enough credit score that it actually propagates through to their friends and family. But if you take your email database and you actually segmented out and look through there generally three to five percent of your email database actually can outperform one celebrity and the reason you know let’s say more about that, and the reason is because when you take your database, you generally have people who care about your cause and there’ll be a number of people in there who don’t necessarily have the huge following is saying and curry and on what she was able to do in two thousand ten with their her haiti tweet was tweeted the year, but what they are able to do is these are people who have already your message is resonating with them. They may have already donated, and what you see is a sort of one hundred twenty times. Effect and the idea being that if only if you have let’s, say, fifty thousand e mail addresses, you might actually still have an audience of roughly four million because of that effect. But how do you find these three to five percent to are the key influencers or the motivators? So, you know, certainly for smaller email list, you might just be able to visually go through and sort of figure it out manually by looking at their pages or another another way is to use platform’s like attentively, and certainly i’m sure there are others, but the idea being that it actually will match up those e mail addresses to all their social profiles and then scan those posts and pulling all those scores and the idea being that you can actually identify who those folks are and they may not be household names they made, you know, they’re not i mean, we’re down. We’re not talking about celebrity. Yeah, you know, i guarantee you that down at the washington post, there’s, probably forty or fifty journalists who have clouds scores over forty on who we would, we would certainly locally believe a sort of local celebrities, but have that reach because of obviously who they work for, who they are. Okay on, once you’ve identified these, these the top key influencers, what is it you’re asking them to do? How do you do, then approach them? Once you’ve identified, we think approaches that ultimately you’re going to, and this goes back to the engagement issue and challenge with the supporters and donors, when you start to find those people, they’re generally your vips are influencers. And so what you want to do obviously, is, you know, as the title here suggests, you need activate and the way we recognize that is we say that i’m looking at those vips, we actually want to start a segment them down into different groups based on the topics they’re talking about. And so you might have some of your supporters talking about climate change, and they may not follow you, but you might care about climate change and so weak suggests maybe take a baby step and start to follow them or reach out to them via email and say, you know, we’re talking about the same causes here. You want to join our effort, you could like us, you can also retweet some of our issues there and it’s very powerful, because when you’re looking at three to five percent it’s, not a huge number might be only thirty or forty people depending on the size that email list. But again, they still have that reach to get to three or four million people. So it’s it’s quite effective and it’s also something that it’s sort of buried inside your your database or your email platform or your syrian platform. We haven’t mentioned the blogging. I mean, they might maybe they don’t have a huge twitter following, for instance, but but their site gets a lot of hits, absolutely blogging is just as important, and, you know the challenge with blogging of courses, you know, it’s, even maurin structured content just like sort of the posts on facebook and twitter, but you, khun, obviously segment them down based on topics or terms and start to put them in a group. Let me give an example so that you know it, it makes a little bit more sense, but, you know, we typically look and work with non-profits and, you know, their databases aren’t necessarily large, you know, varies we have some customers that have very large databases, but let’s, certainly with the small ones that we want to focus on our listeners. Yes, mom, but so they might only have five, ten, fifty thousand emails, and it might be past donors. Or it might be people who showed up at rallies or somebody just signed up for the newsletter, but fifty thousands of good number, because it’s actually not that hard to get to, you know, in terms of what let’s, let’s, let’s, divide that by ten. Ok, for our for our listeners, i want to deal with something that’s manageable by most ultra z even just use five thousand as our example. Okay, so in the five thousand example, they might have five thousand, but there may be only three hundred there that are actually very active on social media and have that cloud score we talked about. And so they’re sort of your influence or group. Obviously, for three hundred, you can send very easily consent individualized message to them, you know, sort of expressing your your want for them to retweet some of their stuff and on their platforms you can also then put them into segments. And so this is one of our non-profit clients did is they started looking at who’s, mentioning some of the key words that they follow. I used the example of climate change, it might be elections. It might be a variety of terms, and so they put them in a segment called supporter no, and they actually sent him a bumper sticker. And so they’re actually trying to actually build some sort of relationship. They’re more than just sort of this mass mutual, like, yeah, especially before you’re asking for some kind of called action, you know, get to know the people start having a conversation about the fact that you know you’re sympathetic to our cause, and we notice, you know, we know you’re spending a lot of time on climate change in your example, and we’d like to get to know you better. I mean, you’re trying to build a relationship before you start asking you and we’re going to follow you and you’re gonna follow us. You’re listening to the talking alternative network. Oppcoll have you ever considered consulting a road map when you feel you need help getting to your destination when the normal path seems blocked? A little help can come in handy when choosing an alternate route. Your natal chart is a map of your potentials. It addresses relationships, finance, business, health and, above all, creativity. Current planetary cycles can either support or challenge your objectives. I’m montgomery taylor. If you would like to explore the help of a private astrological reading, please contact me at monte at monty taylor dot. Com let’s monte m o nt y at monty taylor dot com. Are you suffering from aches and pains? Has traditional medicine let you down? Are you tired of taking toxic medications, then come to the double diamond wellness center and learn how our natural methods can help you, too? He’ll call us now at to one to seven to one eight, one eight, three that’s two one two, seven to one eight, one eight, three or find us on the web at www dot double diamond wellness dot com way. Look forward to serving you. Talking alternative radio twenty four hours a day. Lively conversation, top trends and sound advice. That’s. Tony martignetti non-profit radio. And i’m lawrence paige nani, author off the non-profit fund-raising solution. And so then you can start scanning their posts as you go forward. Oh, and ultimately, if they retweet you or retweet something that you think is on message with one of your issues, then they become an ambassador. They’re literally in a new segment inside the database on then that will shoot off. An email is you brought a called action, you know, for a little donation, and the idea is that, you know, we think it resonates better when you’ve built that relationship, however small it might be, and you take it off line and the example here, you know, we start to see engagement really jump because most most organizations non-profits don’t have time to do anything other than sort of a monthly blast here we start to see opens increased to two hundred forty four percent of what they normally see, which is twenty, thirty percent open rates are generally what we see because it’s personalized it’s, individualized and it’s triggered on a behavior that just happened it’s right there, the recall is immediate because they’re getting it immediately, and we also see one hundred sixty one percent increase generally in the cliques. So you’re getting that called action and you’re starting to see ultimately revenue lift or donation left here generally of three to six times of what you’d see on a regular email blast. And so, you know, it’s it’s something that no matter how small your list is, you can get a lot more effective using that third leg of sort of activating now the facebook, twitter and ultimately email to really make it a lot more powerful. Um, and we’ve got obviously hundreds of clients that are doing this in a variety different areas, but i thought that example was most apra poto what we’re doing here because of i’m sort of building that relationship, okay, part of the workshop title is for ah, activating for self organizing. So what do you mean by self organizing? So i think with self organizing, i think it’s similar to the example and that, you know, you’re calling on people that maybe are sort of like minded to you and you have to identify them. They may not know about your organization, but you you’ve been able to scan through either their posts or their tweets and understand that maybe there aligned with your organisation. And so you can do things like not just call for donations, but ultimately call for action. Real action, there’s. A number of clients that i work with capitol hill, and, obviously, their causes, and not a sign a full lobbying effort. But a call to action. It might be something that triggers a kn e mail or fax to senator based on certain votes that are coming up. And so, you know, those those air sort of the more traditional cause actions that we see in the self organizing, you know, and we think that, you know, platforms that involved. Obviously, social media, as well as email, can be more effective, similar to what we saw in terms of engagement and ultimately converting them to that call of action called action in self organizing. Okay. Let’s ah, spend a little time on celebrity a couple minutes left. What? How do we identify the celebrities that that may be appropriate for us to reach out to on? Do keep in mind our listeners are small and midsize shop, so we’re not a list that there’s not a list non-profits oh, and maybe not not even pursuing a list. Celebrities necessarily mean there are lesser known celebrities who could still bring a considerable following. Uh, so but how do we how do we identify? And every celebrity is not not open about the causes? Andi, you know what? A lot of times if they are open, they may already be allied with a charity. So prods of them coming to us, it seemed kind of small. How are we going to find the right people with knowing all that? Well, you highlighted a couple of issues. One is obviously identifying, but the other is sort of weighing the risk. And so, you know, once you take on a celebrity, take on the full persona from yesterday and tomorrow, right, way unknown tomorrow we can’t predict tomorrow, but what we do see with celebrities is that they do. Have ultimately that immediate reach. You know, in one of the earliest examples we talked about, they have the halo effect in the immediate reach and they tend to have, you know, even celebrities with relatively low cloud scores, they can still reach a million plus in a roughly about eighteen minutes that’s generally the life span of the tweets and celebrity world. Okay, so you don’t have a lot of long term promotional effect there, but what we do see is that it does activate people who maybe weren’t even close to your cause, and it also is something that we see cross platform, so it might be a tweet that ends up on a variety of different social networks because of who that person is particularly it’s funny, you know? And the other thing is, celebrities really help with the search engine optimization, and we won’t go into the reasons why, but identifying the celebrity is actually not that difficult part of where i’d like to start on part of it is this where the process starts? That’s right is picking the right one’s a part of it is sort of looking off line. Which one do you? Think you identify with your organization does do they care about the issues that you care about? Are they on the right or the left? Those are things that you certainly you care about in terms of aligning your message because you don’t want to have a celebrity activate and help you, and then all of a sudden be off message two weeks later it’s part of that risk one way you can do it certainly is toe look at what’s in the popular press and gather a lot of what some of the comments are in the popular press you can use platforms that scan similar to what we do with the donor databases and supporters. You can put a celebrity’s email address in there, most of them know one or two and identify some of the social networks they’re on and see what the types of things that they care about. You can also approach them privately, and we’ve found certainly an example. Tomorrow on the panel will be the will be goldberg example, it’ll be the pluses and minuses of this strategy, but, you know, they literally just tweeted out to them on the site on her. Her profile and we’ll be then retweeted it, and it was something that there was there was no deal backroom deal. There was no phone calls, there was no rep agents, but it was actually something that they thought she she actually cared about, and they were right, and you’ll see that an example tomorrow well, in more detail, but our listeners won’t be there so what’s right? What was the cause on? So for her, the cause was it related to her love for for animals, and i won’t go into specifically because it’s something that’s being presented, but i will give you another one that that we’re talking about two more. Another was ann curry tweet from two thousand ten it was actually the twit of the year, and she had actually been contacted by doctors out borders to help them get into haiti after that disaster, the air force is blocking the planes that were allowing some of these crucial supporters in there, and and curry saw an opportunity there to retweet to get them to help planned those doctors. Obviously, and this is an example of someone who really only had fifty thousand supporters, but our followers, but it immediately got retweeted to the point where it reached over four, point three million people in that eighteen minute span. And so, you know, there are timely causes, too. You have to take advantage of events in the news and again, if you’re scanning posts of what your supporters we’re talking about, you’ll catch a lot of those things that are in the news, locally and regionally, that may not be in the national news, and you could take advantage of that. And so, you know, we we certainly believe, you know, a celebrity can help, but we also think that the influences that are already in your database can help you just as much because they really care about what you have to say. They’ve already proven it by their interaction or their donation or their activism, and they can’t have that same reach and that’s what generally we say is take baby steps, okay? They also you know, so i don’t have that dance. You minimize your potential downside risk, that’s, right? And what the celebrities gonna be doing or saying as you, you know, tomorrow and the day after, yeah, it’s, it’s similar to putting all your money into one stock, yeah, way don’t know what the future may hold, and we certainly don’t know if that type of celebrity will, you know, have the staying power. But certainly your supporter bases it’s a much broader base, and certainly they have the same influence with their followers on their social media networks and and they can certainly broadcast to their audience with the same type of general volume that you would see. All right, we’re gonna leave it there. Thank you very much. Matthew fisher, chief marketing officer for fishing strategy. Thanks so much, matthew. Thank you. I appreciate it, tony. And my pleasure. I look forward to speaking again sometime in the future. All right, all right. Thank you very much for joining us. Tony martignetti non-profit radio coverage of non-profit technology conference two thousand fourteen. I’m grateful to everybody at the non-profit technology conference and at and ten, the ones who hosted the non-profit technology network. Always great fun, tio have be to be with that crowd. And next week, the ceo of inten will be returning that’s, amy sample ward, our social media contributor and also alison fine returns next week. To continue our discussion on matter-ness had to show people that they matter to your organization. If you missed any part of today’s show, you can find it at tony martignetti dot com. Our creative producer is claire meyerhoff. Sam liebowitz is the line producer. Sure, social media is by julia campbell of jake campbell. Social marketing and the remote producer of tony martignetti non-profit radio is john federico of the new rules will be with me next month to do fund-raising day. Our music is by scott stein. You with me next week for non-profit radio. Big non-profit ideas for the other ninety five percent go out and be great. 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If you would like to explore the help of a private astrological reading, please contact me at monte at monty taylor dot. Com let’s monte m o nt y at monty taylor dot com. Are you suffering from aches and pains? Has traditional medicine let you down? Are you tired of taking toxic medications, then come to the double diamond wellness center and learn how our natural methods can help you, too? He’ll call us now at to one to seven to one eight, one eight, three that’s two one two, seven to one eight, one eight, three or find us on the web at www dot double diamond wellness dot com. We look forward to serving you. Talking. Come on.