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16NTC Videos: Virtual Orgs & Volunteers + 17NTC + Hair News

New video interviews from #16NTC, the Nonprofit Technology Conference. And you need to take a look at #17NTC in Washington, D.C. in March. P.S. Hair news. 

Nonprofit Radio for December 9, 2016: Leveraging Expert Or Tech Volunteers & 7 IT Security Pitfalls

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Steve Heye, Erin Dieterich, & Princessa Bourelly: Leveraging Expert Or Tech Volunteers

(L to R) Steve Heye, Erin Dieterich & Princessa Bourelly

We’ve got what you need to know about managing volunteers with special expertise. Where do you find them? What about screening and scoping? Our panel is Steve Heye and Erin Dieterich from NetSuite and Princessa Bourelly from Juma Ventures. (Recorded at the 2016 Nonprofit Technology Conference)

 

 

 

Leon Wilson & Dan Rivas: 7 IT Security Pitfalls

(L to R) Leon Wilson & Dan Rivas at 16NTC

Not sexy but very important. Leon Wilson from The Cleveland Foundation and Dan Rivas from Idealware walk you through bad habits that you need to change so you don’t put your precious data at risk. (Also from the 2016 NTC)

 

 


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Okay. Hello and welcome to tony martignetti non-profit radio big non-profit ideas for the other ninety five percent on the aptly named host we have a listener of the week, young non-profit professionals network of milwaukee hello, milwaukee! They tweeted learning about non-profit excellence listening to tony martignetti non-profit radio end quote excellence love that thank you so much for that. Plus they’re very loyal re tweeters. Thanks for that also, i’m glad you found us. Thanks so much for listening for loving non-profit radio. I’m glad we’re helping your important work. Young non-profit professionals network of milwaukee they’re at and why p n m e congratulations on being our listener of the week. Oh, i’m glad you’re with me. I’d suffer with bracket nathalia if i had to speak the words you missed today’s show leveraging expert or tech volunteers we’ve got what you need to know about managing volunteers with special expertise. Where do you find them? What about screening and scoping their work? Our panel is steve hi and aaron dietrich from net sweet and princessa bourelly from juma ventures that was recorded at the twenty sixteen non-profit technology conference. Are you signed up for twenty seventeen? You? Need to and seven security pitfalls not sexy but very important leon wilson from the cleveland foundation and dan revis from idealware walk you through bad habits that you need to change so you don’t put your precious data at risk. That’s also from the twenty sixteen and tc. Sign it for twenty seventeen on today’s. Tony, take two your trump challenge reduction director’s cut. We’re sponsored by pursuing full service fund-raising data driven and technology enabled, you’ll raise more money pursuant dot com, and by we be spelling supercool spelling bee fundraisers we be spelling dot com here is leveraging expert or tech volunteers from the twenty sixteen and tc. Welcome to tony martignetti non-profit radio coverage of sixteen auntie si non-profit technology conference in san jose, california. This is also part of ntcdinosaur stations my guests now are steve, hi, aaron dietrich and princessa bourelly let’s meet them. They’re seminar topic is leveraging expert or technical volunteers. Steve is solution consultant for net suite, and next to him is erin aaron dietrich, director of corporate citizenship, and princessa bourelly director of finance at juma ventures. Steve aaron princessa welcome, thank you. You’re very welcome welcome to non-profit radio. Just indulge me for a moment while i highlight our swag item for this interview, which is from black mesh. Everything is in black there’s. A very high gloss notebook with a calendar at the end. And we have a usb drive. Flash driver should tell you flash drive and, uh, upend your basic basic pen. And this goes into our are you our swag pile for the day, which is right here. Awesome. Third for the for the people, for our listeners. Just have audio. Okay. There’s a difference. Hyre let’s. Steve, you explain it off off. Mike let’s, have you explain now, there’s a difference between using experts who are technical and non-technical help us with an overview of this? Sure. So the way we first started, you know, talking about this was, you know, we all have volunteers. We all understand how to work with them when we all have ideas. Part of matthew’s. Um but there is a very fundamental difference between using somebody that just wants to come in for a single day and do a single task versus somebody that has ah, very skill. A very big skillsets and indoors and expert. So you know, with probono the key is they’re coming in and they do legal work for their living, or they do finance work for their living, and they come or technology for their living, and then they want to do that for you, but do it for free. So that kind of volunteer requires a very different relationship with them because you’re allowing them to do work that will have dramatic impact on your organization and is much more critical that you understand what they’re going to be doing, how you’re going to use them and build a relationship with them. All right, erin, is it essential that these technical volunteers be supervised by other people who are technically inclined or who are technicians? So i would say it’s very important that they’re supervised the level of technology knowledge that the person who supervises has will differ at different organizations. And i think the most important thing is just that whoever’s managing thie non-profit ah project and whoever’s, the lead volunteered that they’re on the same page about what the project’s going to be, so as long as they can speak the same language and that’s probably the right skill level. But if you have a volunteer who’s very, very skilled and is speaking a language that you just don’t understand, as they described a project that projects probably not going to go well until you find somebody on your side who can speak the same language and understand what you’re getting involved in, ok, so at least that level of understanding. Okay, now princessa you’re using technical volunteers at juma ventures, we are currently using the probono through net sweet this’s a multi year and the project is going really well, and it is i have been a great experience and opportunity for juma as well as the net sweet probono to come in and offer their experience in what capacity are using technical volunteers, so they are helping us now set up our dash schwartz within the net sweet system, tio take an excel spreadsheet and be able to pull that same information out of net sweet without having to pull all of these different areas together. So it’s going to be sort of easier for us to manage to maintain. So we use their technology expertise to actually do the set up, and i managed the dashboards as well, okay. And do you have some lessons learned to share? Not necessarily. Right now, way. Have another twenty minutes together. But there’s some lessons learned about using technical volunteers. The biggest lesson that i shared today would be for us to be prepared on the non-profit side. Okay, little better preparation. So all right, well, we’ll get there. We’ll get a chance. Talk about that. Andi okay, you have some advice on finding technical volunteers. Erin, you want to start with there, start start stuff. They’re sure one of the things that we shared today in our session was that it’s important to look at who as a non-profit you’re already connected, teo. So you look at who is already, you know, from the corporate side making donations who perhaps is already a partner and look at what their core competencies are as an organization, and see if there is an alignment between their core competencies and what you need help with. If there is, it might be very easy. Next step to go back to them and say, hey, we love working with you, here’s something that were really struggling with do you think that this is something? Your team would wantto look at probono and start the relationship that way. In addition to looking at your corporate kind of connections, there are a lot of really awesome sites out there that can help you find an individual technical volunteer. So we shared a list of resource is today, but among them is the taproot foundation. Catch afire community core volunteermatch linked in latto from empower there’s a bunch community corps for man, power and power and power. Okay, where you could get you could go on there and essentially say, you know, we’ve scoped out this it’s a challenge that organizations having. Perhaps we need a new website and you can go and find volunteers who are taking their personal time after their job to to do that project for you. Okay, i’ve had the catch a fire ceo on rachel chong. Yeah, it was great a couple years, but yes, very true. Okay, is a screening is going to be important eyes? Okay, wait. So we talked a little about finding now we’ve got a prospect pool of whether it’s from real time relationships and partnerships or somewhere we found online screening. We re interview them. Right? I mean, i would think same way you’re interviewing. Ah hyre yeah, so there’s a couple, it varies a little bit. First, the amount of screening, the amount of effort that you’re going to put into the screening process depends on what the type of project that they’re going to be working on. So based on the level of impact of the project was going tohave and the risk that’s involved in this project, you’re going to want a little varying level of screening. So if it’s if it’s a project where they are like princessa talked about, they’re going to be in your financial system. They’re going to be looking at, you know, helping you, you know, adjust you although or if it’s a legal probono where your they’re reviewing contracts or they’re doing that, you’re gonna want to ah, ah, lot more screening a hell of a lot. A proprietary information, proprietary and potentially damaging. Yeah. So you want to make sure it fits in the wrong hands, right? So what do some of those, you know, nondisclosure agreement might be in place or, you know, on actual application, ask him who they worked with before. Do some background checks if it’s needed, but if it’s a vendor that you already have a long term relationship, you’re a customer with them and, you know, maybe then the barriers drop a little bit because you’ve already had a long letter longer relationship with that company and because you’re paying them and they have, you know, are already a setup established program is a little bit different on the type of screening you would do, or if you’re just having somebody build a little widget on your website, that isn’t like mission critical, then you’re screening might be a little lower because it’s it’s not like mission critical it’s not going to blow up the whole world, your world, your mission world and there isn’t a finance proprietary data right involved, but still there still going into your yeah, you still have to ensure that they have a certain level of technical expertise because they are going into the back end of your system, your coding and yeah, so i mean, asking could mess things up, right? Asking for examples of work they’ve done before who they worked with or even asking for their resume or having a full out a sample application there’s a number of things you could do just to get some simple information about them. Okay? Yeah, right to screen him. Princessa any any advice lessons learned on screening volunteers? So going through net sweet, we didn’t have to do the screening. We just we applied we the hardest part is narrowing down from this, you know, these grand scheme of ideas that we need internally narrowing that down for the next week team to then matches teo prose that could come in and have the availability to sort of target our project. Okay, so you potentially could have used more volunteers? Is that what you mean? T to other work for you? The beauty of net suite is that they offer it multiple times per year. So even though we didn’t get to address all of the projects there is, there is a possibility that we could get to it. Okay, okay, you’re tuned to non-profit radio tony martignetti also hosts a podcast for the chronicle of philanthropy fund-raising fundamentals is a quick ten minute burst of fund-raising insights published once a month. Tony’s guests are expert in crowdfunding mobile giving event fund-raising direct mail and donor cultivation. Really, all the fund-raising issues that make you wonder, am i doing this right? Is there a better way there is? Find the fund-raising fundamentals archive it. Tony martignetti dot com that’s marketmesuite n e t t i remember there’s, a g before the end, thousands of listeners have subscribed on itunes. You can also learn maura, the chronicle website, philanthropy dot com fund-raising fundamentals, the better way. Dahna the errand and steve are both nodding. So i guess you have a shot at this. All right? So instead of talking around, this remains will say, well, let’s, just have aaron, why did you describe the net sweet volunteer technical volunteer program? How this works? Sure so and nets sweet. We donate our software platform to non-profits and social enterprises, and once they start using that platform, they are eligible to apply for probono support from our global employee workforce every quarter, so at the beginning of each quarter and application goes out to non-profits they say, here are the things i need help with. And then internally at the company, we send out an email to all of our employees and say, hey, hear the things that non-profits need help with on the platform. We need your technical skills if you want to get involved, let us know, and then our team actually does the matchmaking. So were the screeners in that instance, we look at all the employees, backgrounds, we look at where they work, what time zone they’re on, what their expertise is and we put together typically teams of two to four employees who we think have the right skills to get that project done. That’s been requested. Okay. How many? How many people on your team princessa there? Ford for max. You got the mac. Okay, now, doesn’t that sweet? Havea probono requirement part of employment is you’ll spend weeks or ten percent of your time or something. Is there anything like that? So, it’s not a requirement, but all of our employees are allowed to spend twenty hours a quarter on a project probono when they get matched up so they could, you know, work it out with their manager that they apply and take on a project every single quarter of the year. But it’s not a requirement. Okay. Okay. All right. Thank you. Uh, all right. So after screening let’s, see where should we wish we go on starting to manage? We’ve nothing scope. Hoping is that we are right now on twenty martignetti non-profit radio. I have george in jail now think if this was a discussion on on hiking in the in the adirondacks, scoping, you know, would probably be pretty simple thing, understand? But in this conversation, i don’t know what scoping is. So get yourself out of jail, what is scoping? So i think the key teo a big differentiator between using an expert or technical volunteer is they will need something that tells them exactly the challenge you’re having, what you’re hoping to solve and how you want, ok, scope of the project so it’s a scope of the project, meaning that you’re going to just both sit down with a document and agree on what are the what is the challenge? We’re trying to solve one of the goals of the project and then talk through that together to figure out what the actual outcome will be. So you know it usually it starts way too big, and then you scale down into something that’s actually accomplish because that’s, one of the channels we have with expert could also employees only have up to twenty hours per quarter, right? And that zoho almost all probono helped that you get will have some sort of ah, limitation to how much help you’ll get and how long the project can last. So the real key to using a technical volunteer is having a chunk of work. That’s, containable, it’s, describable attainable and it’s something that you can easily pass to someone and have them understand. Princessa was this hard? Teo, define the scope. It was hard to narrow down internal given. I mean, you said there were other things get done, and maybe this project was even bigger than it. It could reasonably be i think i shot for the moon, ok? And they had to bring me back down. All right, so i basically put out our, you know, our primary concerns. They chose a a project that they could actually accomplish within the twenty hours. And so the difficult part is on my end, making sure that i’m providing them with the proper information to make the project six successful. Okay. Yeah. You clearly have responsibilities. Yes, a swell as they do. Okay. Okay. All right. So scoping. Yes, of course. We what do we want to see if the out at the end of this whether you know again, this supplies beyond that’s that’s sweet program, but, uh, you gotta have a scope document. Yeah. Okay. All right. Yeah. It’s hopeful about both sides. Not just for the non-profit, but also for the, you know, the probono person because the probono in person and it knows what’s expected of them. And then is mohr able to know if their skills is the right skills and if they’re able to actually achieve it, or to start to understand if it’s even impossible within the amount of time that they’re given to do it? Okay, and that they have to do to donate. Okay, all right, what comes at right now? Snack it’s, savoury snacks are being served and the announcement is being made. That is not theirs, not god. Not on. I’m diffident, it’s. Just somebody who knows that the savoury snacks are being served. That’s awesome that’s extension of a sense of his omnipotence. Chocolate snacks, including big urns of chocolate milk. Here. Then i see which i don’t know about the rest, but i kind of like talking, but it was weird to see a milk in an urn and you don’t see that very clear that they were armed with a silver top. It looks like a three gallons, three or four gallon earned. It looks like to me. Yeah, and with a little with, you know spigot on it. Okay. Okay. After scoping working with our technical volunteers. Aaron, what comes? Next what i’m really getting into the meat and potatoes of getting the project done and, you know, something that’s important to think about there is project management because sometimes you’ll get a really excited set of volunteers. And if there’s not somebody who’s responsible for keeping the project on track, as with any project you’d work on probono or not, you know, khun, go kind of off the rails or can get delayed, or people can kind of wander away, and it doesn’t get accomplished on the time that you really had set aside for it. So focusing, having that timeline, having a project manager who’s going to lead everybody through the process is really critical. But now we are working with volunteers. So where do you draw the line between? You know, team, this is you’re too slow and okay, team i understand. We understand who will will extend the timeline. You are volunteers and we don’t want to lose you because we’re twenty five percent of the way into this now, right? How did we manage that? Well, it’s a collaboration. So i think that’s one of the most important things about using technical volunteers is that it’s not like you’re saying i want this project done, go do it and let me know when it’s done it’s that you are saying, i’m going to work with you and we’re going to get this project done together, so if it starts getting delayed because of your timeline or their timeline, you’re kind of in that together and you can re adjust expectations vs if you just kind of set it and forget it, then you have no idea what’s going on on the scenes, but if it’s a true collaboration, then you’re both coming to the table. You’re both taking on work in order to get this delivered and the project’s going to be something that really resonates with your organization and that you can continue using for a long time if you were part of the process versus if non-profit volunteered just came in. Did something said, here you go and then left. You might not know how to use that thing in the future, okay? I don’t know, princess is i don’t want to put you on the spot and say that sweet volunteers volunteermatch please there, there, there, there, over budget there, behind time. E, you want to you want to get more out of this so you don’t know anything you want to add to this part of the project management internally, we had to make sure that we were prepared for our meetings, okay? You know, you have periodic meetings face-to-face orwell, skype or whatever virtual virtual once a week, and prior to that meeting on the non-profit side, we had to be prepared in order to get the best benefit from the professionals on get their insight in their feedback. Ok, what do you want to say about preparation? You got to get the right people collaborating internally. So internally we have a great team, you know, working with the accounting team and then also communicating that information to the leadership team for their feedback, and they’re circling back to net sweet just to make sure that they know that things are working that were, you know, also to make sure that we’re on track and to make sure that we’re on pretty much on track to complete the project. Okay, okay, i should have asked you earlier. What is juma ventures work? So junior ventures works too. They’re they’re fighting. The poverty, the poverty cycle by providing education and financial literacy to youth. And they employ the use at the ballpark. Ballpark venues around the area and what’s your area. Where are you? We are end. We’re here in san jose. We’re in san francisco. Where in nor new orleans. We have new york. Venue way are growing. Yes. Yeah. Your central. You’re west. Your east? Yes. Nothing north. The chicago. Detroit? Not yet. Okay, but probably definitely on the on the horizon. Okay. Okay. What’s, the budget there, annual budget. The annual budget is eight million. Yeah. Okay. Now, some people might think, why a million dollar budget? Why do they need probono? How come they couldn’t pay for the help that they need? So with non-profits we use most of that that money to sort of support the mission. And it is it is difficult to be able to provide income for this level of professional, you know, services? Yeah. You’re getting roughly eighty hours of technical help. Which several hundred dollars an hour. I imagine if you had to go out and purchase it. Yes. Okay. Okay. Fair enough. Uh, all right. Project management. That seems like a pretty broad topic is there more we could say about strategies for project manager? Upleaf i think the key there is just that collaboration and just trying to have regular scheduled meetings and you even having a regular format to that regular scheduled meeting like, we’re going to start the meeting and we’re going to look at the goal we meet the goal help along. Are we on the timeline? I know there’s not much else to say about the project management, except that it shouldn’t be a, um, attack or, you know, like we didn’t meet the deadline or, you know, managing it that way as much as trying to ensure the both sides are happy with the progress, but i’d say the other big key with that project management that isn’t talked about enough is making sure that the non-profit is in er the probono person is seeing their impact and seeing the progress that is being made and understanding how it is really helpful to the non-profit so the non-profit has sort of has a responsibility to keep sharing back to the volunteer of how appreciative they are from the help and the outcome that it’s going to do and what it’s going to allow that non-profit to do, they couldn’t do without that help. And just because the energy of a probono khun feed over time especially the project, is like three months or, you know that it’s time, you know, when they’re when they first start, they’re not they’re excited, they’re energetic, but then when they get into the weeds and then the problems start or they hit a hiccup part of that project management is keeping that person engaged and excited and reassured. Yeah, there’s value there’s a number of ways to do that of, you know, either to recognition or doing many celebrations of metoo hitting a milestone or doing, you know, small thank you says you go, i think that’s a big part of that project management. Okay, princessa you wantto share what what you’re doing around, sharing the value and encouraging the the probono volunteers? I don’t think i’ve done anything specific, but i think what goes a long way is the fact that they can see that their work is being utilized ized and actually brings value to the organization. How do they see that they don’t see that? During them during the project management phase, so they don’t see it until abila project is finished, right? But during the process, you know the fact that we’re not coming back with a lot of changes, a lot of iterations, you know, a lot of going over the time schedule in the time frame, i think it’s it’s sort of positive reinforcement tio let them know that things are going smoothly and according to plan and will be seen to her through fruition, your work is appreciated, yes, and i think the other thing that she’s maybe down playing a little bit is that she is able princessa did talk about how she was able to share that back-up with our leadership team, and i know that the probono volunteers are seeing the fact that there’s, an investment from the leadership team there’s an engagement through the team and their energy is staying up and excited about it so that just, you know, it plays into it, it doesn’t have to be in actually like a gift or anything like that. It’s just that continued conversation, okay? And i think as the volunteers get the exposure of understanding more and more of what you’re non-profit does they take away a real pride of what they’ve helped you achieve, even if what they were building is, you know, a small widget for your website, they are now kind of feeling a part of the team, and i love when i, you know, ask employees who have done probono projects hey, what kind of a project did you d’oh? What was the organization? And they automatically become the spokesperson for the organization they tell you about they light up there like, oh, and you’re now i donate to them or oh, i just went into the five k run for them and there’s so much more engaged now than they were before, and they kind of feel like they have a real responsibility for that organization because they took on actual technical work for them. That’s wonderful. All right, all right. Are we at project completion? Now? We have. We have a couple minutes left together. We’re okay. Are you anxious to get out of here? I don’t know. I mean, the project. I got to go somewhere way. Chocolate milk. You’re looking really good there in the middle. You can’t leave. Until steve, steve are princessa does okay, what? We’re project completion. Yeah, so i think the big project completion to me then is where we ended our presentation was talking about connecting it back to the mission, so then, you know, the outcome was a great great we created this financial dashboard, but i think taking a minute there and just saying, yeah, you just created a finding dashboard, but now what you’ve done is you’ve eliminated hours of work that i was doing every week in a manual spreadsheet that now i can really spend time analyzing that data and actually changed the way my organization works based on this data and just taking time to celebrate that, connecting it back to the overall goal and of inviting leadership, maybe to come in and talk to thank the volunteers. That could be a real way to wrap up and close the projects that leadership leadership touch again. Yeah, valuable aaron, anything. You know, i think revisiting the project maybe five, six months out is also really important for the volunteers just to hear from you about hey, you know, for six months now, we’ve been using these new dashboards. And here’s, what we’ve seen that’s happened at the organization, i had a probono project that some colleagues were working on a few years ago, where they helped build a social media strategy for a non-profit and a year later, the non-profit came back to them and said, hey, you know, because of that strategy that you helped us build, we want to grant to get a full time social media person on the other hand, it’s like gravel or the amazing, amazing stories, but had that non-profit not come back to the volunteers a year out and told them that they would have never known that we’ve just been happy about the project, but now they felt real prime glee that’s, magnificent. Princessa is your project finished? It is one week away from ove r being done there. Go deliver balls have been sent to us, the dashboards are set up, the reports are active, and it is now on me to actually play around with them and make sure that they’re functioning properly and any changes or anything like that, we would have to communicate back to the team, but we’re pretty close to signing off on that. Okay. This’s is exciting. Time was cool and, uh, what’s planned for the for the for the mark. The occasion of the completion dahna we hadn’t thought that far. That’s only you only got a week left. I got to get to ceo onboard is gonna be some something dramatic. Okay. Okay. Uh, all right. This is wonderful. Lots of great ideas are durney project management tools. Online tools that you you recommend that you like. If not, you could say no, but i think the project management for me, for this kind of a project, it depends on the severity or the scope of the project. But i think keeping it simple, askey, let’s say scope, not severity also. Very. Yeah. Yeah. E i think keeping the tool is simple. A za project. So you know, if it is something something as simple as a google doc just having a quick outline, they’re keeping your mini me meeting minutes. They’re keeping, you know, the record of what happened and what got done. You could do something more complicated now, but i don’t think it really needs to be anything more. Okay. All right. Should we wrap it up there? Hands alright, excellent, great ideas, lovett and that was leveraging expert or technical volunteers with steve hi solution consultant at net sweet also aaron dietrich, director of corporate citizenship at that sweet and princess bourelly director of finance for juma ventures steve princessa thank you so much. Thank you, thank you, tony martignetti non-profit radio coverage of sixteen ntcdinosaur non-profit technology conference thank you for being with us. Seven security pitfalls coming up first pursuant, they have a new content paper for you, it’s free and easy to get overcoming the major donor dilemma. How to identify and engage new major donors and also optimized your cultivation process. You’ll find this paper at pursuing dot com, and we’ll be spelling spelling bees for fund-raising are you kicking off millennial engagement in twenty seventeen? You can do it with stand up comedy, live music, dancing and raising money. Check out the video at we b e spelling dot com now, tony steak too you’re trump challenge re ducks director’s cut it’s still up it’s the reduction of the reduction check out to lula, the jack russell terrier. I’m telling you she has great insights into donald trump’s. Potential impact on non-profits and i have minor contributions. Check out the video. The director’s cut. The video is at tony martignetti dot com. And that is tony’s take two. We got to live listener love. I would do it quickly. And then, of course, the affiliate affections of podcast pleasantries. If you’re listening live love out to you you know who you are you know where you are. Thank you so much for being with me. Podcast pleasantries i still got to check you know i keep saying way we’ve been spiking twelve thousand on some shows. However many there are is way over ten thousand could be his money is twelve or thirteen thousand pleasantries to you, our podcast listeners and the affiliate affections to our am and fm station listeners nationwide, you thought of anything to say throughout the country, but i nationwide affections to you. Let your station know thatyou listen, i’d be grateful for that. Thanks so much for being with us. Here are leon wilson and dan revis from the twenty sixteen non-profit technology conference seven security pitfalls welcome to tony martignetti non-profit radio coverage of sixteen ntcdinosaur non-profit technology conference. We’re in san jose, california, at the conference convention center in san jose. My guest now are leon wilson and dan revis. Leon is chief technology and information officer at the cleveland foundation. And he’s sitting right next to me. And dan revis is managing writer for idealware. Gentlemen, welcome. Thank you. Welcome to non-profit radio. Pleasure to have you. Yeah, a pleasure being here. Your session is seven. Highly risky habits of small to midsize non-profits security pitfalls. That’s great. Leon let’s. Start with you. Why? Why are non-profits just not paying enough attention, teo. Security? Well, a lot of in the whole emphasis behind presentation was just my travels over the last four years of working with small and midsized non-profits and constantly seeing the same challenges that we’re dealing with. Some of it is just naive nous ignorance, complacency, poor slumming that it really doesn’t impact them until it does impact them. So we felt that this session was critically important to just remind them of some of the simple, basic and black lean tackling things. Okay, we’re trying to avoid crises here. Is that right there? That’s? Right? Dahna i mean, how bad can it be? Security, dan, don’t you have an actual example of or just making hypothetical, but how bad could it be? Well, yeah, i don’t have examples. We worked on a report recently where we talked teo security experts and sort of learned from them what are the things that non-profits they’re dealing with? And we found that, you know, non-profits are in an interesting space, as we all know, low budgets, very little time security often gets overlooked, gets neglected, it’s not particularly sexy, no it’s, sort of the vegetables, you know, the non-profit world. We were surprised by how many people came to our session because the reality is it’s the last thing you really want to do, but i think people have seen enough of the data breaches they’ve seen enough of the issues come out like weekly there’s, there’s, data breaches and that’s on the commercial side where they presumably have so much more money toe to throw with us. Absolutely on dh that’s where we see so much of trouble. Yeah, all right arika okay, i mean, it’s pretty simple stuff, i mean, the way you do, i don’t mean the topic metoo details of it, the way you’ve organized seven highly risky habits. Right. So all right, you know, you shouldn’t be sleeping with a bad partner. What? All right, why don’t you start us off? Well, leon, but you bring up anything point, they were all very common sense things that are happening. What we want to do is share with them if you’re going to do these things, but we wanted to educate you on how you can mitigate the risk. For example, one of the first things we talked about wass bring allowing people to use personal computers in the workplace. We know it’s going to happen because for a lot of non-profits it’s the way that they can save money because you don’t have to worry about purchasing a computer for someone. But keep in mind that you have toe put some provisions around that, like making sure that they have the most up to date somewhere running on that computer, making sure they have anti virus running on that computer, otherwise and who’s had who who else has access to the computer when they’re at their homes, their family members, friends, other type of disaster. Exactly. So we know it’s gonna happen. And that’s why we said that? We’re not telling you something that you don’t already know, but what we do want to do is provide you with some wisdoms and some thoughts as far as how can you mitigate, prevent or least contains some of the challenges that you’re going to be dealing with that so that’s a good example right there. Okay, so way need to have policies, i presume they’re absolutely around the use of the personal technology in the workplace. What are some of these policies? Well, i mean, just having a policy thinking ahead of time, what should we allow and what should we not? You know, that’s probably the first most important thing just to think it through. So you’re not doing that at hawk way or that people aren’t sort of making it up as they go along. But then from there, you know, some of the things we talked about our session things that you already know you need anti virus software, you need to make sure it was on your phone that your aps are not downloading something malicious. That’s pulling data from your phone, you know, there they’re things that you have probably all heard somewhere in. Your life. But, you know, in the work context, we sort of forget that, you know, we assume that there’s someone on the and who’s taking care of everything and we forget once we bring it home, you know, it’s up to us now, and so if you as leader of your organization, aren’t making sure your employees, they’re doing those things, they’re helping them do those things, there’s a lot of risk in that we did it, we did it really a straw man pole where we asked a lot of people had about forty or fifty people in our session, and we ask him how many of you have any virus software on your cell phone? I was expecting to see about release half only about maybe six people raise your hands, and i don’t even think most people know that that exists. There you go. So now wear allowing folks to share to sync up their email, sync up their email that context also get access to certain files off their mobile devices, because, again, it’s how we operated these at these days, and it works for a lot of us, but what happens when that smart? Phone gets stolen, lost or if you’re constantly upgrading, you’re a smart phone and you don’t properly clean out here clean out your smartphone well, if you don’t have password protection and also, if you’re not using anti virus software on their, imagine how others can get out that information. Where are we even gonna find auntie? But where do we start to look for anti virus software for our phone? It’s right out there? I mean, if you go out to the iphone store and just search for any virus software, if you go to the google play store and search for anti virus software, it is out there it’s just again. It’s not sexy, it’s, not something you’re downloading, usually downloading games and absent things that nature, you’re not down lee office productivity, our office, productivity, aps as well as in the especially for android phones because they’re not as police. The acts that are not a police there’s a lot of malicious acts that are out there, so you’re downloading what you might think. It’s a free game, the software but it is designed to then go after your contacts, your emails and other type of other types of information that could end work its way into your organization. Leon let’s, stay with you. How did we enforce these policies that both are saying are important on the in this? This this one on the personal technology side? How do we make sure that people are doing with their equipment what we’re asking them to do if they want to use it in the workplace? Great question. And that question came up a couple of times in our talk. Part of it is human police enemy some of it you can, you can you can afford through technology through right, so certain kind of tools, but sometimes it’s just about writing that policy in place, right creating a b y o d policy and and require all your staff members to comply with that were to sign off and understand a lot of his education, and then try to do sometimes basic auditing and checking with people’s equipment. Verify that they have this, that they have, that they’re compliant with those policies. So if you have the luxury of adapting technologies to enforce those rules and some of them are very commonplace with microsoft exchange and often sixty five you could do some of those things, but you you can’t it cost you nothing to write a policy, to put it in place forces, but enforcement. So there is actual verification. We actually going to look at their device and see that they’ve got on it what we are asking them to put. Well, imagine if you’re working for social services organization and you have health and human services information on there that information get lost, would you would you rather not go after and once a year check and verify that they are in compliance with that as opposed to falling prey to a hip, a compliance issue? Okay, okay, then let’s move on to number two are you know what a second? Why don’t mean necessarily in sequence, but what’s another one out of the seven? You know, another one that i think falls in line with it’s a bad habit that people just aren’t really necessarily very aware of is they’re. They’re not always very discerning about which cloud platforms they’re using so often people wanting his drop box. It’s easy. They probably have a personal account already and so, you know, you jump. On dropbox and you’re putting your data files from your organization on there, the reality is that consumer based called services just aren’t as secure as ones that air oriented, more towards business and enterprise type. I’m called service, so you know, people think they’re doing fine, they think they’re doing good, they trust drop box, but they don’t really understand there is a difference between using that and a more business orian commercial. What were some of the more? What are some of the commercial ones? Leon leon for-profit says that well, i mean what again, what we’re talking about rather than using the dropbox to personal version used to run blocks for business or dog bites for team rather than using dahna g dr usedto get a partial use g driver’s part of blue collapse whether than using microsoft one dr that you get for free if you haven’t outlook dot com account, use it as a part of one dr for business on the part of your opposite sixty five you have greater securities, the i t department or whoever is your tech support provider has greater control over containing who has access to that information. Plus you can retrieve that information more efficiently. Imagine it wanted you using your own personal dropbox account and it’s sink to, like five or six other different devices when you leave that organization. How do we get that information back from your personal rot box account? We don’t basic. There you go. So information’s out door now you’re basically are storing your data and everybody’s home when everybody’s personal device you’re probably not a magic. I don’t know how many people have tried to return. Retrieve a lot of information off a dropbox personal account’s been successful at it. Okay. Okay. So you thank you because you let your name three resource is there on top. Your head. Excellent. Ok. Alright. So safe for use of the cloud of cloud services. Okay, what else we got of our seven? Well, the one thing that we always harp on and people get a chuckle out of it. But we have deal with it is proper password management strong password using stronger passwords and insurance, and requiring that your staff members whether they’re using their personal devices or if they’re using company own devices to use strong passwords and not just using one, two, three, four, five, six or password as your password, but also changing that passed were periodically will do with that that’s still out there, we showed a church, we showed her chart and still one, two, three, four, five, six password no past are still the top passwords being used by most folks. So we again we think that we’re past that, but we’re really not and what we’re what we’re doing in our talk is really just reminding folks and educating them of things that they know, but they just need to be reminded of people. Please have a secure password do not use one, two, three, four, five or password, no path, no pan out used you’ll be, you’ll be, you’ll be better than probably two thirds of users if you just eliminate those three things that i don’t use them. What oppcoll yeah again, you’re right. These things were here, but we’re not doing it exactly when i do it, there should be numbers that should be symbols. It should be a word out of a definition of what a lot of people are talking about. It now is maybe using phrases so you can’t you can’t assume you can’t you can’t expect your staff member to come up with a cryptic pass where like a b capital, jay lorts see one, two, three oh, the ampersand sign and all that sort of stuff, but they could come up with a phrase always use the example of it. He used big mac fries but capitalized, obey in the a m and neck and then using empress stand for the a m a that is going to be far harder to increase, to break to crack, then some some more simple password, but you’ll remember it. Or maybe a phrase that’s just known to you or your family or your yeah, yeah it’s in your from your grandparent’s something, and then you choose the first couple of letters of each exactly, exactly, and using symbols and numbers and still those things, too, make it somewhat creek critics still, because really, what? What happens? You know you’re you’re lengthening the time it takes to crack your password, you know, if they if they know there’s a with just twenty six characters a through z, they can do that a lot more quickly than if there’s twenty six. Characters plus, you know, ten digits plus cerini of upper case and symbols. You just magnify the difficulty. Yeah, absolutely exponentially. Okay, okay, give us another one again. Would you throw something else out from our from our seven? Yeah. You know, one that is another pretty basic thing. People aren’t necessarily always backing up their data. They they don’t have a plan for back-up. Yeah. Disaster recovery, you know, not just a disaster. Where, say, a server breaks down or, you know, something gets erased, but like real disasters, what happens if you have a flood and you know, your servers get destroyed? That way, you know, a fire, those sorts of situation, actually, at last, year’s auntie si i interviewed. I remember you could you could search listeners if you want to find this one. Her name was dar geever ca. It was all about you, you know that. You know, you know that, you know, dark. It was all about your disaster disaster recovery plan. So that was just one year ago. But first of all, you gotta have a plan. You’re not the airtight may not be hurricane proof, but i have a plan, right, let’s. Get started well, that’s the key thing, and we were saying that a lot of non-profits have become more mature, smart backing up their data. But david, backing up your data is just one part of it. When you talk about disaster recovery, you’re talking about protecting the entire environment. So if your server crash it’s going to take a lot longer to bring that server back-up depending on how you been, how you been poor, proactive, into that recovery, then just restoring the working files, how long is it going to take for you to get the operating system back-up apply altum security patches and all that sort of stuff and depending on the type of non-profit you are, is that ok or not for you to be dahna day a week, two weeks, so when we talk about disaster recovery we’re talking about you got to go beyond just backing up the data, you’ve got to be concerned with the environment as a whole and what is your strength? What is your what if analysis for if this were to occur, when are we going to do? Like what you’re hearing a non-profit radio tony’s got more on youtube, you’ll find clips from stand up comedy tv spots and exclusive interviews catch guests like seth gordon. Craig newmark, the founder of craigslist marquis of eco enterprises, charles best from donors choose dot org’s aria finger do something that worked. And naomi levine from new york universities heimans center on philanthropy tony tweets to he finds the best content from the most knowledgeable, interesting people in and around non-profits to share on his stream. If you have valuable info, he wants to re tweet you during the show. You can join the conversation on twitter using hashtag non-profit radio twitter is an easy way to reach tony he’s at tony martignetti narasimhan t i g e n e t t i remember there’s a g before the end he hosts a podcast for the chronicle of philanthropy fund-raising fundamentals is a short monthly show devoted to getting over your fund-raising hartals just like non-profit radio, toni talks to leading thinkers, experts and cool people with great ideas. As one fan said, tony picks their brains and i don’t have to leave my office fund-raising fundamentals was recently dubbed the most helpful non-profit podcast you have ever heard. You can also join the conversation on facebook, where you can ask questions before or after the show. The guests were there, too. Get insider show alerts by email, tony tells you who’s on each week and always includes link so that you can contact guests directly. To sign up, visit the facebook page for tony martignetti dot com. Lively conversation, pop trends and sound advice. That’s. Tony martignetti non-profit radio. And i’m lawrence paige nani, author off the non-profit fund-raising solution. Dar even went into the possibility that some organizations may need off site places to go. Well, you gotta have some place rented or or have a share agreement for when you needed an emergency for physical location. It is it is conceivable me, obviously, going to the cloud has helped out tremendously as far as people who still itjust dorner information in a cloud using google laps ofthis office. Three, sixty five things that nature there, they have access to their working files, and they could still use things like microsoft office or google docks and things that nature. But if you’re trying to get to your donor zsystems and hopefully that’s in a cloud of swell, but there might be still some things that are on that physical server and what happens if that server was to crash or the building that you’re operating out of two is inaccessible or loses power? Yeah, okay, all right. They’re excellent. What else you guys got? Well, the one of things that we also talked about that we want to touch on was about software management. And this is about basically ensuring that when you’re doing software updates, patch updates and things that nature, that you do it in an intelligent matter-ness not every not every update is a good update. A lot of the hackers thes days are going through the adobes, the job of e ems and things of that nature. So you want to be mindful of that? And you want to make sure that if you’re allowing people to download software and do updates on their own, um what? What are your provisions around that they’re actually downloading malicious software. So we talked about again, more policies the potential the locking down the workstations and required an it person or tech support person, too. Basically white list that particular software patch up days before comes down. Because once you do that, then it help out with on the productivity. Okay. Okay. Anything else, dan, you want to add about the suffering management side? No, i think that covers it that way. Okay. Okay. Don’t want to go through these two fast. No that’s. Quite all right. Okay. So feel free to elaborate. Well, well, i will share that one thing that in the office, when we’re talking, we’re going to talk. That thing that came up a lot of security and especially we start talking about cyber security, and they say, well, leon and dan, if you’re telling us we have to be have stronger passwords if we have to be responsible about where we’re storing our data in mohr business, great cloud storage solutions as opposed to consumer grace clouds store solutions, what does that say for cybersecurity were what are your thoughts on cybersecurity? And what we were sharing with them is that we feel that a lot of the cloud stores a lot, a lot of the cloud vendors are doing a decent job as far as doing that. What we need to start looking at when we start talking about password management is looking to some of the clouds cloud password management solutions out there, because now we’re requiring our staff members to remember five or six or seven different passwords because they log into their computer one way they logged into google app susan another password because we were now no longer have single sign on any more, so they were asking questions regarding that and make it, and we were given recommendations on tools like last past and so forth, okay. Let’s not gloss over this. Yeah, yeah. Last last past a cz one of those clouds on password management solutions and there’s two or three others that are out there if you go out there and google them. But what they allow you to do is is almost like a software it’s. Almost like a password vault. You can upload a key and all your primary passwords. And then you have one master password with some kind of token key that allows you to then log in one time. And then those solutions was analog into your sixty five. Those solutions argument with in laws because they have they have they hold on to your credentials. So as we’re now moving into maur, this hybrid mode where we still have to log into a local network. But we have a lot of our systems out in a cloud. We have to now deal with howie managing our passwords across both in the cloud and on premise. Okay, about dash lane. Either of you familiar with it. Actually. Password management is that you think is in the same camp it’s in that same camp with last pass and so forth. I mean there’s two or three, they’re out there. Octus another one that’s out there that a lot of people are trying to use for a single sign on between their microsoft active directory network as well as in the cloud. So and some of them tie in with things like salesforce. Dot com embraces these kind of things. So the more major players out in the field, the major software vendors are making sure that their cloud management solutions are our being able to be accessible through these cloud password management system. Okay, dash lane, last pass octa okay, and he wasn’t any another one. You want to shout out as worthy? There was another and there’s another incarnation of non-profit radio. So you won passed hyre special one passes another one as well. Ok, very good. What else? But this is in our list of seven. Well, the other thing that we talked about it kind of going to school in size. We are talked about personal computers to introduce it, but i’m going to talk about that. But then, if you want to talk about, we’re talking about the mobile devices and so forth and the issues that come with that mobile, right? So we we talked about bring your own device when your pc or your laptop, you know similar concerns with mobile devices. You know, you need policies in place. I need to make sure that, you know, there’s a reality that people were using their phones or tablets for work. We’re taking our work everywhere now. And so how do you manage that? That’s a there’s a reality there that everyone’s probably living with on some degree. How do you minimize the risk and manage it so that your comfortable with how people using their mobile devices for work? Okay, how do you how do you know? Well, you know, i think some of the things that we’ve already talked about you making sure you have antivirus software on your phone is a really important thing, okay, you’ll be able to manage on some level the device that if someone say, leaves your organization that you can either you know, it’s complicated, potentially, but you potentially could delete some of the information in particular aps you’re not likely probably to be able to delete their whole phone and that’s probably good for everybody, but just having a little bit more control. On how people are using their mobile devices when it comes to work. And, you know, leon mentioned he’s sort of old school, and i think maybe very prudent in the sense that he has his personal device and he has a work device and he keeps those separate, i think, for for an organization, if you could do that, it really is the most prudent approach, because the reality is you can’t control. So what else is device they’re passing around with their family, you know, someone borrows it to look something up or use the phone, you know, that data contract veliz the reality. And so, you know, you have to think about that risk, and if your organization is sort of willing to take that risk, or if it needs to take some steps to kind of minimize the okay, we have time for one more dan you want introduce the last one? Yeah, the last one is the lack of network security, right? So you’re we often using wifi. You have a router. But did you make sure to set a unique password for that round? Or are you just using the factory setting and itjust admin, which is public. Anyone could look that up and get on your router at any time. You know things like that, making sure firewalls are in place. You’re making sure your network is secure altum throughout and i think leon comprise going more. Did you want to have anymore about network security? Yeah, that’s the one thing is it’s a multi layer it’s, a multi layered approach. So you have to have the external penetration protection with your firewall but that’s also where you need to also maybe have a firewall running at the pc level is well along with the a v and malware software. Additionally, what we were talking about, hiss. If you’re providing wifi access within your organization, you definitely want to have a separate wifi space for a guest, contractors, visitors and thea nature versus you definitely want to do that. And you definitely want because again, if you have people just coming in off the street in public and bringing in their laptops, you don’t know what’s running on their laptop you again. It goes back to a lot of the other issues we were talking about it’s, like, bring another personal workstation in there we’ll have to wifi. And exactly you want to have a separate it one where? Even if you give him a password to log again. That password maybe times out after two hours of three hours with boy, they have to re authenticate, separate from your stamp, where they’re always going to be able to go on and have constant access to what? You want to keep it separated. Okay, we’re gonna leave it there. Ok. Cool. So it’s cool, right? They are. Leon wilson, chief technology and information officer at the cleveland foundation, and dan rivas, managing writer for idealware. Gentlemen. Thank you very much. Thank you very much. I have to a highlighter intense wag item. We’re doing that each each interview and i neglected due in the beginning. We have this usb flash from texas, and we had that to the pile of here. You might have thought we just have a message said that’s. Not true. Thean ten swag pile. Very well organized. Cool. See? Very nice. Tony martignetti non-profit radio coverage of ntc sixteen twenty sixteen non-profit technology conference. Thank you so much for being with us. Thank you. Thanks. Next week, zombie loyalists. If you missed any part of today’s show, i beseech you, find it on tony martignetti dot com. We’re sponsored by pursuing online tools for small and midsize non-profits data driven and technology enabled, and by we be spelling supercool spelling bee fundraisers. We b e spelling dot com. Our creative producer is claire meyerhoff. Sam liebowitz is the line producer. Kevin dollars are am and fm outreach director shows social media is by susan chavez, and his great music is by scott stein of brooklyn. You with me next week for non-profit radio. Big non-profit ideas for the other ninety five percent. Go out and be great. Hey! Buy-in what’s not to love about non-profit radio tony gets the best guests check this out from seth godin this’s the first revolution since tv nineteen fifty and henry ford nineteen twenty it’s the revolution of our lifetime here’s a smart, simple idea from craigslist founder craig newmark yeah insights, orn presentation or anything? People don’t really need the fancy stuff they need something which is simple and fast. When’s the best time to post on facebook facebook’s andrew noise nose at traffic is at an all time hyre on nine a m or eight pm so that’s, when you should be posting your most meaningful post here’s aria finger ceo of do something dot or ge young people are not going to be involved in social change if it’s boring and they don’t see the impact of what they’re doing. So you got to make it fun and applicable to these young people look so otherwise a fifteen and sixteen year old they have better things to do if they have xbox, they have tv, they have their cell phones. Me dar is the founder of idealist took two or three years for foundation staff, sort of dane toe add an email address card, it was like it was phone. This email thing is right and that’s why should i give it away? Charles best founded donors choose dot or ge somehow they’ve gotten in touch kind of off line as it were and and no two exchanges of brownies and visits and physical gift. Mark echo is the founder and ceo of eco enterprises. You may be wearing his hoodies and shirts. Tony, talk to him. Yeah, you know, i just i’m a big believer that’s not what you make in life. It sze, you know, tell you make people feel this is public radio host majora carter. Innovation is in the power of understanding that you don’t just do it. You put money on a situation expected to hell. 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Nonprofit Radio for April 15, 2016: 8 Areas of Nonprofit Excellence

Big Nonprofit Ideas for the Other 95%

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Michael Clark & Melkis Alvarez-Baez: 8 Areas of Nonprofit Excellence

The Nonprofit Coordinating Committee Excellence Awards are based on tough criteria that reveal the right way to run your organization in areas like fundraising; management; board; financial; and diversity. This is from the show on March 6, 2015, when Michael Clark was NPCC’s president, and Melkis Alvarez-Baez was their director of programs. They explain all the standards.


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Hello and welcome to tony martignetti non-profit radio big non-profit ideas for the other ninety five percent i’m your aptly named host it’s tax day. I hope that doesn’t make you cringe just think about next year when you’ll have until april seventeenth, two extra days next year see how generous the irs is to you. Oh, i’m glad you’re with me. I’d be thrown into thrombosis, ida pina, if you dealt me the low blow that you missed today’s show eight areas of non-profit excellence the non-profit coordinating committee excellence awards are based on tough criteria that revealed the right way to run your organization in areas like fund-raising management board, financial and diversity. This is the show from march six twenty fifteen, when michael clark was and pcc’s president and melkis alvarez-baez was their director of programmes. That explains all the standards on tony’s tech too our contributors, we’re sponsored by pursuant full service fund-raising data driven and technology enabled, you’ll raise more money pursuing dot com also by crowdster online and mobile fund-raising software for non-profits now with apple pay for mobile donations. Crowdster dot com here are michael clarke and melkis alvarez-baez with eight areas of non-profit excellence, i’m very glad teo welcome it’s, a pleasure to welcome michael clarke and melkis alvarez-baez to the show, michael is president of the non-profit coordinating committee of new york. He has thirty five years of training and experience in urban issues, public health and non-profit management, and they are at n pcc. And why on twitter melkis alvarez-baez, director of programmes at non-profit coordinating committee of new york, one of the programs she directs is the new york community trust non-profit excellence awards that we’re talking about today and she’s at melkis alvarez-baez michael melkis welcome to the show. Thank you for having us. Pleasure. Pleasure. Tio be able to spend the hour talking about some, i think extraordinary guidelines. Eight specific areas. That non-profits good. Very much benefit from michael, our president and pcc, new york. Where were these eight areas of excellence come from that? The awards are based on well, it’s. Funny. You should ask tony. We we actually little karin answer for that. I didn’t prepare nasco and not only prepared but it’s the truth. Ten years ago we looked around the country and we realised there are thirty six regional associate state and regional associations of non-profits like ours, representing a total of about twenty five thousand non-profit organizations and nineteen of them have developed their own standards for what are the key areas of management that you have to do really well, so that your organization performs at a high level and as a ceo so you don’t get fired. So the point is we took a look at those we identified even though they don’t quite agree with each other. We said we’re gonna fight eight areas that that they all had in common. Okay? And we decided to use those eight areas to build a slightly different kind of programme. Most of those are certification programs. You take a workshop, you passed the test, they say, okay, you’re certified in financial management. You certified in this, we thought we would create an aspirational program, one that really talks about what did the excellent practices and financial management look like? What did the excellent practices and communication look like? Because i think these days, most people are trying to figure out how to make the organization’s perform better. So these air guides to how to make your organization perform better in those areas and quite well detailed. We’re gonna have time since we have the full hour. Get into some of the detail of it. Um, now, only nineteen of the thirty eight organizations had had standards of sometime. That’s only that’s, only half. Yeah, that’s all within the last five or ten years. It’s a trend that they’re gradually developing these program or more. Yeah. No kisses, nothing. Yeah, i think last time i checked, it was actually twenty one of them that had some sort of standards program. It’s growing. I just came from our national conference, and we talked a lot there about standards of excellence programs and also about the excellence awards program and where they were one of only two organizations that has an excellence award. Strauss cool. All right, the other one is washington d c right now melkis this is a lot more than an awards ceremony, right? Maybe there’s let’s talk about the workshops that aaron get involved all year. You’re raising really the level of lots and lots of non-profits whether there in the awards competition or not. Yeah, we actually like to say that the awards is uneducated schnoll program disguised. As an awards program on and it’s quite lengthy process from march to november, culminating in that final award ceremony where we sort of announced three winners but really the entire process, even the application is meant to be educational for applicants, so that there’s something for all of the organizations that go through the process, even those that don’t win, right? And the idea is that by going through this application process, they’re learning about their management practices and how to improve them. At the end of each awards program, we also put on a siri’s of workshops that are actually going on. Now they’re called the pathways toe excellence workshops in the idea with those is to really disseminate the best management practices in each of these eight key areas that we’re going to talk about from past winners of the awards. And it was that award ceremony last november that motivated me tohave the two of you on the show because i was i just was so taken by how no, how the organizations had risen to the to the challenge of the eight areas that there were three organizations on stage, but i know there’s lots. Of lots of organizations a z i said, i mean, even even beyond the ones that are in the competition, there’s lots of organizations learning a lot about very, very good practices. Andi was just i hadn’t i hadn’t heard of the awards. Sorry to say i hadn’t heard of them before i was invited. Okay? All right, well, i’m too i’m helping you. We’re getting it out to ten thousand more people. Yeah, i was invited to go boyfriend hey. And i went and i really was was taken by the descriptions of the organizations out there with the three that were on the stage, the finalists and just the overall explanation of the eight areas. So welcome. I’m glad i’m glad i was there going. You’re the practices. The good thing about the program when you come to those awards and when you sit through the best practices workshop is you’re listening to people that have actually had to implement these things. Yes. So this is not somebody’s theory about how to do this stuff. This is this is just a lesson straight from the field, right? How they think it has a has a i think non-profit managers recognize that right away it has an authenticity that you wouldn’t necessarily see if you read a lot of books. There are something over seven million entries and google for non-profit excellence. Okay, it’s, a confusing world let’s start to get it let’s start to get into our eight because because there are eight, and i want it just as an overviewing i’m going to take them off, okay, if you’ll allow me great. So people know what’s what’s coming up, the first we’re going to talk about is effective and ethical fund-raising and resource development overall management focus on results, governance structure that moves the organization forward strong, transparent and accountable financial management, diversity and culturally competent organizational practices. Enlightened use of human resource is that’s interesting, enlightened use appropriate and reliable information technology it systems and regular ineffective communications and use of communications technology. That’s where we’re headed let’s start with thea the fund-raising and ethical effective unethical fund-raising and resource development let’s start with you, michael, the one of the things that there’s lots of bullets under all of them. And we obviously do not have time for all that for each bullet. That’s impossible, but let’s ah, let’s talk let’s. Look at a couple like fund-raising revenue streams are as diverse as possible. What are we looking for there? Why is it important? You’re looking for something that looks like a pyramid and a lot of non-profits finances looked like an inverted pyramid are the words you’re looking for some money coming from private donors, some money coming from foundations, some money coming from the government, some money coming from corporations and that there’s a very simple reason for that. If you have only one source revenue, then you’re extremely vulnerable to changes in politics or changes in foundation trends or changes in whatever that one sources so better toe have you that that’s very risky? Yes. So you you know, just to keep it to be a sustainable is posits a big word in the nonprofit sector. Sustainability to be a sustainable is possible. You want tohave as diverse range of sources of money as you can get the the board. So i’ll tell you what we’ll may well go back and forth. So you know michael will cover. Well, michael will cover the talk about the fund-raising and then melkis will do the next area. Okay, we’ll be all right. But then chime in two, you know, i mean, let’s have a conversation. I don’t mean to shut you off milk if you want to add something about effective ethical fund-raising please do. Okay, um, the board overall responsibility for raising funds to meet the organization’s needs the responsibility fund-raising resides with the board, michael, it actually does. You know, there are three basic principles built into non-profit law about what boardmember we’re supposed to do, and one of them is called the duty of care, and that involves making sure the organization is sustainable and has revenue. A lot of board members walk onto boards and never realized that we do a lot of training with board members and coaching on they say, really, i’m supposed to help them raise money? Absolutely it’s part of its part of the job of being a boardmember so, you know, boardmember is frequently represent very different kinds of backgrounds than the managers, but they bring a lot to the table, and we’re looking for one hundred percent annual giving on the board. A good standard is tohave one hundred percent above board giving something personally. Some board set up a number something just say, give something that’s meaningful to you, but somehow you one hundred percent giving you what that is that if your board members aren’t giving, then it’s hard to convince others to give to your organization. Sure, they’re your key, your key volunteers right there. You’re a prime stakeholders if they’re not doing it, why should others? Yeah, cool. Um, let’s say i’ll tell you what, let’s let’s go out on a break and when we come back, we’re going toe we’ll get through our next area, which is going to be overall management focused on results, and we’ve got six other areas after that, so hang there with us. You’re tuned to non-profit radio tony martignetti also hosts a podcast for the chronicle of philanthropy fund-raising fundamentals is a quick ten minute burst of fund-raising insights published once a month. Tony’s guests are expert in crowdfunding, mobile giving event fund-raising direct mail and donor cultivation. Really all the fund-raising issues that make you wonder am i doing this right? Is there a better way there is? Find the fund-raising fundamentals archive it tony martignetti dot com that’s marketmesuite n e t t i remember there’s, a g before the end, thousands of listeners have subscribed on itunes. You can also learn maura, the chronicle website, philanthropy dot com fund-raising fundamentals the better way. Welcome back to big non-profit ideas for the other ninety five percent let’s do live listener love let’s do it early because we got a lot manami wisconsin love it, my nominee. I love that st louis missouri would bury new jersey, new bern, north carolina will be there in a couple weeks in north carolina. Anyway, new york, new york live listener love to each of you will go abroad a little later on got to send out the podcast pleasantries, people listening in the time shift on any device, anytime podcast pleasantries to you and our affiliate affections love our affiliates throughout the country, lots of affection going out to them melkis let’s, look at this overall management focus on results and why a well defined mission statement is important. Yeah, i mean, i think mission statements contend to be kind of cloudy sometimes they’re up there, right? And this area really has to do with organizations defining the difference that they want to make people’s lives in the communities that they’re serving, and then setting sort of milestones and benchmarks to assess and track their own progress towards that difference right towards the impact that they ultimately. Want to it? See? And there’s a point made that it’s ah it’s. A well defined mission statement so narrowly focused. Ah, what else? Well defined geographical focus also, you know, in terms of when it comes to what the selection committee is looking for, a strong response in this in this question, they’re looking to get a sense from the mission statement. What an organization does, right. And ultimately, if an organization has to take a paragraph toe, explain what they do, then perhaps it’s worth revisiting the mission statement. Okay. You mentioned the selection committee. Who is the selection committee for the awards? Yeah. The selection committee is a group of about thirty two consultants non-profit leaders. That’s a big committee. Yeah, many of thirty two. Yep. And the idea is that we have about four people strong in each of these eight areas. Okay. Oh, i see. All right. So there’s target over their teams. Some committee’s subcommittee. Oh, excellent. Okay. Um, expert consultants and technical assistance air used when they’re needed. Yeah. What’s what’s a focus their you know, this is an area that can get really expensive, you know, to do long term evaluations for example, and so consultants provide a service that allows organizations toe improve upon this practice, especially if they can’t do it. I’m themselves. Last year, rome, new york, during their site visit, spoke about their use of consultants and row in new york was one of the three finalists. Yes, that i saw on the stage. Three winners for one of three winners, right on dh. They spoke during their site visit, which is the final stage of the selection process about how they had used um ah, consultants teo improve their own performance in this area to assess thie impact of their work. Remember what kinds of consultants they were using? Let’s. See? So in one area they were working to improve their boards performance and making sure that they were setting expectations on dh, that the responsibilities were clear. So, you know, this area about tracking results is not just about program results, but also about organizational results as well. Yeah, okay. The organization uses reflective learning. What is that? It’s an organization. You know, it’s a practice that organizations are being mindful of what they’re seeing, and then reflecting back on that. So saying, well, why did that work a certain way, or why didn’t that work a certain way? As we expected, perhaps, and then coming back and trying to take steps to sort of address whatever you know, they did see what the result wass, you know, so they’re not just resting and great results, for example, but they’re trying to see how can they be even greater? And if something doesn’t work, then how can we improve upon it going forward? All right, how about we go to aa governance structure, michael governance structure that moves the organ move the organization forward, that’s what we do, yeah, we do more that i functional agreement, our experience high performing non-profits and i say this without exception all think of the relationship between their board of directors and their top manager, usually the executive director of the president as a partnership. I say that because when i came into the sector thirty five years ago, there was a tendency to see the board as the governance body, and they made the decisions, and they made the policy. It never really worked like that. But it sounded nice on paper. But the truth is, if they’ve got to work together because both of them play essential roles in making sure that the organization is is working at its optimum. And there are a lot of details to that, as you know, but the point is, you know, it’s it’s just to make sure that everybody’s on the same page and we’re all moving in the same direction, and that we have some markers for determining whether we’re getting there. One of the standards is that the individual board members and the board overall is regularly evaluated key huge print, huge thing people think, well, the board should be evaluating the executive director of the year it’s true that’s true, right? The government governance committee or some other body should be evaluating the performance of the board as a whole and the performance of every boardmember because it really is a job. And you want to make sure that everybody’s playing on the team think of think about rowing about like rome. New york does every day and you get imagine if eleven people are growing really well on one person’s decided that this is lunch time. You’re not gonna have a high performing rowing team? Yeah, teamwork. Is what non-profits take toe work effectively. Um, new board candidates get a recruitment prospectus and site visits. It’s a big deal. What should be in that recruitment prospectus? We look well, a lot of things that expectations. Ideally, you’d have a job description for board members. You have some sort of description of the kinds of functions of the different committees on the board. How will you be evaluated a year from now? So people know what they’re working against. You know what with what will this test cover, as they say in school and, you know, it’s it’s way give people in our organization we give people the last six meeting’s minutes so they can sort of get a flavor for how the board talks about things. We have ah, charge to every one of our committees that says not only what its duties are, but sort of what its goals are. Our contribution should be, i presume. Non-profit coordinating committee of new york is adhering to these eight standards we try, we were working in its very aspirant. They’re very aspirational really mean. They are it’s and it’s. A constant, innovative process. I can’t. Exactly. And the exciting thing. Tow us is about fifty percent of the people that apply now have applied before that’s exactly way we structured. The weight is fifty percent of the organization’s. Oh, oh have r repeat people keeping one of they want they want to do more. They want it. They want to come back to the inn are most positive. Feedback comes from people that don’t win. They say this is the best thing we ever. It was an enormous amount of lorts cream it’s the best thing we ever went through it’s better than strategic planning, you know it’s it’s ah it’s better than anything else. We’ve tried and we and we didn’t win this year, but we want to go through again next year. We have part of a big part of the reason too. That is melkis gives everybody on our toe now on behalf of detailed feedback in a conference call after the committee of the committee of our two hour and a half, you here’s here’s what the committee said about your communications here’s what the committee said about your financial management hears so mary’s where you need to improve that’s what would cost most? Non-profits a lot of money and, you know, and paid consultant and how many organizations do you do that for? Its offered to everyone that applies. So, for example, in twenty fourteen, we had seventy seven applicants. I’ve done feedback calls with fifty three of them so that’s, about seventy percent of them. Okay, that’s, a big commitment on our part, you know, toe invest that time. But as she said, it’s, really from our point perspective, a training and consulting and coaching program mohr than a competition in the competition is it’s like the voice, you know, see the voice on television. You know, the big payoff in the voice is not whether you win that particular cycle, it’s, that you get to be part of some, you know, master, musical persons team, and you’re going to learn a mountain from that. Well, we hope you learned a mountain from our whole application process. All right, excellent. Um okay. Another one just under the governance structure. That expectations are understood by board members, i guess. That’s part of that probably reflects on the prospect. The recruitment prospectus. Yeah, it does. But it’s it’s also something that needs a constant refresh because board members, i think a lot of them have sort of fallen into ah, dreamlike stand trance where they believe, you know, my job is to come and make sure that the staff’s doing a good job and pat him on the back well, that is part of their job. But there are a lot of other parts to their job, and they they need to do it. And sometimes i need coaching and coaxing and and help and all sorts of stuff, all of which is part of the picture. But staff does a lot of the driving of that process. But boardmember sze have very definite responsibilities just ah, quick. When do you think that these this the recruitment prospectus would that be something that signed by the boardmember i acknowledge that i’ve received a copy and i understand it. Is that that important? It some organizations do that. Some organizations have an annual commitment. Statement where every boardmember signs a commitment that this year i will help raise this amount of money this year with individualized goals. Yeah, this year i will attend at least seventy five percent of all the board meetings, committee meetings and so on. It’s not a light thing. You know, i had a governess, board chair, governance committee chair at a previous organization who used to say it’s the reverse of the old army slogan which used to say it’s, not a job. It’s a journey. He said, this is not a journey at the job. Yeah, it really today running a nonprofit corporation has never been more demanding, but it’s also, you know, one of those things where it’s really closely related toe having board assessments and having a report card, you know, of the entire board or individual boardmember because that’s another way to die, checkin on whether they know what is expected of them on and to remind them when they are not performing, and to acknowledge them when they are, you know, performing you know, i love the annual commitment document or something like that. And and of course, the individual boardmember zehr all being reviewed? Yeah, cool melkis let’s stay with you for ah, accountable financial management. What? Why don’t you? Why don’t you point out what you think is important there? Yeah, i think in this area what? And michael said, one of the buzzwords earlier sustainability, right? So the selection committee is really looking for organizations that are financially healthy and that are that are making smart choices in their finances so that they’re around five years from now, ten years from now, long long term write the other thing that they’re looking for here is how their mission is informing their financial practices. And sometimes we tend to think that those two things are separate, but are the finances informed by what is important to the organization? Right? So, for example, with leek and watts, who was our gold prize winner last year, they were really focused on making sure that their programs were being maximized because beds that weren’t full meant dollars were being thrown. What you tell us what we can watch those? Yeah, sure. So lincoln watts has a school up in yonkers. They also provide tons of programs and services for juvenile justice, youth or kids that are involved in the juvenile justice and students with disabilities. They have programming for them as well. So it’s a pretty multi service organization. All right, so you want to see that alignment between financial priorities and mission and that correct mission statement? Yeah, exactly. Okay, um, adequate cash reserves. Yeah, the protect the organization against contingencies about that. Yeah. I mean, it’s sort of ties back to what michael was talking about earlier about having a diverse revenue stream. It’s all about making sure that you’re protecting yourself and having that cash available is critically important. This election committee looks for a minimum of three months of cash reserves, but ideally at least six months. And of course, you keep saying the selection committee, but we know that this is for all non-profits whether you and to the end of the competition or we’re just or not, it has been an area of serious advancement in the nonprofit world of management of governance. In the last twenty five, thirty years, there was a time when people thought, well, they should operate in a break even, you know, they should just barely make it out because we don’t want a pile of money in the closet. And the truth is, you do that and you’re putting your entire mission at risk. It’s a very silly way to do business. In fact, there’s a standard here for ah working, striving toward a budget surplus each year. Yes, you should. You should want one of the simplest ways. And people don’t think about it is one of the simplest ways to build a surplus is to put it in the budget every year. Contribution of the surplus. Fifty thousand dollars on contribution of the surplus one hundred thousand dollars and treated as an annual recurring expense. And next thing you know, you look up in five years. So it’s not just an afterthought, right? Exactly. Well, not just what’s left over what’s left at the end because non-profit people tend to always could think of more needs and more things they can do and more activity. But you got to think about preserving your organization. I don’t like your own personal finances. Budget for savings? Yes, not just save what’s left of the exactly. Exactly. All right, all right. I’ll stay with you, michael. For ah, diversity and culturally competent practices. Well, this is a very rich area. The truth is diversity. I think most people understand what that means, but diversity’s important, we believe, for all kinds of companies, not just non-profit companies, but in the nonprofit sector where were frequently dealing with such a diverse communities it’s especially critical that we have boards that represent that staffs that represent that, and those are some of the questions that we and the practices that we focus on, representing the communities, that they’re serving exactly the populations, but there’s another issue in here, which is cultural competency, which is a little newer, but i think in many ways is more on point, and that is, if you’re working with populations that are that are each have their own cultural and language and other kinds of barriers to perhaps to dealing with you, you know, it’s part of your job to make sure that you can communicate with him in ways that are understood and that you understand enough about the culture and the language to make sure that not only are you getting the word out, but also you’re getting communications back. Yes, there is, and i think we’re going you have it in one of those standards, regular feedback from the communities that you’re serving. Yeah, there’s a great example. There’s, an organism wonderful organization, bronx works that that about five years ago applied and when asked about diversity said, well, you know, they’re in the bronx and they said, well, you know, we have several people on staff to speak spanish, and i think at the time, they thought that was a good answer, but the selection committee actually dinged him on that because the bronx today represents a very diverse number of ethnic communities, and it goes way beyond the sort of historic image of the puerto rican south bronx. So we came back this past year, and i asked them that same question, and they explained that they had the capacity now to trance simultaneously translated thirty four languages, that they had people on staff speaking nine of the most frequently spoken languages in the bronx. And they want outstanding that’s. That what that’s a what a great story. That’s. Terrific. Um, you have about a minute left before we, uh, we take a little break. Um, the organization regularly assesses in response to emerging needs. So that’s. That’s a big part of that feedback you’ve gotto do you know what your community’s needs are? Yeah, because the truth is not a static, especially in new york city, no place like new york city, where neighborhoods turnover constantly in terms of ethnic and demographic, another composition just look at brooklyn or queens in the last ten or fifteen years, so what you want to do is keep making sure that the geographic area is serving on the issues that you’re working on, connect with those realities outstanding. All right, mohr with michael and melkis coming up first, pursuant and crowdster i’ve talked to their ceos, both of these guys, you are focused on small and midsize shops just like this show, and just like i am, trent recur at pursuant, he has thirteen years working in small and midsize non-profits he gets your fund-raising challenges he’s lived them day in and day out and that’s. Why pursuing tools are made to overcome those challenges so you will raise more money pursuing dot com over crowdster the ceo there, joe ferraro, he and his wife, hanna run a small charity, and he used to be a marketing executive at t he knows your challenges also living them now each day and he’s at crowdster applying corporate marketing to overcome these challenges. That’s why, they added apple pay for mobile donations they’re peer-to-peer micro sites, they’re simple to set up elegant crowdster has terrific support. You are not going to be doing this alone just ah, talk to joe yourself. Joe ferraro, joe dot ferraro at crowdster. Dot com talk to the guy now. Time for tony’s. Take two. I am so grateful to our three regular contributors, amy sample ward, maria semple and jean takagi. They are by no means regular, like ordinary. They’re exemplary. The time they put in to prepping were even before prepping. But just thinking about topics, you know they’re always out thinking about topics emailing me here. This could be good. How about this? And nine times out of ten, whatever they come up with is outstanding. And i say, yes, let’s, go with it. And then the time that they spend preparing and then actually doing the show, you know they have to arrange their schedules around that. Obviously so, you know, very very grateful. Ah, i’m thanks. Latto have amy and maria. And jean on the show, month after month, it’s been for years, all of them jean has been the longest, like he was on one of the very first shows. So that’s, almost latto what we’re coming up on five years, six years come upon six years in july, and maria and amy, like four years or something, you know, it’s just enormous gratitude to the three of them. Thank you so, so much that’s. Tony’s take two now here’s michael and melkis continuing with eight areas of non-profit excellence melkis i think i think it’s your turn all right, let’s sound right for the enlightened use of human resource is what’s enlightened use? Um, so enlightened use means that that organizations are sort of maximizing the talent that is available of them, that they are taking care of their staff. And what else? That they’re sort of using their staffs experienced, tio benefit the organization. Okay, uh, another area in that and there is making sure that your risk level for your staff and three organization is as low as possible so that you don’t allow your organization be blown off course because of something didn’t expect and for that matter, you don’t subject your staff too. Such stressful conditions that it’s bad for them. So it’s it’s, really? The karen nature nurturing of your staff, as well as optimizing with one of the standards, is professional development opportunities, internal and external melkis yeah, so that’s something that the selection committee members really look for in strong organizations is that they’re investing in their staff, right? And so that khun b you know that can take the shape of online universities almost that are created for larger napor imitations and their staff, or something as simple as belonging to end pcc and sending your staff to the workshops that we put on that’s that’s you know something else that a lot of organizations tower in their own applications? Um, that there that there is a whistleblower and conflict of interest policies. Now i noticed those those specific policies appearing to two different standards. What? Why are those specifically mentioned whistleblower in conflict of interest? Well, one one big thing is we just wait. Just finished passing the first revision of the new york state, not for-profit corporation long forty five years and i served on the attorney general’s task. Force that created much of the draft for that and the truth is so so i’m only i’m only two levels. I’m only two degrees of separation from new york state attorney general, two degrees of separation. Well for mr snusz wish i had known you als, but the upshot is it requires now used to be recommended and now requires that every non-profit have a conflict of interest policy and a whistleblower policy, and not everyone was civil or you have to be above a certain budget level. But the point is that there’s much more law undergirding those doing policies. What conflicts of interest are we talking about this between morgan over primarily material conflicts of interest between your sister is the treasurer, right or or the money, you know says we’re paying we’re paying an insurance company. This is an actual example. We’re paying insurance company to ensure all of our operations, but it turns out you’re paying the insurance company more than they really charge, and they’re taking the extra and kicking it back to us. Executive director is just a couple of examples of flagrant abuse that’s about somebody just went what prison last year? For okay, for eleven years of that kind of behavior. And the truth is ah, it turns out this is far more important even than the audit. We actually raised the threshold for audits in the state from two hundred fifty thousand up to a million starting over the next few days. Give a break to the smaller organization exactly on it for what it is not because an audit is not it. You know, every one of the organizations that you’ve read headlines about people stealing money in the last fifteen years, they had a clean audit here before. So the point i’m making us it’s. Not that the auditors weren’t doing their job. They were. And on it is a very limited tools to assess the finances. Okay, and the conflict of interest part are we also thinking about conflicts between boards? Boardmember is doing business with the organization? Yeah. That’s part of what’s covered. Okay. Has a whole list of things. If your mother, brother, sister, grandfather, any people like the any relatives, children, you know, life partners or people are also being paid by the organization. Then you have to. You have to do a declaration. You have to fill out a form. Okay? Succession planning is a part of this too. That that’s part of risk is it is you don’t want an organization that has suddenly hit from sideways because executive director dies. Gets run over by a truck is the favorite example. Yeah, or just, you know, gracefully retired, whatever it is you want to know about that, you want to plan for it in advance. You want to have process established for how it’s going to work on big organizations. You might even have somebody in waiting in smaller organization to at least know what the plan is, you know? And it could even be a you mentioned could be retirement. Retirement could be corixa. Resignation could be sudden. And ideally, the person would stay until the replacement is in place. But maybe there next-gen job doesn’t allow that. Thinks that i mean, that could that could shake things up pretty seriously when the ceo walks in and says, you know, i’m only gonna be here another three months yet big deal. Okay, okay. I’m going back to melkis because you took over work-life. Um melkis information technology. This is this is big reliable we have reliable. So if we’re using windows x p still that’s ah, we probably do not have, which is totally unsupportive and has been un supported by window by microsoft. For i think a year now or something that’s, not a reliable system. Ok, yeah. So this area actually focuses more on like it. T infrastructure has a hole, right? But also i’m shallow, shallow examples of so here we’re looking at, you know, making sure that you have the technology that you need to make sure that the organization is efficient. That it’s, you know, sort of making everyone’s job a little bit easier. But also, you know, what roles does technology play in advancing your mission related goals? A cz. Well, so we often hear about how organizations are trying to use technology. Teo sort of helped deliver the programs and services that they offer. So eh? So i guess this this area is twofold. It’s about building that infrastructure to support your staff, but also the infrastructures to support your programs as well. Yeah. Ok. I see that disaster preparedness and disaster recovery planning is a part of that. One of the interviews i did we’re gonna have? Ahh we’re gonna have ahh half a show devoted to that because it’s one of the end and tcs reviews i got was exactly that. Why? Why so important? Well, we saw it with sandy firsthand, right? Organizations that didn’t have that solid infrastructure were unable to return toe work on dh basically were not able to provide services on dh programming organizations that had a more solid infrastructure we’re able to, even though they might not have been able to return to their offices physically were able to continue their work with pretty minimal interruption because they were ableto work remotely from home on. And we saw that, you know, with our own organization where a lot of us were able to work from home even though it was difficult toe commute into the into the office. Okay, andi, even if you can’t maintain fool full operations, at least you khun, you’re functioning, you’re in communication with each other, you can you can communicate outward to the people that you’re serving mean, at a minimum, you know, i think those things are important communications. What was your michael? What was the ceo there? President there? What was the post sandy like for ah non-profit coordinating committee? Well, it was quite hectic because a lot of organizations were, you know, trying to scramble to come up with solutions to problems that varied all over the map from literally being underwater toe having some of their system’s knocked out toe, having clients that were stranded in communities that were heavily impact about the hurricane and one of our winner is actually in the excellence awards program redhook initiative had had had the foresight four years earlier to build a wireless network in the largest public housing project in brooklyn, and it was it was done for the right programmatic reasons, the very reasons melkis just mentioned so they get communicate easily and cheaply out toe people that lived there, that’s the low income population so that those people could talk directly back to bradrick initiative and say, we need a program that does this, and we need some economic work on this and so on it’s very rambunctious programmed as a lot of stuff, and they didn’t plan it. I don’t think that’s a disaster response mechanism, but when the when the flood hit and then i think fourteen thousand people stranded in all these buildings with no elevators and very difficult problems with medications and food and stuff. They were all they were able nonetheless, in most cases to communicate, at least with every floor, and they were able to talk to people going to get people out, bring stuff in. So, you know, you forget sometimes you think of it and wireless services, you know, that stuff that you have to have a certain level of influence for, but, you know, when used public broadband and things like that, you can actually make it quite cheap, so non-profits air finding very innovative ways to use it, i think, okay, augment their mission, all right, and it’s part of the standards melkis thea, there should be a technology plan shouldn’t just all be happening haphazardly. We should actually should be planning our use of tech. Yeah, i mean, this is something that i feel like a lot of organizations don’t do but it’s a worthwhile investment, it helps you sort of monitor the systems that you haven’t place and thinking about where you’re going in the future and what sort of investment’s in you’re right, you’re going to need to make right. And that also sort of gets the different parts of the organization involved in talking about it. T as it relates to them as well. So, you know, it should not just be the Job or responsibility of 1 person, but really, it should be integrated until the entire, you know, organisation and its functioning. Yeah. Including the people who are doing the program work, everybody’s feeding in at least to the to the person who has the responsibility. Um, there was something that oh, yeah, the confidentiality standards, privacy standards. That’s a little about the importance of thinking about this. Yeah. And and this becomes a bigger issue with the following area as well. Communications. But, you know, there are organizations that do health related work that need to really be mindful of the hip standards on dh, the responsibilities that they owe to their clients to make sure that their information is protected and kept confidential. Okay, michael, anything you want to add on the on the side? No, just obviously, with all social media that are exploding. And with all the various ways in which people network these days non-profits have to be at least keeping up with that and making sure that they’ve got the ability to reach people and at least a lot of those ways, and this would this would flow back to the financial management. I think that should be budgeting for it for the support, the play and that we need to have in this area exactly it it is a growing budget item in a lot of non-profits lives, sure, and it cuts across communications and just basic infrastructure of technology. But it’s it’s pretty much an indispensable assumption today that you need that you think we’ll do with live listen, love, we got more new york, new york joined us welcome, welcome additional new york city people and madison, wisconsin joined us live listener love going out there to medicine let’s go abroad! We’ve got we’re in china! We’ve got wenzhao and tajol china ni hao, seoul, korea and young son korea love went south, south korea so loyal, always, always south korean listeners, please, on your haserot and going to japan, konnichiwa to honda and masato kenichi while we got hungary with us, we can’t see your city, hungary, but we know that. You’re with us live. Listen, love going out to hungary and bringing it back to you to the states. Middleton, middletown, middletown, delaware, joined us live, listener love, of course, those podcast pleasantries always and the affiliate affections so, so important. Okay, um, we’re moving on can hear me turning pages, uh, where we now with michael, right, michael, tends tio take over a bit, but really, sam, we got a minute for a break, ok, it’s melkis astern. Okay, melkis, we’re going tow. I’ll tell you what, let’s, go out for a break. Now. I think it makes sense to have our break now, when we come back, effective communications that melkis was just alluding to stay with us. Like what you’re hearing a non-profit radio tony’s got more on youtube, you’ll find clips from stand up comedy tv spots and exclusive interviews catch guests like seth gordon. Craig newmark, the founder of craigslist marquis of eco enterprises, charles best from donors choose dot org’s aria finger do something that worked. And naomi levine from new york universities heimans center on philanthropy tony tweets to he finds the best content from the most knowledgeable, interesting people in and around non-profits to share on his stream. If you have valuable info, he wants to re tweet you during the show. You can join the conversation on twitter using hashtag non-profit radio twitter is an easy way to reach tony he’s at tony martignetti narasimhan t i g e n e t t i remember there’s a g before the end he hosts a podcast for the chronicle of philanthropy fund-raising fundamentals is a short monthly show devoted to getting over your fund-raising hartals just like non-profit radio, toni talks to leading thinkers, experts and cool people with great ideas. As one fan said, tony picks their brains and i don’t have to leave my office fund-raising fundamentals was recently dubbed the most helpful non-profit podcast you have ever heard. You can also join the conversation on facebook, where you can ask questions before or after the show. The guests were there, too. Get insider show alerts by email, tony tells you who’s on each week and always includes link so that you can contact guests directly. To sign up, visit the facebook page for tony martignetti dot com. I’m rob mitchell, ceo of atlas, of giving. And you’re listening to tony martignetti non-profit radio. Big non-profit ideas for the other ninety five percent. Welcome back to big non-profit ideas for the other ninety five percent and since we did the live listen love wigan uk joined us welcome, wigan live listen love out to you, marcus, you’re up communications and and use of communications technology why is this important? Yeah, so with this area were really focused on not just how organizations are broadcasting their own work and the services that they provide, but also, you know, going back to that piece of feedback, how are they asking their different stakeholders? Not just their clients, but they’re funders there? Other donors, they’re boardmember zeev anon volunteers? How are they asking them for feedback? And then what our organization’s doing with that feedback? So our communications out, and then we’re also listening in writing to be listening to our stakeholders, right? So there’s that focus on the two way communications bond with the stakeholders it’s not just about communicating with all of them and the exact same way there should be the communications practices should really be tailored towards the stakeholders and you would know, you know what works with them by sort of tracking the effectiveness of your communication strategies and also just by listening to them, right? So what is what is it that they like to hear about? How do they like to be communicated with all right? Critical? I mean, you know, you’ve got to go to where people are not not the channel that you want them to be on, whether it’s email or social media or your sight or you’re a blogger or live events, you’ve got to do where you gotta go, where they are, right, and with social media it’s not even just about, you know, being on everything that’s available, right? It’s about being really mindful about about how you use each forum. So, for example, the washington heights corner project was a finalist last year, and they talked about how they use social media for the purposes of of connecting with city officials, right? So if they attend events and didn’t get to shake a hand, they will tweet at the city official and say, sorry i missed you hope we can reconnect at some point, all right? So that’s a very smart use on very targeted use of one particular media and your point about not being in all of them just because they’re exist when i was it. Ah, again non-profit technology conference this week few people mentioned, you know, avoiding shiny object syndrome just because there’s something new and shiny, a new network, a new social channel doesn’t mean that you need to be on it. Are your people there? Do they want? Do they want to hear from you? There doesn’t make sense for the age, the geography, the other demographics of the people you’re talking to it might not make sense for for your audience. I noticed that there’s something mentioned about formal and informal communication strategies. This could be just meeting people in the building where they live all right, right? Right? Or even, you know, mapping out sort of ah, touch strategy. Right? For particular people, for donors. Maybe where you’re going to map out, how many times a year going to speak to them and whether you know you want to make sure that, especially with funders this is true. You don’t want to make you want to make sure that each touches not an ask, right? So one of them might be, you know, how’s your daughter doing is she liking college? Write something very simple like that that’s that’s an informal check in but something that could go a long way right and says also a lot about how you communicate with with your you’re different audiences making the form nine ninety available is mentioned in this standard thiss area. And in a couple of others to teo to one or two others. Well, what you looking for? That nine? Ninety? It speaks the transparency of the organization. Is the organisation willing to put its finances out there for the public to review? Andi, think, michael, you can jump in here, but i am seeing that more and more of them are available online because it’s a testament to how the organisation sort of holds its self accountable by putting out there it’s, you know, it’s finances or others to see michael anything when we actually did a national guide to how to read the nine ninety and figure out what it means. Because it’s a complicated form, the iris requires it it’s not just a financial form and asked you to talk about are you still pursuing the mission that you were created for? Are you getting results? What is your board looked? Like it’s, it’s, a pretty exhaustive look at your organization from different angles, and they are all indeed online. But the truth is, you know, not every organization puts it on its own website was that my question would be where, where they’re accessible at the national level from an organization called guides guide star, of course, is that but for the for the committee, like now, i am going to focus on what the committee is looking for. Is that sufficient? If it’s if it’s killing one guy, they want ideally, they want to see your nine ninety on certainly they want to see it referenced on guide it’s our maybe a link or from your site? Yes to it on god, because the guy it’s different than a financial form because it gives the organization a chance to talk about its mission. It’s progress, it’s it’s ways of tracking progress and that sort of stuff. So you know non-profits have a cz jim collins once said, i really have to bottom lines. We have a financial bottom line and we have what they call a return on social investment and that’s the way in which you are are not fulfilling your mission. Are you changing anything in the world? And you should be able to track both of those things every year. Ideally, you’re nine, ninety and a certain sections of it that will help people figure that out. Are they making progress? So they helping more kids? Are they getting the kids not only into high school, but into college or they you know that sort of stuff? I had a guest. Ah, a couple of months ago. Now c p a huge tomb and the the conversation was about using the nine. Ninety as a marketing tool. The narrative sections instead of just copying and pasting from your mission statement, you use the narrative two to beam or if you save about what? About what your what your work is because because it is so widely available, use it as a marketing tool. Right? Um, all right, we just have a couple minutes left, and i want to talk some more about these workshops that are that that you conduct or are they strictly in person events or they on the web that others can take advantage of melkis pathway, sexson’s workshops are in person events. But what we do is we post the materials that are distributed at each of the sessions on our awards website, so folks can still i have access to all of the tools and templates that we share in person. Okay, cool it’s called pathways to excellent pathways. And, of course, the site organs of the sorry the organization site is n pcc. And why dot org’s? And where would people go to find the resource is you’re talking about melkis yeah, so actually, they would be on the awards microsite, which is np excellence dot f d n y dot or ge and there’s a a section for that on pathways to excellent say that. Say that you’re ill one more time, it’ll slower for the for the awards. Microsite yep. It’s n p excellence dot fc. And why dot or ge? Okay, i think there’s a link to it and the pcc. And why dot org’s? Yeah. Okay. Okay. Yeah. You’re raising the level of ah, lots and lots of non-profits minutes. It’s important for people to recognize. This is not just ah, a competition. All right. And and those have start the workshops have started. You said march to november. So there started, right? We yeah, so we’ve conducted three of them to date. So the one on fund-raising one on results in one on human resource is going to more coming up. And for those folks who are in new york when what’s the date of the ceremony, i very much hope to be there. We might be talking about that, michael. Yep. So for the twenty fifteen awards, the date is november nineteenth. A location to be determined. Okay, excellent that’s. Michael clarke is president of the non-profit coordinating committee of new york and melkis alvarez-baez director of programmes also at n p c c and they are at n pcc. And why on twitter? Michael melkis thank you so, so much. Thank you, toni. This has been great conversation appreciate. Thank you. My pleasure. Next week, i’ll be back live, probably with mohr from the non-profit technology conference. Got over thirty interviews from there. If you missed any part of today’s show, find it on tony martignetti dot com. Where in the world else would you go? Hyre? I don’t know. Responsive by pursuant online tools for small and midsize non-profits data driven and technology enabled pursuant dot com and by crowdster online and mobile fund-raising software for non-profits now with apple pay for mobile donations. Crowdster dot com. Our creative producer is clear. Meyerhoff. Sam liebowitz is the line producer. Gavin dollars are am and fm outreach director. The show’s social media is by dina russell, and our music is by scott stein. That’s right, scotty, be with me next week for non-profit radio. Big non-profit ideas for the other ninety five percent. Go out and be great. What’s not to love about non-profit radio tony gets the best guests check this out from seth godin this’s the first revolution since tv nineteen fifty and henry ford nineteen twenty it’s the revolution of our lifetime here’s a smart, simple idea from craigslist founder craig newmark yeah insights, orn presentation or anything? People don’t really need the fancy stuff they need something which is simple and fast. When’s the best time to post on facebook facebook’s andrew noise nose at traffic is at an all time hyre on nine a m or eight pm so that’s when you should be posting your most meaningful post here’s aria finger ceo of do something dot or ge young people are not going to be involved in social change if it’s boring and they don’t see the impact of what they’re doing so you got to make it fun and applicable to these young people look so otherwise a fifteen and sixteen year old they have better things to dio they have xbox, they have tv, they have their cell phones. Me dar is the founder of idealist took two or three years for foundation staff, sort of dane toe add an email address card. It was like it was phone. This email thing is right and that’s why should i give it away? Charles best founded donors choose dot or ge somehow they’ve gotten in touch kind of off line as it were on dno, two exchanges of brownies and visits and physical gift. Mark echo is the founder and ceo of eco enterprises. You may be wearing his hoodies and shirts. Tony, talk to him. Yeah, you know, i just i’m a big believer that’s not what you make in life. It sze, you know, tell you make people feel this is public radio host majora carter. Innovation is in the power of understanding that you don’t just put money on a situation expected to hell. You put money in a situation and invested and expect it to grow and savvy advice for success from eric sacristan. What separates those who achieve from those who do not is in direct proportion to one’s ability to ask others for help. The smartest experts and leading thinkers air on tony martignetti non-profit radio big non-profit ideas for the other ninety five percent.

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Hello and welcome to tony martignetti non-profit radio big non-profit ideas for the other ninety five percent. I’m your aptly named host. Oh, i’m glad you’re with me. I’d come down with mette hemoglobin e mia if our conversation bled into why you missed today’s show, pay attention to n ten and auntie si the non-profit technology network and their annual non-profit technology conference are outstanding resource is for everyone who uses technology for social change and who doesn’t? You need to check out their excellent online and real time programs, affordable membership, smart conferences and great value, including for non members. Amy sample ward is our social media contributor and intends ceo of course i was just at and t c two weeks ago and that’s where amy and i talked also volunteer training long distance do you have volunteers who can’t always make it to your office? Bring your training to them. We’ll talk about learning styles on dh pros and cons of tools like mu tal, collaborate and teamviewer and the value of open source resource is that is also from ntcdinosaur on tony’s, take two blue pedicure challenge reduction we’re sponsored by pursuant full service fund-raising data driven and technology enabled you’ll raise more money pursuant dot com and by crowdster online and mobile fund-raising software for non-profits now with apple pay crowdster dot com here are amy sample ward and i from and t c just two weeks ago. Welcome to tony martignetti non-profit radio coverage of sixteen and t c that’s the twenty six steen non-profit technology conference hosted by n ten, the non-profit technology network at the convention center in san jose, california, and with me now is amy sample ward, ceo of non-profit technology network. Welcome amy. Thank you for having me. Thanks for coming all the way to the show. Absolutely from from new york and north carolina. It’s ah, it’s. Always a pleasure to meet you in person. Yeah, do so we don’t get. Yeah, we don’t get to see each other in person very often. No, your voice is the same. Thank you. You sound like yourself. You think we’re highlighting one and ten swag item? Oh, and one ntcdinosaur ag item each interview, and right now, of course i’ve got my ten headband. You probably didn’t notice that i was wearing a amy suggested exercise video, so i could be doing i could be doing yoga or squat thrust, but we have a small lead us in some jazzercise. So i’m going to take this off now and added to the swag pile. We’re all the all the swag for the show goes okay, sixteen ntcdinosaur yeah, here we are. How we doing? Way we got it. We got two thousand people. Yeah, way exactly. It’s. I am surprising how many people two thousand is when it’s in one room. You know, i think in my mind, two thousand seems like kind of, you know, it’s a big conference, but it’s not a huge conference, you know, you hear about conference like dreamforce with, you know, sell by self. What, like an entire town is coming to this conference? So our seems so small and then, you know, and like in the morning planter everybody’s in there and you look at you like there’s, a lot of people here this is actually a pretty big conference. Yeah, yeah, yeah, yeah. Turns out there are a whole lot of people that want to talk about technology for use in their non-profit at a growing number every year. Exactly. Yeah. Yeah, let’s. See? So, what are some highlights for people who are here? But of course they’re listening and tc conversation tonight there will be available starting tonight, and we want to even tease twenty seventeen. Yeah, we got twenty, five hundred people e like my overreaching twenty twenty. I don’t, i don’t think twenty five hundred. I mean, sure, you’re welcome to come, but i just think we’ll get there. No, i mean, our goal isn’t necessarily to try and grow in every year. We want to make sure we’re still serving everybody. So you’ll be ambitious and we’ll be conservative. Okay? Okay, yeah, i liked so, soldier were so highlights of this year. Well of you are on site. A couple highlights. You definitely need to make sure you go to selfie town selfie town and take some photos with the big t rex. Yeah, well, good. We can do a selfie and sell freetown unite, okay? And we’ve got i mean, all the session, all the folks that you’re interviewing there are over a hundred twenty sessions in three days. So whether you’re here or not, you don’t have to go for like, ten minutes into every single session every break out, teo, get all that content there’s what we call collaborative notes so they’re google docks for every single session where attendees in real time in the session take notes about what’s being presented so that everybody else can benefit from that knowledge even if you’re not in that room that we call them collaborative notes. But the links are just in the agenda online. So you khun browse through, see what people are writing down? Does that do this year? No, it’s not we’ve done it. We’ve done it every year for a number of years now because people like it so much, you know? They know, even if i don’t go to that session, i could just look up the collaborative notes and see what people wrote down. Yeah, exactly. And then it helps for folks who aren’t here to, they can see that, but i think even though you know, there are lots of different tools every year that people use people consistently use twitter the most of the conference, even if they’re not a big twitter user the rest of the year. So following the sixteen inches hashtag or every session has its own hashtag like sixteen auntie sees something, so if you see on the online agenda, even if you’re not here that you really want to follow that session, you know, just put that into a twitter search even if you’re not a twitter user and follow along. What what folks are saying? Because people post so you can’t read all of them all of the treats you have tio, you know, filter it out, but because i think that’s what’s different about the ntc people want to be sharing what they’re learning, you know or share what they know it’s not like, oh, i’m here to learn everything and write it down in my secret notebook, you know? Yeah, but intent is not like that either. Exactly. Well, look, by the way, let’s put a little shout out for another hashtag non-profit radio yes, i can’t say that we suffer from too much you can’t follow-up it’s not however i mean it does well it’s respectable hashtag yeah tech non-profit radio no intend intent is definitely a very collaborative sharing. I mean, even for non members. Yeah, you have a ton of content available, you know about the year. Exactly. Yeah. This morning at the plenary, i was highlighting one aspect of intense content. And today was the research that we do so five to eight reports every year some of those we do by ourselves because we just need them to happen on others we do with partners or sponsors. So them, the most recent report is the state of the cloud, which we’ve only done one previous time, and that was four years ago. And the difference between that report and this report is that now one hundred percent of people responding said they use at least one cloud tool, whereas that was not true four years ago. So looking now, okay, if we do that report again in a couple of years, what’s the difference, then everyone says they use at least to everyone, you know, clearly that’s the trend. So but all of that, i mean, that report and all of the rest of our research you can download even if you’re not remember. So go use that knowledge, especially if you’re trying to make the case to your board or to your staff that you want to change something the research is there to support better decision making and ten dot org’s because you don’t know now intent. This’s. Eventually i’ve been to your nine nine because i’m a member yet that i’m a donor. Yeah, in a nosey where’s, the you’re underpaid should be lobbying for double double n t e end. But it’s non-profit technology enterprise network that is the original name when we were incorporated by what happened to them. Well, i’m pretty sure that, like on day two, after having that name, enterprise didn’t make any sense. I don’t even know really what enterprise was meant. Teo really symbolize a lot of people, actually think, you know, just cause they haven’t looked up. R r incorporated name. Ah lot of people think the e stands for education, so we’ll get we’ll get people writing to us. Say, non-profit technology education network, which sounds great. It’s, not us. Maybe that is an organization out there, but yeah, do not donate to the non-profit technology. Education work, right? Yes. You want to give to end exactly the legitimate riel and ten? Yes. Okay. Just a little novelist thing about. Yeah, in the ensign history. Yeah. If antennas ever a category on jeopardy. That what does the e stand for? Could be one of the topics. Yeah, and you will get it right. Enterprise. A village, it times. You’re tuned to non-profit radio. Tony martignetti also hosts a podcast for the chronicle of philanthropy fund-raising fundamentals is a quick ten minute burst of fund-raising insights, published once a month. Tony’s guests are expert in crowdfunding, mobile giving event fund-raising direct mail and donor cultivation. Really, all the fund-raising issues that make you wonder, am i doing this right? Is there a better way there is? Find the fund-raising fundamentals archive durney martignetti dot com that’s marketmesuite n e t t i remember there’s, a g before the end, thousands of listeners have subscribed on itunes. You can also learn maura, the chronicle website philanthropy dot com fund-raising fundamentals the better way. Dahna okay, but no it’s very collaborative. Now, even, you know, if you’re not a member, you’re welcome tow to the to the club’s. Yep. Throughout all the way. Yeah, yeah, we have tech clubs that air in the u s in canada, in poland. Yeah, and if you want to start one wherever you are, happy to help you start one, even if you don’t intend member, even if you’re not in in ten member that’s. Wonderful. Yeah. Ok, so that so you’re fostering that kind of exactly hearing and this is no surprise. I mean, there’s, you see, you know, we’re not an association. We are a c three and we have a membership because for us, membership helps us know that we’re either on track or we’re not. If nobody wants to join anymore, then we’re clearly not delivering value. And if people want to join and they want to renew, okay, then we’re on the right path. You know, it’s an indicator for us, it’s, not our business. We’re not an association, and we’re never going to achieve our mission by saying everyone has to be a member, right? If if our mission is really that all non-profits are able to use technology to really do their work to really meet their mission. Well, we can’t say they all have to be members because then it’s gonna be even harder to reach an already impossible mission, right? We’re creating way too many barriers for ourselves. Yeah, actually, that’s what i admire about the organization i do embody that also where you share on non-profit radio month after month after month for three years. Now you kayman after that. You came after the hundredth show? Yeah. Hundred schnoll was your first. Yes, it was my very first. We’re coming up on three hundred this july. Yes. So that b two hundred sho? Yeah. Four yearsworth. Exactly. Yeah, and thank you. Thank you for giving me access to your stage. Yeah, very welcome. Anytime. Yeah. You’re going to stick it out through july, right? I think so. Yeah. Three hundred? Yeah. Six years. Okay. Back-up let’s say, you know, this is our opportunity, our annual opportunity. Tio recap. Inten yeah. Uh, right now we know the mission. Of what way do you want to become a member? He’s? Very like me to say affordable, yes. Very reasonably accessible, accessible. Yeah, like, yeah, it’s. Not cheap. Okay, yeah, we’re accessible. Yeah. Run that down. So if you are for the most common situation, is that a non-profit has less than five hundred thousand a year? Is your annual operating budget that the majority of non-profits non-profit radio listeners? Yeah, exactly. Yet. So it’s seventy dollars for a year for all of your staff to be that members all your staff, the whole organisation, as many people as you want to have joined. Exactly that. If you’re at that budget level that annual revenue with an annual budget of a half million dollars yellow as many people, you can stuff into a membership welcome for seventy bucks. Exactly. And you save three hundred dollars on all of those people coming to the ndc. Um plus, of course, there’s all the benefits he around, you know that aren’t just here at the ntc, you have access to webinars either at a reduced rate or for free. So for example, you were just on one of our ask the expert webinars and noser those air free. But they’re only open to members. So you get to talk to smart people like tony every month and ask question about all different topics on dh those have really spanned, you know, sometimes like yours was on podcasting, so much more niche, but then there’s others where they’ve been about, you know, finance or hr, what are the tools for that? What are the things i haven’t even been thinking i’m supposed to be doing? You know, all kinds of topics on dh, then outside of education discounts and auntie si discounts, members are promoted through all of our content channel, so you should be submitting a guest article for one of our topics each month. There’s a different topic on the website participating and research participating in tech clubs. You know, we want to make sure that if you are remember, we’re promoting you up and you’re getting access to leadership, you’re getting to be a volunteer and have you no access to new skillsets through that mean, really, we want to make sure if there’s something that we d’oh or something that we can do that helps you in your career were providing that avenue throughout town about thie over half a million dollars a year budget what’s the what’s the cost there for membership. Then the costs go up by your operating budget kind of level. So under five hundred above above that up to a million and there’s tears from there. But even the highest here, i believe, is three. Thirty five. Oh, my god. So even if you have millions and millions of position, right, three hundred thirty five dollars, right? So we’re talking. Yes. Accessible? Yes, exactly. All right. Well, should we? You know, we should, uh, a little more a little more about the ntc because we wait. We kind of glossed over where we’re sitting right now. Yeah, what’s coming up days two and three. So, yeah, so tomorrow we have at the plenary at least three different folks who are going to talk, you know, this morning we had ignites. So those air five minute kind of short conversations tomorrow are three key notes are going to have a really luxurious fifteen minutes to talk, and then we’re going to have a conversation together. And they’re all talking about different perspectives around digital equity. So looking at myths that we all may be ah participating in or believing when it comes to who is online, who has access to our beautiful emails were crafting every day, you know? And what does that mean as faras our own digital strategy for not thinking about who’s really trying to access our content? But we’re jumping all over, okay? And ten last year, this was an issue you and i talked about on the show was was encouraging. Uh, non-profits to do speak to the fcc to make comments about the deal was a digital inclusion actors so that’s that’s that actor’s past. We’ve passed that yet? Yeah, and we also last year had a report similar on a similar topic around digital adoption and whether organizations even saw themselves as part of that work, you know? So i think tomorrow will be a good kind of next next section of that conversation. Yeah, sensibility, but equity, exactly. Yeah. Accessibility, let’s make it right. Just because a library exists doesn’t mean we all have access to that library either, right or the times it’s open or the limited number of computers there, maybe. Or the bus fare to even go on our on the bus to get to. But, you know, all of these pieces contribute to us thinking, oh, everybody, you know, because this is san jose or because i live in portland and it’s a city everyone’s online, they’re not still write. So are different presenters were going to talk about some of those misperceptions both urban settings, suburban, rural settings, a cz well as larger systemic, you know? So who is making the tools we’re using that’s? Not necessarily all of us a right. So does that mean that they’re going to somehow make a tool? That’s really great for me if if someone like me isn’t part of that process, so just kind of raising a lot of questions, i think i don’t know that there’ll be a lot of answers tomorrow, but there’ll be a lot of questions on and then we’ll have a bit of a conversation. So i think that’ll be a good day, too. You know, the first day we got to feel things out, meet some new people. Tomorrow we can go a little heavy, and then on the final day on friday, we’ll have more of those ignite presentations. And the theme for friday’s ignite is it is oh, makers n p tech makers today was my blank career. Yeah. Yeah, makers. Friday, what’s makers, makers. So these are people who have made a tool there, people who have made a community there, people who have made something inspirational in their life. They ve made a physical space, you know, they’ve they i think folks are taking a pretty diverse definition. Turn on friday. Yeah, yeah, but i’ve had the opportunity to hear all of their talks ahead of time as they submitted their slides and came to rehearsal. And they’re kind of all over the place. It’s going to be great. Okay. Yeah. It’s ignite sessions, your slides move automatically. Your whether you’re ready for them to move or not. Right. Exactly. Every every how many seconds? Every fifteen seconds. Yes. All right. Yeah. You got to keep pace with your slides. Exactly. Your husband max, is stage managing. Yes. Oh, he’s there with a stopwatch, i presume. You know, wave automated that power but it’s every fifteen seconds. Yeah, exactly. And you know it’s surprising how much you can say in fifteen seconds if you planned for it. If you are someone who you know is going toe into it your way through your presentation you’re waiting for to slide, to pop up and then you kind of react to it. You will never stay out of it, you know? You have to have thought ok, i could only make one point per slide, right cause fifteen seconds. Just going to fly by. Yeah, ignite. Yes, yes, i think they’re a spectator sport. You know, that’s why? They’re great. That’s. Why? They’re great for the ndc. So what was the reaction today at the my blank career ignites? They were really great. They similarly, we’re kind of taking a few different paths. There were a couple folks whose ignite story personal story was more about, you know, reflecting back and thinking, oh, i actually have had a career, you know, first is all these different jobs that at the time felt like a totally different path every time i took the, you know, took a new job. Now, looking back, i can see there is a through line, right? And there was some sort of purpose to all of this on dh then and then a few folks talked about kind of challenges that they’ve had. So, you know, in my career have i made the right decision. Or was i really kind of living the values i said? I wass or was i kind of leaving people in the dust as i went through there? So i think there were some good contemplated sessions and some some funny ones, as people realised, you know, for example, molly. Her title was my cheese castle career, because in wisconsin, she worked at the mars she’s castle, and, you know, she learned some valuable career lessons while working in a cheese factory. So, yeah, we’re learning every day, exactly, exactly, technology. Wait, we should teo little more shout out about about intend, okay, the features of of what you’ve got going on, whether or not a member, you know what else is happening there. So i think some of the biggest stuff that’s goingto go on this year twenty sixteen wise for antennas where, where? Changing a bit of what we consider our educational programs and, you know, it’s twenty sixteen it’s pretty easy to come across a webinar on the internet, you know, and we’ve always held very high standards for content that was in a, you know, an online program like a webinar for ourselves, but that doesn’t mean anyone else knows that our standards air different than anyone else’s on dh. So what we’re going to do this year is change that focus and have it be really explicitly on training. So if you want to participate in a program with us, even if it’s a one time program there will be learning objectives, there’s, homework, there’s, riel, riel training that outcomes that, you know you’re getting on dh, that you can actually do a number of those and have them add up to a non-profit technology perfect. Professional certificate so if you complete enough programs in, you know, a year will be able to give you a certificate creating a sort of exactly and ten certification yet exactly. Oh, yeah, and that way, folks, you know, that we’ve heard from for years have who come to intend for training because a there’s nowhere else maybe that they thought they could go or was directly on the content that we had, you know, four non-profits on technology versus just maybe technology for anyone or more business focused, but also that there’s some sort of validation, they know these things, right? I mean, i think a very common story you’ll hear even at the anti sees that people say, you know, i was hired to do x i was hired to be the communications manager, but actually, i’m now in charge of our website, you know, i’m working with our advocacy team on all of our data management, and i want to prove that i have technical skills, even though maybe that hadn’t been written into the job description when i was hired esso i could i’ve either get a raise or maybe go to a different team or go to another organization, but i can’t i can’t prove i have those skills, you know, cause i don’t have my college degree in this topic, you know, tc conferences, right? Exactly. I yes, i have my own learning, but i don’t have a way of proving exactly what this is all led to exactly. Yeah, yeah. So that, you know, we’re not trying to say this is like your master’s program or anything exactly it’s professional certificate to help you have that proof that someone else can stand behind you and say yes, you know, tony really does know these things. Okay, you know, what is this certification called the non-profit technology professional certificate. Okay. Very aptly, yes. You know, i believe in naming things for what they are. No, you’re non-profit radio, you know, that’s what it is. Okay, so you haven’t rolled this out officially technically yet? No, we’ll be announcing it at tomorrow’s plenary. But, you know, the kind of shift in training away from more one time webinars that feel, you know, like you showed up. And then you left into webinars that have those riel learning outcomes. That’s that’s already kind of a shift. That we’re making in our scheduling and planning for all of our program’s going forward. So we’re going to see, like, two credits, this this will be we probably won’t call them credits no, because it’ll just be a class a program, okay, how do you how do you lead to you? How do you know what you need to do to get the certification? Ah, well, first it’s all on the website, but there’s a corps. So, you know, no matter what, you’ll take this kind of ten week, make sure you have skills across an organization, and then you just have to take five more more courses during the rest of the year. So you just pick oh, this one really interest me or i want to only do one on fund-raising because that’s, where i’m trying to prove i have these skills or, you know, so you kind of choose or they’re kind of like electives, you know, the rest of the time, okay? Yeah. Yeah, just one certification, not different tracks. So i know now is this ash, shepherds, department abilities and he’s education? Yeah. He’s, the education director. S o he’s. Certainly deeply involved, but like anything it in ten. This is every all hands on deck. You know, everybody controlled contributes yet exactly because at the end of the day, it’s going to take communities and take membership. It’s going take marketing. You know, everybody is gonna have to be a part of it being successful. Okay? Yeah, we have another couple of minutes to get. Okay, what else you want to shout out about and ten for twenty sixteen or maybe even ntcdinosaur nt s o the twenty seventeen ntc will be the same dates is this year, so you can go ahead and reserve on your calendar now, march twenty to twenty five. Just the you know, the full four days for however, everything that plan’s out so same dates and we’ll be in washington d c back at the gay lord where we were that we were we’ve never been at the gaylord. Where at the wardman park marriott wardman park. Oh, that’s. What? We were looking for something else. I’m sorry. No it’s. Okay. It wasn’t a competitor to intend. No worries on wardman park that’s where we were two years ago. Right it three years ago, however many years ago, it was yeah, for the fort fourteen. Auntie si for the fourteen. Because there’s. Sixteen and then we’ve got every three years. Yeah, back. Yes, yes, it was marriott wardman park. Cause i was shout out the beginning of the buy-in beginning of every interview. Sure, mary-jo? Yes, just okay. Okay. So that’s twenty seventeen, same dates. More? Yep. So, anybody just i mean, same processes every other year so anybody can submit a anti seizure shin idea. It could be a session that you want to present. It could be a session that you want to attend and you know, you’re basically saying, please, someone delivered this session for me because it’s what i want to learn on and that will open at the end of may, and that will be open for six weeks. So all the way through june and then in july and maybe a little bit and august, i think mostly in july is when everybody convert on sessions help filter down that list we normally have between four and six hundred submissions and there’s only going to be one hundred twenty, two hundred thirty on the agenda. So the voting really helps us. Yeah, and that that way by the fall we can say here’s the lineup and registration opens november first. Okay? Yeah. Twenty seventeen will there be? You think they’ll be anti seek conversation again next year was too hard to tell whether we’ll be. Yeah, i dont evening or converse is yeah, we don’t have a lot of knowledge as faras those services will be something they’ll be. Something goes you can’t go. Yes, exactly. There’s always something. Even if it’s collaborative notes there’s always something for folks who can’t come. Okay, yeah, i’m proud to be the host of ntc conversation. Yeah, everyone of the sessions at the end of the day is going to be uploaded yet on dh available on soundcloud on the ten sandorkraut account. Yep, exactly yet. And we’ll post them all on the ntc website on the ntc conversations page so you can just click right through the agenda. Okay, yeah, in the coming months, we’re all going to be out non-profit radio exactly as well. Every sample work it’s true. Yeah. I’m awesome. Thanks for having me. My pleasure always. Hey, twenty martignetti non-profit radio coverage of twenty sixteen non-profit technology conference the hashtag sixteen ntc thank you so much for being with us. Volunteered training long distance is coming up first. Pursuant their tools are made for small and midsize non-profits that’s why their sponsors? It fits perfectly. You choose what he works for you and leave the rest behind it’s like ala carte fund-raising management. Very simple. Check out the tools pursuant. Dot com crowdster continues their deal for non-profit radio listeners get thirty days free or fifty percent off. You could try a crowdster peer-to-peer fund-raising sight completely free for a month. Or take the half ofthe deal that means pay for a month and get a month free. Sign up for two months. Get two months free it’s for for two or six for three or ate for four. You see the pattern developing its its doubles. Or you could take the three months. Claim your deal at crowdster dot com in the chat window. Tell them you’re from non-profit radio and choose which deal you want now. It’s. Time for tony’s take two it’s blue pedicure challenge reduction. Just like where in the world else would you go? The blue pedicure challenge returns. This is part two of me in the salon after my friends from high school challenged me to get a blue pedicure if they got metoo three hundred facebook likes back in twenty thirteen i do the powerful treatment, of course you gotta have the callous removal, the color application and of course the drying follows immediately. I know, i know, i know a lot of you know that men may not, but you gotta have the drying. If you’re gonna have the color, you gotta have the drawing. You can’t have that you can’t have the color without the drawing gotta have the drawing and it’s there the redux video is up you know where to go tony martignetti dot com and that is tony’s take two live listener love! I can’t shout you out by sitting state because we’re pre recorded today. However, you know that the love goes out the love always goes the love is going it’s just not pinpointed love but the live lesser love it’s coming it’s coming right to you it’s going and it’s coming going from here it’s coming to you goes and it comes you have it, it’s it’s in your lap! Live listener! Lap live! Listen, love podcast pleasantries, whatever device whatever activity wherever, whenever pleasantries to the over ten thousand podcast listeners and our am an affiliate am and fm affiliate stations affections to each of our affiliate listeners, i know you’re out there, and i’m grateful affiliate affections to the affiliate listeners here are chadband hman and ashley turner with volunteer training. Long distance also from ntcdinosaur welcome to tony martignetti non-profit radio coverage of sixteen ntc non-profit technology conference in san jose, california, at the convention center with me now our chad limon and ashley turner. Chad is director of development for the kneel squire society and ashley turner is communications manager at options for sexual health. Chad actually welcome. Thanks. Tulani. Pleasure. Pleasure to have you with unison. We’re in sync. So coordinated. Yes. Your session topic is here, there and everywhere. Distance volunteer training. Ashley, do we need to get our mind set first? Just being willing tto recognize that there’s value in doing training for volunteers? That is not face-to-face we just have to get our minds right first. Is that it? Yeah, i think we do have teo to adjust to it a little bit. It’s? Definitely not. Picking up emmanuel and reading it anymore. It’s definitely much more involved, but it also gives us the ability to do a lot of different things and made a lot of different learning styles. Yes, learning styles. Chad let’s. Say something about how do we know what different styles are out there among our volunteers? Yeah, so there’s in general, four types of learning styles, visual learners, auditory learners reading and writing and kinesthetic. The truth is, we all learn a variety of ways, but some people have preferences in town. They prefer to learn are they learned bath so providing things through mobile multiple modalities can help people learn retain better and so doing that to be a distance. Actually, some benefits because you had to newsome technology to, like, show video or play audio or have pictures a supposed to sometimes like face-to-face someone standing in front of you in the room. Okay, how dispersed are your volunteers at the kneel squire society? Their throat canada throw canada latto ours in our burnaby area, but our model provide has volunteers and clients. I can’t make it to her office, able to connect through ah live on one on one computer training, so it allows us to reach people that otherwise we won’t be able to reach in actually grows our impact with instead of having just people that come in her all this month. Monday to friday nine to five volunteers khun do their tutoring or training afternoons, evenings, weekends, whatever works best actually allows us they reach people that otherwise you wouldn’t okay actually options for sexual health. Are you canadian? Also? We are yes. Okay, are you equally dispersed or we’re not all across canada, we’re just in british columbia. We have sixty clinics that operate through a british columbia, and we have volunteers at about forty nine of those clinics. So we definitely do have a lot of geographic reach. Okay? And in terms of our volunteer training is this we’re doing this virtually ongoing is not just initial training, but is there a need for continue training as the person goes through the life cycle of a being a volunteer? Yeah, actually, yeah, absolutely. So right now what we’ve done is we have the online training that kind of sets are level one, volunteers up to b level two volunteers and after they’ve done the level to volunteer training than what they can do to continue their own education is participate in our webinars and our clinical webinars, as well as repeat the training in the future if they want to continue their education. Okay, what? What distinguishes that duvette levels? Yeah. What kind of question? So for us in our clinical setting level one volunteers to a lot of good men work. So they’re the backbone of the clinic there’s supporting the clinic. They’re providing any attention and support that our staff need our level. Two volunteers are providing contraceptive education training, so they are herbs. So i volunteered around the contraception with the clients that come in. So they’re providing the education for our clients. And with that, the training that we give them allows them to sit with the clients, provide the information, educate them. Okay. How about kneel, squire? What volunteers doing there? Yeah. It’s a very different from ashley’s works where they have people working in clinics. Love. Our volunteers are basic computer trainers, computer tutors. So the mount training we have is definitely not as long. Or his deepest ashley’s eyes more just helping people like use of the technology that used to set up and give them some teaching best practices, toe health um, being, in fact, impactful tutor. Okay, all around it. A technical learning. Yeah, yeah. So it’s and it’s really driven by what the person the disability wishes to learn. So perhaps i want to learn to how to use, like office or word or excel and that’s. Great. Maybe they want to learn how to use facebook to see what the kids are up to, our snapchat or whatever, right, so it’s really driven by like what their needs and their goals are, and then the tutor because it is one on one they work with, um ah, i’ve thrown pacing and see the screen from their screen. Um, connected them, and we’ll help, um, meet and work on their goals. Okay, all right. So let’s, talk about some of the strategies xero we all can benefit from and for virtual volunteer training. Who wants to start with some strategy ideas? Yeah, we talked a little bit about this in our session. Where there’s different tools, i can allow you to kind of help do others online. This is training. A lot of ours has done synchronously like through a webinar. So the volunteers that we’ve recruited come in. And we do an online training session with, um and it’s the same platform that they will then use when they connect two their participants there tutoring along the way. So there’s synchronised sort of learning that kind allows us to connect in real time to do some skilled developments of technical testing with the person. Make sure the computer is writing, enable and helping them the skills they need. Ashley has ah, different model that they do their volunteer to anyone. Go ahead. Yeah, so we use model, which is an asynchronous model. And basically, what we do with our volunteers is there’s eight weeks of training where they participate around two to four hours per week. And they are longing into this middle course so that they can read and view different videos and discussion forums and quizzes and journal post so they are very much involved in as charges, saying earlier we use different methods to kind of get the learning happening. Now i let chad slide on durney martignetti non-profit radio have jargon jail, let it slide on the secretive so you can you can get him out. Everyone may not know what on a secret his toys, i have to pass it back to chat. Sure you’re on top. Well, chad, get himself out. There we go. There we go. I document grieving climb out of it. Yeah. So synchronous would be, like, live real time learning. So like, for example, in education, that would be like you’re in a classroom together. So today we’re all doing this. So synchronous is like a live, real time sort of thing. So technology tools enable that might be like, ah, twitter chat might be ah, weapon are those would be like synchronous examples where asynchronous is sort of at your own pace or your own time. So if the synchronised is your classroom, asynchronous would be like your textbook but someone could work for. So the model platform that we both use but actually uses for volunteer training. It’s like a website. But bill specifically with learning places, pieces in place, right? So you can have a form or quiz, and that all comes as part of it. You just kind of literally click a button to add a new quays, and they start taking your questions for people along the way. So the best method really is a bit bland. Tohave, you know, some live face-to-face time to build some report, but also have some asynchronous things to support people to ganga with their own pace. The latto research shows that a blend of the both is really the magic sauce. Okay? And your session is going to be spent. Or you did send your special did it already. Pros and cons of different tools. Right. So, yeah, we talked that’s, let’s dive into boodle. Yeah, yeah. We talked a little bit about, like, volunteers and engaging volunteers that’s on the benefits of having a distance model and how it could grow your impact. And then we did talk about some of the different tools that we both use along the way. Model is an open source tool. I was free to download free to use our i pay for some of the host because i don’t want to worry about administrating a server along the way, but and it’s ah totally open. So we’ve done like a lot of customization at our work to try to make it more accessible to people, the variety, different abilities or disabilities we’ve built, like a scream leader for our site, we built a custom youtube player to allow it to be easy for someone as low vision doctor control the playback of the video, so we’ve done a lot of work try to customize it, to make it a simple and easy as possible for people to use and that’s the beautiful thing with open source is you kind of have you can tinker and play and adapt to meet your own personal needs. Ok, actually, what would you like to add about boodle? Yeah, one of the cons that we’ve been experiencing lately is we’re using an old version of mood or one of the cons. You’re one of the concerts that we’re using the old version, so we’re having some things that are starting to not work the way we want them to. So i mean that the pros of open source is that they’re amazing and you can customize them and you can make him do the things you want them to dio. But unless you have someone who is an expert on site upgrading them to the new version when the new version comes out could be a real challenge now, is that a cost? Reason is that why? Why you? Using an older version cost and time i would say the to kind of go hand in hand non-profit a lot of the time but absolutely it’s it’s a cost issue. It would cost time and money to get up to where we wanted to be so okay, yeah, okay. Anything more about boodle that we should share with listeners i want to get yeah, just like it. No one’s looking at building a learning platform i would say give it a shot. It’s used by over, like eight hundred thousand universities worldwide. The open university in the uk uses it and it supports over a million people connected to it on a daily basis. So it’s super robot! Some people have this misconception that always open source software is going to be flaky. This is this. Like rock star, six, super well supported by the community, their head office there in australia. But there’s. A number of, um, oodle connection, sort of communities around there that you support the australia. I don’t know about birth and the world. I love australia. One other thing i love. Australia doesn’t, but i do look now. Okay, so we have exhausted boodle anything more you want to share? My little quick thing to add is that our volunteers, regardless of kind of how tech savvy they are, they do, for the most part find model quite easy to navigate and quite easy to understand. We do have to give them a little bit of set up and support and getting used to it, but once they’re logged on the majority of them, do you find it quite easy? Deals for the interface is is good even for low, low tech sophistication. Absolutely. All right, another one you were goingto we’re going talk. Teo gotomeeting both using goto or no, i’m using another tool called blackboard collaborate on it’s a webinar tool very similar. I mean, i want to talk about gotomeeting oh, you’re taking over the show. I’m sorry i had to yours. Us what again? Blacks missed it so quickly. Yeah, very carefully. And latto the tool that i’m using is called blackboard collaborate. One of the reasons why we went with that tool is because its primary markets education, the united states education i states is like super well regulated around accessibility. So law of accessibility features that some of our users would need are there in that platform comparatives on the others that are on the market at the time when we chose that other tool, i’m sure things have evolved in the last few years. Um, and the other thing that with the r black or collaborate licenses, i can kind of set up infinite webinar rooms they haven’t synchronously. So i have, you know, an online career program that people in bc might be doing, and then that could have four five different webinar rooms where people are doing one on one volunteer training and then a wellness program we’re going on in the eastern side of the country allows me to kind of have one interface where can manage all these different rooms and tools, and and it works, you know, when it works, it works really well on this job of bass. So it works across platform. Is that is that open source also know is not open source? No, no, no, the open source of equivalent that is, uh, we’re going take a serious look at coming up is called big blue button. So is again a weapon. Our tool, but it is open source on dh. We’re starting to investigate that and attempt to kind of drive down costs. Actually, you are not using the blackboard collaborative. No, we’re not. We’re actually not using anything for our volunteers. Currently we are using go to webinar as something that our clinical department is utilizing for education purposes are volunteers do get to access those weapons, as i mentioned. But we’re not using it as a part of our training, training, training or? No, not yet. Okay. What other weather tools were you? Did you did you evaluate? Ah, when we looked at blackmore cola and going black were collaborate. We looked at about five or six other ones along the way. A lot of the weapon our tools are or were flash based use flash which for people with disabilities, especially the vision and disabilities. A screenwriter flash could be a real problem. Some flash is accessible, but a lot of them they just get like this. You know, there is an apple it here and have nobility that control. Click the buttons. No was going on at all. So for us, that really narrowed the scope quite. Quickly, um, when that is something, the tools are really not accessible toe portion of our users. Okay, why don’t you just name name you name a couple of them that you’ve got because others, you know, others may not have the disability population that you have. Yeah, yeah, one the ones we looked at was ah, adobe connect, um course, adobe flash based like, not not a big surprise there. Um, we did look at the goto webinar meeting, but i didn’t kind of have that like that back in ability to manage a bunch of different rooms and set it up. Um, i think what else we did look a big blue button when we chose black work elaborate, but it was very it was very new at the time, like it wasn’t polished, they know there’s a missing certain features at that time that have come along since then. Um, i’m not i i did try to use likes on google, plus hangouts that can i duck tape some skype sessions together sort of thing, but that i didn’t have this sort of a mean in the back and that, though one of the kind of quality control things that we have with the black work collaborate is all the weapon our sessions. We have set for one, one tutoring to record. So if ever there is a complaint like, hey, you know, he was offensive to me, or he wrecks something, our blob of law, we can actually look at the recording and for the investment to is great cause they could go back. They could wash it archives. So they showed him, like, oh, how’d they get my pictures off my phone? And what did i do when i’m missing? They can actually watch that recording of class of that learning material stays with them before. Like what you’re hearing a non-profit radio tony’s got more on youtube, you’ll find clips from stand up comedy tv spots and exclusive interviews catch guests like seth gordon, craig newmark, the founder of craigslist marquis of eco enterprises, charles best from donors choose dot org’s aria finger do something that worked and they are levine from new york universities heimans center on philanthropy tony tweets to he finds the best content from the most knowledgeable, interesting people in and around non-profits to share on his stream. If you have valuable info, he wants to re tweet you during the show. You can join the conversation on twitter using hashtag non-profit radio twitter is an easy way to reach tony he’s at tony martignetti narasimhan t i g e n e t t i remember there’s a g before the end, he hosts a podcast for the chronicle philantech thirty fund-raising fundamentals is a short monthly show devoted to getting over your fund-raising hartals just like non-profit radio, toni talks to leading thinkers, experts and cool people with great ideas. As one fan said, tony picks their brains and i don’t have to leave my office fund-raising fundamentals was recently dubbed the most helpful non-profit podcast you have ever heard, you can also join the conversation on facebook, where you can ask questions before or after the show. The guests were there, too. Get insider show alerts by email, tony tells you who’s on each week and always includes link so that you can contact guess directly. To sign up, visit the facebook page for tony martignetti dot com. Dahna actually, you’re nodding a lot. That recording is important. We don’t actually do that. I’m just nodding because i think chad system is awesome. I think it’s, a really great opportunity for learning, so i’m jealous, just sitting over here, being jealous of that system, okay. Ah, what else you had, like, a ninety minute session? What else have i not ask you about? Actually any more tools that we haven’t talked about? No. Okay, if you were going to do like aa one toe one sort of tutoring again, the reason i chose weber thinks i fifth of multiple different learning programs. We haven’t organization. If you’re just going to a one to one tutoring, i think you could go with this guy sort of thing that another great tool is teamviewer it’s. Super low cost. It works like on your phone to connect or whatever. So, you khun connect on sloane’s computer pretty easily through that. So that that’s another to live sometimes uses back back and support in-kind of game thing. Set up a second cents on a length or they can kill, like click instantly. I can see their desktop of screen allows me to, like, fix their audio settings or, you know, once the spyware tools or whatever, like, try to get the computer. So it’s healthy enoughto tulani teamviewer teamviewer teamviewer. Yeah. Yeah. Okay. Wait a couple more minutes together. What else? What else have i not ask you about that? You want to share around this whole idea of volunteer training? A virtual volunteer training? What else? We got it covered. I think i might have. Mentioned this a little bit, but just to expand on it. One of the riel awareness is i had when i was preparing our presentation was i was thinking about are we did a program evaluation in two thousand fifteen, and one of the things that came out of that is that a lot of our volunteers have said it would be really great to have a level one training similar to the level to training and there’s no specific training for level ones, and i went well, no, they’re actually is it’s just a emmanuelle that you’re not using, and it really spoke to the fact that when we have such a distance between us and when we have different sites in different locations and different staff members that are working with the volunteers in order to have consistency, having the online training is a really key piece of the puzzle for us, like having the ability to have everything connected, everybody connected to the same piece of the same time really gives the opportunity for the volunteers to be on the same page no matter where they’re located. Yeah, chad, this idea of connectedness totally, yeah, i couldn’t. Agree more, and it really allows, like to grow the impact of, like you’re working your organization, right? Not everyone that you want to serve or that could help you, and further your mission lives in a five minute drive or short bus ride away, right? So really allowed us to go from ah very successful award winning program was delivered at our office to something where doesn’t matter something disability isn’t able to get out of bed or that they live in a rural town and have difficulties. Transportation like we can really meet the person where they are through using these tools, right? And so it really grows are impacting allows us to in-kind scale at a really small cock, i felt like i was going to open a new classroom somewhere, you know, rent light internet like you knows tons of the cost of that right or for me to, like, deliver connected sametz computer home is, you know, just the price, my weapon or to one, it doesn’t cost me more to add another weapon, our room, right? So it really allows us to scale or impact at minimal to no additional cost kottler let’s talk. A little more about something you mentioned earlier. If you’re around open source that it’s not gonna be reliable, whatever it is sabotaged, you know, wherever deep fears run, where can we lay some of these concerns? Yeah, i’ma hoping that that that’s been put to rest those promotion, every web server runs on a limb it’s background, a tip ashy, both open source tools. You know, it’s an allows things to grow beyond the control of one sort of corporation. Anything along the way, right? The world is big and beautiful, there’s lots of smart people that contribute add things along the way. So i personally feel that when you close your walls, you’re closing yourself to innovation and and to the community. Right? So it doesn’t dahna it’s a model that i prefer to support, the open sources, can i connect people to grow and there’s created huge culture like around model. There are tons of different plug ins that people have built along the way is with learning management piece is like solid and totally works. You could build things for it. We built and releases shared les screenwriter so, like, if you get anyone can add it to the site and it just allows you got texas page there’s a play but beside it so you can listen to it. So that means different learning styles, different disability needs and sometimes, like, you don’t really want to read like the twenty pages again, like, just play any kind of listened through it, right? So that’s, just like one examples on that we’ve built it was a huge community that built like different sort of layers for the pages are different toolbars, so it really allows things kind of grow abandoned and meet more people’s needs as well. So actually open source, you’re you’re a fan so far. Yes, i have to admit i’m very new to kind of a lot of the tech things and i’m not very tight check knowledgeable, but what our experience with open source has been has been fantastic and as somebody who is relatively new to the to the tech side of things, i look at it as something that is easy to customize and therefore easy for us to learn and adapt and get what we need out of the open source dahna it’s actually valuable, you know that you’re not you don’t have a tech the tech background yet. It’s. Not anxiety producing for you, you know you’re not. You’re not afraid of it. No. Like a minute left. What do you want to leave people with around this idea of virtual volunteer training? Actually, what do you want to wrap up? Our volunteers in our organization are the most valuable asset that we have their amazing, and they deserve to have the best opportunity to get the training in the knowledge and the education, and we feel that providing it through technology has really benefited our volunteers. Yeah, i would say in doing some things online, you can actually do things that you totally couldn’t do, like in a classroom like having ah, pulling on there are having that sort of recording and playback having options to kind of share screens are too around websites the chat box, right? Like, you know, when you’re in your typical class was like i don’t pass notes that’s totally flipped in a webinar like there’s a chatterbox, and i encourage people like to share our comment and how they feel comfortable, right? Maybe someone doesn’t feel comfortable like having their voice heard, but the type of messages feels safer for them, for whatever reason, our love like a lower buried entry, so a lot of people think. That all you know, when you start introducing technology on going at a greater distance that you, you’re losing something, but i think you’re also gaining a lot along the way and opens a lot of possibilities. Just tell me, what do you love about the work that you’re doing? Um, i will well, i’ll give you the short version, but when i was going to university for computer science, it came apparently pretty quick that was never going to be the smartest nerd in the room at all, so i had the opportunity to do like a summer internship at the kneel squire society, and and that really resonates me. We’ll have the opportunity used technology to kind of help people along the way, and i’ve had loss of amazing opportunity to kind of do that in other settings. I’m on a couple different boards now that how technology helping education helped run a local group of vancouver that helps non-profits use technology so falik technology can help people and change lives is like a really sweet spot for me to kind of use that nerdy part of my brain. I don’t want to be a coder and a cubicle for the rest of my life but helping people and helping the allies to technologies, presidents latto actually, what do you love about your work? I started as a volunteer with the organization. I fell in love with the organization and with our mission in her vision and just want to keep working towards making a sexual health accessible to everybody. Nbc and our volunteers. They’re such a crucial part of that that i’m glad to support them in any way that i can. All right, you’re both making a big difference. I think you’re part of it, right? You’re in it every day. Thanks. Thanks for your time, tony. Thank you. Chad. Chad lehman, director of development of kneel squire society and ashley turner, communications manager at options for sexual health. Thank you so very much. Thank you. Tony martignetti non-profit radio coverage of twenty sixteen non-profit technology conference. Thank you so much for being with us next week. Eight areas of non-profit excellence from the non-profit coordinating committee. If you missed any part of today’s show, i rebuke you. Find it on tony martignetti dot com. I think once per show is quite sufficient for ah, for the singing, i’m still very conflicted. We’re sponsored by pursuant online tools for small and midsize non-profits data driven and technology enabled pursuant dot com, and by crowdster online and mobile fund-raising software for non-profits. Now with apple pay crowdster dot com, our creative producer is clear. Myer half sam lever, which is the line producer gavin dollars, are am and fm outreach director shows social media is by susan chavez. 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