Tag Archives: GuideStar

Nonprofit Radio for July 1, 2016: Purpose Driven Branding & GuideStar Platinum

Big Nonprofit Ideas for the Other 95%

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My Guests:

Laura Ferry: Purpose Driven Branding

You need to be deliberate in the partners you select when you venture into co-branding. Laura Ferry helps you package yourself to potential partners; find the right ones; and, select the relationship that makes the most sense for your objectives. Laura is the founder of Good Company.

 

 

Eva Nico: GuideStar Platinum

Eva Nico, GuideStar’s lead on nonprofit strategy and evaluation, walks you through their new platinum level and how to get there. Your nonprofit probably has a GuideStar profile, and if you haven’t contributed to it, it looks bad. Whichever level you’re at, Eva will help you out.

 


Top Trends. Sound Advice. Lively Conversation.

You’re on the air and on target as I delve into the big issues facing your nonprofit—and your career.

If you have big dreams but an average budget, tune in to Tony Martignetti Nonprofit Radio.

I interview the best in the business on every topic from board relations, fundraising, social media and compliance, to technology, accounting, volunteer management, finance, marketing and beyond. Always with you in mind.

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Skip Wealth Screening For Planned Giving

Torn window screen

photo credit: quinn.anya via photopin cc

I consistently preach this to clients and audiences: small-and mid-size nonprofits need not spend money on wealth screening to find potential Planned Giving donors. You have all the data you need in your fundraising or CRM database.

Query your data for age and giving consistency and you’ll find your best Planned Giving prospects.

If you don’t have age info, consistency alone will work if you’ve been around for many years. Lots of my clients go back many decades, sometimes into the late 1800’s. But 20th century roots will be fine for you to rely on giving consistency as a proxy for age.

If a donor has been giving for 30 years, for instance, they’re probably in the age range you’re after.

If you don’t have giving data going back far enough to extrapolate age, then before you pay for an age overlay from a screening service consider this. Can you survey your donors with a reply card in your next mailing? If you don’t want to ask for date of birth, ask for age. It’s worth considering before you make the plunge into age screening.

An important word about giving consistency. Ignore gift size.

I literally mean if a donor has given you just $5 a year, and they’ve done it for 18 years out of the past 20, or 25 years out of the past 30, then they are an outstanding prospect for a charitable bequest, which is a gift to you in their will. (I said a lot about starting your PG program with bequests in this series for GuideStar.)

The students at Fairleigh Dickinson University’s Center for Excellence heard me say this just last week.

Age and giving consistency. That’s all you need to get started in Planned Giving.

Large shops will want to move beyond bequests, so they may wisely invest in wealth screening further down the road. But it’s not needed at the outset.

Small- and mid-size nonprofits can have very respectable PG programs that start and stop with gifts by will.

To launch any program–big or small–you can skip wealth screening.

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Nonprofit Radio for September 6, 2013: The Overhead Myth Letter Signers & Good Overhead, Bad Overhead

Big Nonprofit Ideas for the Other 95%

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My Guests:

Art Taylor, Jacob Harold, and Ken Berger: The Overhead Myth Letter Signers

Art Taylor
Art Taylor
Jacob Harold
Jacob Harold
Ken Berger
Ken Berger

 

 

 

 

 

 

Written “To the Donors of America,”  The Overhead Myth letter created a lot of buzz in the nonprofit community this summer. My guests are the three co-signers, the CEOs of Better Business Bureau Wise Giving Alliance, GuideStar, and Charity Navigator. Art Taylor, Jacob Harold and Ken Berger will explain what led up to the letter, why it was necessary and why they feel “many charities should spend more on overhead.”
Gene Takagi: Good Overhead, Bad Overhead

picture of Gene TakagiGene Takagi, our legal contributor, helps you understand what may be sensible and appropriate non-program expenses for your nonprofit, and what you should avoid. How do you protect your board, officers and employees, but not go overboard on overhead? Gene is principal of the Nonprofit & Exempt Organizations law group (NEO).

 


Top Trends. Sound Advice. Lively Conversation.

You’re on the air and on target as I delve into the big issues facing your nonprofit—and your career.

If you have big dreams but an average budget, tune in to Tony Martignetti Nonprofit Radio.

I interview the best in the business on every topic from board relations, fundraising, social media and compliance, to technology, accounting, volunteer management, finance, marketing and beyond. Always with you in mind.

When and where: Talking Alternative Radio, Fridays, 1-2PM Eastern

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You can also subscribe on iTunes to get the podcast automatically.

Make 2010 the Year YOU Start Planned Giving

Man Giving Gift

I’m writing a year-long series of articles for GuideStar to help nonprofits get started in Planned Giving with a bequest marketing program. The penultimate, fifth article, is out today.

While it’s probably too late to start your program in this, the fourth quarter, you can start planning for 2011. The series has been going since February.

If you really want to dig into bequest marketing, here are the first, second, third and fourth pieces. They build on each other to lead you through the process of inaugurating your program.

Bequests are the place to start your Planned Giving program. They are always the most popular gift in any program, regardless of what type of work you do and who your donors are. Why? I explained that in this November 2009 GuideStar gem, “Get Going On Planned Giving.”